Citation
Utenzi wa Qatirifu (Wadi Isban) (MS 45022b)

Material Information

Title:
Utenzi wa Qatirifu (Wadi Isban) (MS 45022b)
Series Title:
Taylor Papers : Swahili Verses
Creator:
Abu bakr bin Mwengo ( Author, Primary )
Kijuma, Muhammad ( contributor )
Publication Date:
Language:
Swahili
Materials:
Paper
Technique:
Handwritten manuscript : Handwritten in black and red ink on old thick papers

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Islam ( LCSH )
Legends ( LCSH )
Religious belief
Swahili poetry ( LCSH )
Warfare, Conventional ( LCSH )
Military art and science ( LCSH )
Imani za kidini
Uislamu
Kiswahili mashairi
Faith ( LCSH )
Muḥammad, Prophet, -643 ( LCNA )
Prophet Mohammed
Fāṭimah -632 or 633 ( LCNA )
Fatima
Abū Bakr, Caliph, -634 ( LCNA )
Abu Bakr
ʻAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib, Caliph, approximately 600-661 ( LCNA )
علي بن أبي طالب، الخليفة، 600-661
Genre:
Poem
Utenzi
Poetry ( LCTGM )
Spatial Coverage:
Africa -- Eastern Africa -- Swahili Coast
Coordinates:
-9.633997 x 39.778998

Notes

Abstract:
The second poem of this MS is the religious poem known as ‘Utenzi wa Wadi Isban’, rendered here as ‘Utenzi wa Qatirifu’. The same poem with transliteration is to be found is MS 47779 and MS 380552 (Hichens collection). This poem was given to Rev. John Williamson by Kijumwa in 1940. The writing of the scribe is difficult to read, and his spelling is erratic. The manuscript exemplifies (see, for example, the first several lines) the manipulation of Arabic words to fit the Swahili rhyme scheme, resulting in phrases that are neither properly Swahili nor correct Arabic. The poem narrates about a battle in a Valley, the Wadi Isban, between the Prophet Mohammed’s army and the army of an unbeliever, Katirifu. It is written in northern dialect, with borrowings from Arabic. In brief, the poem narrates of a Jew named Amri, who wants to become a Muslim and he is travelling to Mecca to see Mohammed. On his way, Amri meets a shepherd and inquires about the owner of a beautiful house visible in the distance. The shepherd explains that the palace belongs to a tyrant and his daughter Hasina, both of whom are unbelievers. A man named Katirifu wishes to marry Hasina, but as her bride price the princess has demanded that Katirifu kill Mohammed and Ali, against whom her husband fought in the battle of Badr, in which he died. Hasina and Katirifu made an agreement, and Katirifu went to gather his troops. The poem contains 450 stanzas, of one line in each stanza. ( en )
General Note:
Biographical information: Abu Bakr bin Mwengo, who is named by Knappert (1969) as the author of Utenzi wa Isubani, is described in that version of the poem as a natiive of Lamu who lived in Pate
General Note:
Date of Composition is unknown
General Note:
Languages: Swahili (Arabic script)
General Note:
Dialects: Northern
General Note:
Poetic Form: Utenzi
General Note:
Extent: 16 leaves
General Note:
Purchased from Mrs W.E. Taylor for £10, March 1930 (entered in Accession Book 21 January 1942)
General Note:
Incipit: Bismillahi andika wahdahuu laa sharika ndiye mwenye mamlaka yake ye pweke amuri
General Note:
See SOAS University of London manuscripts MS 47779 and MS 380552
General Note:
VIAF (name authority) : Kijuma, Muhammad : URI http://viaf.org/viaf/43775563
General Note:
Africa -- Eastern Africa -- Swahili Coast
General Note:
Scribe: Kijuma, Muhammad
General Note:
Publication information: Knappert, Jan. 1969. The Utenzi wa Katirifu or Ghazwa ya Sesebani. Afrika und Ubersee 52: 81-104 and 264-313.
General Note:
Publication information: Knappert, Jan. 1999. A Survey of Swahili Islamic Epic Sagas. Lewiston, New York; Queenston, Ontario; Lampeter, Wales: Edwin Mellen Press; pp. 76-82
General Note:
Publication information: Abou Egl, Mohammad. 1983. The life and works of Muhamadi Kijuma. PhD thesis, SOAS, University of London

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS University of London
Holding Location:
Archives and Special Collections
Rights Management:
This item is believed to be in the public domain
Resource Identifier:
MS 45022 ( SOAS manuscript number )
MS 45022b ( SOAS manuscript number )

Full Text
Item Reference: MS 45022b
Collection: Taylor Papers
File Reference: MS 45022
Title: Utenzi wa Qatirifu (Wadi Isban)
First lines of manuscript: Bismillahi andika wahdahuu laa sharika ndiye mwenye mamlaka yake ye pweke amuri
Authors: Abu bakr bin Mwengo
Scribe: Muhammed Kijumwa
AD Date: Unknown
AD date of composition: Unknown
AH Date: Unknown
AH date of composition: Unknown
Extent: 16 leaves
Resource Type: Poem
Poetic Form: Utenzi
Format: Handwritten manuscript
Language: Swahili
Script: Arabic
Relevant Dialects: northern dialect
Subject and keywords: Islam, warfare, legend, religious belief, Swahili poetry
People: Mohammed, Ali, Fatima, Abu Bakr
Biographical history: Abu Bakr bin Mwengo, who is named by Knappert (1969) as the author of Utenzi wa Isubani, is described in that version of the poem as a natiive of Lamu who lived in Pate
Archival history: None
Physical characteristics: handwritten in black and red ink on old thick papers
Electronic reproductions: None
Existence/location of copies: None
Finding aids: None
Relevant publications: Knappert, Jan. 1969. The Utenzi wa Katirifu or Ghazwa ya Sesebani. Afrika und Ubersee 52: 81-104 and 264-313. Ibid. 1999. A Survey of Swahili Islamic Epic Sagas. Lewiston, New York; Queenston, Ontario; Lampeter, Wales: Edwin Mellen Press; pp. 76-82 Abou Egl, Mohammad. 1983. The life and works of Muhamadi Kijuma. PhD thesis, SOAS, University of London.
Notes: See Mss 47779, 380552
Scope and content: The second poem of this MS is the religious poem known as 'Utenzi wa Wadi Isban', rendered here as 'Utenzi wa Qatirifu'. The same poem with transliteration is to be found is MS 47779 and MS 380552 (Hichens collection). This poem was given to Rev. John Williamson by Kijumwa in 1940. The writing of the scribe is difficult to read, and his spelling is erratic. The manuscript exemplifies (see, for example, the first several lines) the manipulation of Arabic words to fit the Swahili rhyme scheme, resulting in phrases that are neither properly Swahili nor correct Arabic. The poem narrates about a battle in a Valley, the Wadi Isban, between the Prophet Mohammed's army and the army of an unbeliever, Katirifu. It is written in northern dialect, with borrowings from Arabic. In brief, the poem narrates of a Jew named Amri, who wants to become a Muslim and he is travelling to Mecca to see Mohammed. On his way, Amri meets a shepherd and inquires about the owner of a beautiful house visible in the distance. The shepherd explains that the palace belongs to a tyrant and his daughter Hasina, both of whom are unbelievers. A man named Katirifu wishes to marry Hasina, but as her bride price the princess has demanded that Katirifu kill Mohammed and Ali, against whom her husband fought in the battle of Badr, in which he died. Hasina and Katirifu made an agreement, and Katirifu went to gather his troops. The poem contains 450 stanzas, of one line in each stanza.
Description
Location: None
Places:
Further Info:


HIRQL [sic, Hirql]

[3 Swahili poems:

(1) 2 fragments of the Hirql [sic, Hirql] saga, on Muhammads victory over the Romans under Hirql [sic, Hirql] (Heraclius): ff. 1-30;

(2) a poem on Muhammads victory over the army of qatirifu: ff. 31-48;

(3) a poem on the legend of Moses protecting Gabriel disguised as a dove from Michael disguised as a hawk: ff. 49-51.

Written in Arabic script, in leather case with rude ornamental designs.]

[Manuscript, 19th century].