Citation
United States : Report for the year 1913 on the trade and commerce of the Philippine Islands

Material Information

Title:
United States : Report for the year 1913 on the trade and commerce of the Philippine Islands
Series Title:
Diplomatic and consular reports
Creator:
Great Britain. Foreign Office.
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Harrison & Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce
Komersyo
International trade
Internasyonal na kalakalan
Genre:
Government Document
serial ( sobekcm )
Temporal Coverage:
19130101 - 19131231
Spatial Coverage:
Asia -- Philippines
Asya -- Pilipinas
Asia -- Filipinas
Coordinates:
14.63 x 121.03

Notes

General Note:
"Presented to both Houses of Parliament by command of His Majesty, July, 1914."
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue number: Cd. 7048-168
Funding:
Funded with resources from SOAS Archives and Special Collections and with the generous support of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs and the Office of Senator Loren Legarda.

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
CF327.42 /23894 ( SOAS classmark )
291455 ( aleph )
Cd. 7048-168 ( Publisher_ID )

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Full Text
No. 5513 Annual Series.
DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR REPORTS

UNITED STATES.

REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1914

ON THE

TRADE AND COMMERCE OE THE PHILIPPINE

ISLANDS.

Edited at the Foreign Office and the Board of Trade.

REFERENCE TO PREVIOUS REPORT, Annual Series No. 5851.

Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty,
NOVEMBER, 1915.

LONDON:

PRINTED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF IIIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE
By HARRISON and SONS, 45-47, St. Martin's Lane, W.C.,
Printers in Ordinary to His Majesty.

To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from
WYMAN and SONS, Limited, 29, Breams Buildings, Fetter Lane, E.C., and
28, Abingdon Street, S.W., and 54, St. Mary Street, Cardiff; or
H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE (Scottish Branch), 23, Forth Street, Edinburgh; op
E. PONSONBY, Limited, 116, G-rafton Street, Dublin,-
or from the Agencies in the British Colonies and Dependencies,
the United States of America and other Foreign Countries of
T. FISHER UNWIN, Limited, London, W.C.

1915.

[Cd. 7620123.]

Price Twopence.




CONTENTS.

Manila Page

Currency ..........................................................................................3

Weights and measures ...........................................................................4

Towns, industries, population ....................................................................................................4

General remarks..........................................................................................................................................5

Imports.................................................................................................6

Exports

Sugar..................................................................................................................................................................12

Hemp .............................................................................. 13

Maguey ......................................................................................................................................................14

Copra ...............................................................................................15

Tobacco .........................................................................................................15

Gums and rosins..................'...........................................................-16

Pearl buttons ..............................................................................................................16

Lumber ......................................................................................................................................................16

Miscellaneous

Shipping ........................................................................................................1.7

Railways ......................................................................................................................................................18

Cattle "..................................................................................18

Cement.........................................................................................18

Mining ....................................................................................19

Public health ...........................................................................................19

Statistics

Annex 1.Total foreign trade.....................................................20

2.Imports ........................................................................21

3.Exports .....................................................................................22

4.Return of all shipping ..............................................23

5.Return of British shipping ........................................................................23

Iloilo, Vice-Consul's report.........................................................................................24

Currency.

s. cl.

1 peso (100 centavos) ... ...... = 2 1 (nominally)

The unit of value in the Philippine Islands is the theoretical gold peso,
containing 12 -9 grains of gold, nine-tenths fine, representing gold value exactly
equal to 50 c. United States currency. This parity is maintained by the sale of
drafts in the Philippines by the Government on its redemption fund in New
York and the sale of drafts in New York by the agent of the Philippine Govern-
ment on the Government's redemption fund in Manila. The Government's
rates of exchange are fixed and represent as nearly as practicable the cost of
shipping gold bars between New York and Manila.

Note.The figures given in the tables relating to British shipping in the
Consular reports are exclusive of vessels arriving at the port to which the tables
relate from other ports in the same country, unless they landed cargo at that port
from another country; and similarly of vessels departing for other ports in the
same country, unless they loaded cargo for another county. The figures differ
in consequence in some cases from the figures given in the tables relating to
shipping of all nationalities, which are based on the local shipping returns.

(560)


4

Weights ancl Measures.

Only the metric system is now permitted to be used official^.

Scales, steelyards and the like imported from abroad must be marked in
kilos., &c., only ; if bearing any marks other than those of the metric
system they will not be accepted for registration by the Bureau of Internal
Revenue.

The following table contains a list of the principal towns, giving the
provinces, industries and products :

Town. Province. Population. Industry or Products.
Manila ... Manila ... 234,409 Distributing centre
Laoag ... 1 Iogos Norte 34,454 Tobacco
Batangas Batangas... 41,102 Sugar
Oebu ...... Cebu ...... 57,181 Hemp port
Camiling Tarlac ...... 29,132 Sugar
Tabaco ...... Albay ...... 22,197 Hemp and copra
Zamboanga Mindanao 20,692 Hemp, copra, shells, almaciga and lumber
Dagupan Pan gasman ...; 20,357 Rice
Iloilo ...... 11 oil o ......! 39,812 Sugar
Capiz ... Capiz 20,800 Rice and hemp
Aparri ... Cagayan ...... 20,138 Tobacco and maguey
Nueva Caceres ... Ambos Camarines 12,411 Hemp and rice
Ormoc ... Leyte 30,924 Hemp
San Fernando ... La Union 16,095 Maguey, sugar and tobacco
Oalbayog Samar ... ...i 17,220 24,597 Hemp
Silay ...... Negros Occidental Sugar
Yigan ... Ilocos Sur 33,226 Maguey, sugar and tobacco
Dumaguete Negros Oriental... 14,894 Sugar, hemp and tree cotton
Borongan Samar 14,245 Copra
Sorsogon Sorsogon... 13,512 Hemp
Tarlac...... Tarlac ... 12,718 Provincial capital
Romblon Romblon... 16,180 Hemp and copra
Lucena ... Tayabas ... 9,375 Copra
Catbalogan Samar 7,758 Hemp
Surigao...... Surigao ... 7,749 Hemp
Cavite ... Cavite 16,556 Naval station
Masbate Masbate ... 5,237 Gold dredging
Jolo Jolo. 1,270 Hemp and shells
Legaspi... Albay ...... 27,901 Hemp port

The total population of the Philippine Islands according to the official census
of 1903 was 7,635,426.


No. 5513. Annual Series.

Reference 1o previous Report, Annual Series No. 5351.

Report on the Trade of the Philippine Islands for the Year 1914
By Mr. Consul-General J. B. Rentiers.

The total foreign trade of the Philippine Islands for 1914 amounted
to 20,266,3101., a decrease of 793,2192. as compared with that of 1913
and of 3,994,6561. as compared with that of 1912. It is, however,
greater than that of 1911 or any other year since the annexation of
the islands by the United States.

The uncertainty that prevailed in 1913 as to the policy to be
adopted by the United States with regard to the control of the islands
existed and caused a continuance in 1914 of a general want of
confidence in commercial circles and a consequent disinclination to
extension of commercial or industrial undertakings. The Jones Bill,
which was to decide the question of the future status of the Philippines,
has been before Congress and has been shelved until the winter session
of 1915. In considering the strong opposition raised in the United
States to this measure, it must be remembered that these islands,
while they remain in the possession of the United States, offer an
outlet for a large quantity of the produce of the United States which
enters this market free of duty, and that any alteration in the status
of the islands might deprive these products of the favoured treatment
that they now enjoy. There is a consuming population of 8,000,000
whose trade the United States is in a position to monopolise. She
United States now supplies 50 per cent, of the imports of these
islands. The islands also do, or can, produce all, with the possible
exception of Chilian nitrate, that the United States now buys in
South America.

Business conditions, which had somewhat improved in the early
part of 1914, were again depressed by the outbreak of war in Europe,
and the reduction in the year's trade is accounted for by the falling-off
in imports during the latter half year, which amounted to only
4,295,0062., a decrease of 1,532,6241, from those of the first half year,
which amounted to 5,827,6302.

The total value of imports in 1914 was 10,122,6361. and of exports
10,143,6742., as against 11,106,8302. and 9,952,6992. respectively in
1913. The exports therefore show an excess over imports of 21,0382. ;
while in the previous two years imports had exceeded exports.

(560)


6 MANILA.

The following table gives the figures of the total trade for the last
five years :

Year. Imports. Exports. Total.
1910 ... 1911 ... 1912 ... 1913 ... 1914 ... £ 10,358,200 10,005,092 12,847,479 11,106,830 10,122,636 £ 8,464,263 9,289,020 11,413,487 9,952,699 10,143,674 £ 18,822,463 19,294,112 24,260,966 21,059,529 20,266,310

After the outbreak of war in Europe there was for some weeks
no market for Philippine products for export, with the exception of
sugar, the price of which rose immediately upon the removal from the
world's markets of the European production. For hemp and copra
there was for a time no market, but with the resumption of foreign
commerce the prices of these commodities again approached the
normal. Prospects of commerce for the year 1915 appear indeed
not unfavourable. The sugar crop is large and prices satisfactory.
New markets are being developed for copra, and a gradual strengthen-
ing of the' market is to be expected. The hemp market is low, but
the demands of the principal buyersthe United States and the
United Kingdomcontinue steady and there is no reason to apprehend
any serious disturbance in prices. The shortage in shipping is,
however, exercising a serious influence on the markets, as exporters
naturally are averse from incurring the loss by shrinkage due to long
storage of copra, or to purchase hemp which they have no immediate
prospect of being able to ship.

Of the entire trade of the islands approximately 50 per cent. wTas
with the United States, the exports to that country amounting to
slightly more than 50 per cent, of total exports, and imports from
it to slightly less than 50 per cent, of total imports. The advance
made by the United States in the export trade from the islands,
from 3,423,754Z. in 1913 to 5,132,353?. in 1914, was at the expense of
th^United Kingdom, France, Japan, China, Hong-Kong and Germany,
all of which countries show a decrease in the export trade from the
islands for 1914. Italy and the Netherlands are the only foreign
countries that show an increase in it.

Imports.The decrease in imports during 1914 of 984,194?. as
compared with 1913 is due to the falling-off that occurred in the last
six months of 1914. Imports from Japan, French Indo-China and
China increased during the year, while imports from the United
States decreased by 500,266?., and practically the entire balance of
the total decrease, viz., 484,000?. was proportionately divided between
the United Kingdom, Germany and France.

The heaviest items in the decrease of imports are to be found in
manufactures of iron and steel, which show a falling-off in 1914 of
339,679?. ; in cotton manufactures, 393,345?. ; and in meat and dairy
products, 58,326?.


MANILA.

7

Only imports of rice and manufactures of leather show any sub-
stantive increase, the latter having advanced from 219,468?. to
324,547?. There was an increase also in the import of cattle.

Rice.The prospects in the earlier part of the year were that the
crop would be a very large one ; it was, however, seriously affected
by the drought of the last three months of the year.

It is stated in a report by the Director of Agriculture that the
average annual normal increase in consumption of cleaned rice in the
archipelago is approximately 50,000 short tons, and that under normal
conditions the Philippine Islands would have consumed 1,000,000 tons
of cleaned rice during the year just closed.

In view of the shortage in the local supply of rice, considerable
quantities were imported in the autumn months from Saigon, and this
accounts for the increased import. The import during 1914 from
French Indo-China amounted to 614,375?. The total import of rice
in 1913 and 1914 was smaller than in any other year since 1899.

In connection with the efforts of the Government to make the
islands self-supporting in this commodity, the staple food of the
inhabitants, to which reference has been made in the reports for the
two preceding years, it may be mentioned that an agricultural colony
was started in July, 1914, by the Agricultural Bureau at Momungan
in the large southern Island of Mindanao. At the close of the year it
consisted of 46 American families settled on the land allotted for
cultivation, and all indications pointed to the unqualified success of
the experiment. The colony mentioned in last year's report was
that established by the Executive Bureau in 1913 at Cotabato, also
in the Island of Mindanao. The colonists in this case are, however,
Filipinos.

Cotton.Imports for the past year show a considerable falling-off
all round, their total value being 393,345?. less than for 1913. Imports
from the United States were 1,213,819/., and from the United Kingdom
323,348?., as against 1,475,983?. and 427,817?. respectively in 1913.

The following table shows the proportion in which the United
States and the United Kingdom participated in the supply of some
of the chief items :

Articles. United States. United Kingdom. Total Import.
Cotton cloth £ £ £
Unbleached 47,679 4,117 59,079
Bleached ... 345,247 78,870 448,497
Dyed ... ...... 266,158 102,-218 455,005
Printed 313,413 30,966 350,536
Yarn
Bleached ... 15,044 31,458
Dyed 38,652 72,500
Handkerchiefs 7,956 16,811 26,923
Laces...... 436 11,956 14,952
Total 980,889 298,634 1,458,950


8

MANILA.

Of bleached yarns Japan contributed 13,958Z. and of dyed yarns
10,833?., while out of a total import of 32,2921 worth of mercerised
yarns she contributed 29,7921. Of unbleached yarns, of which the total
import was 53,333Z., Japan contributed 47,500Z. and British India 4,7921.

The United States have barely maintained their proportion of this
trade at the 1913 level, the decrease being about 1J per cent., while
the United Kingdom has continued to lose ground, imports from there
having dropped from 17J per cent, in 1913 to 15J per cent, in 1914
of the grand total. In view of America's position this further decline
in imports from the United Kingdom can hardly be attributed wholly
to tariff duties, but appears to be, in a considerable measure, the result
of increased competition from the Continent of Europe in muslins and
dyed yarns, and from Japan in bleached yarns, items that have hitherto
been almost exclusively British. Trade is of course always changing
more or less, and while United States manufacturers have succeeded
in introducing new items, they continue to meet with strenuous com-
petition from Japan in fancy cloths, and even to a smaller extent in
staples such as grey drills and sheetings.

Iron mid steel.Importations of galvanised iron from the United
States were on a free scale during the first eight months of the year,
but fell off latterly owing to heavy stocks held by dealers. Only a
very small proportion of the total quantity of this article was imported
from the United Kingdom. Steel bars, round and twisted, were im-
ported on a smaller scale in 1914 than during the previous year, owing
partly to existing stocks and also to the falling-off in the number of
reinforced concrete buildings under construction. Belgium continued
to supply practically all the bar iron used until the outbreak of war
in Europe. It now looks as though American mild steel bars will be
substituted pending a resumption of shipments from the Continent.

Business in pig iron was somewhat better in 1914 than during
the previous year. Importations were principally from the United
Kingdom, but a small quantity was imported from British India with
a view to testing its suitability for use in the Philippines.

Small hardware was supplied principally by Germany until the
outbreak of war. Since then there have been practically no arrivals
and stocks are low.

Of the total import the United States contributed 1,061,103?., all
other countries 393,7812. The countries of origin and the values of the
quantities of the principal items coming from each are as follows :

£

Pig iron ... 4,792
Of which
United Kingdom 3,958
British India 625
Bar iron ... 9,583
Of which
Belgium 5,625
United Kingdom 2,708-
St?el bar and rod 46,458
Of which
United Stales 30,000
United Kingdom 4,792,
Belgium 4,375
Germany 6,042


MANILA.

9

£

Steel rails ... 88,958
Of which

United States ..................58,333

Germany ........................28,750

Sheets and plates, corrugated and other 216,667
Of which

United States ... 192,292

United Kingdom ... 22,708 -

Structural iron and steel 110,833
Of which

United States 101,458

United Kingdom 4,792

Germany ... 2,500

Enamel ware' ... 22,292
Of which

Austria-Hungary 5,208

Germany ... 11,458

Wire nails............21,458

Of which

United States ... 19,375

The largest item, Machines and machinery/' with a total of
528,542?., shows a decrease of 151,250/!. from the previous year. Of
this total the United States contributed 344,375?., the United Kingdom
82,500?. and Germany 79,583?. ; aggregating between them 506,458?.
A few of the most important classes are as follows : *

£

Steam engines and boilers 127,708
Of which

United States 38,542

United Kingdom 51,458

Germany ... 32,917

Sugar machinery... 35.417
Of which

United States 20,416

United Kingdom 1,208

Hawaii ... 4,583

Electrical machinery 21,975
Of which

United States ... 13,333

United Kingdom ... 2,292

Germany ............6,042

Mining machinery ... 16,875
Of which

United States ... 11,875

Australia ... ... 5,000

Of wood cutting machinery, total 10,000?., sewing machines
(141,667?.) and typewriters (15,833?.), practically the whole import
was from the United States.

Brass and manufactures thereof.Of this, 27,500?. came from the
United States. In only one item, machinery, did the import from the
United Kingdom (L229Z.) exceed that from the United States (938?.).

Cereals and cereal products.Of the total import of these, 233,318?.
came from the United States. They include wheat flour 335,625?.,
of which 218,750?. came from the United States and 116,667?. from
Australasia ; bread and biscuits, 29,375?., of which 25,417?. came from
the United Kingdom ; and macaroni from China, 21,250?.


10

MANILA.

Cars and carriages.These were imported from the United States
to the value of 195,309?., and from other countries to the value of
114,559?.

Automobiles.589 cars were imported valued at 146,667?. Of
these, 499 of a value of 108,333?. were from the United States and
79 of a value of 34,583?. from France.

Tyres.These were imported from the United States to the value
of 31.250?. and from France to the value of 13,750?.

Passenger and freight cars for steam railways.These were imported
to the value of 47,708?., of which 45,417?. came from the United
Kingdom and the balance from the United States.

Cement.Imports decreased. The total import was 115,625?.,
of which

The German import was little more than one-third of that of 1913,
while the Japanese have nearly trebled and the Chinese doubled
theirs.

Coal.The following were the chief imports :

£

From January to March Japanese coal was selling at from 9 pesos
50 c. to 11 pesos (195. 10c?. to 1?. 2s. 11 d.) per ton; Chinese at 8 pesos 50 c.
(17s. 9c?.) per ton ; Australian was being delivered against contracts
made towards the end of 1913 at 12 pesos to 12 pesos 50 c. (1?. 5s.
to 1?. 65. per ton), but fell in May to 11 pesos per ton, Japanese coal
remaining stationary. The above prices are per English ton ex ships,
import duty of 50 c. (Is. 0^d.) per ton paid.

During August and September bookings and arrivals became much
heavier.

Contractors bought up all coal of suitable quality, and having, with
great difficulty, made good their obligations, now find themselves
considerably over-stocked, and few sales have been made during the
last three months of the year.

Between August 7 and September 4 five ships laden with coal,
aggregating about 16,000 tons, were despatched by German agents
for warlike purposes; the last ship that attempted to leave on
September 26 returned to port fearing capture by the British cruisers
on watch outside Manila Bay.

Of the 16 German ships in harbour at the close of the year, seven
had on board cargoes of coal aggregating probably 22,000 tons. Most
of this had been purchased in August at 15 pesos (1?. lis. 3d.) per
ton, while as much as 20 pesos (2?. Is. 8c?.) per ton is reported to have
been paid.

Germany ...
Hong-Kong
Japan
China

£

32,708
20,458
25,208
20,833

Japan

216,667
43,333
38,541
32,083
25,000

Australia ...
China

Japanese leased territory
United States .....


MANILA.

11

Cattle.9,072 head of cattle valued at 40,5332. were imported from
Australasia as against 7,516 head in 1913. The Philippine Govern-
ment, fearing a shortage in the supply of meat due to a threatened
embargo on the export of fresh meat from Australia in September of
1914, raised the prohibition of the import of beef cattle from French
Indo-China, and 2,008 head valued at 9,7232. were imported during
the last three months of the year. Hitherto, through fear of the
introduction of disease, the import of draught cattle only had been
permitted at Iloiio, where they were inoculated against rinderpest.

Meat and dairy products.These show a decrease. Imports from
the United States were 129,2992. and 492,4822. from other countries.
Fresh beef and mutton (193,9582.) came entirely from Australasia,
while the import of hams and bacon from there exceed that from any
other country. Tinned meats on the other hand came chiefly from
the United States. Butter from Australasia amounted to 28,1252.
and to 13,9582. from Denmark. The import of condensed milk was
150,8332., of which the United Kingdom contributed 97,2922. and the
United States 23,7502.

Oils.Mineral naphthas were imported to the value of 38,3332.
from the United States and 19,3752. from the Dutch Indies, illuminating
oil from the United States (225,4172.) and from Dutch Indies (41,4582.).
Lubricating oils (44,3752.) were practically exclusively from the United
States. Linseed oil from the United Kingdom (8,3332.), olive oil from
Spain (12,5002.) and peanut oil from China (16,6672.) are other imports.

Mineral oils, &c.Deliveries into consumption at Manila, Cebu,
Iloiio and Zamboanga by the three importing companies, viz., the
Standard Oil Company, Texas Oil Company and Asiatic Petroleum
Company, amounted in 1914 to 1,453,574 cases of kerosene and 196,600
cases of gasoline (motor spirit). The consumption of liquid fuel
during 1914 was over 1,300 tons, an increase of nearly 100 per cent.
All oil fuel comes from the Dutch Indies. Prices of kerosene of the
highest grades, 4 pesos 5 c. and 3 pesos 40 c. (85. 5d. and Is. Id.) per case
on January 1, stood at 4 pesos 20 c. and 3 pesos 55 c. (85. 9d. and
7s. 5d.) per case respectively on December 31, 1914, after which date
an advance of 57 c. (Is. 2d.) per case on kerosene and 1 peso 45 c.
(3s.) per case on gasoline was made by all importers to meet the new
consumption tax imposed from January 1, 1915.

The retail price of gasoline varied from 6 pesos 50 c. to 6 pesos 10 c.
(136-. §d. to 12s. 8d.) per case and closed at 6 pesos 40 c. (13s. 4d.) per case.

Paints.Imports from the United States were 18,7502., while of
the remaining 21,2502. the United Kingdom supplied no less than
17,0832.

Silks.Spun silk from China was valued at 53,3332. ; while out
of 36,2502. worth of silk clothes China sent 16,4582., Japan 8,9582.
and the United Kingdom 3,9582., the last country sending also plushes
valued at 9,1672. Of the whole import the United States contributed
25,9862. and other countries 150,9802.

Spirits, wines, &c.Imports from the United States amounted to
13,8122. and from other countries to 59,1162.

Out of 16,6672. worth of malt liquors in bottle, 11,4582. came from
the United Kingdom and 3,9582. from the United States.


12

MANILA.

Of whisky, total 16,875?., malt whisky from the United
Kingdom was 9,167?., rye from the United States 5,833?.

Of the import of wines, amounting to 25,417?., 18,750?. came
from Spain.

Sugar {refined).The total import amounted to 55,000?., of
which :

Tobacco.From the United States 51,155?., other countries 12,865L
Of the latter, 8,125?. represents leaf from the Dutch Indies and 4,583L
smoking tobacco from China.

Wool and manufactures thereof.From the United States 44,105?.,
from other countries 35,104?. Of woollen cloths valued at 21,042?.,
11,458?. came from the United Kingdom, 3,750?. from Belgium and
1,042?. from the United States.

Fibre manufactures.Burlaps and bagging (34,792?.) came entirely
from British India. Of bags (49,167?.) nearly one-half came from
British India, the rest from China and Hong-Kong, while more than
one-half of the import of cloths, valued at 26,042?., came from the
United Kingdom.

Leather and leather manufactures.Of these, 298,484?. came from
the United States, only 26,042?. from other countries. Boots to
the value of 182,917?. are included in the former and to the value
of 5,625?. from Spain in the latter. Boot leather (sole and upper)
to the value of 65,208?. is almost all included in the former.

Glass and glassware.Of these, 14,948?. came from the United States
and 46,160?. from other countries. Of the latter Japan supplied
one-half, 11,250?. of which represented bottles. Window glass of the
value of 4,167?. came from Belgium.

Exports.The total exports in 1914 exceeded those of 1913 by
191,000?., and were greater than in any previous year with the exception

Sugar.The greatest increase was in sugar, the export of which
shows an increase of nearly 78,000 tons, say 50 per cent, in weight,
and 839,000?. in value over that of 1913. Not far short of 75 per cent,
of the better qualities went to the United States, the remainder chiefly
to China and Japan.

The average value of last year's crop was about 9?. 95. per ton,
while the average of this year's crop has been approximately 9?. lis.
per ton. These figures show a healthy condition of business in the
sugar districts, but notwithstanding this sugar planters met with con-
siderable financial difficulties, and for a time it looked as if a portion
of their crops would not receive the necessary attention owing to the
lack of financial facilities. Finally, however, support was received
from the Insular Government, which lent sums between 200?. and 300L
to planters through one of the local banks. This support w7as required
not because the industry was not in a good condition, but owing to
the fact that planters generally had extended their planting consider-
ably and improved their machinery and implements. The coming-

United States
Hong-Kong
Dutch Indies

£

41,667
10,000
3,125

of 1912.


MANILA.

13

crop for 1915 promises to be a record one, due in part to this increased
acreage and in part to exceedingly favourable weather conditions.
It is estimated at about 270,000 tons, of which a larger proportion
than hitherto will consist of centrifugal sugar. Probably about
35,000 tons of this quality of sugar will be produced. Sugar planta-
tions in Luzon suffered severely during the year from the ravages of
locusts, and on this account the yield from this district has been
comparatively poor.

The destination of the exports during 1914 was as follows :

The average price of the sugar was satisfactory to planters, leaving
them a fair margin of profit. Unfortunately for them, however,
when the big rise in price of sugar took place in consequence of the
European war, practically all the crop had been sold; whatever
balance was left was practically entirely in the hands of exporters and
speculators.

The crop planted during 1914 will enjoy the preference hitherto
given to Philippine sugars in the United States ; but this advantage
will cease on March 1, 1916, from which date the United States has
abolished the import duty on sugars. That country will therefore
no longer be the ruling factor in this market, and most of the sugar
produced in the Philippines will probably find its way to eastern
markets.

The San Carlos (Negros) Sugar Central, which completed its first
year's operations during the early months of 1914, is the first large
modern plant in the islands to be'Completed and put into full opera-
tion. The new central at the Calamba estate was completed and
put into operation during the year. The results obtained at both
milling centrals, according to a report issued by the Director of the
Bureau of Agriculture, are such as to warrant the immediate construc-
tion of others in the principal sugar-producing districts of the islands.

Hemp {abaca) (Musa textilis).Exports for 1914 show a slight
falling-off in quantity and value.

The production during the year under review has been disappoint-
ing, having amounted to only 120,875 tons, which is just equal to
the preceding year, but shows a decrease of 30 per cent, on the figures
of 1912. Values, as a consequence, were fairly well maintained until
the outbreak of the European war in August, when they fell from
81. to 12I. per ton below the price ruling in May, recovering, however,
to the extent of about 50 per cent, towards the end of the year.

In the greater part of the archipelago the weather conditions
have been favourable to the growth of the hemp trees, and, were all
other things equal with previous years, a large crop should be looked
for. The trade, however, has become temporarily disorganised by a

United States
United Kingdom,
China
Japan

Tons.
167,436
5,373
46,219
13,746

Total

232,774


14

MANILA.

law recently passed by the local legislature, which came into force
on January 1, 1915, to regulate the grading of hemp under Government
classification and inspection. The law is not a Very complete one,
and leaves much to be desired. However, the regulations governing
the grading of fibre have been largely left, as a fact, to the Bureau
of Agriculture, and it is hoped that the law may be made workable.
The chief object of the law is to improve the quality of fibre by stricter
classification and grading, and this is to be commended. Some fibre
experts, however, fear that the results of the Bill may be the production
of a superfluous quantity of fine grade hemp which would lower net
results to the growers. The effect of the law, coupled with the un-
certainty of prices in the consuming markets and the prospects of
increase in freight rates, has led to a restriction of business which, in
its turn, is likely to affect production, and to cause some reduction in
the figures for 1915.

The Japanese trade in fine grade hemp suitable for braid maiding
has become dull owing to the effects of the war on American trade,
prices for some of these grades having declined 201, per ton or more.

A demand for hemp waste and low grade fibre for paper making
was one of the new features brought about by the war. This has only
been spasmodic.

The principal consuming countries, with the values of hemp ex-
ported thereto, are as follows :

This year's export includes knotted hemp 313 tons valued at
118,914?., of which 93,0001!. went, to Italy, 11,000Z. to France and
9,000Z. to Belgium. The export of this in 1913 was 330 tons valued
at 117,8542.

A recent report issued by the 'Bureau of Agriculture states that
the hemp plantations have almost entirely recovered from the effects
of the drought in 1912, and with the exception of the south-west
provinces in Luzon, which were rather severely hit by the typhoon
of June, 1914, the production would have shown a normal increase
but for the depression in prices, and has reached some 130,000 metric
tons. It is stated that a marked improvement in the quality of
fibre produced was noticeable subsequent to July 1, 1914, due to the
educational campaign conducted by the bureau in connection with the
new fibre classifications.

Maguey (gantala).The production of this fibre shows no increase.
Exports show a decrease of 1,500 tons, or nearly 22 per cent., from
1913. Prices rule low as this fibre feels the competition of sisal.
Supplies for 1915 look like continuing small.

Destinations of exports were as follows :

United States
United Kingdom
Japan

£

2,004,000
1,259,000
432,000

u iAjjaiJLi

United States

United Kingdom
Japan

£

46,000
19,000
10,000


MANILA.

15

Copra.There was an increase in the quantity of copra exported
in 1914 but a decrease in its value due to the fact that over 60 per
cent, of the entire export was shipped during the latter half of the
year when prices, which had fallen sharply in foreign markets imme-
diately after the outbreak of war, had not recovered.

Destinations of principal exports of copra were as follows :

The increase in the export of coconut oil covers two-thirds of the
loss in value of copra exported. This new item has been of rapid
growth. In 1912 the export was 660 kilos., or little over \ ton,
valued at 81 ; in 1913 it was 4,509 tons valued at 238,821?. ; while in
1914 it had risen to 10,748 tons valued at 545,663?., the whole of which,
with the exception of 2,500?. shipped to Hong-Kong, went to New
York.

Another new item of export, a by-product of the oil, is coconut
cake, the export of which in 1913 was 2,696 tons valued at 22,828?.
The entire export, which had increased by 50 per cent, in 1914, went
to Hamburg. The year 1914 marked the full recovery of the coconut
plantations from the effects of the drought and typhoons of 1911-12,
and a larger production was looked for.

This was, however, naturally curtailed by the low price to which
copra fell. A marked improvement in the general situation was,
however, noticeable during the last three months of the year. Pros-
pects for the coming crop are good, though in some places there is fear
that continued dry weather may have retarded the growth of the
nuts.

The local oil mill continues to be a strong buyer, and when a further
mill, now under construction near Cebu, is completed some reduction
may be looked for in the export of copra which may, however, be
equalised by an increased production.

Tobacco.The various classes of tobacco show a decreased export
in 1914, cigars alone showing a falling-off of 145,000?.

In leaf tobacco 270,000?. are accounted for by two countries alone,
Spain taking 239,000Z. and the Netherlands 31,000?. The balance of
approximately 110,000?. is widely distributed in comparatively small
quantities.

Of cigars the principal buyers, accounting for 438,000?. of the
total exports, are :

To
France

United Stales
Spain

Germany ...
United Kingdom

726,005
335,000
204,000
160,000
100,000

£

£

United States
United Kingdom

272,000
25,000
38,000
25,000
42,000
36,000

British India
Hong-Kong
Australasia
China


16

MANILA.

Cigarettes went chiefly to the following :

United States
China
Japan
Hong-Kong

£

2,000
1,250
1,250
1,700

The tobacco harvested during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1914,
amounted to 46,731,463 kilos. (102,809,218 lbs.), showing an increase
of 671,073 kilos. (1,476,360 lbs.) over that of the previous fiscal
year.

In the Isabela and Cagayan provinces, whose tobaccos rank as the
two finest qualities produced in the Philippines, the crop has suffered
severely from the drought and is short, and in Cagayan also of poor
quality. In these two provinces the 1914 crop is estimated not to
exceed 120,000 quintals (say 12,000,000 lbs.) or but little more than
one-half of an average crop.

The prospects for the coming year also are not bright, many of
the planters having lost a part or all of their seed beds on account of
the unusually early advent of the dry season. The 1915 crop will
therefore probably be even less and poor in quality. Little if any
of these tobaccos were exported this year in the leaf, the export con-
sisting of cheaper grades.

The Bureau of Agriculture has distributed selected seed among
the planters, and has continued its efforts to eliminate the cigarette
beetle as a factor militating against the export of tobacco products.
Four of the local exporting houses are now processing their leaf with,
it is claimed, signal success.

Gums and resins.There was a small export of copal, 23,000?.,
of which 16,000?. was to British India.

Hats.These are classified as bamboo, buntal, buri and arayat.
The export of buntal alone amounted to 55,000?., of which nearly
46,000?. went to the United States and 6,000?. to France. The others
go principally to the United States. Buntal hats are woven from a
fibre extracted from the inner part of the leaf petiole of the buri palm
(Corypha elata) and are those most in favour for export, being of fine
appearance and of excellent wearing quality.

Pearl buttons.These were exported in 1913 to the extent of 8,000?.
and in 1914 to over 12,000?., all of which went to the United States ;
while shells, chiefly trocha, green snail and gold lip pearl were exported
to the value of 78,000?. in 1913 as against 71,000?. in 1914. The
principal destinations of these were:

British India
United Kingdom
United States

£

35,000
11,000
9,000

Lumber.With the increasing possibility of assured supplies the
export of native woods is expected to increase. The exports for
1913-14 are as follows :


MANILA.

17

Native Woods.

1914.

Cubic feet. 1 £ Cubic feet. £
Tanguili 213,920 29,796 278,985 34,969
Almond 34,860 3,571 106,015 9,266
Other... 364,350 31,561 255,850 20,299
Total ... 613,130 64,928 640,850 i ! 64,534

Of these exports some 34,000Z. of tanguili and 15,000Z. of other
woods went to the United States.

Lumber concession.The Kolambugan Lumber and Development
Company, of which mention was made in last year's report, has during
the year completed the erection of its mill at Kolambugan near the
port of Misamis, in the north-west of the Island of Mindanao. The
company was in February, 1915, awarded a contract for the supply of
nearly 2,500,000 feet of lumber to the Army Department, which has
decided to make trial of the native woods instead of using Oregon
pine as it has done hitherto. The actual quantity is 2,430,495 board
feet and the price over 100,000 pesos (10,400Z.).

Miscellaneous. Shipping.It will be seen in Annex 4 that there
has been a considerable decrease in shipping at Manila during 1914.
Of the decrease of 37 in the number of ships entered, 11 were British.
The relative proportion of British shipping to the total has therefore
been maintained, being 53 per cent, of the total as against 52 per cent,
in 1913. The United States figures include 3 sailing vessels of a total
tonnage of 2,890 tons.

It will be noticed that while the number of German ships entered
is the same as in 1913, the number that cleared was only 61 as against
81 in the preceding year; 25 German ships entered this port after
August 5, of which 7 put to sea again ; of these 3 again took refuge
in another port in the Philippines. There were at the close of the
year 24 German vessels of a total net tonnage of 54,448 tons laid up
in Philippine ports, and of these 17 were at Manila. Of the 24 vessels,
2 were transferred to Philippine registry with a view to their employ-
ment in the inter-island coasting trade. This intention has, however,
not been carried out; the total net tonnage of these 2 vessels is only
2,351 tons.

From June,. 1914, the Canadian Pacific Steamship Company made
Manila a port of call for its vessels on the outward run from Vancouver
to Hong-Kong, and the Empress of Russia" and Empress of
Asia made each one call at this port before the service was dis-
continued.

Three steamship companies, viz., the Ocean Steamship Company
and two Dutch companiesRotterdam Lloyd and the Netherlands
will in turn send one ship a month from New York making Manila
its terminus port after calling at Batavia and Macassar; and calling
at Batavia, Colombo and Gibraltar on the return journey to New
York.

Under the American flag tEe two steamers Rubi and Zafiro,"
(560) B


18

MANILA.

of 1,409 net tons each, were, in July, taken off the Hong-Kong-Manila
run on which they had been employed since 1901.

As a direct consequence of the stranding of the British freight
steamer Bengloe on the Moyune shoal in September, 1914, it was
decided to increase the lighting of the Sulu Sea, and early in 1915
acetylene flashlights were installed on the three islands Manucan,
Black Rock and Comiran, which are on the direct line of homeward
shipping bound from "Iloilo. After the removal of the wreck a
further light is to be erected on the Moyune shoal itself. Other lights
have also been erected for the use of the inter-island shipping.

Railways.The extension of the lines in Luzon of the Manila Rail-
road Company has proceeded, and 86 miles have been opened to
traffic during 1914. Rails have been laid on a portion of the mountain
section from Aringay to Baguio. This company has imported during
the year three locomotives, valued at 3,600?. each, from the United
Kingdom, and three rack-work locomotives, valued at 3,400?. each,
from Switzerland.

No additions have been made to its lines by the Philippine Railway ;
Company.

Cattle and rinderpest.To prevent the introduction of rinderpest
through imported stock, cattle for draught purposes are imported
only at Iloilo, where they are inoculated. Since the establishment
there by the Bureau of Agriculture in May, 1914, of the inoculation
station over 3,000 imported animals have been treated. Carabaos
(water buffalo) are imported from Pnom Penh, and are much sought
after in the sugar districts, the animals being larger and stronger than
those of Philippine stock. During the past year nearly 8,000 animals
have been inoculated in the islands, with a loss of less than 1 per cent.
It is stated in an official report that the immunity conveyed appears
to be complete and that there is good reason to believe that it con-
tinues throughout the life of the animal.

During the year there were located 3,940 cases of rinderpest, of
which 2,715 ended fatally. The corresponding figures for 1913 were
4,972 and 2,986. The average annual loss to live-stock owners from
this disease in the last five years is stated to have been over 50,000?.
In one year, 1902, the loss is estimated to have been between 5,000,000?.
and 6,000,000?., many provinces having lost from 50 to 80 per cent,
of their carabaos and cattle.

At the close of the year a second inoculation station was opened.
in Pampanga province, in which, together with the provinces of Tarlac
and Pangasinan, 80 per cent, of the deaths from rinderpest occur.
Quarantine maintained in these districts has at best not more than
kept the disease from spreading, at an average annual cost to the
Government of 48,542?. It is estimated that at a cost to the Insular
Government of 20,000?. all the cattle and carabaos in these provinces,
some 150,000 head, can be rendered immune in from one to three
years, and that after thus stamping out the disease in this region an
annual charge of from 5,000?. to 7,500?. would suffice to protect all
young stock and animals imported into the provinces.

Cement manufacture.The works erected in 1914 by the Rizal


MANILA.

19

Cement Company at Binangonan on Laguna de Bay are expected to
be completed early in 1915.

The present output is expected to be 500 barrels per day, with
one kiln, but the intention is to add a second kiln shortly, the machinery
and power having been designed for an output of 1,000 barrels per day.
The company is said to own large deposits in this district of limestone
and of volcanic toba, and with its works situated on the lake it has
the advantage of water transport by the River Pasig to Manila.

The average consumption in the Philippine Islands, apart from
army requirements, is stated to be about 2,000 barrels per day.

Mining.Several new dredges and mills have been put into opera-
tion during 1914, resulting in a greatly increased output of gold as was
anticipated in the last report. The estimated value of the gold pro-
duced in 1914 is 250,729?., an increase of 69,791?. or nearly 39 per
cent, on the production of 1913, which was 180,938?.

A little more than half the production of 1914, as was the case
also in 1913, is the result of lode mining, the balance being obtained
by dredging.

The dredging is carried on chiefly, if indeed not entirely, by
Australians, and machinery for this purpose was imported from
Australia during the year of the value of 5,000?.

A small quantity of silver, about 1,600?., was obtained from the
gold ores in which it occurs. There is no mining of silver ore,

Gas.The Manila Gas Corporation, after more than a year's work-
ing, reports that the expectations of the increase of the use of gas for
cooking purposes have been realised, but that the work of installation
has been considerably curtailed by shortage of fittings owing to the
war.

Public health. Plague.There were 26 cases and 22 deaths in the
city of Manila during the year 1914 ; no case of human or rat plague
has been found since September, 1914, when the last human case was
reported. The rat-proof building ordinance put into force by the
Municipal Board is mainly responsible for the eradication of the
disease, while a rat-killing campaign was carried out in the autumn.
No case was reported in the provinces.

Cholera.In the city of Manila there were 490 cases and 281 deaths
and in the provinces 3,013 cases and 2,165 deaths. It may be regarded
as having been epidemic in Manila during January and from July
to December, and in the provinces from July to November

The Bureau of Health has made an examination especially among
household servants and those engaged in the sale, handling or pre-
paration of articles of food. Of some 36,000 cases examined 3 per
cent, were, while not suffering from the disease themselves, found to
be carriers of infection and were detained under treatment. It is
doubtless owing to these measures and to strict isolation of the sick
that the disease has now almost completely disappeared.

Small-pox.There has been no case in Manila since February, 1910.

(560)

b 2


Annex 1.Total Foreign Trade of the Philippine Islands during the Years 1912-14 by Countries.

Country. 1912. Imports. Exports. 1913. Imports. Exports. 1914. Imports. Exports.
British Empire United Kingdom ...... Australasia British East Indies ...... Hong-Kong ......... Canada ...... Other colonies and dependencies Total, British Empire United States ......... Austria-Hungary......... Belgium ... ... China ... ... ... France French Indo-China......... Germany Italy............... Japan Netherlands Dutch East Indies......... Siam ... Spain... Switzerland... Other countries Grand total ......... £ 1,198,065 702,732 514,657 173,255 10,443 2,860 £ 1,905,763 120,406 252,524 329,935 1,980 443 £ 1,120,008 557,935 138,591 110,304 18,853 586 £ 1,889,312 128,523 276,485 662,274 1,478 3,300 £ 922,836 505,260 155,072 61,906 9,596 4,947 £ 1,516,674 125,552 241,061 422,066 482 3,014
2,602,012 5,064,377 47,201 65,014 401,226 300,285 2,373,215 591,603 48,623 633,369 40,681 113,886 74,921 298,596 99,692 92,778 2,611,051 4,752,966 49,009 219,125 226,2.92 1,817,425 1,733 349,700 169,415 534,591 46,154 8,643 1,380 530,720 29,017 66,266 1,946,277 5,557,554 33,597 59,799 455,136 301,701 564,091 601,758 47,832 706,923 38,205 88,759 96,810 258,109 146,205 204,074 2,961,372 3,423,754 39,655 113,364 342,931 1,142,261 2,559 362,833 103,408 817,611 59,796 12,751 2,634 510,939 10,232 46,599 1,659,617 5,057,288 31,051 44,908 521,581 228,877 652,342 469,281 39,933 757,009 27,605 114,656 66,874 248,641 108,520 94,453 2,308,849 £ 5,132,353 > 17,256 £ 52,818 > 229,644 811,934 1,772 224,940 153,858 623,718 69,399 22,347 5,109 470,070 2,312 17,295
12,847,479 11,413,487 11,106,830 9,952,699 10,122,636 10,143,674


Annex 2.Imports into the Philippine Islands during the Years 1912-14.

Articles. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1912. 1913. 1914.
Animals £ £ £
Cattle...... Number 27,126 7,622 12,678 157,536 35,126 64,234
Horses...... 351 106 76 8,431 2,478 1,275
All other ... ...... ... ... 1,351 1,651 1,975
Total ......... 167,318 39,255 67,484
Agricultural implements ... ... ... 7,385
Books and other printed matter ... ... ... 97,832
Brass and manufactures thereof ... ... ... 56,636 52,965 47,476
Cereals (except rice) and cereal products ... ... ... 644,338 521,674 4-26,076
Cars and carriages including auto-
mobiles and parts thereof ...... ... ... ... 301,239 338,509 309,868
Cement ............Lbs. 138,122,859 169,887,582 127,740,192 107,964 169,103 115,600
Chemicals, drugs, dyes, &c. ... ... 159,790
Coal ............Tons 407,472 552,439 587,727 219,816 330,014 364,530
Cotton and manufactures thereof 2,289,392 2,467,563 2,074,21b
Iron and steel and manufactures thereof ... ... 1,288,412 1,794,563 1,454,884
Meat and dairy products ...... ... ... ... 788,393 680,107 621,781
Oils, including illuminating oil... ... ... 446,919 440,137 432,261
Rice ............Lbs. 663,852,868 191,777,173 213,227,293 2,710,105 659,290 682,531
Silk and manufactures thereof...... ... 190,110 174,234 176,966
Spirits, wines, &c.......... ... 98,348 82,410 72,928
Tobacco and manufactures thereof ... ... 51,092 64,837 64,020
Wool and manufactures thereof ... ... 88,445 68,206 79,209
All other articles......... ... ... ... 3,398,952 3,223,963 ...
Grand total ...... ... ... ... 12,847,479 11,106,830 10,122,636


Annex 3.Exports from the Philippine Islands during the Years 1912-14.

Products. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1912. 1913. 1914.
£ £ £
Copra ............Tons 140,566 80,904 85,969 '2,954,889 1,988,692 1,662,556
Coconut cake ... ... ... 3,905 ... 24.336
oil and other oils ... ... 11,755 15,453 252,772 550,546
Fibres, vegetable and textile grasses
and manufactures thereof ...... ... ... ... 243,368 180,232 181,599
Gums and resins...... ...... ... ... ... 20,005 40,290 29,592
Hats ......... Number 901,192 547,218 681,356 96,366 85,196 65,392
Hemp ............Tons 172,347 117,904 114,554 4,599,098 4,400,226 3,998,916
Kapok ............ 42 132 ... 1,457 4,693 322
Lumber.........Cubit feet ... 640,850 ... 64,534
Maguey ............ 7,038 "(3,958 5,440 114,436 123,115 86,887
Pearl buttons ... ... ...... ... 1 ... 12,733
Shells ............Tons 1,100 70,901
Sugar ......... ... 194,449 154,816 232,774 2,020,904 1,465,185 2,304,081
Tobacco, unmanufactured ... Lbs. 31,273,504 28,584,945 29,584,894 461,752 392,014 379,927
Cigars ......... Number 271,840,000 191,762,442 154,753,363 664,180 627,549 482,325
Cigarettes......... 49,316,000 47,882,687 44,121,247 11,440 9,982 8,067
Exports of foreign merchandise 111,213
All other exports............ 230,139 382,753 109,747
Total ......... i i 11,433,487 1 9,952,699 10,143,674


MANILA.

23

Annex 4.Return of all Shipping Entered and Cleared at the P.)rfc
of Manila during the Years 1913-14.

Entered.

Nationality. 1913. 1914.
British...... United States ... French ... German...... Japanese Norwegian Philippine Russian... Swedish...... Vessels. 51 31 1 78 39 5 60 2 Net tonnage. 788,554 206,377 997 235,434 412,845 7,460 64,294 5,118 Vessels. 340 32 1 78 138 8 38 1 Net tonnage. 766,032 194,835 2,470 227,163 418,437 14,800 51,211 995
Total 673 1,721,079 636 1,675,943
Cleared.
Nationality. 1913. 1914,
British ... United States...... Danish ... French ... German...... Japanese Norwegian Philippine .......'.. Portuguese Russian... .Spanish ... Swedish............ Vessels. 359 29 1 1 81 133 4 45 13 2 Net tonnage. 827,246 204,582 40 997 250,321 402,496 5,117 60,964 32,558 6,882 Vessels. 350 27 61 132 8 37 1 1 12 2 Net tonnage. 822,648 193,049 181,847 422,265 16,220 51,700 207 995 28,355 4,645
Total 668 1,791,203 631 1,721,931

Note.Coastwise vessels are not included in the foregoing table, only
those entering and clearing Manila direct in foreign trade being mentioned
here. The others appear in the Cebu and Iloilo returns according as they
called at either of these ports before or after Manila.

Annex 5.Return of British Shipping which Entered and
Cleared at the Port of Manila during the Year 1914.

Steam Vessels.

Entered.

From-

United Kingdom
Hong-Kong ...
Australia

Straits Settlements

With Careo.

In Ballast.

Total.

Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
14 85,159 14 85,159
102 138,938 17 59,536 119 198,474
37 71,847 1 82 38 71,929
7 8,539 4 10,384 11 18,923


24 MANILA.

Enteredcontinued.

From With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.
China......... Japan ... United States ... French Cochin-China... Total ...... Vessels. 33 9 56 15 Tonnage. 49,429 21,388 211,570 17,615 Vessels. 7 1 Tonnage. 23,333 2,565 Vessels. 33 16 57 15 Ton nage. 49,429* 44,721 214,135- 17,615
273 604,485 30 95,900 303 700,385

Cleared.

To- With Cargo. In Ballast- Total.
United Kingdom Hong-Kong Australia ...... Straits Settlements ... British India ... China......... J apan......... United States...... France ... French Cochin-China... Italy ......... Total .... Vessels. 25 132 2 1 30 6 56 9 3 2 Tonnage. 115,718 207,635 4,015 879 43,943 18,901 209,242 23,879 3,999 7,209 Vessels. 8 14 5 1 12 8 1 1 3 Tonnage. 19,027 15,830 14,732 2,662 20,412 25,811 3,240 2,815 3,829 Vessels. 25 140 16 6 1 42 14 57 10 6 2 Tonnage 115,718 226,662 19,845 15,611 2,662. 64,355 44,712 212,482: 26,694 7,828 7,209*
266 635,420 53 108,358 319 743,77S

Iloilo.

Mr. Acting Vice-Consul Stewart reports as follows :

Sugar.The total crop for the year was 170,378 tons as against
110,980 tons of the previous year, showing an increase of 59,398 tons.
Good prices have been obtained throughout the season, and the year
can be considered a profitable one from the planters' point of view.

The lowest price paid was in January, when sugar changed hands
at 87 pesos (about 81. 14s.) per ton (basis 88 degrees), and the highest
price was paid in September, when sugar was sold at 156 pesos (about-
151. 12s.) per ton (basis 88 degrees).

The prospects for the coming crop are excellent, and the estimate
of 178,125 tons shows an increase of 7,747 tons on last crop and is the.
highest estimate ever known.

During the year 169,690 tons against 108,274 tons in 1913 have
been exported to the following countries :

Tons.

United States ... 128,405*

United Kingdom... 1,039

China ............30,146

Japan ............10,100

Total 169,690

* Of which 10,588 tons were centrifugals.


ILOILO.

25

Copra.This has shown an increase in production, the total amount
shipped from this port during the year being 2,244 tons against 1,081
tons in 1913. Shipments were made as follows :

Tons.

Note.Coastwise shipments will appear as being exported from Manila or
Cebu.

Sapan ivood.This is exported entirely to China. During the year
960 tons were exported as compared with 1,137 tons during 1913.

Imports. General.In reviewing the market for the year, while
importers complain that conditions, from a financial point of view,
were far from satisfactory, there was an appreciable improvement in
the volume of business done as compared with 1913. The European
war was responsible for this to a great extent as, with the fear of a
shortage later on, a fair amount of speculative buying was indulged
in by dealers during the few weeks following the outbreak of hostilities.

Cotton p>iece-goods and yarns.In the early part of the year business
was fairly satisfactory. An extensive fire in the retail district of the
town in May caused a certain amount of extra buying.to replace
stocks destroyed. On the outbreak of war the rise in prices and delay
to supplies affected business temporarily. During the closing months
of the year things w7ere very dull. Cotton piece-goods come prin-
cipally from the United States of America and yarns from the
United Kingdom, Australia and Japan.

Trouserings of good quality have been in good demand all the year
and supplies have been insufficient. Low qualities have been in over-
supply and fetched very poor prices. All importations have been from
the United States.

Grey drills ancl grey cloths.Demand has been good and a steady
business has been done in all qualities. Of fine drills there has been
a shortage during the last months of the year, these goods to a great
extent taking the place of bleached drills. All importations are from
the United States.

Prints.Importations have been steady from the United States,.
but prices have been generally low. Latterly supplies have been
short, partly owing to the loss of supplies on the ill-fated ship Shirley,"
and fair prices were obtained for any stocks held.

Bleached shirtings, lawns and nainsooks.The improved finishes
now obtained by the United States of America have diverted practically
the wrhole of this large business to America. Shirtings especially
have been in over-supply all the year until the last few months, when
temporary stoppage of supplies allowed of clearances of surplus being
made. Importations from the United Kingdom have been compara-
tively small.

Bleached and dyed yarns.The bulk of importations of dyed yarns
have been from the United Kingdom, but Japan has been supplying

United States
United Kingdom..
Coastwise ...

100
1,778
366

Total

2,244


26

ILOILO.

all the mercerised goods, which are cutting out the ordinary goods
to a certain extent. British mercerised goods apparently cannot
compete, being too dear. Japanese bleached goods are very inferior
to British goods and have not made much headway here.

Fancy goods. Imitation silks, &c.These goods have been in good
demand all the year, and all importations have been from the United
States.

Singlets.Practically all supplies of these have been coming from
Japan at low prices. Better qualities still come from Spain in small
quantities.

Printed, dyed and white muslins and lenos.The United Kingdom
still does the major part of the trade in the former, while lenos are
practically all of Swiss manufacture, the peculiar crisp finish of the
latter being apparently unobtainable in the United Kingdom.

Khaki.The United Kingdom still has the monopoly for the better
qualities. There has been a fairly large consumption, the lower
qualities coming for the most part from the United States of America.

Galvanised iron.A fair business has been done during the year.
The inferior quality of the United States production seems to be
becoming'better known and most inquiries are for British iron.

Yellow metal sheathing and nails.A fair business has been done
in British and German qualities until the outbreak of war, since when
British supplies have been short and German supplies stopped.

Bar iron and mild steel.A small business has been done. Impor-
tations almost entirely from the United States.

Wire nails.Fair importations from Germany and the United
States until the outbreak of war, when of course importations from the
former source stopped.

Enamelware and hollow-ware.A good business has been done at bare
prices until the outbreak of the war, since when supplies of the former
have been stopped and the latter delayed. The former comes from
Germany and Sweden and the latter from the United Kingdom.

Box irons.There is considerable consumption, which has been
supplied entirely from Germany. Supplies were short towards the
end of the year. This article is commended to the attention of British
suppliers. The quality of British samples is too superior, and goods
have therefore been unable to compete with the German product.

Rice.Importations of this article show a large decrease owing to
the local paddy crop being exceptionally good. Only 6,825 tons were
imported, against 9,324 tons in 1913 and 33,627 tons in 1912. Importa-
tions of rice in 1915 are expected to be heavy owing to the partial
failure of the local paddy crop on account of drought.

Petroleum and gasoline.The total imports were 189,563 cases
an increase of 16,063 cases over 1913.

Coal.The total importations were 27,535 tons against 23,995 tons
in 1913, and were as follows :

Australia

China

Japan

Tons.
5,435
11,403
10,697

Total.

27,535


ILOILO.

27

Cement.Imports of this article are almost the same as last year
and amount to 23,710 casks. Almost all comes from Hong-Kong and
Haiphong. The small supplies which formerly came from Germany
have stopped.

Water buffaloes.Imports from Indo-China amounted to 1,939
head.

Soap.Importations are on the increase^ 37,800 cases having
arrived during the year. Almost all importations are from the
United Kingdom. .

Flour and milk.Consumption is on the increase, 113,245 sacks
of flour and 12,947 cases of milk having been imported during the year.
A large proportion of these articles is transhipped in Manila and is
therefore treated as having entered that port and cannot be included
in the Iloilo figures. Nearly all the flour comes from the United
States and the milk from Norway and Switzerland.

Machinery imports.As in former years, most of the machinery
imported consists of sugar-making machinery, three-fourths of which
is made by British manufacturers. During the year the importations
have fallen off somewhat. There have been no new modern factories
erected but a small factory capable of dealing with about 5 tons of
96-degree sugar in 12 hours is in course of erection, the machinery
for which comes from the United Kingdom. The native planter is
gradually improving his condition and going in for modern machinery,
British being his preference.

Traction and cable ploughs.These are being adopted by the larger
planters, most of them being of British manufacture. The cost is
much higher than for American engines, but they give better satis-
faction.

Rice hullers and polishers.There are a few of these being imported.
Small mills for plantation use, capable of hulling about 2 to 4 tons of
rice in 12 hours. This class of machinery is almost exclusively
American.

Light portable railway track.Most of this, with the small wagons
for sugar cane, is supplied from Germany. The track in general is 12
or 14-lb. rails with steel stamped ties. Formerly the United States
supplied a good proportion of this small track, but of late the imports
have been coming almost entirely from Germany. There should be
a good opportunity for British manufacturers to extend their trade
in this direction, now that German supplies have stopped.

Automobiles.There has been a large trade during the past
two years. Importations mostly come from the United States and
the balance from France. The United Kingdom is only represented
by two makes. The price of the average British car appears to be
too high for this market with a 20 per cent, customs duty against it.

Shipping.An improvement is shown on last year's figures chiefly
owing to the larger sugar crop. British shipping continues to hold
its own with 109 vessels out of a total of 160 vessels of all nationalities
entered during the year.


28 ILOILO.

Return of Principal Articles of Import at Iloiio during the Year

1914.

Articles. From Quantity. Value.
Rice Saigon and Hong-Kong Tons 6,825 £ 70,980
Petroleum and gasoline United States......Cases 148,921 54,622
Sumatra ... ... ,, 40,624 14,975
Coal Australia ......Tons 5,435 8,696
China......... 11,403 15,964
Japan ... ... ... ,, 10,697 14,976
Cement ... Japan, Hong-Kong and Hai-
phong ......Casks 23,710 13,040
Soap United Kingdom ... Cases 37,801 22,6S0'

Return of Principal Articles of Export at Iloilo during the Year

1914.

Articles. To- Quantity. Value.
Tons. £
Cent rif ugal sugar United States ... 10,588 135,526
Raw sugar United States...... 117,817 1,083,916
United Kingdom 1,039 8,312
China......... 30,146 241,168
Japan ... 10,100 88,880
Copra United States...... 100 1,600
United Kingdom Manila and Cebu, for 1,778 28,448
transhipment 366 5,856
Sapan wood China......... 960 1,690

Return of all Shipping at the Port of Iloiio during the Year 1914.

Steam Vessels.

Entered.

Vessels. Tonnage.
British 109 212,436
United States 25 36,838
Spanish 13 31,558
Japanese 7 15,985
Norwegian ... 5 4,929
German 1 3,228.
Total ... 160 . 304,974

Cleared.

Vessels. Tonnage-

British ... 109 212,439

United States 25 36,838

Spanish ... 13 31,558


ILOILO.

29

Clearedcontinued.

J apanese

Norwegian

German

Total

Vessels. Tonnage.
6 13,028
5 4,929
1 3,228
159 302,020

Note.The British steamship "Taming," of 1,356 tons, was in port on the
evening of December 31, 1913, and cleared in 1914. The British steamship
" Chinhua," of 133 tons, and the Japanese steamship Shinkai Maru," of
2,957 tons, were in port on the evening of December 31, 1914, and cleared in 1915.

Return of British Shipping which Entered and Cleared at the Port
of Iloilo during the Year 1914.

Entered.

From With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.
Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
Hong-Kong ...... 52 69,638 4 8,541 56 78,179
China ... 6 9,250 1 999 7 10,249
Singapore ...... 4 4,021 5 14,761 9 18,782
Japan ...... 1 1,932 7 21,469 8 23,401
United States...... 7 24,371 7 . 24,371
Newcastle, N.S.W. ... 2 5,073 2 5,073
Calcutta 2 6,943 2 6,943.
Colombo ...... 1 3,420 1 3,420
Durban...... 1 3,293 1 3,293
Java ... ... ...] 1 2,557 1 2,557
Samarang ......1 1 1,228 1 1,228
Macassar ... 1 83 1 83
Total ......! 1 72 114,285 24 63,294 96 177,579

Cleared.

To- With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.
Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
United Kingdom 2 4,442 2 4,442
Hong-Kong ...... 47 62,884 7 8,924 54 71,808
Singapore ...... 3' 5,366 3 5,366
China......... 12 14,527 12 14,527
Japan ...... 1 2,686 1 2,686
United States .'.. 30 97,298 30 97,298
Angaur Island... 1 2,378 1 2,378
Total ...... 91 179,151 12 19.354 103 198,505


Reports of the Annual Series have been recently issued from His Majesty's
Diplomatic and Consular Officers at the following- places, and may be obtained from
the sources indicated on the title-page :

Abyssinia

Argentine

Republic
Austria-

Hungary

Price

5420 Ilarrar. Trade, 1913...... Id

5421 Gambela. Trade, 1913...... Id

5422 Abyssinia. Trade, 1913 ... 2£d
5458 Rosario. Trade during recent

Finances,

Belgium

Bolivia
Brazil

Bulgaria
Chile ...

Colombia
Congo ...
Corea ...
Costa Rica
Crete ...
Denmark

Dominican
Republic

Egypt...
France

Germany

Greece

Hayti ...
Italy ...

yenrs ......

5231 Austria-Hungary.

1912-13 ............

5346 Hungary. Trade, &c., 1913 ...
.. 5274 Antwerp. Shipping and navi-
gation, 1913 .........

5416 Bolivia. Trade, &c., 1913

.. 53S0 Para. Trade, 1913 ......

5392 ltio Grande. Trade, 1913 ...
5412 Pcrnambuco. Trade, 1913 ...

5451 Brazil. Trade, 1912-13

5506 Bulgaria. Trade, 1914......

5401 Iquique. Trade, 1913......

5452 Coquimbo. Trade, 1914

5476 Anlofagasta, &c. Trade, 1914
5455 Nanking. Trade, 1914......

5460 Ilangchow. Trade, 1914

5461 Foochow. Trade, 1914
5463 Ichang. Trade, 1914 ...

5468 Swatow. Trade, 1914......

5469 Tientsin. Trade, 1914......

5470 Teng Yueh. Trade, 1914

5471 Kiukiang. Trade, 1914

5472 Chinkiang. Trade, 1914

5479 Shasi. Trade, 1914 ......

5480 Shanghai. Trade, 1914

5489 Changsha. Trade, 1914

5490 Air.oy. Trade, 1914 ......

5498 Wuhu. Trade, 1914 ......

5507 Canton. Trade, 1914......

5509 Kiungchow. Trade, 1914 ...

5437 Bogot.il. Trade, 1909-13

5493 Congo. Trade, 1913......

5500 Corea. Trade, 1914 .....

5363 Costa Hica. Trade, dkc.,1913..

5393 Crete. Trade, &c., 1912-13 ...
5382 Faroe Islands and Iceland.

Trade, &c., 1913
5165 Denmark. Trade, &c., 1913 ...
5485 St. Thomas, &c. Trade, 1914

5477 Dominican Republic. Trade,

&c., 1914............

5395 Port Said. Trade, 1913 ...
5502 Alexandria. Trade, &c., 1914

5409 Madagascar. Trade, 1913 ...

5410 Martinique. Trade, 1912-13...

5423 Dakar. Trade, &c.......

5435 Nice. Trade, &c., 1913......

5439 Rouen. Trade, &c., 1913

5442 Saigon. Trade, 1913 ......

5444 Algeria. Trade, 1913......

5457 Corsica. Trade, 1914......

5462 Brest. Trade, &c., 1914

5505 Pondicherry, &c. Trade, &c.,
1914 ............

5379 Germany and Diisseldorf.

Trade, 1913 .........

5381 Stettin. Trade, &c., 1913 ...
5394 Bavaria. Trade, &c., 1913 and

part of 1914 .........

5397 Danzig. Trade, &c., 1913 ...
5404 Germany. Trade, 1913
5414 Hamburg. Trade, &c., 1913 ...
5417 Togoland. Trade, &c., 1913 ...
5441 German Bast Africa. Trade,

&c., 1912-13 .........

5466 Samoa. Trade, 1913 ...

5429 Thessaly. Trade, &c., 1913
5449 Salonica. Trade, 1:113 ...
5483 The Pirrciis. Trade, 1914 ...
5495 Corfu. Trade, &c., 1914

5288 Hayti. Trade, &c., 1913

5375 Brindisi. Trade, 1913......

5391 Piedmont. Agriculture and

industries, 1913 ......

5396 Naples. Trade, 1913 ......

5400 Leghorn. Trade, &c., 1913
5426 Bengasi. Trade, &c., 1913
5438 Milan. Trade, 1913 ...
5448 Italy. Finances, 1914 ...

5491 Italy. Foreign trade, 1914

lid

Ud
2d

2d
3d
2d
bd

2kc\
lid
2 id
l§d
Id
2d
Ud
2d
Ud
Ud
l|d
Id
2d
Ud
Ud
lid
2d
HA
l|d
Id
l£d
3d

2k d

3ld
lid
2d

2hd
2|d
Id

2d
2|d
4d
Ud
lid
3d
Id
4d
2d
4d

i|d

Id

3M
2gd

2d
3d
5 hd
4*d
id

3§d
... Id
... l£d
... 2d
... 2*ri
... 2d
... 2d
2|d

2d

... Ud

... Ud

... Ud

... 3d

... 2d

... 2d

Japan ...

Mexico

, 5408 Kobe. Trade, &c., 1913
5445 Nagasaki. Trade, 1913
5478 Hakodate. Trade, 1914
5487 Formosa. Trade, 1914...
5503 Japan. Trade, 1914 ...
5508 Dairen. Trade, &c. 1914
5510 Osaka. Trade, 1914

Price
... 4d
... 2d
... 2d
... 2M
... 5|d
... 2§d
, 2Sd

Morocco
Muscat

Nicaragua
Norway
Panama
Paraguay

Persia

Peru ...
Portugal

Id
lid
fd
lid

5365 Vera Cruz. Trade, &c., i913... lid
5367 Progreso. Trade, 1913 ... id

5467 Morocco. Trade, 1913...... 4d

5473 Muscat. Trade, 1913-14 ... 2§d
Netherlands 5325 Netherlands Bast Indies.

Trade, &c., 1913 ......3£d

5336 Netherlands. Finances, 1913 Id

5456 Surinam. Trade, 1913...... Id

5427 Nicaragua. Trade, 1911-13 ... l$d
5464 Norway. Trade, &c., 1913 ... 4d

5338 Panama. Trade, 1913......2|d

5269 Paraguay. Budget, &c., 1914
5403 Paraguay. Trade, &c., 1913

and part of 1914 ......2£d

5425 Bunder Abbas. Trade, &c
March 21, 1913, to March 20,

1914 ............2d

5430 Bushire. Trade for the year

ending March 21, 1914 ... 3£d
5450 Arabistan. Trade, &c., for the

year ending March 20, 1914 2d

5481 Khorasan. Trade for the

year ending March 20, 1914 2d

5482 Kerman. Trade, 1913-14 ... l$d
Persian Gulf 5105 Koweit. Trade, 1913-14 ... 2d

5433 Bahrein Islands. Trade for the
year ending March 31, 1914 2§d

5501 Iquitos. Trade, 1914......l£d

5385 Louren^o Marques, &c. Trade,

&c., 1913............3$d

5402 Angola. Trade, 1913......l£d

5418 Portuguese Guinea. Trade,

&c., 1913.........

5486 Madeira. Trade, &c., 1914
5488 Goa. Trade, 1913-14 ...
5492 The Azores. Trade, &c., 1914

5496 San Thome, &c. Trade, &c.,
1914 ............Id

5497 Southern Angola. Trade, &c.,
1914 ............Id

5326 Roumania. Trade, &cM 1913... 3£d

5329 Warsaw. Trade, 1913......2£d

5354 Finland. Trade, 1913...... 4d

5415 Moscow. Trade, 1913......4id

5432 Riga. Trade, 1913 ......3|d

5436 Odessa. Trade, 1913 ...... 5d

5454 Batoum. Trade, 1914...... 3d

5428 Bangkok. Trade, April 1,1913,

to March 31, 1914 ......2*d

5446 Chiengmai. Trade, &c., 1913 2d

5447 Senggora. Trade, &c., for the
year April 1, 1913, to March
31, 1914............Ud

5340 Seville. Trade, &c., 1913 ... 2£d
5411 Barcelona. Trade, &c., 1913 ... 3d
5440 Spain. Industries, &c., 1913... 3d
5453 Canary Islands. Trade, &c,,

1914 ............2d

5398 Switzerland. Trade, 1913 ... 2£d

5431 Tunis. Trade, 1913 ...... 3d

5339 Jerusalem. Trade, 1913 ... 2d

5369 Basra. Trade, 1913 ...... 2d

5370 Erzeroum. Trade, 1913 ... Id
5374 Constantinople. Trade, 1913 3£d

5383 Aleppo. Trade, 1913 ...... 2d

5407 Baghdad. Trade, 1913 ... 2d
5347 Boston. Trade, &c., 1913 ... 3d
5351 Philippine Islands. Trade,

&c., 1913............2h d

5434 Galveston. Trade, &c., 1913... 3d
5443 New Orleans. Trade, &c., 1913 3d
5459 Hawaii. Trade, &c., 1913-14... Id
5504 Chicago. Trade, &c., 1914 ... 3d
5512 St. Louis. Trade, 1914 ... 3d
5358 Venezuela and Caracas. Trade,

1912-13............2^d

5360 Ciudad Bolivar. Trade, &c.t

1913 ............ Id

Roumania
Russia

Siam

Spain .

Switzerland

Tunis.....

Turkey

United

States

Venezuela ,

(560)

1375 11/15 H & S


Full Text

PAGE 1

No. 5513 Annual Series. DIPLOMATIC .A.ND CONSUL.AR REPORTS. UNITED STATES. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1914 ON THE TRADE AND COMMERCE OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. EDITED AT THE FOREIGN OFFICE AND "THE BOARD OF TRADE. REFERENCE TO PREVIOUS REPORT, Annual Series No. 5351'. Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty, NOVEMBER, Hl15. LONDON: PRINTED UNDER THE AU'l'I-IORITY OF HIS MA,TESTY'S STATIO:NERY OFFICE BY HARRISON AND SONS, 45-47, ST. MAnrrN's LANE, W.C., PRINTERS IN ORDINARY TO HIS MM!lSTY. To be purchased, either directly or through any Ilookseller, from WYMAN AND SONS, LIMITED, 29, BREAMS Bun,DINGs, FmTER LANE, E.C., and 28, ADINGDON STREET, S.vV., and 54, ST. MARY STREE'l', CARDIFF; or H.l\I. STATIONERY OFFICE (SCOT'.rISll BRANCH), 23, l<'0R'l'H STREET, EDil!IJURGtI; 01' E. PONSON.BY, LIMITED, 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUDLIN; or from the Agencies in the British Colonies ancl Dependencies, the United Stoites of America and other Foreign Countries of 'l', FISHER UNWIN, LIMITED, LONDON, ,v.c. 1915. [Cd. 7620-123.J Price Twopence.

PAGE 3

CONTENTS. --+-MANILAp AGE Currency ........................................ ..................................... 3 ,veights and measures ................... ............................... ......... 4 Towns, industries, populatioa . . . . . .. .. . .. . .. .. .. 4 Ganeral remarks .. . . .. .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 5 Imports ............................................... .................................. 6 ExportsSugar ................................................................................ Hemp ............................................................................. l'daguey ......................................................................... Copra ............................................................................. Tobacco .......................................................................... Gums and resins .................. .............................................. .. Pearl buttons ........................... _._ ....................................... Lumber .......................................................................... MiscellaneousShipping .......................................................................... Railways ....................................................................... ." .. Cattle ............................................................................ .. Cement .............................................................................. Mining ............................................................. ." ................ Public he,ilt.h .................................................................... Statistics12 13 14 15 15 16 16 17 18 18 18 19 19 Annex 1.-Total foreign trade ..... ... .......... ... .... .. ............. ........ 20 2.-Imports ................................................ ............ 21 3.-Rxnorts .. .... .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . . ... . . .. 22 4.-Return of all shipping .......................................... 23 5.-Rcturn of British shipping ... . .... .. .. .. . . . 23 lLOILO, Vice-Consul's roport .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. .. .. . 24 CURRENCY. 8. d. 1 peso (100 centavos) 2 1 (nominally) The unit of value in the Philippine Isla.nds is the theoretical gold peso, containing 12 grains of gold, nine-tenths fine, representing gold value exactly equal to 50 c. United States currency. This parity is maintained by the sale or drafts in the Philippines by the Government on its redemption fund in New York and the sale of drafts in New York by the agent of the Philippine Govern ment on the Government's redemption fund in Manila. The Government's ra.tes of exchange are fixed and represent as nearly as practicable the cost or shipping gold bars between New York and Manila. NOTE.-The figures given in the fohles relating to British shipping in the Consular reports are exclusive of vessels arriving at the port to which the tables relate from other ports in the same country, unless they landed cargo at that port from another country ; and similarly of vessels departing for other ports in the same country, unless they loaded cargo for another country. The figures differ in consequence in some mises from the figures gi.ven in the tables relating to shipping or all nationalities, which are based on t_he local shipping returns. (5GO)

PAGE 4

4 WEIGII'rs and Measures. Only the metric system is now permitted to be used officially. Scales, steelyards and the like imported from abroad must be marked m kilos., &c., only ; if bearing any marks other than those of the metric system they will not be accepted for registration by the Bureau of Internal Rernnue. The following table contains a list of the principal towns, giving the provinces, industries and products :Town. Manila .. Laoag .. Batangas Cebu Camiling Tabaco ... Zamboanga Dagupan Iloilo Capiz Aparri N ueva Caceres ... Ormoc San Fernando ... calbayog Silay Vigan ... Dumaguete Borongan Sorsogon Tarlac Romblon Lucena ... Catbalogan Surigao .. Ca.vite .. Masbate .Tolo Legaspi... Province I Population. Manila llooos Norte Batangas ... Uebu ... 1 Tarlac AlLay Mindanao P,rngasinan Iloilo Capiz I I J Cagayan ... Ambos Camarines' Leyte ... I La Union ... S,unar 1 N egros Occidental Ilocos Sur N egr;is Oriental. .. Samar Sorsogon ... Tarlac Romblon .. Tay11bas .. Sanrnr Surigao ... Cavite Masbate ... Jolo. Albay 234,409 34454 41:102 57,181 29,132 22,197 20,692 20,357 39,812 20,800 20,138 12,411 30,924 16,095 17,220 24,597 33,226 14,894 14,245 13,512 12,718 16,180 9,:375 7,758 7,749 16,556 5,237 1,270 27,901 Industry or Products. Distributing centre Tobacco Sugar Hemp port Sugar Hemp and copra Hemp, copra, shells, almaciga and lumber Rice Sugar Rice and hemp Tobacco and maguey Hemp and rice Hemp Maguey, sugar and tobacco Hemp Sugar Maguey, sugar and tobacco Sugar, hemp and tree cotton Copra Hemp Provincial capital Hemp and copra Copra Hemp Hemp Naval station Gold dredging Ht-mp and shells Hemp port The total population of the Philippine Islands according to the official census of 1903 was 7,635,426.

PAGE 5

No. 5513. Annual Series. Reference to previous Rep01t, Anmial Series No. 5351. Repo1t on the Trade of the Philippine Islands for the, Yem 1914 By MR. CONSUL-GENERAL J. B. RENTIERS. The total foreign trade of the Philippine Islands for 1914 amounted to 20,266,310l., a decrease of 793,219l. as compared with that of 1913 and of 3,994,656l. as compared with that of 1912. It is, however, greater than that of 1911 or any other year since the annexation of the islands by the United States. The uncertainty that prevailed in 1913 as to the policy to be adopted by the United States with regard to the control of the islands existed and caused a continuance in 1914 of a general want of confidence in commercial circles and a consequent disinclination to extension of commercial or industrial undertakings. The Jones Bill, which was to decide the question of the future status of the Philippines, has been before Congress and has been shelved until the winter session of 1915. In considering the strong opposition raised in the United States to this measure, it must be remembered that these islands, while they remain in the possession of the United States, offer an outlet for a large quantity of the produce of the United States which enters this market free of duty, and that any alteration in the status of the islands might deprive these products of the favoured treatment that they now enjoy. There is a consuming population of 8,000,000 whose trade the United States is in a position to monopolise. ihe United States now supplies 50 per cent. of the imports of these islands. The islands also do, or can, produce all, with the possible exception of Chilian nitrate, that the United States now buys in South America. Business conditions, which had somewhat improved in the early part of 19_14, were again depressed by the outbreak of war in Europe, and the reduction in the year's trade is accounted for by the falling-off in imports during the latter half year, which amounted to only 4,295,006l., a decrease of l,532,624l. from those of the first half year, which amounted to 5,827,630l. The total value of imports in 1914 was 10,122,636l. and of exports 10,143,674l., as against ll,106,830Z. and 9,952,699l. respectively in 1913. The exports therefore show an excess over imports of 21,038l. ; while in the previous two years imports had exceeded exports. (560)

PAGE 6

6 l\IANILA. The following table gives the figures of the total trade for the last five years:Year. Imports. Exports. I Total. 1910 10,358,200 8,46,1,263 18,82:l,463 1911 10,005,092 9,289,020 19,294,112 1912 12,847,479 11,413,487 24,260,966 1913 11,106,830 9,952,699 21,059,529 1914 10,122,636 10,143,674 20,266,310 After the outbreak of war in Europe there was for some weeks no market for Philippine products for export, with the exception of sugar, the price of which rose immediately upon the removal from the world's markets of the European production. For hemp and copra there was for a time no market, but with the resumption of foreign commerce the prices of these commodities again approached the normal. Prospects of commerce for the year 1915 appear indeed not unfavourable. The sugar crop is large and prices satisfactory. New markets are being developed for copra, and a gradual strengthen ing of the' market is to be expected. The hemp market is low, but the demands of the principal buyers-the United States and the United Kingdom-continue steady and there is no reason to apprehend any serious disturbance in prices. The shortage in shipping is, however, exercising a serious influence on the markets, as exporters naturally are averse from incurring the loss by shrinkage due to long storage of copra, or to purchase hemp which they' have no immediate prospect of being able to ship. Of the entire trade of the islands approximately 50 per cent. was with the United States, the exports to that country amounting to slightiy more than 50 per cent. of total exports, and imports from it to slightly less than 50 per cent. of total imports. The advance made by the United States in the export trade from the islands, from 3,423, 754l. in 1913 to 5,132,353l. in 1914, was at the expense of th1eUnited Kingdom, France, Japan, China, Hong-Kong and Germany, all of which countries show a decrease in the export trade from the islands for 1914. Italy and the Netherlands are the only foreign countries that show an increase in it. lmports.-The decrease in imports during 1914 of 984,194l. as compared with 1913 is due to the falling-off that occurred in the last six months of 1914. Imports from Japan, French Indo-China and China increased during the year, while imports from the United States decreased by, 500,266l., and practically the entire balance of the total decrease, viz., 484,000l. was proportionately divided between the United Kingdom, Germany arid France. The heaviest items in the decrease of imports are to be found in manufactures of iron and steel, which show a falling-off in 1914 of 339,679l. ; in cotton manufactures, 393,345l. ; and in meat and dairy products, 58,326l.

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, MANIL,A, 7 Only imports of rice and manufactures of leather show any sub stantive increase, the latter }laving advanced from 219,468l. to 324,54 7l. There was an increase also in the import o:f cattle. Rice.-The prospects in the earlier part of the year were that the crop would be a very large one; it was, however, seriomily affected by the drought of the last three months of the year. It is stated in a report; by the Director of Agriculture that. the average annual normal increase in consumption of cleaned rice in the archipelago is approximately 50,000 short tons, and that under normal conditions the Philippine Islands would have consumed 1,000,000 tons of cleaned rice during the year just closed. In view of the shortage in the local supply of rice, considerable quantities were imported in the autumn months from Saigon, and this accounts for the increased import. The import during 1914 from French "Indo-Ohina amounted to 614,375l. The total import of rice in 1913 and.1914 was smaller than in any other year since 1899. In connection with the efforts of the Government to make the islands self-supporting in this commodity, the staple food of the inhabitants, to which reference has been made in the reports for the two preceding years, it may be mentioned that an agricultural colony was started in July, 1914, by the Agricultural Bureau at Momungan in the large southern Island of Mindanao. At the close of the year it consisted of 46 American families settled on the land allotted for cultivation, and all indications pointed to the unqualified success of the experiment.. The colony mentioned. in last year's report was that established by the Executive Bureau in 1913 at Ootabato, also in the Island of Mindanao. The colonists in this case are, however, Filipinos. Cotton.-Imports for the past year show a considerable falling-off all round, their total value being 3'93,345l. less than for 1913. Imports from the United States were l,213,819l., and from the United Kingdom 323,348l., as against l,475,983l. and 427,817l. respectively in 1913. The following table shows the proportion in which the United States and the United Kingdom participated in the supply of some of the chief items :Art.ides. United United / Totnl State8. Kingdom. Import. Cotton clothUnbleached 47,679 4,117 59,079 Bleached 345,247 78,870 448,497 Dyed 266,158 102;218 455,005 Printed 313,413 30,966 350,536 YarnBleached 15,044 31,458 Dyed 38,652 72,500 Handkerchiefs 7,956 16,811 26,923 Laces ... 436 11,956 14,952 Total 980,889 298,634 1,458,950

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8 MANILA. Of bleached yarns Japan contributed 13,958l. and of dyed yarns 10,833l., while out of a total import of 32,292l. worth of mercerised yarns she contributed 29,792l. Of unbleached yarns, of which the total import was 53,333l., Ja pan contributed 4 7,500l. and British India 4, 792l. The United States have barely maintained their proportion of this trade at the 1913 level, the decrease being about l per cent., while the United Kingdom has continued to lose ground, imports from there having dropped from 17 per cent. in 1913 to 15 per cent. in 1914of the grand total. In view of America's position this further decline in imports from the United Kingdom can hardly be attributed wholly to tariff duties, but appears to be, in a considerable measure, the result of increased competition from the Continent of Europe in muslins and dyed yarns, and from Japan in bleached yarns, items that have hitherto been almost exclusively British. Trade is of course always changing more or less, and while United States manufacturers have succeeded in introducing new items, they continue to meet with strenuous com petition from Japan in fancy cloths, and even to a smaller extent in staples such as grey drills and sheetings. Iron and steel.-Importations of galvanised iron from the United States were on a free scale during the first eight months of the year, but fell off latterly owing to heavy stocks held by dealers. Only a very small proportion of the total quantity of this article was imported from the United Kingdom. Steel bars, round and twisted, were im ported on a smaller scale in 1914 than during the previeus year, owing partly to existing stocks and also to the falling-off in the number of reinforced concrete buildings under construction. Belgium continued to supply practically all the bar iron used until the outbreak of war in Europe. It now looks as though American mild steel bars will be substituted pending a resumption of shipments from the Continent. Business in pig iron was somewhat better in 1914 than during the previous year. Importations were principally from the United Kingdom, but a small quantity was imported from British India with a view to testing its suitability for use in the Philippines. Small hardware was supplied principally by Germany until the outbreak of war. Since then there have been practically no arrivals and stocks are low, Of the total import the United States contributed l,061,103l,, all other countries 393, 78ll. The countries of origin and the values of the quantities of the principal items coming from each are as follows :Pig iron ... Of whichUnited Kingdom British India Bar iron ... Of which Belgium United Kingdom St=el bar and rod Of whichUnited Sta.:es United Kingdom Bdgium Germany 4,792 3,958 625 9,583 5,625 2,708 46,458 30,000 4,792, 4,375 6,042

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Steel rails ... Of which United States Germanv :MANILA. Sheets and plates, corrugated and other Of whichUnited States United Kingdom Structural iron and steel Of whichUnited States United Kingdom Germany Enamelware Of which Austria-H ungary Germany Wire nails ... Of which United St.ates 88,958 58,333 28,750 216,667 192,292 22,708 110,833 101,458 4,792 2,500 22,292 5,208 11,458 21,458 19,375 9 The largest item, "Machines and machinery," with a total of 528,542l., shows a decrease of 151,250l. from the previous year. Of this total the United States contributed 344,375l., the United Kingdom 82,500l. and Germany 79,583l. ; aggregating between them 506,458l. A few of the most important classes are as follows :Steam engines and boilers Of whichUnited States United Kingdom Germany Sugar machinery ... Of whichUnited States United Kingdom Hawaii ... Electrical machinery Of whichUnited States United Kingdom Germany Mining machinery Of which United States Australia 127,708 38,542 51,458 32,917 35,417 20,416 10,208 4,583 21,975 13,333 2,292 6,042 16,875 11,875 5,000 Of wood cutting machinery, total 10,000l., sewing machines (141,667l.) and typewriters (15,833l.), practically the whole import was from the United States. Brass and manufactures thereoj.-Of this, 27,500l. came from the United States. In only one item, machinery, did the import from the United Kingdom (1,229l.) exceed that from the United States (938l.). Cereals and cereal products.-O the total import of these, 233,318l. came from the United States. They include wheat flour 335,625l., of which 218, 750l. came from the United States and 116,667l. from Australasia ; bread and biscuits, 29,375l., of which 25,417l. came from the United Kingdom ; and macaroni from China, 21,250l.

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10 MANILA. Cars and carriages.-These were imported from the United States to the value of 195,309l., and from other countries to the value of 114,559l. Automobiles.-589 cars were imported valued at 146,667l. Of theEe, 499 of a value of 108,333l. were from the United States and 79 of a value of 34,583l. from France. Tyres.-These were imported from the United States to the value of 31,250l. and from France to the value of 13, 750l. Passenger and freight cars for steam railways.-These were imported to the value of 47,708l., of which 45,417l. came from the United Kingdom and the balance from the United States. Oement.-Imports decreased. The total import was 115,625l., of whichGermany ... Hong-Kong Japan China 32,708 20,458 25,208 20,833 The German import was little more than one-third of that of 1913, while the Japanese have nearly trebled and the Chinese doubled theirs. Coal.-The following were the chief imports :Japan Australia ... China Japanese leased territory United States 216,667 43,333 38,541 32,083 25,000 From January to March Japanese coal was selling at from 9pesos 50 c. to 11 pesos (19s. 10d. to ll. 2s. lld.) per ton; Chinese at 8 pesos 50 c. (17s. 9d.) per ton; Australian was being delivered against contracts made towards the end of 1913 at 12 pesos to 12 pesos 50 c. (ll. 5s. to ll. 6s. per ton), but fell in May to 11 pesos per ton, Japanese coal remaining stationary. The above prices are per English ton ex ships, import duty of 50 c. (ls. Od.) per ton paid .. During August and September bookings and arrivals became much heavier. Contractors bought up all coal of suitable quality, and having, with great difficulty, made good their obligations, now find themselves considerably over-stocked, and few sales have been made during the last three months of the year. Between August 7 and September 4 five ships laden with coal, aggregating about 16,000 tons, were despatched by German agents for warlike purposes; the last ship that attempted to leave on September 26 returned to port fearing capture by the British cruisers on watch outside Manila Bay. Of the 16 German ships in harbour at the close of the year, seven had on board cargoes of coal aggregating probably 22,000 tons. Most of this had been purchased in August at 15 pesos (ll. lls. 3d.) per ton, while as much as 20 pesos (2l. Is. 8d.) per ton is reported to have been paid.

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MANILA. 11 Oattle.-9,072 head of cattle valued at 40,533l. were imported from Australasia as against 7,516 head in 1913. The Philippine Govern ment, fearing a shortage in the supply of meat due to a threatened embargo on the export of fresh meat from Australia in September of 1914, raised the prohibition of the import of beef cattle from French Indo-China, and 2,008 head valued at 9, 723l. were imported during the last three months of the year. Hitherto, through fear of the introduction of disease, the import of draught cattle only had been permitted at Iloilo, where they were inoculated against rinderpest. Meat and dairy products.-These show a decrease. Imports from the United States were 129,299l. and 492,482l. from other countries. Fresh beef and mutton (193,958l.) came entirely from Australasia, while the import of hams and bacon from there exceed that from any other country. Tinned meats on the other hand came chiefly from the United States. Butter from Australasia amounted to 28,125l. and to 13,958l. from Denmark. The import of condensed milk was 150,833l., of which the United Kingdom contributed 97,292l. and the United States 23, 750l. Oils.-M:ineral naphthas were imported to the value of 38,333l. from the United States and 19,375l. from the Dutch Indies, illuminating oil from the United States (225,417l.) and from Dutch Indies ( 41,458l. ). Lubricating oils (44,375l.) were practically exclusively from the United States. Linseed oil from the United Kingdom (8,333l.), olive oil from Spain (12,500l.) and peanut oil from China (16,667l.) are other imports. Mineral oils, dbc.-Deliveries into consumption at Manila, Cebu, Iloilo and Zamboanga by the three importing companies, viz., the Standard Oil Company, Texas Oil Company and Asiatic Petroleum Company, amounted in 1914 to 1,453,574 cases of kerosene and 196,600 cases of gasoline (motor spirit). The consumption of liquid fuel during 1914 was over 1,300 tons, an increase of nearly 100 per cent. All oil fuel comes from the Dutch Indies. Prices of kerosene of the highest grades, 4 pesos 5 c. and 3 pesos 40 c. (8s. 5d. and 7s. ld.) per case on January 1, stood at 4 pesos 20 c. and 3 pesos 55 c. (8s. 9d. and 7s. 5d.) per case respectively on December 31, 1914, after which date an advance of 57 c. (ls. 2d.) per case on kerosene and 1 peso 45 c. (3s.) per case on gasoline was made by all importers to meet the new consumption tax imposed from January 1, 1915. The retail price of gasoline varied from 6 pesos 50 c. to 6 pesos 10 c. (13s. 6d. to 12s. 8d.) per case and closed at 6 pesos 40 c. (13s. 4d.) per case. Paints.-Imports from the United States were 18,750l., while of the remaining 21,250l. the United Kingdom supplied no less than l 7,083l. Silks.-Spun silk from China was valued at 53,333l.; while out of 36,250l. worth of silk clothes China sent 16,458l., Japan 8,958l. and the United Kingdom 3,958l., the last country sending also plushes valued at 9,167l. Of the whole import the United States contributed 25,986l. and other countries 150,980l. Spirits, wines, &c.-Imports from the United States amounted to l3,812l. and from other countries to 59,116l. Out of 16,667l. worth of malt liquors in bottle, ll,458l. came from the United Kingdom and 3,958l. from the United States.

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12 llIANILA, Of whisky, total 16,8751., malt whisky from the United Kingdom was 9,1671., rye from the United States 5,8331. Of the import of wines, amounting to 25,4171., 18, 750l. came from Spain. Sugar (refined).-The total import amounted to 55,0001., of which:Unit.ed States Hong-Kong Dutch Indies 41,667 10,000 3,125 Tobacco.-From the United States 51,1551., other countries 12,865l. Of the latter, 8,125l. represents leaf from the Dutch Indies and 4,583l. smoking tobacco from China. Wool and manufactures thereo.f.-From the United States 44,1051., from other countries 35,1041. Of woollen cloths valued at 21,0421., 11,4581. came from the United Kingdom, 3, 7501. from Belgium and. 1,0421. from the United States. Fibre manufactures.-Burlaps and bagging (34,7921.) came entirely from British India. Of bags (49,167l.) nearly one-half came from British India, the rest from China and Hong-Kong, while more than one-half of the import of cloths, valued at 26,0421., came from the United Kingdom. Leather and leather manufactures.-Of these, 298,4841. came from the United States, only 26,0421. from other countries. Boots to the value of 182,9171. are included in the former and to the value of 5,6251. from Spain in the latter. Boot leather (sole and upper} to the value of 65,2081. is almost all included in the former. Gl,ass and glassware.-Of these, 14,9481. came from the United States and 46,1601. from other countries. Of the latter Japan supplied one-half, il,2501. of which represented bottles. Window glass of the value of 4,167l. came from Belgium. Exports.-The total exports in 1914 exceeded those of 1913 by 191,000l., and were greater than in any previous year with the exception of 1912. Sugar.-The greatest increase was in sugar, the export of which shows an increase of nearly 78,000 tons, say 50 per cent. in weight, and 839,000l. in value over that of 1913. Not far short of 75 per cent. of the better qualities went to the United States, the remainder chiefly to China and Japan. The average value of last year's crop was about 91. 9s. per ton, while the average of this year's crop has been approximately 91. 17s. per ton. These figures show a healthy condition of business in the sugar districts, but notwithstanding this sugar planters met with con siderable financial difficulties, and for a time it looked as if a portion of their crops would not receive the necessary attention owing to the lack of financial facilities. Finally, however, support was received from the Insular Government, which lent sums between 2001. and 300l. to planters through one of the local banks. This support was required not because the industry was not in a good condition, but owing to the fact that planters generally had extended their planting consider ably and improved their machinery and implements. The coming

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M.ANILA. 13 crop for 1915 promises to be a record one, due in part to this increased acreage and in part to exceedingly favourable weather conditions. It is estimated at about 270,000 tons, of which a larger proportion than hitherto will consist of centrifugal sugar. Probably about 35,000 tons of this quality of sugar will be produced. Sugar planta tions in Luzon suffered severely during the year from the ravages of locusts, and on this account the yield from this district has been .comparatively poor. The destination of the exports during 1914 was as follows :United States United Kingdom ... China Japan Total ... Tons. Hi7,436 5,373 46,219 13,746 232,774 The average price of the sugar was satisfactory to planters, leaving them a fair margin of profit. Unfortunately for them, however, when the big rise in price of sugar took place in consequence of the European war, practically all the crop had been sold; whatever balance was _left was practically entirely in the hands of exporters and Bpeculators. The crop planted during 1914 will enjoy the preference hitherto given to Philippine sugars in the United States; but this advantage will cease on March 1, 1916, from which date the United States has abolished the import duty on sugars. That country will therefore no longer be the ruling factor in this market, and most of the sugar produced in the Philippines will probably find its way to eastern markets. The San Carlos (Negros) Sugar Central, which completed its first year's operations during the early months of 1914, is the first large modern plant in the islands to be ,completed and put into full opera tion. The new central at the Calamba estate was completed and put into operation during the year. The results obtained at both milling centrals, according to a report issued by the Director of the Bureau of Agriculture, are such as to warrant the immediate construc tion of others in the principal sugar-producing districts of the islands. Hemp (abaca) (Musa textilis).-Exports for 1914 show a slight :falling-off in quantity and value. The production during the year under review has been disappoint ing, having amounted to only 120,875 tons, which is just equal to the preceding year, but shows a decrease of 30 per cent. on the figures -0 1912. Values, as a consequence, were fairly well maintained until the outbreak of the European war in August, when they fell from 8l. to l2l. per ton below the price ruling in May, recovering, however, to the extent of about 50 per cent. towards the end of the year. In the greater part of the archipelago the weather conditions have been favourable to the growth of the hemp trees, and, were all other things equal with previous years, a large crop should be looked for. The trade, however, has become temporarily disorganised by a

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14 MANILA. law recently passed by the local legislature, which came into force on January 1, 1915, to regulate the gradi_ng of hemp under Government classification and inspection. The law is not a very complete one, and leaves much to be desired. However, the regulations governing the grading of fibre have been largely left, as a fact, to the Bureau of Agriculture, and it is hoped that the law may be made workable. The chief object of the law is to improve the quality of fibre by stricter classification and grading, and this is to be commended. Some fibre experts, however, fear that the results of the Bill may be the production of a superfluous quantity of fine grade hemp which would lower net results to the growers. The effect of the law, coupled with the un~ certainty of prices in the consuming markets and the prospects of increase in freight rates, has led to a restriction of business which, in its turn, is likely to affect production, and to cause some reduction in the figures for 1915. The Japanese trade in fine grade hemp suitable for braid making has become dull owing to the effects of the war on American trade, prices for some of these grades having declined 20l. per ton or more. A demand for hemp waste and low grade fibre for paper making was one of the new features brought about by the war. This has only been spasmodic. The principal consuming countries, with the values of hemp ex ported thereto, are as follows :United States United Kingdom ... Japan 2,004,000 1,259,000 432,000 This year's export includes knotted hemp 313 tons valued at 118,914l., of which 93,000l. went. to Italy, 11,000l. to France and 9,000l. to Belgium. The export of this in 1913 was 330 tons valued at 117,854l. A recent report issued by the -Bureau of Agriculture states that the hemp plantations have almost entirely recovered from the effects of the drought in 1912, and with the exception of the south-west provinces in Luzon, which were rather severely hit by the typhoon of June, 1914, the production would have shown a normal increase but for the depression in prices, and has reached some 130,000 metric tons. It is stated that a marked improvement in the quality of fibre produced was noticeable subsequent to July 1, 1914, due to the educational campaign conducted by the bureau in connection with the new fibre classifications. Maguey (gantala).-The production of this fibre shows no increase. Exports show a decrease of 1,500 tons, or nearly 22 per cent., from 1913. Prices rule low as this fibre feels the competition of sisal. Supplies for 1915 look like continuing small. Destinations of exports were as follows :United Kingdom ... Japan United States 46,000 19,000 10,000

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:MANILA. 15 Oopra.-There was an increase in the quantity of copra exported in 1914 but a decrease in its v_alue due to the act that over 60 per cent. of the entire export was shipped during the latter half of the year when prices, which had fallen sharply in foreign markets imme diately after the outbreak of war, had not recovered. Destinations of principal exports of copra were as follows :ToFrance United States Spain Germany ... United King
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16 MANILA, Cigarettes went chiefly to the following :United States China Japan Hong-Kong 2,000 1,250 1,250 1,700 The tobacco harvested during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1914, amounted to 46,731,463 kilos. (102,809,218 lbs.), showing an increase of 671,073 kilos. (1,476,360 lbs.) over that of the previous fiscal year. In the Isabela and Cagayan provinces, whose tobaccos rank as the two finest qualities produced in the Philippines, the crop has suffered severely from the drought and is short, and in Cagayan also of poor quality. In these two provinces the 1914 crop is estimated not to exceed 120,000 quintals (say 12,000,000 lbs.) or but little more than one-half of an average crop. The prospects for the coming year also are not bright, many of the planters having lost a part or all of their seed beds on account of the unusually early advent of the dry season. The 1915 crop will therefore probably be even less and poor in quality. Little if any of these tobaccos were exported this year in the leaf, the export con sisting of cheaper grades. The Bureau of Agriculture has distributed selected seed among the planters, and has continued its efforts to eliminate the cigarette beetle as a factor militating against the export of tobacco products. Four of the local exporting houses are now processing their leaf with, it is claimed, signal success. Gums and resins:-There was a small export of copal, 23,000l., of which 16,000l. was to British India. Hats.-These are classified as bamboo, buntal, buri and arayat. The export of buntal alone amounted to 55,000l., of which nearly 46,000l. went to the United States and 6,000l. to France. The others go principally to the United States. Buntal hats are woven from a fibre extracted from the inner part of the leaf petiole of the buri palm (Oor1Jpha elata) and are those most in favour for export, being of fine appearance and of excellent wearing quality. Pearl buttons.-These were exported in 1913 to the extent of 8,000l. and in 1914 to over 12,000l., all of which went to the United States ; while shells, chiefly trocha, green snail and gold lip pearl were exported to the value of 78,000l. in 1913 as against 71,000l. in 1914. The principal destinations of these were :British India United Kingdom ... United States 35,000 11,000 9,000 Lumber.-With the increasing possibility of assured supplies the export of native woods is expected to increase. The exports for 1913-14 are as follows:

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MANILA. 17 -------Native Woods. I 1913. I 1914. Cubic feet.. Cubic feet. Tanguili 213,920 29,796 278,985 34,969 Almond 34,860 3,571 106,015 9,266 Other ... 364,350 31,561 255,850 "20,299 Total 613,130 64,928 640,850 64,534 Of these exports some 34,000l. of tanguili and 15,000l. of other woods went to the United States. Lumber concession.-The Kolambugan Lumber and Development Company, of which mention was made in last year's report, has during the year completed the erection of its mill at -Kolambugan near the port of Misamis, in the nortp.-west of the Island of Mindanao. The company was in February, 1915, awarded a contract for the supply of nearly 2,500,000 feet of lumber to the Army Department, which has decided to make trial of the native woods instead of using Oregon pine as it has done hitherto. The actual quantity is 2,430,495 board feet and the price over 100,000 pesos (10,400l.). Miscellaneous. Shipping.-It will be seen in Annex 4 that there has been a considerable decrease in shipping at Manila during 1914. Of the decrease of 37 in the number of ships entered, 11 were British. The relative proportion of British shipping to the total has therefore been maintained, being 53 per cent. of the total as against 52 per cent. in 1913. The United States figures include 3 sailing vessels of a total tonnage of 2,890 tons. It will be noticed that while the number of German ships entered is the same as in 1913, the number that cleared was only 61 as against 81 in the preceding year ; 25 German ships entered this port after August 5, of which 7 put to sea again ; of these 3 again took refuge in another port in the Philippines. There were at the close of the year 24 German vessels of a total net tonnage of 54,448 tons laid up in Philippine ports, and of these 17 were at Manila. Of the 24 vessels, 2 were transferred to Philippine registry with a view to their employ ment in the inter-island coasting trade. This intention has, however, not been carried out; the total net tonnage of these 2 vessels is only 2,351 tons. From June, .1914, the Canadian Pacific Steamship Company made Manila a port of call for its vessels on the outward run from Vancouver to HongKong, and the Empress of Russia and Empress of Asia made each one call at this port before the service was dis -continued. Three steamship companies, viz., the Ocean Steamship Company and two Dutch companiesRotterdam Lloyd and the Netherlands will in turn send one ship a month from New York making Manila its terminus port after calling at Batavia and Macassar; and calling at Batavia, Colombo and Gibraltar on the return journey to New York. Under the American flag tlie two steamers "Rubi" and "Zafiro," (560) B

PAGE 18

l8 MANIL.A.. of 1,409 net tons each, were, in July, taken off the Hong-Kong-Manila run on which they had been employed since 1901. As a direct consequence of the stranding of the British freight steamer "Bengloe" on the Moyune shoal in September, 1914, it was. decided to increase the lighting of the Sulu Sea, and early in 1915 acetylene flashlights were installed on the three islands Manucan, Black Rock and Comiran, which are on the direct line of homeward shipping bound from Iloilo. After the removal of the wreck a further light is to be erected on the l\foyune shoal itself. Other lights have also been erected for the use of the inter-island shipping. Railways.-The extension of the lines in Luzon of the Manila Rail road Company has proceeded, and 86 miles have been opened to traffic during 1914. Rails have been laid on a portion of the mountain section from Aringay to Baguio. This company has imported during the year three locomotives, valued at 3,600l. each, from the United Kingdom, and three rack-work locomotives, valued at 3,400l. each, from Switzerland. No additions have been made to its lines by the Philippine Railway. Company. Cattle and, rinderpest.-To prevent the introduction of rinderpest through imported stock, cattle for draught purposes are imported only at Iloilo, where they are inoculated. Since the establishment there by the Bureau of Agriculture in May, 1914, of the inoculation station over 3,000 imported animals have been treated. Carabaos (water buffalo) are imported from Pnom Penh, and are much sought after in the sugar districts, the animals being larger and stronger than those of Philippine stock. During the past year nearly 8,000 animals have been inoculated in the islands, with a loss of less than 1 per cent. It is stated in an official report that the immunity conveyed appears to be complete and that there is good reason to believe that it con tinues throughout the life of the animal. During the year there were located 3,940 cases of rinderpest, of which 2,715 ended fatally. The corresponding figures for 1913 were 4,972 and 2,986. The average annual loss to live-stock _owners from this disease in the last five years is stated to have been over 50,000Z. In one year, 1902, the loss is estimated to have been between 5,000,000l. and 6,000,000l., many provinces having lost from 50 to 80 per cent. of their carabaos and cattle. At the close of the year a second inoculation station was opened. in Pampanga province, in which, together with the provinces of Tarlac and Pangasinan, 80 per cent. of the deaths from rinderpest occur. Quarantine maintained in these districts has a~ best not more than kept the disease from spreading, at an average annual cost to the Government of 48,542l. It is estimated that at a cost to the Insular Government of 20,000l. all the cattle and carabaos in these provinces, some 150,000 head, can be rendered immune in from one to three years, and that after thus stamping out the disease in this region an annual charge of from 5,000Z. to 7,500l. would suffice to protect all young stock and animals imported into the provinces. Cement manufacture.-The works erected in 1914 by the Rizal

PAGE 19

MA.L~ILA. lQ Cement Company at Binangonan on Laguna de Bay are expected to be completed early in 1915. The present output is expected to be 500 barrels per day, with one kiln, but the intention is to add a second kiln shortly, the machinery and power having been designed for an output of 1,000 barrels per day. The company is said to own large deposits in this district of limestone and of volcanic toba, and with its works situated on the lake it has the advantage of water transport by the River Pasig to Manila. The average consumption in the Philippine Islands, apart from army requirements, is stated to be about 2,000 barrels per day. Mining.-Several new dredges and mills have been put into opera tion during 1914, resulting in a greatly increased output of gold as was anticipated in the last report. The estimated value of the gold pro" duced in 1914 is 250,729l., an increase of 69,791l. or nearly 39 pet cent. on the production of 1913, which was 180,938l. A little more than half the production of 1914, as was the case also in 1913, is the result of lode mining, the balance being obtained by dredging. The dredging is carried on chiefly, if indeed not entirely, by Australians, and machinery for this purpose was imported from Australia during the year of the value of 5,000l. A small quantity of silver, about 1,600l., was obtained from the gold ores in which it occurs. There is no mining of.silver. or~. Gas.-The Manila Gas Corporation, after more than a year's work ing, reports that the expectations of the increase of the use of gas for cooking purposes have been realised, but that the work of installation has been considerably curtailed by shortage of fittings owing to the war. Public health. Plague.-There were 26 cases and 22 deaths in the city of Manila during the year 1914; no case of human or rat plague has been found since September, 1914, when the last human case was reported. The rat-proof building ordinance put into force by the Municipal Board is mainly re!'lponsible for the eradication of the disease, while a rat-killing campaign was carried out in the autumn. No case was reported in the provinces. Cholera.-ln the city of Manila there were 490 cases and 281 deaths and in the provinces 3,013 cases and 2,165 deaths. It may be regardeq as having been epidemic in Manila during January and from July to December, and in the provinces from July to November The Bureau of Health has made an examination especially among household servants and those engaged in the sale, handling or pre paration of articles of food. Of some 36,000 cases examined 3 per cent. were, while not suffering from the disease themselves, found to be carriers of infection and were detained under treatment. It is doubtless owing to these measures and to strict isolation of the sick that the disease has now almost completely disappeared. Small-pox.-There has been no case in Manila since February, 1910. (560) B 2

PAGE 20

Annex 1.-TOTAL Foreign Trade of the Philippine Islands during the Years 1912-H by Countries. Country. 1912. Imports. Exports. 1913. Imports. Exports. 1914. Imports. Exports. British EmpireUnited R;ingdom ... ... ... 1,198,065 1,905,763 1,120,008 1,889,312 922,836 1,516,674 Australasia ... ... ... .. 702,732 120,406 557,935 128,523 505,260 125,552 British East Indies ... ... ... 514,657 252,524 138,591 276,485 155,072 241,061 Hong-Kong ... ... ... .. I 173,255 329,935 110,304 662,274 61,906 422,006 Canada ... ... ... ... ... 10,443 1,980 18,853 1,478 9,596 482 Other colonies and dependencies ... 2,860 443 586 :3,:300 4,947 3,014 Total, British Empire ... 2,602,012 2,611,051 1,946,277 2,961,372 1,659,617 2,308,849 United States ... ... .. .. 5,064,377 4,752,966 5,557,554 3,423,754 5,057,288 5,132,353 .AustriaHungary ... ... ... ... 47,201 49,009 33,597 39,655 31,051 17,256 Belgium ... ... ... ... .. 65,014 219,125 59,799 113,364 44,908 52,818 China ... ... ... .. ... 401,226 226,292 455,136 342,931 521,581 229,644 France ... ... ... .. ... 300,285 1,817,425 301,701 1,142,261 228,877 811,934 French Indo-China ... ... ... .. 2,373,215 1,733 564,091 2,559 652,342 1,772 Germany ... ... ... .. ... 591,603 349,700 601,758 362,833 469,281 224,940 Italy ... ... ... .. ... .. 48,623 169,415 47,832 103,408 39,933 153,858 Japan ... ... ... .. .. 633,369 534,591 706,923 817,611 757,009 623,718 Netherlands ... ... ... .. 40,681 46,154 38,205 59,796 27,605 69,399 Dutch East Indies ... ... ... ... 113,886 8,643 88,759 12,751 114,656 22,347 Siam ... ... ... ... .. ... 74,921 1,380 96,810 2,634 66,874 5,109 Spain ... ... ... ... ... .. 298,596 530,720 258,109 510,939 248,641 470,070 Switzerland ... ... ... ... ... 99,692 29,017 146,205 10,232 108,520 2,312 Other countries ... ... ... .. 92,778 66,266 204,074 46,599 94,453 17,295 Grand total ... ... .. 12,847,479 11,413,487 I 11,106,830 9,952,699 10,122,636 10,143,674

PAGE 21

Annex 2.-llll'ORTS into the Philippine Islands during the Years 1912-14:. Articles. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1912. 1913. 1914. AnimalsCattle ... ... Number 27,126 7,622 12,678 157,536 35,126 64,234 Horses ... ... 351 106 76 8,431 2,478 1,275 All other ... ... .. ... ... .. 1,351 1,651 1,975 Total ... ... .. ... .. .. 167,318 39,255 67,484 Agricultural implements ... ... .. ... ... .. .. 7,385 Books and other printed matter ... ... ... ... .. .. 97,832 Brass and manufactures thereof ... ... .. .. 56,636 52,965 47,476 Cereals ( except rice) and cereal products ... ... .. 644,338 521,674 426,076 Cars and carriages including automobiles and parts thereof ... ... .. ... ... 301,239 338,509 309,868 Cement ... ... .. .. Lbs. 138,122,859 169,887,582 127,740,192 107,964 169,103 115,600 Chemicals, drugs, dyes, &c. ... ... ... .. ... .. .. 159,790 Coal ... ... .. ... Tons 407,472 552,439 587,727 219,816 330,014 364,530 Cotton and manufactures thereof ... ... .. ... 2,289,392 2,467,563 2,074,2lb Iron ancl steel and manufactures thereof ... .. ... 1,288,412 1,794,563 1,454,884 Meat and dairy products ... ... .. .. .. 788,393 680,107 621,781 Oils, including illuminating oil ... ... ... .. ... 446,919 440,137 432,261 Rice. ... ... ... ... Lbs. 663,852,868 191,777,173 213,227,293 2,710,105 659,290 682,531 Silk and manufactures thereof ... ... ... ... .. 190,110 174,234 176,966 Spirits, wines, &c .... ... .. ... ... .. .. 98,348 82,410 72,928 Tobacco and manufactures thereof ... ... ... .. 51,092 64,837 64,020 Wool and manufactures thereof ... ... .. .. 88,445 68,206 79,209 All other articles ... ... .. .. ... ... ... 3,398,952 3,223,963 .. Grand total ... ... .. ... .. 12,847,479 11,106,830 10,122,636

PAGE 22

Annex 3.-EXPORTS from. tjie Philippine Islands during the Years 1912-14. Products. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1912. 1913. 1914. Coora ... ... .. Tons 140,566 80,904 85,969 '2,954,889 1,988,692 1,662,556 Co~onut cake ... .. ... ... ... 3,905 ... .. 24,336 oil and other oils ... ... ... 11,755 15,453 252,772 550,546 Fibres, vegetable and textile grasses and manufactures thereof ... ... ... ... .. 243,368 180,232 181,599 Gums and resins ... ... ... ... .. .. .. 20,005 40,290 29,592 Hats ... .. .. Number 901,192 547,218 681,356 96,366 85,196 65,392 Hemp ... ... .. Tons 172,347 117,904 114,554 4,599,098 4,400,226 3,998,916 Kapok ... .. .. ... 42 132 I ... 1,457 4,693 322 Lumber ... .. .. Cubit feet ... .. 640,850 .. .. 64,534 Maguey ... .. .. ... ,, 7,038 6,958 5,440 114,436 123,115 86,887 Pearl buttons ... ... ... ... ... .. I .. .. .. 12,733 Shells ... .. .. .. Tons ... ... 1,100 .. .. 70,901 Sugar ... .. .. 194,449 154,816 232,774 2,020,904 1,465,185 2,304,081 Tobacco, unmanufactured ... Lbs. 31,273,504 28,584,945 29,584,894 461,752 392,014 379,927 Cigars ... ... .. Number 271,840,000 191,762,442 154,753,363 664,180 627,549 482,325 Cigarettes ... ... .. 49,316,000 47,882,687 44,121,247 11,440 9,982 8,067 Exports of foreign merchandise ... ... .. .. .. .. 111,213 All other exports .. ... ... ... ... .. .. 230,139 382,753 109,747 Total ... .. ... ... .. I .. i 11,433,487 9,952,699 10,143,674 i

PAGE 23

I MANILA. 23 Annex 4.-RETURN of all Shipping Entered and Cleared at t.he P Jrt of Manila during the Years 1913-14. ENTERED. Nationality. 1913. 1914. Vessels. Net tonnage. Vessels. Net tonnage. British ... ... ... 51 788,554 340 766,032 United States ... ... 31 206,377 32 19:l,835 French ... ... ... 1 997 1 2,470 German ... ... ... I 78 235,434 78 227,163 Japanese ... .. 30 412,845 138 418,437 Norwegian I 5 7,460 8 14,800 ... i Philippine ... ... 66 64,294 38 51,211 Russian ... ... ... ... .. l 095 Swedish ... ... .. 2 5,118 ... ... Total ... 673 1,721,079 636 I 1,675,043 CLEARED. Nationality. 1913. 1914, Vessels. Net tonnage. Vessels. Net tonnage, British ... .. ... .. 359 827,246 350 822,648 United States ... ... ... 29 204,582 27 193,049 Danish ... ... ... .. 1 40 ... ... :French ... ... ... .. 1 907 ... .. German ... ... ... ... 81 250,321 61 181,847 Japanese ... ... .. 133 4-02,496 132 422,265 Norwegian ... ... ... 4 5,117 8 16,220 Philippine ... ... .. 45 60,964 37 51,700 Portuguese ... ... ... ... .. 1 207 Russian ... ... ... ... .. .. 1 995 .Spanish ... ... ... ... 13 32,558 12 28,355 Swedish ... ... ... ... 2 6,882 2 4,645 Total ... 668 I 1,791,203 631 1,721,931 NoTE.--Coastwise vessels are not included in the foregoing table, only those entering and clearing Manila direct in foreign trade being mentioned here. The others appear in the Cebu and Iloilo returns according as they called at either of these ports before or after Manila. Annex 5.-RETURN of British Shipping which. Entered and Cleared at the Port of Manila during the Year 1914. FromUnited Kingdom Hong-Kong Australia Straits Settlements STEAM Vessels. ENTERED. With Cargo. In Ballast. Total. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. 14 85,159 14 85,159 102 138,938 17 59,536 119 198,474 37 71,847 1 82 38 71,929 7 8,539 4 10,384 11 18,923

PAGE 24

MANILA. ENTERED-continued. FromWith Cargo. In Ballast. Total. 'Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. China ... ... 33 49,429 ... ... 33 49,42 Japan ... ... ... 9 21,388 7 23,333 16 44,721 United States ... ... 56 211,570 1 2,565 57 214,135, French Cochin-China ... 15 17,615 ... ... 15 17,615 Total ... .. 273 604,4851 30 95,900 303 I 700,385' CLEARED. ToWith Cargo. In Ballast. Total. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnag1>. United Kingdom ... 25 ll5,718 Hong-Kong ... ... 132 207,635 Australia ... ... 2 4,015 ... ... 8 19,027 ]4 15,830 25 115,71 140 226,66 16 19,84 8 2 5Straits Settlements ... 1 879 5 14,732 6 15,611 British India ... ... ... ... 1 2,662 China ... ... 30 43,943 12 20,412 Japan ... ... ... 6 18,901 8 25,811 United States ... ... 56 209,242 1 3,240 France ... ... ... 9 23,879 I 2,815 French Cochin-China ... 3 3,999 3 3,829 Italy ... ... ... 2 7,209 ... ... Total .... ... 266 635,420 I 53 I 108,358 lLOILO. Mr. Acting Viee-Consul Stewart reports as follows :1 42 14 57 10 6 2 319 2,66 2 5, 64,35 44,712 212,48 26,69 7,82 7,20 2: 4 s g. 743,77B Sugar.-The total crop for the year was 170,378 tons as against 110,980 tons of the previous year, showing an increase of 59,398 tons_ Good prices have been obtained throughout the season, and the year can be considered a profitable one from the planters' point of view. The lowest price paid was in January, when sugar changed hands at 87 pesos (about 8l. 14s.) per ton (basis 88 degrees), and the highest price was paid in September, when sugar was sold at 156 pesos (about, 15l. 12s.) per ton (basis 88 degrees). The prospects for the coming crop are excellent, and the estimate of 178,125 tons shows an increase of 7,747 tons on last crop and is the. highest estimate ever known. During the year 169,690 tons against 108,274 tons in 1913 have been exported to the following countries :United States United Kingdom ... China Japan Total Tons. 128,405* 1,039 30,146 10,100 169,690 Of which 10,588 tons were centrifugals.

PAGE 25

ILOILO. 25 Oopra.-This has shown an increase in production, the total amount shipped from this port during the year being 2,244 tons against 1,081 tons in 1913. Shipments were made as follows:United States United Kingdom ... Coast.wise ... Total Tons. 100 1,778 366 2,244 NoT.rn.-Coastwise shipments will appear as Leing exported from Manila or Cebu. Sapan wood.-This is exported entirely to China. During the year 960 tons were exported as compared with 1,137 tons during 1913. Imports. General.-In reviewing the market for the year, while importers complain that conditions, from a financial point of view, were far from satisfactory, there was an appreciable improvement in the volume of business done as compared with 1913. The European war was responsible for this to a great extent as, with the fear of a shortage later on, a fair amount of speculative buying was indulged in by dealers during the few weeks following the outbreak of hostilities. Cotton piece-goods and yarns.-In the early part of the year business was fairly satisfactory. An extensive fire in the retail district of the town in May caused a certain amount of extra buying to replace stocks destroyed. On the outbreak of war the rise in prices and delay to supplies affected business temporarily. During the closing months of the year things were very dull. Cotton piece-goods come prin cipally from the United States of America and yarns from the United Kingdom, Australia and Japan. Trouserings of good quality have been in good demand all the year and supplies have been insufficient. Low qualities have been in over supply and fetched very poor prices. All importations have been from the United States. Grey drills and grey cloths.--:-Demand has been good and a steady business has been done in all qualities. Of fine drills there has been a shortage during the last months of the year, these goods to a great extent taking the place of bleached drills. All importations are from the United States. Prints.-Importations have been steady from the United Statesr but prices have been generally low. Latterly supplies have been short, partly owing to the loss of supplies on the ill-fated ship" Shirley," and fair prices were obtained for any stocks held. Bleached shirtings, lawns and nainsooks.-The improved finishes now obtained by the United States of America have diverted practically the whole of this large business to America. Shirtings especially have been in over-supply all the year m1til the last few months, when temporary stoppage of supplies allowed of clearances of surplus being made. Importations from the United Kingdom have been compara tively small. Bleached and dyed yarns.-The bulk of importations of dyed yarns have been from the United Kingdom, but Japan has been supplying

PAGE 26

26 ILOILO, all the mercerised goods, which are cutting out the ordinary goods to a certain extent. British mercerised goods apparently cannot compete, being too dear. Japanese bleached goods are very inferior to British goods and have not made much headway here. Fancy goods. Imitation silks, dk-These goods have been in good demand all the year, and all importations have been from the United States. Singlets.-Practically all supplies of these have been coming from Japan at low prices. Better qualities still come from Spain in small quantities. Printed, dyed and white muslins and lenos.-The United Kingdom still does the major part of the trade in the former, while lenos are practically all of Swiss manufacture, the peculiar crisp finish of the latter being apparently unobtainable in the United Kingdom. Khaki.-The United Kingdom still has the monopoly for the better qualities. There has been a fairly large consumption, the lower qualities coming for the most part from the United States of America. Galvanised iron.-A fair business has been done during the year. The inferior quality of the United States productipn seems to be becomingbetter known and most inquiries are for British iron. Yellow metal sheatking and nails.-A fair business has been done in British and German qualities until the outbreak of war, since when British supplies have been short and German supplies stopped. Bar iron and mild steel.-A small business has been done. Impor tations almost entirely from the United States. Wire nails.-Fair importations from Germany and the United States until the outbreak of war, when of course importations from the former source stopped. Enamelware and hollow-ware.-A good business has been done at bare prices until the outbreak of the war, since when supplies of the former have been stopped and the latter delayed. The former comes from Germany and Sweden and the latter from the United Kingdom. Box irons.-There is considerable consumption, which has been supplied entirely from Germany. Supplies were short towards the end of the year. This article is commended to the attention of British suppliers. The quality of British samples is too superior, and goods have therefore been unable to compete with the German product. Rice.-Importations of this article show a large decrease owing to the local paddy crop being exceptionally good. Only 6,825 tons were imported, against 9,324 tons in 1913 and 33,627 tons in 1912. Importa tions of rice in 1915 are expected to be heavy owing to the partial failure of the local paddy crop on account of drought. Petrol,eum and gasoline.-The total imports were 189,563 cases an increase of 16,063 cases over 1913. Ooal.-The total importations were 27,535 tons against 23,995 tons in 1913, and were as follows :Australia ... China Japan Total... Tons. 5,435 11,403 10,697 27,535

PAGE 27

ILOILO. 27 Oement.-Imports of this article are almost the same as last year and amount to 23,710 casks. Almost all comes from Hong-Kong and Haiphong. The small supplies which formerly came from Germany have stopped. Water buffaloes.-Imports from Indo-China amounted to 1,939 head. Soap.-Importations are on the increase; 37,800 cases having arrived during the year. Almost all importations are from the United Kingdom. Flour anil millc.-Consumption is on the increase, 113,245 sacks of flour and 12,947 cases of milk having been imported during the year. A large proportion of these articles ~s transhipped in Manila and is therefore treated as having entered that port and cannot be included in the Iloilo figures. Nearly all the flour comes from the United States and the milk from Norway and Switzerland. achinery imports.-As in former years, most of the machinery imported consists of sugar-making machinery, three-fourths of which is made by British manufacturers. During the year the importations have fallen off somewhat. There have been no new modern factories erected but a small factory capable of dealing with _about 5 tons of 96-degree sugar in 12 hours is in course of erection, the machinery for which comes from the United Kingdom. The native planter is gradually improving his condition and going in for modern machinery, British being his preference. Traction anil cable ploughs.-These are being adopted by the larger planters, most of them being of British manufacture. The cost is much higher than for American engines, but they give better satis faction. Rice hullers anil polishers.-There are a few of these being imported. Sm~ll mills for plantation use, capable of hulling about 2 to 4 tons of rice in 12 hours. This class of machinery is almost exclusively American. Light portable railway track.-Most of this, with the small wagons for sugar cane, is supplied from Germany. The track in general is 12 or 14-lb. rails with steel stamped ties. Formerly the United States supplied a good proportion of this small track, but of late the imports have been coming almost entirely from Germany. There should be a good opportunity for British manufacturers to extend their trade in this direction, now that German supplies have stopped. Automobiles.-There has been a large trade during the past two years. Importations mostly come from the United States and the balance from France. The United Kingdom is only represented by two makes. The price of the average British car appears to be too high for this market with a 20 per cent. customs duty against it. Shipping.-An improvement is shown on last year's figures chiefly owing to the larger sugar crop. British shipping continues to hold its own with 109 vessels out of a total of 160 vessels of all nationalities ent~red during the year.

PAGE 28

ILOILO. RETURN of Principal Articles of Irr:iport at Iloilo during the Year 1914. Articles. FromI Quan~~~~ I Value. Rice Saigon and Hong-Kong Tons Petroleum and gasoline United States ... .. Cases 6,825 148,921 70,980 54,622. Coal Cement Soap Sumatra ,, Australia ... Tons China ... ,, I Japan ... ... ... ,, ... Japan, Hong-Kong and Hail phong . .. Casks 1 United Kingdom ... Cases I 40,624 14,975 5A35 8,696 11,403 15,964 10,697 14,976 23,710 13,040 37,801 22,680 RETURN of Principal Articles of Export at Iloilo during the Year 1914. Articles. ToQuantity. Value. Tons. Centrifugal sugar United States ... 10,588 135,526 Raw sugar United States ... 117,817 1,083,916 United Kingdom 1,039 8,312" China ... 30,146 241,168 Japan ... 10,100 88,880 Copra United States ... 100 1,600 United Kingdom 1,778 28,448 Manila and Cebu, for transhipment 366 5,856 Sapan wood ... I China ... 960 1,690 RETURN of all Shipping at the Port of Iloilo during the Year 1914~ STEAM Vessels. British United States Spanish Japanese Norwegian German British United States Spanish ENTERED. Total ... CLEARED. Vessels. 109 25 13 7 5 1 160 Vessels. 109 25 13 Tonnage. 212,436 36,838 31,558 15,985 4,929 3,228 304,974 Tonnage 212,439 36,838 31,558

PAGE 29

Japanese Norwegian German ILOILO. CLEARED-continued. Total ... Vessels. 6 5 1 159 Tonnage. 13,028 4,929 3,228 302,020 29 NoTE.-The British steamship "Taming," of 1,356 tons, was in port on the evening of Der.ember 31, 1913, and cleared in 1914. The British steamship "Chinhua," of 133 tons, and the ,Japanese steamship "Shinkai Maru," of 2,957 tons, were in port on the evening of December 31, 1914, and cleared in 1915. RETURN of British Shipping which Entered and Cleared at the Port of Iloilo during the Year 1914. FromHong-Kong China ... Singapore Japan ... United States ... Newcastle, N.S.W Calcut.ta Colombo Durban ... Java Samarang Macassar Total ToUnited Kingdom Hong-Kong ... Singapore ... China ... ... Japan ... ... United States ... Angaur Island ... Total ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... :::, ... I .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ENTERED. With Cargo. In Ballast. Total. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels., Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. 52 69,638 4 8,541 56 78,179 6 9,250 1 999 7 10,249 4 4,021 5 14,761 9 18,782 1 1,932 7 21,469 8 23,401 7 24,371 ... .. 7 24,371 2 5,073 ... .. 2 5,073 ... ... 2 6,943 2 6,943, ... ... 1 3,4.20 1 3,420 ... ... l 3,293 I 3,293 ... ... l 2,557 1 2,557 ... ... 1 1,228 1 1,228 ... .. 1 83 1 83 -----72 I 114,285 24 I 63,294 96 177,579 ---CLEARED. With Cargo. In Ballast. Total. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. 2 4,442 ... ... 2 4,442 47 62,884 7 8,924 54 71,808 .. .. 3 5,366 3 5,366 12 14,527 ... .. 12 14,527 ... ... 1 2,686 1 2,686 30 97,298 ... .. 30 97,298 .. .. 1 2,378 1 2,378 91 I 179,151 12 I 19,354 103 I 198,505

PAGE 30

REPORTS of the Annual Series have been recently issued from His Majesty's Diplomatic and Consular Officers at the following places, and may be obtained from the sources indicated on the title-page:Price ABYSSINIA ... 5420 Harrar. Trade, 1913 .. 1,LGIUM Bouvu Bu..a..z1L 5346 Hungary. Trade, &c., 1913 ... 2d .. 5274 Antwerp. Shipping and navigation, 1913 ... .. 2d 5-116 Bolhia. Trade, &c., 1913 3d ... 5380 Parit 1 1 rade, HH3 2d 5392 ltio Grande. Trade, 1913 M 5412 I>crnamhnco. Trade, 1913 ... :111 5451 Brazil. Trade, 1912-13 .. ~rl Bur.GARU .. 5506 Bulgaria. Trade, 1914... .. I}rl VHILE .. a401 Iquique. Trade, 1913 ... .. 2rl 5ia2 Coquimbo. Trade, 1914 ... lc1 CHINA .. 5476 Antofagasta, &c. Trade, 1914 1,1 ... 5455 Nanking. Trade, 1914... .. 2,1 5460 Ilangchow. Trade, 1914 ... l:llLA.NDS 5325 Net.her lands East Indies NICARAGUA NORWAY PAN.AMA PARA.GUAY PERSIA Trade, &c., 1913 ... 3!d 5336 Net.herlani\s. Finances, 1913 ld 5456 Surinam. 'l'rnilc, 1913... ,.. ld 5427 Nicaragua. Tracie, 1911-13 lid 541i4 Norway. Trai\e, &c., 1913 ... 4d .. 5338 Panama. Trade, 1913 .. .. 2ld ... 5269 Paraguay. Budget, &c., 1914 jd 5403 Paraguay. Trade, &c., 1913 and part of 1914 ... .. 2!/1 5425 Bun347 Boston. Trane, &c., 1913 ... 3d STATES 5351 Philippine Islands. Trade, 5434 G~~.~.f~~tTrarl~, &c.'. 0 i913::: 2 tl 5443 New Orleans. Trade, &c., 1913 3,1 5459 Hawaii. 'l'rade, &c., 1913-14 ... J,-J 5504 Chicago. Trade, &c., 1914 .. :1,1 5512 St. Louis. 'l'rade, IUJ4 .. 3d VENEZUELA. ... 5358 Venezuela anrl Caracas. rrade, 1912-13 ... ... .. 2~cl 6360 Oiuilad Bolivar. Trade, &c., 1913 ld 1375 11/15 H & S