Citation
Utenzi wa Ndiwa na Kozi (MS 45022c)

Material Information

Title:
Utenzi wa Ndiwa na Kozi (MS 45022c)
Series Title:
Taylor Papers : Swahili Verses
Creator:
Kijuma, Muhammad ( Author, Primary )
Kijuma, Muhammad ( contributor )
Publication Date:
Language:
Swahili
Materials:
Paper ( medium )
Technique:
Handwritten manuscript : Handwritten in black and red ink on old thick papers

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Islam ( LCSH )
Religious belief
Oral history ( LCSH )
Swahili poetry ( LCSH )
Uislamu
Kiswahili mashairi
Faith ( LCSH )
Imani za kidini
Gabriel (Archangel) ( LCSH )
Jibril
Michael (Archangel) ( LCSH )
Mikail
Musa
Moses (Biblical leader) ( LCSH )
Genre:
Poem
Utenzi
Poetry ( LCTGM )
Spatial Coverage:
Africa -- Eastern Africa -- Swahili Coast
Coordinates:
-9.633997 x 39.778998

Notes

Abstract:
The last section of MS 45022 contains a short poem (utenzi) about the legend of the prophet Moses who was put to test by an hawk and a dove that were, in fact, the angels Michale and Jibrail. The poem contains 37 stanzas, with one line in each stanza. The story begins when Moses is sitting under the shade an Ndiwa, dove, approaches him to look for refuge as it is escaping from a Kozi, hawk. The Ndiwa hides under Moses’s legs when the Kozi reaches them too. The Kozi asks Moses why is hiding his risiki (subsistence) that is the Ndiwa. The story deploys metaphorical meanings about life. The characters are caught in a dilemma about their food and livelihood, risiki, that has been allocated to them by God. However, this contains a contradiction in the sense that the Nidwa is the food of the Kozi, but he wishes to escape from this affliction and look for protection under Musa. However, from the point of view of the Kozi, the Ndiwa is his risiki allocated by God. Moses has to solve this dilemma. The story continues with Moses trying to accommodate the needs of both birds, but without much success, as their needs are in such contradictions that are impossible to resolve. Moses even suggests the Kozi to eat a part of his body instead of the Ndiwa. At the end, the Ndiwa and the Kozi reveal themselves as the angels Jibril and Mikail who tested Moses’s actions in a difficult situation. The author, named Muhammed (without further indication of his identity that make us assume that he could be Muhammed Kijumwa), says that to keep this poem in the household will bring reward from God in life and afterlife. The reading of this poem is very difficult because of some unclear lexicon as well as unclear scribing. ( en )
General Note:
Biographical information: Muhammad Kijumwa was born circa 1855 in Lamu. He was a poet, scribe, peformer calligrapher, carpenter, tailor and sculptor who taught his son, Helewa, the craft of decorative woodcarving. He assisted many Eurpoean scholars of Swahili literature, including William Taylor, Alice Werner, Carl Meinhof, H.E. Lambert, William Hichens, Ernst Dammann and John Williamson, and was a well-known character in Lamu
General Note:
Date of Composition is unknown
General Note:
Languages: Swahili (Arabic script)
General Note:
Dialects: Northern
General Note:
Poetic Form: Utenzi
General Note:
Extent: 2 leaves
General Note:
Purchased from Mrs W.E. Taylor for £10, March 1930 (entered in Accession Book 21 January 1942)
General Note:
Incipit: Nanda kubaini kwa isimu yake karimu na ahrahmani baadaye kirasimu
General Note:
VIAF (name authority) : Kijuma, Muhammad : URI http://viaf.org/viaf/43775563
General Note:
Africa -- Eastern Africa -- Swahili Coast
General Note:
Scribe: Kijuma, Muhammad
General Note:
Publication information: Abou Egl, Mohammad. 1983. The life and works of Muhamadi Kijuma. PhD thesis, SOAS, University of London. pp. 171-179
General Note:
Publication information: Dammann, E. 1960. Kozi na Ndiwa. Afrika und Ubersee, 44:207-218

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS University of London
Holding Location:
Archives and Special Collections
Rights Management:
This item is believed to be in the public domain
Resource Identifier:
MS 45022 ( SOAS manuscript number )
MS 45022c ( SOAS manuscript number )

Full Text
Item Reference: MS 45022c
Collection: Taylor Papers
File Reference: MS 45022
Title: Utenzi wa Ndiwa na Kozi
First lines of manuscript: Nanda kubaini kwa isimu yake karimu na ahrahmani baadaye kirasimu
Authors: Muhammed Kijumwa
Scribe: Muhammed Kijumwa
AD Date: n.d.
AD date of composition: n.d.
AH Date: n.d.
AH date of composition: n.d.
Extent: 2 leaves
Resource Type: Poem
Poetic Form: Utenzi
Format: Handwritten manuscript
Language: Swahili
Script: Arabic
Relevant Dialects: northern dialect
Subject and keywords: Islam, religious beliefs, oral history, Swahili poetry
People: Musa, Jibril, Mikail
Biographical history: Muhammad Kijumwa was born circa 1855 in Lamu. He was a poet, scribe, peformer calligrapher, carpenter, tailor and sculptor who taught his son, Helewa, the craft of decorative woodcarving. He assisted many Eurpoean scholars of Swahili literature, including William Taylor, Alice Werner, Carl Meinhof, H.E. Lambert, William Hichens, Ernst Dammann and John Williamson, and was a well-known character in Lamu
Archival history: None
Physical characteristics: handwritten in black and red ink on old thick papers
Electronic reproductions: None
Existence/location of copies: None
Finding aids: None
Relevant publications: Abou Egl, Mohammad. 1983. The life and works of Muhamadi Kijuma. PhD thesis, SOAS, University of London. pp. 171-179 Dammann, E. 1960. Kozi na Ndiwa. Afrika und Ubersee, 44:207-218.
Notes:
Scope and content: The last section of MS 45022 contains a short poem (utenzi) about the legend of the prophet Moses who was put to test by an hawk and a dove that were, in fact, the angels Michale and Jibrail. The poem contains 37 stanzas, with one line in each stanza. The story begins when Moses is sitting under the shade an Ndiwa, dove, approaches him to look for refuge as it is escaping from a Kozi, hawk. The Ndiwa hides under Moses's legs when the Kozi reaches them too. The Kozi asks Moses why is hiding his risiki (subsistence) that is the Ndiwa. The story deploys metaphorical meanings about life. The characters are caught in a dilemma about their food and livelihood, risiki, that has been allocated to them by God. However, this contains a contradiction in the sense that the Nidwa is the food of the Kozi, but he wishes to escape from this affliction and look for protection under Musa. However, from the point of view of the Kozi, the Ndiwa is his risiki allocated by God. Moses has to solve this dilemma. The story continues with Moses trying to accommodate the needs of both birds, but without much success, as their needs are in such contradictions that are impossible to resolve. Moses even suggests the Kozi to eat a part of his body instead of the Ndiwa. At the end, the Ndiwa and the Kozi reveal themselves as the angels Jibril and Mikail who tested Moses's actions in a difficult situation. The author, named Muhammed (without further indication of his identity that make us assume that he could be Muhammed Kijumwa), says that to keep this poem in the household will bring reward from God in life and afterlife. The reading of this poem is very difficult because of some unclear lexicon as well as unclear scribing.
Description
Location: None
Places:
Further Info:


HIRQL [sic, Hirql]

[3 Swahili poems:

(1) 2 fragments of the Hirql [sic, Hirql] saga, on Muhammads victory over the Romans under Hirql [sic, Hirql] (Heraclius): ff. 1-30;

(2) a poem on Muhammads victory over the army of qatirifu: ff. 31-48;

(3) a poem on the legend of Moses protecting Gabriel disguised as a dove from Michael disguised as a hawk: ff. 49-51.

Written in Arabic script, in leather case with rude ornamental designs.]

[Manuscript, 19th century].