Citation
United States : Report for the year 1912 on the trade and commerce of the Philippine Islands

Material Information

Title:
United States : Report for the year 1912 on the trade and commerce of the Philippine Islands
Series Title:
Diplomatic and consular reports
Creator:
Great Britain. Foreign Office.
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Harrison & Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce
Komersyo
International trade
Internasyonal na kalakalan
Genre:
Government Document
serial ( sobekcm )
Temporal Coverage:
19120101 - 19121231
Spatial Coverage:
Asia -- Philippines
Asya -- Pilipinas
Asia -- Filipinas
Coordinates:
14.63 x 121.03

Notes

General Note:
"Presented to both Houses of Parliament by command of His Majesty, June, 1913."
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue number: Cd. 6665-47
Funding:
Funded with resources from SOAS Archives and Special Collections and with the generous support of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs and the Office of Senator Loren Legarda.

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
CF327.42 /23894 ( SOAS classmark )
291455 ( aleph )
Cd. 6665-47 ( Publisher_ID )

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Full Text
No. 5089 Annual Series.
DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR REPORTS.

UNITED STATES.

REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1912

on the

TEADE AND COMMEECE OF THE PHILIPPINE

ISLANDS.

Edited at the Foreign Office and the Board of Trade.

REFERENCE TO PREVIOUS REPORT, Annual Series No. 4997.

Presented to loth Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty,
JUNE, 1913.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE.
To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from
WYMAN and SONS, Ltd., Fetter Lane, E.C., and 32, Abingdon Street, S. W.,
and 54, St. Mary Street, Cardiff ; or
H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE (Scottish Branch), 23, Forth Street, Edinburgh; ur
E. PONSONBY, Ltd., 116, Grafton Street, Dublin;
or from the Agencies in the British Colonies and Dependencies,
the United States of America, the Continent of Europe and Abroad of
T. FISHER UNWIN, London, W.C.

printed by

HARRISON and SONS, 45-47, St. Martin's Lane, Y\r.C.,
Printers in Ordinary to IIis Majesty.

[Cd, 666547.]

1913.

Price Threepence.




CONTENTS.

Manila Page

Map of Philippine Islands.

Currency ............................................................................................................................................................3

Weights and measures ........................................................................................................................4

Population and industries of principal towns ............................................................4

Trade and commerce

General remarks....................................................................................................................................5

Trade according to countries engaged....................................................................................6

Imports.........................................................................................................7

Rice ..................................................................................................................................................................8

Other cereals and cereal products ....................................................................................8

Cottons .............................................................................................................................................9

Iron and steel ..........................................................................................................................................9

Meat and dairy products ............................................................................................................10

Cattle ............................................................................................................................................................10

Exports

Hemp ............................................................................................................................................................10

Maguey..........................................................................................................12

Sugar..................................................................................................................................................................12

Copra ............................................................................................................................................................12

Tobacco ................................................................................................................12

Rubber...................................................................................................................13

Miscellaneous

Shipping ......................................................................................................................................................13

Railways ......................................................................................................................................................13

Mining ............................................................................................................................................................14

Harbour works ....................................................................................................................................15

Gas company ..........................................................................................................................................15

Wireless telegraphy .......................'1........................................................................15

Public health ..........................................................................................................................................15

First Philippine Exhibition ......................................................................................................15

Annexes

1.Trade by countries ..................................................................................................................17

2.Import s................................................................................................................................................18

3.Export s................................................................................................................................................19

4.Shipping ................................................................................20

Iloilo report ............................................................................................................................................21

Cebtj report............................................................................................................................................................25

Currency.

jr. d.

1 peso (100 centavos) ... ... = 2 1 (nominally)

The unit of value in the Philippine Islands is the theoretical gold peso,
containing 12 *9 grains of gold, nine-tenths fine, representing gold value exactly
equal to 50 c. United States currency. This parity is maintained by the
sale of drafts in the Philippines by the Government on its redemption fund in
New York and the sale of drafts in New York by the agent of the Philippine
Government on the Government's redemption fund in Manila. The Govern-
ment's rates of exchange are fixed and represent as nearly as practicable the
cost of shipping gold bars between New York and Manila.

(557) A 2


4

Weights and Measures.

Only the metric system is now permitted to be used officially except in the
case of lumber, for which British measurements are retained.

Scales, steelyards and the like imported from abroad must be marked in
kilos., &c., only ; otherwise, if bearing any marks other than those of the metric
system they will not be accepted for registration by the Bureau of Internal
Revenue.

The following table contains a list of the principal towns, giving the
provinces, industries and products :

Town. Province. Population. Industry or Products.
Manila...... 234,409 Distributing centre
Laoag ... Ilocos Norte 34,454 Tobacco
Batangas Batangas...... 41,102 Sugar
Cebu ...... Cebu ...... 57,181 Greatest hemp port in the southern islands
Camiling Tarlac 29,132 Sugar
Tabaco...... Albay ...... 22,197 Hemp and copra
Zamboanga Mindanao 20,692 Hemp, copra, shells, almaciga
and lumber
Dagupan Pan gasman 20,357 Paddy
Iloilo ...... Iloilo ...... 39,812 Sugar
Capiz ... Oapiz 20,800 Paddy and hemp
Aparri...... Cagayan ... 20,138 Tobacco and maguey
Nueva Caceres ... Ambos Camarines 12,411 Hemp and paddy
Ormoc...... Ley te 30,924 Hemp
San Fernando ... La Union 16,095 Maguey, sugar and tobacco
Calbay og Samar 17,220 24,597 Hemp
Silay ...... Negros Occidental Sugar
Yigan ... Ilocos Sur 33,226 Maguey, sugar and tobacco
Dumaguete Negros Oriental... 14,894 Sugar, hemp and tree cotton-
Borongan Samar 14,245 Copra
Sorsogon Sorsogon... 13,512 Hemp
Tarlac...... Tarlac ... 12,718 Provincial capital
Romblon Romblon... 16,180 9,375 Hemp and copra
Lucena ... Tayabas ... Copra
Catbalogan Samar 7,758 Hemp
Surigao...... Surigao...... 7,749 Hemp
Cavite...... Cavite 16,556 Naval station
Masbate Masbate ... 5,237 Gold dredging
Jolo ...... Jolo ...... 1,270 Hemp and shells
Legaspi... Albay ...... 27,901 Greatest hemp port


Ordnance Survey, Sou.thf.unpLon.19.L3.




No. 5089. Annual Series.

Reference to previous Report, Annual Series No. 4997.

Report on the Trade ancl Commerce of the Philippine Islands for

the Year 1912

By Mr. Vice-Consul W. M. Koyds.

General remarks.The total foreign trade of the Philippine Islands
for 1912 amounted to 24,260,9662., an increase of no less than
4,966,854?., or more than 25 per cent., over the total for 1911. This
is considerably larger than the total amount of foreign trade in any
previous year, and shows that the era of commercial prosperity in
these islands which began in 1910, after a long period of depression,
is continuing its course, and, given stable conditions to inspire con-
fidence in the future, is likely to fulfil the great expectations and hopes
which the enormous potentialities of the archipelago warrant.

The imports reached a total value of 12,847,4792. and the exports
11,413,4872., an increase of 2,842,387Z. and 2,124,4671, respectively
over the figures for 1911. The excess of imports over exports,
which in 1911 amounted to 716,072Z., has in 1912 grown to 1,433,992Z.;
in 1910 it amounted to 1,893,9372. The chief cause of this
excess is the large import of rice, the staple food of the people.
Reference to this and to a suggested scheme for making the islands
self-supporting in this particular will be made later. It may, however,
be mentioned here that this disparity is more apparent than real,
as the value of the total imports includes supplies for the United
States Army and Navy, the Government of the Philippine Islands and
the local railway companies, which are owned abroad, as well as large
quantities of supplies imported by firms under contracts with the
United States and Philippine Governments, none of which imports
constitute a charge on the country's resources.

The following table gives the figures of the total trade for the last
five years :

Year. Imports. Exports. Total.
1908' ... 1909 ... 1910 ... 1911 ... 1912 ... £ 6,080,442 6,475,920 10,358,200 10,005,092 12,847,479 £ 6,791,890 7,275,903 8,464,263 9,289,020 11,413,487 £ 12,872,332 13,751,823 18,822,463 19,294,112 24,260,966

(557)


6

MANILA.

The great increase of trade shown above is all the more satisfactory
inasmuch as 1912 was a year which will long be remembered on account
of the unprecedented drought which extended from the autumn of
1911 until the middle of 1912, and the severe typhoons which followed
it in the later summer, both of which causes produced severe damage
to crops of all sorts. Agriculture being the chief resource of the islands,
and the purchasing power of the people consequently depending
largely on the success of the crops, the total effect on trade of the
weather conditions of such a year must be very great. The fact that,
notwithstanding these disasters, so great an advance in trade is shown,
proves the satisfactory material progress which the Philippines are
making in every direction.

. One remarkable feature of the general conditions is the com-
paratively small amount of capital invested by Americans and
foreigners in the islands, where possibilites for investment and re-
sources awaiting development are so great. This fact can only be
ascribed to the uncertainty which exists, and which from the beginning
of the American occupation has existed, as to the future policy of the
United states on the Philippine question. The change of Government,
with the victory of the Democratic Party over the Republican, has
greatly increased the interest of all concerned therein, and whatever
line is to be taken, it is regarded on all sides as essential for the pros-
perity of trade that some definite decision should be come to on the
question as soon as possible, so that business men may know where
they stand and may undertake their operations with some certainty as
to the conditions which will prevail in the course of the next few years.
Meanwhile many plans for putting large sums of American money
into various promising local industries have been cancelled, or post-
poned to await the course of events and the revelation of what the
future is likely to hold in store. It was, however, announced in
December, 1912, that a new company, called the American Philippine
Company, with a capital of over 1,000,000?. all paid up, had been
formed in the United States with the object of exploiting Philippine
products generally by active operations in the islands in every form
of industry. The promoters of the company are expected to bring
expert advisers to Manila in 1913, in order thoroughly to investigate
conditions and to plan their investments.

Trade according to countries engaged. United States.Of the total
foreign trade of the islands, the United States again takes the over-
whelming and increasing share, both in imports and exports, which
it has appropriated in a continuously growing measure since the
Payne-Aldrich tariff in 1909 established free trade between the States
and their dependency, and gave them the lead in trade over the United
Kingdom. Imports from the United States amounted in 1912 to
5,064,377?. as compared with 3,991,046?. in 1911, and exports to the
States to 4,752,966?. in 1912 against 4,130,631?. in 1911.

With regard to imports, the increase from the United States
represents practically the entire increase in the general import trade
of the islands, if the increased value of rice imported be omitted.
The United States, under the advantage of the free trade relations,
is increasingly taking trade formerly enjoyed by other countries, in


MANILA.

7

addition to its own increased trade as a share in the general growth.
In 1900 the share of the import trade taken by the United States
was 8 per cent., in 1912 it was about 40 per cent.

Exports to the United States likewise increased from 18| per cent,
of the total in 1900 to over 40 per cent, in 1912.

United Kingdom.Imports from the United Kingdom amounted
in 1912 to 1,198,065?. in value as against 1,165,843Z. in 1911. The
large falling-off in cotton goods was offset by increases in other
merchandise, principally meat products and bread-stuffs. Exports
rose from 1,407,021?. in 1911 to 1,905,763?. in 1912. The great rise
in the price of hemp chiefly accounts for this. Brown sugar, to the
value of over 100,000?., was also sent to the United Kingdom after three
years without any business in this article.

Frances share of imports in 1912 shows a gain of 60,963?. over
1911, due chiefly to variations in the values of a large number of
commodities. Exports were valued at 1,817,425?. in 1912 against
1,724,176?. in 1911, the large increase in the export of copra being
offset by decreases in that of raw and knotted hemp.

The French East Indies show the large advance in imports of
947,403?.from 1,425,812?. in 1911 to 2,373,215?. in 1912. This is
due entirely to the great increase in price and quantity of rice imports,
due to the drought. The former flourishing cattle trade from Indo-
China is completely killed and there is no probability of its revival,
so that, with the promise of an exceptional crop of rice in the Philip-
pines in 1913, the imports this year will probably show a large decrease
as compared with preceding years.

Germany.Imports increased from 446,050?. in 1911 to 591,603?.
in 1912. Cotton goods show a decrease, but this was counterbalanced
by the increase in cement and other goods. The increase in
exports from 268,861?. in 1911 to 349,700?. in 1912 is chiefly due to
copra.

Japan.Japan largely increased her supply of cotton goods
at the expense of all other countries except the United States and
British India, which both showed small gains, and this accounts for
more than half of the increased value of imports from 557,927?. in
1911 to 633,369I. in 1912. Coal also showed a considerable gain
at the expense of Australia, the rise in freights being the cause. With
regard to exports, Japan took increased quantities of hemp, sugar
and copra.

Australia.Imports increased considerably, from 533,791?. in
1911 to 702,732?. in 1912, the growth in the cattle trade, in meat
and dairy products and in flour more than making good the loss by
the reduced importations of coal.

British India.Imports show an increase from 228,146?. in 1911
to 514,657?. in 1912, rice and, to a smaller degree, manufactures of
vegetable fibresprincipally bagsaccounting for this ; crude cacao
showed a decrease. In exports copra, cigars and hemp advanced,
while pearls, gums and resins fell off.

Imports.The chief increases in imports were made in rice, cotton
goods, meat and dairy products and cereals, slight decreases taking
place in the import of cattle, cement and coal.


8

MANILA.

Rice.The large increase in value of rice imported in 1912 is due
in part to the long-continued drought which did much damage to the
crops in the Philippines and resulted in larger quantities than usual
coming from abroad, and in part to the great rise in price, owing to
the fact that neighbouring rice-producing countries also experienced
a crop shortage.

Importations come chiefly from Saigon and Rangoon, with a
small quantity from Tonkin and Siam.

The average quantity of Saigon rice available for export, taken
over a number of years, is about 800,000 to 900,000 tons per annum,
but, in 1912, the actual amount exported from Saigon fell short
of 550,000 tons.

In the Philippines a larger area than usual was planted under
rice in the autumn of 1911 owing to the high price reached by rice in
that year, but in spite of this the 1912 crop only turned out to be
about 40 per cent, of the production of an average year.

The unusually high prices ruling all through 1912 have caused
still more land to be put under rice cultivation, and as the weather
conditions from July onwards have been extremely favourable, an
exceptionally large crop is anticipated for the year 1913.

The Philippines have for long depended on foreign supplies for
this the staple food of the people, although the islands could easily
supply their needs if attention were given to the cultivation, and a
scheme has now been put forward for utilising some of the Government
lands suitable for the purpose, for growing rice as a Government under-
taking. The Acting Governor-General, in a public speech in July,
1912, stated that since 1898 more than 17,000,0002. had been
paid by the Philippine people to foreign producers for rice alone,
and that the prejudicial effect of this drain on the financial resources,
particularly in so far as it represented capital which would otherwise
have been devoted to' productive investment in the islands, was a
very serious matter. He said further that to remedy this a proposal
would be made at the next session of the Legislature for the Government
to work, by modern methods and with modern machinery, extensive
parts of the Cotabato Valley in Mindanao. This is one of the most
fertile tracts of agricultural land suitable for rice growing belonging
to the Government. It is about 100 miles in length and many miles
broad, a flat alluvial plain, elevated very slightly above the Cotabato
River, from which it would be possible at a minimum of expense
to take water to irrigate the entire tract. It is thought that ample
labour can be obtained from the thickly-populated islands, and the
idea is, when a suitable tract is fully developed and producing rice,
to dispose of it at a price which will reimburse the Government fully
for its outlay, to private persons on the condition that at least one
crop of rice per annum be raised, and then to proceed to develop another
tract.

The whole matter is now under investigation in order that the
best means of carrying this or a similar scheme into execution may be
settled in detail.

Other cereals and cereal products.The increase in the import of
flour and other cereal products from 405,7612. to 644,3382. is to some


MANILA.

9

extent due to the critical situation in respect of rice, and was chiefly
shared by Australia and the United States. The United Kingdom
also enjoyed a gain, while the chief decrease was suffered by Canada.

Cottons.Imports of cottons amounted to 2,289,392?. in 1912
and showed the considerable gain for the year of 388,468?., but in
the improvement the United Kingdom is not a sharer, the free entry
of goods from the United States having more and more effect. The
American manufacturers are paying increased attention to finish,
with the result that their goods are steadily taking the place of
British. This is even apparent in dearer lines, such as white
cotton and other drills and the more expensive white shirtings, which at
first competition could not touch. In muslins and bleached and dyed
yarns the United Kingdom still leads, but as regards cloths,
with the exception of a few drills and shirtings of known marks which
have been established for many years, the trade of the United Kingdom
is rapidly arriving at a vanishing point. The piece-goods market
is very thoroughly worked by New York agents, many of whom stay
several months, and very little escapes them.

Iron and steel.Imports reached a value of 1,288,412?., an increase
of 1,176?. over 1911. The trade in iron and steel has been very satis-
factory, more especially for suppliers in the United States, who have
gained a still firmer hold in all the most important branches of the
trade.

Trade in galvanised corrugated iron sheets has been good and
there has been a slight improvement over the previous 12 months.
This trade, which formerly was in the hands of manufacturers of the
United Kingdom, is now almost entirely American, and importations
from the former country are becoming less every year.

In bar iron Belgium takes first place, with the United Kingdom
second. In bar steel and rods the United States is in the leading
position. Business has been good in both.

A considerable trade has been done in pig iron, nearly all of which
was supplied by the United Kingdom.

Cutlery and small tools imported were chiefly of German and Con-
tinental manufacture, but, as in most other branches of the iron and
steel trade, a marked increase of business has been done by American
manufacturers.

There has been an improvement in importations of steel rails, of
which the United States supplied the greater part, though the increased
business has been shared to some extent by Germany.

In steam boilers, the trade has been divided between the United
Kingdom and the States, with a few importations from Hong-Kong.
In cane-sugar milling machinery the United Kingdom holds her own,
and some considerable business has been done which is likely to
increase on account of the improved conditions of the industry. The
United States is making a very determined effort to secure this trade,
and her position is much improved. In all classes of agricultural,
road-making, electrical and wood-working machinery the United States
has taken the lion's share, with a few importations of rice-milling
machinery, oil and steam motors from Germany and the United
Kingdom.


10

MANILA.

A very good business has been done in automobiles and motor
vehicles, which is almost entirely American, though a fair number
of the'higher grade cars have been supplied by France. This is a
business which is likely to improve, especially in commercial vehicles,
and manufacturers in the United Kingdom should make an effort to
secure a share of the trade.

Inquiries for the addresses of certain British makers were received
at this Consulate-General during the year, the dealers stating that
they had been asked to quote for certain British makes of cars.

Meat and dairy products show an advance from 593,174?. in 1911 to
788,393I. in 1912. Fresh and canned meats increased largely owing
to restrictions placed upon the import of cattle on account of disease.
The closing of the local market through the operation of pure food
regulations to a number of the meat products formerly supplied by
China, notably hams and lard, largely accounts for a great decrease
in imports from that country. Lard compounds from the United
States entirely superseded China in this article, and Australia and
Denmark increased largely their supplies of butter. Australia, the
United States and the United Kingdom all showed increases in canned
meats and dairy products.

Cattle.Attempts have been made to revive the trade in cattle
from Hong-Kong and Indo-China, which was practically killed by the
stringent quarantine regulations enforced since 1910. The authorities,
however, refuse to modify these regulations, which are inspired by the
fear of the spread of rinderpestthe scourge of cattle in the islands.

The trade from Western Australia continues to flourish, and a
proposal is now on foot to establish a large cattle run and breeding
station in the highlands of Northern Mindanao, where there is a great
extent of well-watered grass lands eminently suited for the purpose. A
grant from Government of a large tract of land here is now being sought
by an Australian cattle owner, who is prepared to undertake operations
on a wide scale and to invest a large amount of money in it, stocking
the run with Australian cattle. It is estimated that in this way the
entire needs of the Philippines could easily be met without any further
supply from outside.

Exports. Hemf.The total amount of hemp exported in 1912
was 172,347 tons, valued at 4,599,098?., an increase of 26,139 tons
and 1,574,062?. over 1911.

The drought which commenced in October, 1911, continued till
June, 1912, and, with other products, the hemp trees suffered con-
siderably from it. The effects of the drought, however, seem to have
been greatly exaggerated during the latter half of the year 1912 in
the hemp markets of the world, and the anticipated great shortage
forced up prices from July onwards rapidly, values increasing during
the six months 100 per cent. The figures for the year, however,
show that the damage to the plantations has not yet been felt, and it
remains to be seen to what extent it is going to affect production in
1913. It is quite possible that overstripping by cutting the immature
trees, induced by the high prices ruling, has done more harm to the
plantations than was done by the drought. Two destructive typhoons
passed over the large hemp-producing country in Southern Samar


MANILA.

11

and Leyte in October and November, and it is feared that production
in these districts will be about 30 per cent, below the normal during
1913, say a reduction of about 80,000 bales or 10,000 tons.

The largest of the miscellaneous items of export in 1912 is knotted
hemp. This is a product consisting of specially selected threads of
hemp, knotted together in long filaments, and is shipped principally
to Italy, France and Switzerland, where it is woven into fine textiles.

A considerable quantity of cheap fibre has been shipped to the
United States for manufacture into paper. In former years this fibre
was disposed of in European markets.

The question of the refund of export duty on Manila hemp shipped
to and consumed in the United States is now the subject of much
controversy, and the abolition of this refund is being strenuously
advocated by many of those interested in the trade, a petition to that
effect having been made to Congress.

The export duty is 7 dol. 50 c. gold per metric ton. The law fixing
this duty was enacted by the Philippines Commission in 1901, and
confirmed by Act of Congress in March, 1902, but the latter measure
carried also the refund provision. The United States and Europe
divide almost equally the consumption of Manila hemp, and, as the
amount of duty on the total exports of hemp exceeds 1,000,000 dol.
gold each year, the refund to American manufacturers reaches a
sum of more than 500,000 dol. annually. It is contended that this
discrimination is unreasonable and unfair, and that the hemp industry
of the Philippines is taxed for the benefit of the American manu-
facturer or consumer, while at the same time the insular Government
loses one-half of the revenue yielded by the tax, whereas the tax was
originally imposed to raise revenue.

The manufacturers in America, in opposing the abolition of the
refund, contend that it is the consumer in America who profits by the
rebate, and that if the law be repealed, prices of cordage and binder
twine will have to be raised at once by f c. per lb., by which the rebate
now enables them to reduce the price. This, it is said, will upset trade
and be against the interests of American farmers. Moreover, the
Canadian Government now gives a bounty of f c. per lb. on Manila
hemp imported into Canada, and it is said that should the United
States manufacturer lose the benefit of the rebate, he would be unable
to compete in Canada. It is further argued that the rebate assists
in developing Manila cordage in the United States, in competition
with European products, by offsetting to a large extent the cheapness
of European labour compared with American, and that the United
States manufacturer can now compete with foreign countries in
Central and South America, Cuba, Mexico and the West Indies, which
is entirely due to his obtaining the raw material more cheaply than his
European competitors.

On the other hand, it is contended by those in favour of abolishing
the refund, that it influences prices and thus unfairly handicaps the
industry in the islands to the extent of the amount now refunded
in competition with foreign hemp-producing countries, such as Mexico,
New Zealand, Russia and Italy, which compete in the large demand
for cheap low grades.


12

MANILA.

A definite decision of the question whether the rebate is to be
continued is to be expected shortly.

Maguey.The cultivation of the maguey plant is being greatly
extended, and the fibre is now being produced in increasing quantities,
which increase is likely to become more marked during the next few
years. The production for 1912 was 2,500 tons more than that of
the previous year, and the value of that exported was 114,4361. as
against 61,1582. in 1911.

Sugar.The total value of sugar exported, viz., 2,020,9042., was
279,2362. less than in 1911. Prices ruled lower than in that year and
the output was smaller.

The crop in the Island of Luzon, as shown by shipments from
the port of Manila, appears to have been some 5,000 tons less than
that of the year 1911. A large crop was looked for, but the long drought
during the first half of the year caused the decrease in production,
owing to the standing cane not maturing. The present crop for the
same cause is reported to be very small. Efforts are being made to
improve the system of agriculture, and modern machinery, in the
form of small centrals, is slowly being introduced. A gradual improve-
ment in the quality of the sugar, which is greatly needed, may be
looked for in the future.

In the southern islands several modern mills are in course of erec-
tion, or planned, and sugar machinery will without doubt be in con-
siderable demand for some time to come.

Copra.There is a universally increasing demand for this product,
whereby the islands are steadily profiting, and show signs of continuing
to do so in the future.

At the end of 1912, however, it was reported that supplies of
copra were small and likely to remain so for some time to come, and
it is evident that the damage to plantations by the destructive typhoons
of the summer and autumn has not been exaggerated.

France is the principal purchaser.

Tobacco and manufactures. Cigars.There has been a recovery
in 1912 from the setback experienced in 1911 due to the complaints
as to quality, which led to a great falling-off in the demand from the
United States, the principal market. Reforms were instituted and
special measures taken to secure uniformity and improvement of
quality, and increased sales resulted, but, at the time of writing this
report, it is stated in the local Press that large shipments made at
the end of 1912 have again been found of inferior quality and in
bad condition on arrival in America, and that the shipments have
been rejected.

Cigarettes.The bulk of this manufacture is consumed locally,
only a small quantity being exported.

Other tobacco.Most of the leaf, smoking and other manufactured
and unmanufactured tobaccos exported go to Spain, the United
States only taking a small proportion.

During 1912 a general strike of cigar makers took place and lasted
for several months. The cause of the strike was dissatisfaction at a
certain form of registration which it was proposed to make compulsory
for all cigar matters, and this was eventually modified by the Govern-


MANILA.

13

ment. Owing to the large stocks of cigars held by manufacturers,
who anticipated the strike, orders in hand were able to be filled with-
out the price being raised, and although some new orders had to be
refused, it is not likely that the strike will have any marked effects on
the trade.

Rubber.Although no export of plantation rubber appears in
1912, the Basilian Plantation Company of the Moro province sent
an exhibit to the Third International Rubber and Allied Trades
Exhibition held in the autumn in New York, which exhibit, although
it was entered too late for competition, was considered very good.
Smoked and unsmoked Para, smoked Ceara block and Castilloa
virgin scrapthe last-named the first of its kind ever tapped in the
Philippineswere shown, and the whole exhibit was purchased by
the Goodyear Rubber Tyre Company.

The newly-formed America-Philippine Company is expected to
include rubber growing on a considerable scale in its activities.

Miscellaneous. Shipping.653 vessels of a total tonnage of
1,545,603 tons entered at Manila from foreign ports during 1912,
of which 338 vessels totalling 718,110 tons were British. Out of 681
vessels of 1,642,008 tons which cleared the port in the foreign trade;
347 vessels of 760,789 tons were British. (See Annex 4, and note
thereto.)

British shipping in 1912 thus continued to hold its old position as
contributing about one-half of the total. It is, however, unlikely that
this will occur again, not because any diminution in the number and
tonnage of British vessels trading to the Philippines is to be antici-
pated, but because plans for increasing the number of calls by the
large American, European and Japanese lines are to be put into effect
from 1913.

The American Pacific Mail Steamship Company and the Japanese
Toyo Kisen Kaisha, which have a mutual arrangement as to sailings,
will make 47 calls at Manila in 1913 with their big liners as against
13 in 1912. Several of the European liners of the Norddeutscher
Lloyd Company will also call at Manila after Hong-Kong on their
homeward run to Europe from Japan, which hitherto they have not
done.

Railways.During 1912, the total length of new lines constructed
amounted to 1051 kiloms., all belonging to the Manila Railroad
Company of Luzon.

This brings up the total length of railways constructed in the
islands to 1,051 kiloms. out of a total of 1,785*9 kiloms. authorised,
the remainder of which is to be completed by 1917. During 1913
114- kiloms. of the main line south-east and south of Lucena is expected
to be completed, 136 kiloms. in 1914, 62 kiloms. in 1915 and the re-
maining portion of the 352 kiloms. planned by smaller portions in
the two following years.

The line to Baguio, the summer capital, is being pushed forward,
grading having been done at both ends of the line for several kilo-
metres and track laid at the Aringay end for 2 '3 kiloms. out of the total
of 39*9 kiloms. For a distance of 12 kiloms., up the mountains, it
will be necessary to construct a rack track, and an expert is now in
Europe to order material for this. Preliminary work has been done


14

MANILA.

with the view of placing orders for the steel bridge material which will
be required, and work is progressing on the south tunnel. Five or
more tunnels will have to be constructed on this line.

Since 1910 the net earnings on the southern lines of the Manila
Railroad Company, for which guaranteed Government bonds were
issued, have been sufficient to pay all the fixed charges and leave a
considerable surplus to be disposed of by the directors of the company.

A train de luxe, with sleeping and dining compartments, the first
in these islands, has been ordered in the United Kingdom for the
Manila-Baguio service, and is expected to be in use by May, 1913.

Mining.There has been a steady advance in 1912 in the mining
industry in the Philippines, and it has been proved beyond doubt
that the islands are potentially rich in economic minerals. The
difficulty of obtaining adequate capital is one of the most serious
handicaps experienced.

Gold.The year 1912 has been marked by what gives evidence
of being the beginning of a period of great increase in the gold output.
The chief field of success was the Paracale district, where the big dredge
of the New Zealand type on the Gumaus field, operated by the Philip-
pine Exploration Company, commenced work in December, 1912,
and in 13 days produced over 1,000 ozs. of gold, valued at over 4,000Z.
It has since that time been steadily working with a continuation of
like success, and the Gumaus Company is paying a monthly dividend
of 10 per cent. The Exploration Company is the parent company
and owns the greater part of the Gumaus Company's shares, and it
is hoped that the debt on the older company will be completely paid
off in this way by August, 1913.

In other districts the companies working both quartz and alluvial
deposits have continued operations steadily, and a considerable
extension of work in both ways is in contemplation for the near future.

It is forecasted that the gold output of the islands for 1913 will
reach over 300,000Z. in value.

Coal.The East Batan Coal Company, one of the two mines on
the small Island of Batan, off the east coast of Luzon, which has been
in operation since 1906, having met with difficulties, was bought up
in November, 1912, for 21,000 pesos (2,2001.) by the Government,
the other mine at the west end of the island having belonged to the
United States Military Department from the beginning.

Iron.In the ironfields of the eastern cordillera of Luzon native
mining and smelting continue as in past years. The existence of these
magnetite and hematite deposits, together with the more promising
one of hematite near Mambulao, Ambos Camarines, has caused con-
siderable interest recently among capitalists, who are investigating
their possibilities.

Besides the above, the following fields promise good returns for
development:

(1) The oilfield of Tayabas.

(2) The Cebu, Sibuguey Bay (Mindanao) and Polillo coalfields.

(3) The various sulphur and salt deposits.

(4) The asbestos deposits of Ilocos Norte.

(5) The lead deposits of Batangas province.


MANILA.

15

Harbour works at Manila.Work on the proposed new port and
port district has not yet been commenced, but several sites for building
offices and warehouses have been applied for and allotted to different
firms.

Gas company.A gas company, the first in the Philippine Islands,
was in 1912 established in Manila. The price of electric light, which
at present has no competitor, is exceedingly high, and it is believed
that there is a good opening for gas, which is also likely to be much used
for cooking purposes.

Most of the material for the preliminary work has already been
ordered.

Coal for manufacturing the gas will probably be obtained from
Australia, and negotiations are proceeding with the view of making
a contract for the amount which will be regularly required.

It is expected that gas will be supplied by October, 1913.

Wireless telegraphy.A system of wireless telegraphy comprised
of stations at various points connecting all the more important places
in the archipelago, is now working under the direction of the Bureau
of Posts. The stations already in operation are at Jolo, Zamboanga,
Davao, Malabang, Cuyo and Puerto Princesa. The bureau is also
now installing one at Mangarin, Mindoro.

The Army wireless stations are at Fort Wint or Grande Island,
at Fort Mills at Corregidor and at the Government ice-plant in Manila.
The two inter-island transports are also fitted with the apparatus,
and keep in touch with one land station or another during the whole
of their voyages round the islands.

The most powerful apparatus is that at Corregidor, which has a
range of 1,000 to 1,500 miles, according to weather conditions. Those
of least range are on the inter-island transports "Warren" and
" Merritt," which do not require a message radius of over 400 or 500
miles.

Health. Plague.During June two cases of plague were reported
in Manila, these being the first cases in the Philippines, in human
beings, for a period of over six years and in rats for a period of five
years. Immediate sanitary steps were taken and active rat-catching
measures begun, and by the end of the year, although 49 cases and
42 deaths had occurred meanwhile, the prevention of any spread of
the disease seemed assured, as all the cases occurred within a radius
of 10 blocks of houses in one district of Manila, and no new cases
appeared at the end of the year. In July a case appeared in Iloilo
and preventive measures were at once taken with similar success to
that achieved in Manila, while careful outgoing quarantine measures
were carried out at both places with the view of preventing the spread
of the disease to other places in the islands. It is supposed that the
infection was imported direct from China or Japan.

Cholera.No case reported since 1911.

First Philippine Exhibition.At the time of the annual carnival
in February a Philippines Exhibition, to show as completely as
possible the products and resources of "the islands, was held for the
first time, and a sum of about 8,0002. of public money was granted for
the purpose.


16

manila.

Thirty provinces showed fine exhibits of their varied products,
and in addition there were exhibits by the different Government
bureaux, showing steps taken and results achieved in the schools
of industry and agriculture established all over the islands, as well
as a live-stock exhibition of various breeds and types of imported
and native horses, cattle, sheep, goats and poultry by the Bureau of
Agriculture. Local importers also exhibited machinery and general
imports, many British manufactures being included. Good results
are said to have been obtained from this exhibition, which covered a
large variety of articles and appliances.

The second exhibition will be held in 1914, and will offer a good
opportunity for British manufacturers to exhibit.


Annex 1.Total Foreign Trade of the Philippine Islands during the Years 1910-12 by Countries.

Country. 1910. 1911. i ; 1912.
Imports. Exports. Imports. Exports. i Imports. Exports.
British Empire £ £ £ £ £ £
United Kingdom ...... 1,347,034 1,452,525 1,165,843 1,407,021 1,198,065 1,905,763
Australasia ... ...... 521,557 103,248 533,791 95,634 702,732 120,406
British East Indies ...... 220,065 217,715 228,146 219,269 514,657 252,524
Hong-Kong ......... 122,888 236,014 171,946 193,964 173,255 329,935
Canada ...... 18,875 10,736 3,698 15,092 10,443 1,980
Other colonies and dependencies 694 5,216 ... 2,860 443
Total, British Empire 2,231,113 2,025,454 2,103,424 1,930,980 2,602,012 2,611,051
United States ......... 4,180,946 3,592,026 3,991,046 4,130,631 5,064,377 4,752,966
Austria-Hungary......... 28,950 64,441 40,515 11,807 47,201 49,009
Belgium 82,259 148,387 60,424 291,147 65,014 219,125
China 536,786 154,319 415,947 109,931 401,226 226,292
France 238,801 1,601,628 239,322 1,724,176 300,285 1,817,425
French Indo-China......... 1,390,200 2,344 1,425,812 2,264 2,373,215 1,733
Germany 495,734 150,686 446,050 268,861 591,603 349,700
Italy............... 33,389 136,189 43,757 104,898 48,623 169,415
Japan 546,656 55,721 557,927 117,813 633,369 534,591
Netherlands 40,861 61,026 36,908 89,103 40,681 46,154
Dutch East Indies......... 54,520 11,540 79,996 8,665 113,886 8,643
Siam............... 23,967 3,270 95,987 1,487 74,921 1,380
Spain............... 311,902 413,644 249,067 456,869 298,596 530,720
Switzerland... i 119,884 14,770 97,211 10,103 99,692 29,017
Other countries ......... 42,232 28,818 121,699 30,285 92,778 66,266
Grand total ......... 10,358,200 1 8,464,263 10,005,092 9,289,020 ! 12,847,479 11,413,487


Annex 2.Imports into the Philippine Islands during the Years 1910-12

00

Articles. 1910. 1911. 1912. 1910. 1911. 1912.
Animals £ £ £
Cattle...... Number 60,789 37,198 27,126 275,797 202,740 157,536
Horses...... 821 397 351 17,823 9,773 8,431
All other ... ...... ... ... ... 1,244 ' 3,661 1,351
Total......... ... 294,864 216,174 167,318
Brass and manufactures thereof ... ... 50,781 44,732 56,636
Cereals and cereal products ... ... 497,463 405,761 644,338
Cars and carriages ... ... 153,600 258,737 301,239
Cement ............Lbs. 133,569,199 138,122,859 125,159 131,336 107,964
Coal ............Tons 532,691 407,472 349,853 253,963 219,816
Cotton and manufactures thereof ... ... 2,184,386 1,900,924 2,289,392
Iron and steel and manufactures thereof ... ... 1,158,222 1,287,236 1,288,412
Meat and dairy products ...... ... ... 594,925 593,174 788,393
Oils ............... ... 285,017 362,031 446,919
Rice ...... ......Lbs. 435,025,385 663,852,868 1,248,200 1,410,885 2,710,105
Silk and manufactures thereof...... ... ... 152,998 159,084 190,110
Spirits, wines and malt liquors...... ... ... 97,614 100,610 98,348
Tobacco and manufactures thereof ... ... 46,721 36,932 51,092
Wool and manufactures thereof ... ... 67,191 63,492 88,445
All other articles............ ... ... 3,051,206 2,780,021 3,398,952
Grand total ...... ... ... ... 10,358,200 10,005,092 12,847,479


C7T

cn

Annex 3.Exports from the Philippine Islands during the Years 1910-12.

Articles. 1910. 1911. 1912. 1910. 1911. 1912.
£ -£ £
Copra ......... ... Lbs. 265,618,602 313,378,480 314,868,641 2,216,470 2,712,409 2,954,889
Fibres, vegetables, textile g rasses and
manufactures thereof... ... ... ... ... 119,662 * 18,500 243,368
Gums and resins...... ... ... ... ... 20,337 26,161 20,005
Hats ... ...... Number ... ... 901,192 58,107 82,064 96,366
Hemp ... Tons 160,595 146,208 172,347 3,432,358 3,025,036 4,599,098
Kapok ......... 99 ... 119 24 ... 3,835 1,457
Maguey ......... ... 2,606 4,484 7,038 42,207 61,158 114,436
Oils ......... ... ... ... ... ... 9,489 11,535 15,453
Sugar ... Lbs. 267,796,166 460,078,408 434,566,692 1,505,080 2,300,140 2,020,904
Tobacco, unmanufactured 99 21,926,744 27,656,359 31,273,504 331,946 388,934 461,752
Cigars ...... Number 184,407,000 134,830,000 271,840,000 574,929 396,220 644,180
Cigarettes......... 99 35,629,000 30,170,000 49,316,000 8,467 6,528 11,440
All other exports...... ...... ... ... 145,211 256,500 230,139
Total ... ...... ... 8,464,263 9,289,020 11,413,487

g

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20

MANILA.

Annex 4.-Return of all Shipping Entered and Cleared at the Port
of Manila during the Year 1912.

Entered.

Vessels, Tonnage.
British 338 718,110
United States 17 151,555
Chinese ...... 1 981
Philippine Islands ... 48 60,950
French 9 9,747
German 86 214,236
Japanese ...... 124 353,628
Norwegian ... 28 31,568
Swedish ...... 1 2,468
Spanish ...... 1 2,360
Total ... 653 1,545,603
Note.13 British vessels entered from the United Kingdom, 123 from

Hong-Kong, 45 from Australia, 8 from Straits Settlements, 48 from China, 28
from Japan, 57 from the United States and 11 from French Cochin-China.

Cleared.

Vessels. Tonnage.
British ...... 347 760,789
United States 17 151,559
Philippine Islands ... 41 54,045
French 13 15,457
German 88 218,468
Japanese ...... 125 362,667
Norwegian...... 36' 45,589
Swedish ...... 1 2,468
Spanish ...... 13 30,966
Total ... 681 1,642,008

Note.The above tabulated figures, kindly supplied by the customs, do not
include coastwise vessels, i.e., those which called at other Philippine ports either
in or out, but only vessels coming direct to Manila from foreign ports. Of
164 vessels, with a tonnage of 275,750 tons, which entered coastwise, 92 were
British, 34 Philippine inter-Island boats, 12 Spanish, 12 German, 4 French,
8 Norwegian and 2 Japanese. Similarly 131 vessels, of 201,685 tons, cleared
coastwise from Manila, comprising 86 British, 33 inter-island, 7 German, 2
Japanese, 2 Norwegian and 1 Chinese. These all appear under the returns from
other ports.

British vessels cleared for the following countries in foreign trade :

For

United Kingdom ...................17

Hong-Kong..............................144

Australia ...... ...... ... 21

Straits Settlements........................7

India....................................6

China....................................50

Japan ... ... ... ... ... 20

United States ........................51

France ............ ... 22

French Cochin-China ..................5

Germany ..............................2

Italy....................................1

Netherlands..............................1


iloilo.

21

Iloilo.

Mr. Acting Vice-Consul Price reports as follows :

Imports. Cotton piece-goods and yarns.The market for the year
1912 has been very dull, resultant on poor rice crop and lower prices
obtaining for raw sugar. American cotton piece-goods practically
now rule the market, having the benefit of free entry as against duty-
paid goods imported from other countries.

Trouserings.American qualities have to a great extent replaced
British trouserings and Madras cloths, which were formerly imported
in considerable quantities.

Prints.The largest demand is for the cheap standard 24 to 25-inch
width qualities made by United States of America manufacturers.
A few of the finer grades still come from the United Kingdom.

White shirtings and lawns.American manufacturers have now
been able to supply nearly all grades, and very small quantities of old-
established marks are now imported from the United Kingdom.

NainsooJcs.These are still imported in smaller quantities from
the United Kingdom, but American mills have been successful in turn-
ing out some qualities which compete successfully.

Bleached and coloured yarns.The United Kingdom still holds the
market for these yarns (excepting mercerised yarns, which are now
imported practically solely from Japan). Small lots of bleached
yarns have also been imported from Japan.

Galvanised iron.Demand has been good for all qualities, as there
is still a continued activity in the building trade both in Panay and
Negros. With the exception of small importations of well-known
British brands, American qualities command the market.

Yellow metal sheathing and copper nails.Business has been poor
in these articles, which are still imported from the United Kingdom
and Continent. Many owners of lorchas [i.e., sailing lighters) have
substituted galvanised plain iron for yellow metal.

Linseed oil and paints.These are still in fair demand. American
paints are now imported to a larger extent.

Bar iron.A fair amount is still imported from Belgium, but the
United States of America now compete strongly for this business.

Reinforcing steel bars are imported from the United States of
America, and an increasing business is now being done as concrete
buildings are becoming more popular.

Wire nails.Nearly all importations are made from America,
very small quantities now coming from the Continent.

Enamelware and hollowware.A fair importation of these goods is
made from the Continent and Japan.

Machinery.Importations have been almost entirely for sugar
mills, there being only a small demand for rice and saw mill machinery.
Up to the present the sugar machinery business has been almost
exclusively in the hands of British manufacturers, but part is now
going to the United States of America and a little to Germany.
During 1912 there was a big reduction in importations as com-
pared with 1911, due chiefly to the depression in the sugar market.
British machinery still holds the first place ; about three-fourths


22

iloilo.

came from the United Kingdom, the balance coming from the United
States of America and Germany. Sugar central factories are becoming
more common ; one of these complete, a factory of British make, with
machinery valued at about 20,000?., has been erected; while during
the year orders were booked for two others of British make, with
machinery valued at about 30,000Z. The great majority of the
inquiries are for British manufactures.

America has almost a monopoly of light agricultural machinery,
while France and America about divide the automobile business
between them. Germany has the chief part of the supplying
of light railway track, wagons and small locomotives, with the United
States of America second and the United Kingdom entirely out of this
business.

Rice.Importations were 33,627 tons, a slight increase on last
year; practically all the rice imported comes from Saigon in Cochin-
China. Owing to damage done to the standing crop by typhoons it is
probable more rice will be imported during 1913.

Petroleum.127,000 cases were imported as against 170,214 cases

Gasoline.Importations were 12,000 cases. This is a new line.

Coal.There is an appreciable decrease in the importation of this
fuel, owing in some measure to the fact that the military camp in Jossman
has been removed, so considerably less coal is required for trans-
ports and launches. Australian coal has dropped from 19,088 to
8,966 tons, chiefly owing to the high prices and freights ruling.

Cattle.Importations have greatly declined, only 5,175 head having
been imported, this is owing to the fact that rinderpest broke out
amongst the carabaos (water buffaloes) in a shipment early in 1912, since
when no more have been imported. It is reported that a new quaran-
tine station will be shortly erected, when the importations will again
be resumed.

Cement shows a decrease, only 24,775 barrels being imported as
against 37,356 barrels in 1911.

Milk and soap.An increasing business is being done in these
articles, most of which come from the United Kingdom.

Exports. Sugar.The total crop was 131,715 tons, showing a
decrease of 4,430 tons on last year. Prices ruled considerably lower.
During the year 130,365 tons were exported as follows :

in 1911.

United States

China.....

Japan

Tons.
88,128
29,292
14,945

Total

130,365

Prospects for the present crop are not nearly so good owing to
damage done by typhoon and locusts, &c. The estimate is 100,000
tons.


iloilo.

23

Copra.The production shows a slight increase, the crop amounting
to 3,156 tons, as follows :

Tons.

Continent and United Kingdom ... 1,475

United States ..................1,650

Japan ........................31

Total 3,156

Sayan wood.Exports to China have been 1,635 tons, a slight
increase on last year.

Shipping.This shows a slight decrease on last year's figures
(in a measure due to the stopping of the imports of cattle from Cochin-
China), 174 vessels being entered as against 200 vessels in 1911. The
United Kingdom is first with 97 steamers as against 99 steamers in
1911. Norway drops from 22 to 8 vessels, this being due as above
mentioned to the cessation of the importation of carabaos (water
buffaloes) from Cochin-China.

Return of Principal Articles of Import at Iloilo during the Year

1912.

Articles. From Quantity. Value.
Rice ... Saigon and Hong-Kong . ..Tons 33,627 : £ 448,360
Petroleum United States .. Cases 105,000 33,156
Sumatra ... 22,000 6,485
Cattle and carabaos Cochin-China .. Head 5,175 59,297
(water buffaloes)
Coal......... Australia ... .. Tons 8,966 12,104
Japan >9 10,312 11,858
Borneo 2,300 2,300
Cement Hong-Kong chiefly .. Casks 24,775 13,548
Flour ... United States and Australia
Bags 136,371 32,317
Milk ... United States, United Kingdom
and Switzerland ,. Cases 19,105 19,901
Soap ... United Kingdom... >> 23,013 13,184

Return of Principal Articles of Export from Iloilo during the Year

1912.

Tons. £

Raw sugar ... 130,365 1,303,650

Copra...... 3,156 61,546

Sapanwood... 1,635 2,451


24

iloilo.

Keturn of all Shipping at the Port of Iloilo during the Year 1912.

Steam Vessels.
Entered.

British ...
United States
Spanish...
German...
Norwegian
Japanese
French ...
Chinese*

Total

Vessels. Tonnage.
97 170,974
33 53,427
13 31,913
11 23,850
8 7,206
6 17,091
6 4,920
1 120
174 309,501

* Chinese steamer sold and put under American flag.

Cleared.

Vessels. Tonnage.
British......... 97 170,974
United States ... 34 55,046
Spanish... 13 31,913
German... 11 23,850
Norwegian 8 7,206
Japanese 7 18,841
French........, 5 4,920
Total ... 175 312,750

Countries from which they have entered and to which they have
cleared with their net tonnage :

Entered.

From With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.
Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
Hong-Kong ...... 55 67,087 1 2,541 56 69,628
Japan ......... 10 31,518 10 31,518
United States...... 9 25,991 ... ... 9 25,991
Philippines ...... 9 20,515 9 20,515
China......... 3 3,648 2 5,339 5 8,987
Straits Settlements ... 2 2,303 2 5,104 4 7,407
New South Wales 2 5,090 ... 2 5,090
Cochin-China...... 2 1,838 ... ... 2 1,838
Total ...... 73 105,957 24 65,017 97 170,974


iloilo.

Cleared.

25

i i
To ! With Cargo. | In Ballast. j Total.

Vessels.) Tonnage. Vessels. 1 Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
Hong-Kong ......1 I 42 51,084 14 18,441 56 69,525
United States ... 1 21 63,059 ... ... 21 63,059
China ... ......! ! 5 5,771 2 2,432 7 8,203
Philippines ...... 9 23,234 9 23,234
Straits Settlements ... 1 2,736 1 2,736
Japan ......... 1 2,539 1 2,539
Cochin-China...... 2 1,678 2 1,678
Total ......i ! 68 119,914 29 51,060 97 170,974

Cebu.

Mr. Acting Vice-Consul Walford reports as follows :

Imports.General conditions of the market for the year have been
unfavourable owing to losses in crops in the southern islands through
drought and locusts, in the earlier part of the year, and the severe
typhoon of October last.

The year has been marked by a large proportionate increase in
the consumption of piece-goods from the United States and a con-
sequent falling-off in importations of various classes from the United
Kingdom.

Grey drills, grey shirtings, &c.British grey goods have almost
entirely disappeared from the market now, owing to the free entry
of goods from the United States of America.

White drills.Finer drills from the United Kingdom retain their
position, but the lower qualities are now largely supplied by the United
States of America.

White shirtings.Here the United Kingdom has lost a valuable
business. Manufacturers in the United States of America have
evidently realised that the volume of this business is of sufficient
importance to warrant their adapting themselves to the requirements
of the market in the matter of quality, finish and make up. The
old-established qualities from the United Kingdom under old
marks are fast disappearing.

Prints.The market for ordinary staple goods is entirely in the
hands of American manufacturers, but the finer cloths, in special
fancy designs, are still imported in fair quantities from Europe.

Printed and dyed muslins, lenos, &c.The business in these is still
confined to British and Swiss productions.

Lawns.The old-established qualities from the United Kingdom
still have a considerable outlet, but it is only a matter of time until
this business will also be controlled by the United States manu-
facturers, a number of suitable qualities already offering on the
market.

Yarns.Bleached and coloured yarns continue to be imported
from the United Kingdom and the Continent. Japanese grey yarns
still control the market.


26

CEBU.

Trouserings and fancy cloths.These are now supplied practically
entirely by the United States of America, importations from the United
Kingdom and Continent, from which sources the total consumption
was formerly supplied, being now impossible owing to the free entry
from the United States of America, where manufacturers now under-
stand local requirements.

Galvanised iron sheets.United States productions now supply the
market, the advantage of free entry quite prohibiting the importation
from other countries.

Bar and angle iron.Scotch and Belgian manufactures still supply
most of the demand.

Wire nails.The United States of America has now the bulk of
this business, but German goods are still to be seen on the market.

Paints and oils.Old-established brands from the United Kingdom
still command the market. Varnishes, however, are supplied for the
most part by the United States of America.

Glass, earthenware and enamelled ware.British and Continental
manufactures are chiefly in demand still. Japanese glass and earthen-
ware goods have been coming in, but qualities are very poor and they
have taken little hold.

Tools and hardware generally.The consumption of the United
States of America productions is on the increase, though the bulk of
the business is still in inferior German makes.

Rice.Importations amounted to 49,005 tons against 41,143 tons
in 1911, being back to about the normal amount. Prices went very
high and a good deal of distress was caused in consequence among
the poor natives of the provinces.

Coal.Importations amounted to 23,648 tons only as against
38,670 tons for last year. Stocks at the end of 1911 were very large,
whereas at the moment they amount to practically nothing. This
accounts for the difference between the importations for the two
years.

Petroleum.Imports during the year amounted to 289,120 cases,
a considerable increase over last year, when they were only 212,000
cases. The increased consumption amounts- to about 33,000 cases,
the difference being accounted for by larger stocks held now.

Exports. Hemp production.There has been practically no change
in the Cebu receipts of hemp for 1912 as compared with those for
1911, being 42,600 tons against 42,300 tons in 1911. A considerable
falling-off is expected for 1913, however, partly through drought,
but principally owing to a severe typhoon which passed over this
neighbourhood in October last.

Although the production has remained much on the same scale
as in 1911, there has been an unprecedented rise in prices of all grades
of hemp, far beyond any rise since the Spanish-American war. From
the beginning of the year until June 30 prices remained almost
stationary, but a marked change came in July, when prices of better
class hemp rose from 71, to 81. per ton and lower grades from 11. 10s.
to 21. per ton. The rise continued more or less steady until the middle
of November, when the highest prices of the year were reached. Cebu
good current reached a local price of 34 pesos per picul, equivalent


CEBU.

27

to approximately 54I. 8s. per ton f.c. as compared with, the lowest
price during the previous months of the year of the equivalent of
2 61. Lower grades also continued to improve considerably, reaching a
f.c. price of double that of January 1, 1911. Prices have been more
or less sustained to the end of the year and may be roughly said to
be double to-day what they were at the beginning of the year.

Quality.High-grade hemp has continued scarce, in spite of the
increased prices, and comes only from very few districts and in very
small quantities.

Hemp exports.Total shipments during the year amounted to
42,305 tons as against 42,102 tons during 1911, the distribution being
as follows :

1911. 1912.
Tons. Tons.
United States ... 23,229 19,540
United Kingdom 7,443 6,550
Continent 780 560
Japan ... 99 100
Manila...... 10,551 15,555
Total... 42,102 42,305

The great part of the hemp shipped to Manila was for transhipment
to the United Kingdom and Continental ports. About 4,000 tons
were for transhipment to the United States of America via Pacific
ports.

Maguey.Exports have increased enormously during the year,
amounting to 23,127 bales against only 9,029 bales for 1911.

Sugar.The crop amounted to about 5,500 to 6,000 tons against
6,500 tons last year.

Copra.Exports for 1912 amount to 34,375 tons against 38,080
tons in 1911. This is contrary to expectation, but is accounted for
by the long and serious drought.

General.Cebu and district has had a disastrous year. On top
of a serious drought, which lasted practically without intermission
from October, 1911, until the latter part of May, 1912, and plagues
of locusts which have been far more numerous than usual, the district
has been visited by a damaging typhoon on October 15, causing loss
of life to the extent of 400 persons and incalculable damage to property.
The idea that Cebu was out of the typhoon district, an idea prevalent
for very many years, has been sadly dissipated recently. In addition
to the one on October 15, the district felt the effects of two more severe
ones shortly afterwards, one somewhat to the south and the other some
way to the north, doing very considerable damage in Samar and
Leyte of this district.

Harbour works.The extension referred to in the last report is
taking considerably longer than was then anticipated and is barely
half finished at the time of writing. It is doubtful whether the work
will be completed before August or September of 1914.

The usual disastrous conflagration in the Chinese store district
has, fortunately, been conspicuous by its absence this year.


ho
00

Comparative List of Shipments of Hemp, Copra and Sugar during the last Five Years.

Year. Hemp. Copra. Sugar.
United Kingdom. United | ,7 States. Vanous" United Kingdom. United States. Various. United China. | 0, States.
1008 ............ 1909 ............ 1910 ............ 1911 ............ 1912 ............ Bales. 94,680 91,280 56,043 59,545 52,053 Bales. 153,432 231,568 212,962 185,822 156,322 Bales. 31,120 41,384 96,638 91,446 130,089 Picnls. 8,800 17,600 44,800 35,200 17,600 Piculs. 12,176 5,200 38,000 57,600 Piculs. 298,464 381,528 470.121 536,082 482,450 Piculs. 66,011 20,332 468 12,729 Piculs. 26^064 82,336 46,880


cebu. 29

Imports of Rice, Coal and Petroleum during the Year 1912.

From Rice. Coal. Petroleum.
Saigon............ Australia Japan ............ United States ...... Sumatra Sumatra (gasoline)...... Bags. 871,189 Tons. 13,127 10,521 Cases. 207,000 77,000 5,120
Total...... 871,189 23,648 289,120

Comparative Table showing Exports from Cebu during the Years

1902 and 1912.

1902. 1912.

Sugar ... ......Piculs 70,987 59,609

Hemp ... ......Bales 270,644 338,464

Copra ... ......Piculs 72,772 557,650

Maguey... ......Bales ... 23,127

Tonnage of Shipping Arrived in Cebu during the Year 1912.

Registered
Vessels. Tonnage.
British...... 109 198,319
United States ... 33 46,470
German...... 15 21,954
Norwegian 6 5,242
Japanese 4 12,640
French...... 2 2,955
Swedish.....: 1 3,960
Chinese...... 1 981

Total... 171 292,521


Reports of the Annual Series have been recently issued from His Majesty's
Diplomatic and Consular Officers at the following places, and may be obtained from
the sources indicated on the title-page

Abyssinia

4893 Harrar. Trade, 1911-12
5000 Gambela. Trade, 1911
Argentine 5029 Buenos Ayres. Trade,

Republic 1911 ............

Austria- 5021 Fiume. Trade, &c., 1911 ...
Hungary 5028 Austria-Hungary. Finances,

1911-12............

5067 Bosnia-Herzegovina. Trade,

&c., 1912 .........

5069 Dalmatia. Trade, &c., 1912...
5074 Austria Hungary. Trade,

&c., 1912 .........

5079 Trieste. Trade, &c., 1912 .
5056 Antwerp. Shipping and

navigation, 1912 ......

4888 Bolivia. Trade, 1911......

4900 Sao Paulo. Trade, 1911 ...
4918 Pernambuco. Trade, 1911

Price
Id

2<*

Belgium

Bolivia
Brazil

5M
2d

4d
4d

2d
2jd

8d
6$d

m

4d

Chile ...
China...

Colombia ...

Congo...

Corea.....

Costa Rica ..

Crete.....

Cuba.....

Denmark

Dominican

Republic
Egypt......

8d
... 2bd
... 3d
... 2d
... 3d
... 2bd
... 3d
... 4d
... id
... Id
... 4*d
3d
4d
4|d

5§d

, 4|d
, 6d
. id
, l5rt

, 3d

Germany

Greece

Hayti...

Honduras

Italy .

5049 Rio de Janeiro. Trade, 1911-12 5§d

5076 Bahia. Trade, 1912 ......2£d

5007 Valparaiso. Trade, 1910-11 ... 6d
5053 Coquimbo. Trade, 1912 ... 5d

4979 China. Trade, 1911 ...... 3d

5002 Canton. Trade, 1911......l£d

5035 North Manchuria and Harbin.

Commercial Conditions and
Trade,1911 ......

5050 Shasi. Trade, 1912 ...

5051 Swatow. Trade, 1912...

5058 Ichang. Trade, 1912 ...

5059 Pakhoi. Trade, 1912 ...

5061 Kiungchow. Trade, 1912

5062 Kiukiang. Trade, 1912

5071 Chefoo. Trade, 1912 ...
, 4904 Antioquia. Trade, 1911

5025 Santa Marta, Trade, 1911
, 5043 Congo. Trade. &c., 1911
, 4899 Corea. Trade, 1911 ...
, 4919 Costa Rica. Trade, &c., 1911
. 4982 Crete. Trade, &c., 1911
. 4905 Cuba. Trade, &c., ended June

30, 1911............

. 5031 Denmark. Trade, &c., 1911... 4|d
4977 Faroe Islands. Trade, &c., 1911 2-|d
5070 St. Thomas, &c. Trade, 1912 Id
5066 Dominican Republic. Trade,

&c., 1912 .........

4970 Port Said. Trade, 1911

5026 Port Sudan. Trade, 1911 ..

4948 Nice. Trade, 1911 .....

4931 Madagascar. Trade, 1911
4961 Society Islands. Trade, &cM

1911 ............Id

4987 New Caledonia. Trade, 1911 2£d

4989 Marseilles. Trade, &c., 1911 5id
5001 France. Economic develop-
ment, 19 i D-11.........7£d

5027 Dunldrlc. Trade, 1911 ... 5d

5060 St. Pierre, &c. Trade, &c., 1912 4d

5077 Brest. Trade, &c., 1912 ... Id
5080 Bordeaux. Trade, &c., 1912... 5£d
5084 Havre. Trade, &c., 1912 ... 5|d
4915 German South-West Africa.

Trade, 1911 .........3M

4939 Diisseldorf. Trade, &c., 1911 3|d
4947 Samoa. Trade, 1911...... Id

4949 Stettin, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 2hd

4990 Bavaria. Trade, &c., 19LI .... 9d
5013 Hamburg. Trade, &c., 1911... 5^d
5019 German Empire. Finances,

1912 ............2\d

5072 Dresden. Trade, &c., 1912 ... Id
4882 The Cyclades. Trade, 1911 ... 4d
4887 Corfu. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 2d
4926 Thessaly. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 4fd

5065 Patras. Trade, 1912......2|d

5057 Hayti. Trade, &c., 1912 ... 3d
5038 Honduras. Commerce and

industry .........4d

4871 Sicily. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 5d

4920 Rome. Trade, 1911 ......l^d

4944 Naples. Trade, 1911...... 4d

4988 Milan. Trade, 1911 ...... 4d

4998 Leghorn. Trade, &c., 1911 ... l§d
5005 Brindisi, &c. Trade, 1911 ... 2§d

Japan ...

Mexico

Morocco

Muscat

Norway

Panama

Paraguay

Persia

Price
... 4§d
... 6d
... 4§d

6d

... 4972 Hakodate. Trade, 1911

4975 Kobe. Trade, &c., 1911
4996 Formosa. Trade, 1911
5023 Dairen. Trade, &c., 1911
5042 Liaotung Peninsula Leased

Territory ......

5086 Shimonoseki. Trade, 1912
... 4943 Tampico. Trade, &c., 1911

4976 Mexico. Trade, &c., 1911
5064 Colima. Trade, 1912 ...
5075 Yucatan. Trade, 1912

... 5003 Casablanca. Trade, 1910-11
5006 Tangier. Trade, 1911...

5036 Morocco. Trade, 1911
... 4922 Muscat. Trade, 1911-12

Netherlands 5044 Amsterdam. Trade, 1912 ,

5082 Rotterdam. Trade, &c., 1912 2M

5083 Java, &c. Trade, &c., 1912 ... 2|d
... 5018 Norway (Supplementary).

Trade &c. 1911
5081 Norway'. Trade, &c., 1912 ...
... 4978 Panama. Trade, &c., 1911 ...
... 5040 Paraguay. Trade, 1911
... 5032 Lingah. Trade, &c., March 21,
1911, to March 20, 1912
5033 Bunder Abbas. Trade, &c
March 21, 1911, to March 20,
1912 ........

5037 Persia. Trade, 1911-12
5048 Ispahan. Trade for the year

ending March 20, ] 912
5088 Azerbaijan. Trade for the

year ending March 21, 1912 2£d
5052 Bahrein Islands. Trade,

1911-12............3£d

... 5008 Peru. Trade, &c., 1910-11 ... 2\d

6§d

3|d
. 3d
, 4d

, 2d

id
, 5M
. 3|d
, 5d

5d
2d

2d
2|d
3d
3d

3d

. 3M
2d

3d

Persian

Gulf
Peru ...

Portugal

Russia...

S ervia
Si am ..

Spain .

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

United

States

Uruguay
Venezuela

.. fa

3d

5054 Iquitos. Trade, 1912...... Id

4927 Lisbon. Trade, 1911...... 4d

4937 Oporto. Trade, 1911......4M

5046 Goa. Trade, 1911-12......|d

5063 Cape Verde Islands. Trade,

1912 ............

. 4968 Russian Foreign Commerce
and Trade of St. Petersburg,

1911 ............5M

4984 Poland, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 5|d

5004 Moscow. Trade, 1911......4id

5022 Riga. Trade, 1911 ...... 5d

5030 Russian Budget, 1912...... Id

5041 Vladivostok. Trade, 1911 ... 6^d
5078 Batoum. Trade, 1912 ... 4|d

. 4945 Servia. Finances, 1912 ... Id
, 5020 Senggora. Trade, &c., April 1,

1911, to March 31, 1912 ... 2d
5034 Bangkok. Trade, 1911-12 ... 4d
. 4907 Barcelona. Trade, &c., 1911... 5d
4921 Seville. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 5d

4946 Bilbao. Trade, 1911......5M

4981 Spain. Industries, &c., 1911 3£d

4995 Malaga. Trade, 1911...... 3d

5073 Canary Islands. Trade, &c.,

1912 ............2|d

. 4957 Gothenburg. Trade, &c., 1911 4|d

4911 Switzerland. Trade, 1911 ... 2\d
. 4999 Baghdad. Trade, 1911 ... 3|d
5011 Smyrna. Trade, 1911-12 ... 2|d

5014 Trebizond. Trade, &c., 1910-11 2ld

5015 Adrianople. Trade, 1911 ... 3£d

5016 Damascus. Trade, 1911 ... 3d

5017 Salonica. Trade, 1911 ... 3§d
5045 Constantinople. Trade, 1912 65CI

5055 Mosul. Trade, 1912...... Id

4953 Galveston. Trade, &c., 1911 2|d

4958 Portland, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 6|d

4959 New Orleans. Trade, &c., 1911 l|d
4969 Savannah. Trade, 1911 ... 5§d
4997 Philippine Islands. Trade,

&c., 1911 .........2d

5047 Hawaii. Trade, &c., 1911-12 4d
5068 San Francisco. Trade, &c., 1912 2d
5087 St. Louis. Trade, 1912 ... 4M

. 5024 Uruguay. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 4d
,. 4964 Venezuela and Caracas.

Trade, 1910-11 ...... 5d

5085 Ciudad Bolivar.Trade, &c..1912 2§d

(557)

1375 6/13 H&S


Full Text

PAGE 1

No. 5089 Annual Series. DIPLOMATIC AND CONSUL.AR REPORTS. UNITED STATES. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1912 ON THE TRADE AND COMMERCE OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. EDITED AT THE FOREIGN OFFICE AND THE BOARD OF TRADE. REFERENCE TO PREVIOUS REPORT, Annual Series No. 4997. Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majest9, JUNE, 1913. LONDON, PUBLISHED BY HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONimY OFFICE. To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from WYMAN AND SONS, LTD., FETTER LANE, E.C., and 82, ABINGD0N S.cREET, S. W., and 54,ST. MARY STREET, CARDIFF; or H.lI. STATIONERY OFFICE (SCOTTISH llRANOn), 23, Il'0RTH STREET, EDINBURGII; ur E. PONSONBY, LTD., 116, GRAFl'ON SrREE'r, DUBLIN; or from the Agencies in the British Colonies and Dependencies, the United States of America, the Continent of Europe and Abroad of T. FISHER UNWIN, LONDON, W.C. PRINTED BY HARRISON AND SONS, 45-47, ST. MARTIN'S LANE, w.c., PRINTERS IN ORDINARY TO llrs MAJESTY. H.113. [Cd, 6665-47.] Price Threepence.

PAGE 3

CONTENTS. -MA...~ILAPAGE Map of Philippine Islands. Currency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Weights and measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Population f!.nd industries of principal towns . . . . . . . 4 Trade and commerceGeneral remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Trade according to countries engaged.......................................... 6 Imports................................................................................. 7 Rice ................................................................................. 8 Other cereals and cereal products . . . . . . . . . . 8 Cottons ........................................................................... 9 Iron and steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Meat and dairy products ...................................................... 10 Cattle .............................................................................. 10 ExportsHemp .............................................................................. 10 ~Iaguey... ............................................................................ 12 Sugar................................................................................. 12 Copra .............................................................................. 12 Tobacco ........................................................................... 12 Rubber.............................................................................. 13 MiscellaneousShipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 .. :: :::::: :: :: : : ::::: :::::: ::::::::::::::: :::::::::: ::::: :::::::::: :::::::: :: ~! Harbour works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Gas company . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 \Vireless telegraphy ....................... :.................................... 15 Public health ..................................................................... 15 First Philippine Exhibition . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Annexes1.-Trade by countries .. ..... ...... ..... ..... ...... ... ... ...... ... .. .... 17 2.-Imports ..... ..... ..... ...... ... ......... ...... ... ..... ....... .. ...... ... 18 3.-Exports ........................................................................ 19 4.-Shipping .......................................................... -. . . 20 !LOILO report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 21 CEBU report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 CURRENCY. s. d. 1 peso (100 centavos) 2 1 (nominally) The unit of value in the Philippine Islands is the theoretical gold peso, containing 12 grains of gold, nine-tenths fine, representing gold value exactly equal to 50 c. United States currency. This parity is maintained by the sale of drafts in the Philippines by the Government on its redemption fund in New York and the sale of drafts in New York by the agent of the Philippine Government on the Government's redemption fund in Manila. The Govern ment's rates of exchange are fixed and represent as nearly as practicable the cost of shipping gold bars between New York and Manila. (557) A 2

PAGE 4

4 WEIGHTS and Measures. Only the metric system is now permitted to be nsed officially except in the case of lumber, for which British measurements are retained. Scales, steelyards and the like imported from abroad mnst be marked in kilos., &c., only ; otherwise, if bearing auy marks other than those of the metric system they will not be accepted for registration by the Bureau of Internal Re,enue. The following table contains a list of the principal towns, giving the provinces, industries and products :Town. Province. I Population. I Manila .. Laoag .. Batangas Cebu Camiling Tabaco ... Zamboanga !locos Norte Batangas ... Cebu Tarlac Albay Mindanao Dagupan Iloilo Capiz Aparri ... Pangasinan ... Iloilo ... N ueva Caceres ... Ormoc ... San Fernando ... Calbayog Silay Vigan ... Dmnaguete Borongan Sorsogon Tarlac ... Romblon Lucena ... Catbalogan Surigao ... Cavite ... Masbate Jolo Legaspi. .. Capiz Cagayan ... Ambos Camarines Leyte La Union Samar N egros Occidental !locos Sur Negros Oriental ... Samar Sorsogon ... Tarlac Romblon .. Tayabas .. Samar Surigao ... Cavite Masbate ... Jolo Albay 234,409 34,454 41,102 57,181 29,132 22,197 20,692 20,357 39,812 20,800 20,138 12,411 30,924 16,095 17,220 24,597 33,226 14,894 14,245 13,512 12,718 16,180 9,375 7,758 7,749 16,556 5,237 1,270 27,901 Industry or Products. Distributing centre Tobacco Sugar Greatest hemp port in the southern islands Sugar Hemp and copra Hemp, copra, shells, almaciga and lumber Paddy Sugar Paddy and hemp Tobacco and maguey Hemp and paddy Hemp Maguey, sugar and tobacco Hemp Suaar M:guey, sugar and tobacco Sugar, hemp and tree cotton Copra Hemp Provincial capital Hemp and copra Copra Hemp Hemp Naval station Gold dredging Hemp and shelhi Greatest hemp port

PAGE 5

I 1R i ,: 1li i I 12 0 CJ San 122 0 BATANE.S IS. ,o 0 D 124 MAP OF PHILH'l'INE lK. St~OWIN"PRINCIPAL MINERAL DISTRICTS AND DISTRIBUTION OF KNOWN COAL FIELDS FIREPAAEO BY ~IVISlON OF MINES, BUREAU OF ::SCIENCE. L~GEN D 11111 = !!Ill GOLD COPFER I RON COAL / Lnuag I Ap.~1,1 -RR. completed by Dee. :Jt.Jt 1912 1 I ( --R.R. partly completed or proiectecl Tu uegar~c I I = r iiJiiMANC~YAN 13:,i;u!:i / I Cuyop' San Jose 0 Casil:\urnn .. 0 I. 0 0 m 'p. z SULU SEA o Cagaynn Sulu -~ VsASILAN 1. '10 0 "' 0 ~ Jolo~o 0 cP O O '?-00 a.9Siasi ~<:,,V BORNEO A, c/'' --Bonlta.oc?~c;, ~. \)
PAGE 7

No. 5089. Annual Series. Reference to previous Report, Annual Series No. 4997. Repo1t on the Tmde and C01n1nerce of the Philippine Islands for the Yea1 1912 By MR. VICE-CONSUL W. M. ROYDS. General remarks.-The total foreign trade of the Philippine Islanda for 1912 amounted to 24,260,966l., an increase of no less than 4,966,854l., or more than 25 per cent., over the total for 1911. This is considerably larger than the total amount of foreign trade in any previous year, and shows that the era of commercial prosperity in these islands which began in 1910, after a long period of depression, is continuing its course, and, given stable conditions to inspire con fidence in the future, is likely to fulfil the great expectations and hopes which the enormous potentialities of the archipelago warrant. The imports reached a total value of 12,847,479l. and the exports ll,413,487l., an increase of 2,842,387l. and 2,124,467l. respectively over the figures for 1911. The excess of imports over exports, which in 1911 amounted to 716,072l., has in 1912 grown to 1,433,992l.; in 1910 it amounted to 1;893,937l. The chief cause of this excess is the large import of rice, the staple food of the people. Reference to this and to a suggested scheme for making the islands self-supporting in this particular will be made later. It may, however, be mentioned here that this disparity is more apparent than real, as the value of the total imports includes supplies for the United States Army and Navy, the Government of the Philippine Islands and the local railway companies, which are owned abroad, as well as large quantities of supplies imported by firms under contracts with the United States and Philippine Governments, none of which imports constitute a charge on the country's resources. The following table gives the figures of the total trade for the last five years:-------------Year. Imports. Exports. Total. 1908 6,080,442 6,791,890 12,872,332 1909 6,475,920 7,275,903 13,751,823 1910 10,358,200 8,464,263 18,822,463 1911 10,005,092 9,289,020 19,294,112 1912 12,847,479 11,413,487 24,260,966 (557)

PAGE 8

6 MANILA, The great increase of trade shown above is all the more satisfactory inasmuch as 1912 was a year which will long be remembered on account of the unprecedented drought which extended from the autumn of 1911 until the middle of 1912, and the severe typhoons which followed it in the later summer, both of which causes produced severe damage to crops of all sorts. Agriculture being the chief resource of the islands, and the purchasing power of the people consequently depending largely on the success of the crops, the total effect on trade of the weather conditions of such a year must be very great. The fact that, notwithstanding these disasters, so great an advance in trade is shown, proves the satisfactory material progress which the Philippines are making in every direction One remarkable feature of the general conditions is the com paratively small amount of capital invested by Americans and foreigners in the islands, where possibilites for investment and re sources awaiting development are so great. This fact can only be ascribed to the uncertainty which exists, and which from the beginning of the American occupation has existed, as to the future policy of the United dt::i.tes on the Philippine question. The change of Government, with the victory of the Democratic Party over the Republican, has greatly increased the interest of all concerned therein, and whatever line is to be taken, it is regarded on all sides as essential for the pros perity of trade that some definite decision should be come to on the question as soon as possible, so that business men may know where they stand and may undertake their operations with some certainty as to the conditions which will prevail in the course of the next few years. Meanwhile many plans for putting large sums of American money into various promising local industries have been cancelled, or post poned to await the course of events and the revelation of what the future is likely to hold in store. It was, however, announced in December, 1912, that a new company, called the American Philippine Company, with a capital of over 1,000,000l. all paid up, had been formed in the United States with the object of exploiting Philippine products generally by active operations in the islands in every form of industry. The promoters of the company are expected to bring expert advisers to Manila in 1913, in order thoroughly to investigate conditions and to plan their investments. Trade according to countries engaged. United States.-Of the total foreign trade of the islands, the United States again takes the over whelming and increasing share, both in imports and exports, which it has appropriated in a continuously growing measure since the Payne-Aldrich tariff in 1909 established free trade between the States and their dependency, and gave them the lead in trade over the United Kingdom. Imports from the United States amounted in 1912 to 5,064,377l. as compared with 3,991,046l. in 1911, and exports to the States to 4,752,966l. in 1912 against 4,130,63ll. in 1911. With regard to imports, the increase from the United States represents practically the entire increase in the general import trade of the islands, if the increased value of rice imported be omitted. The United States, under the advantage of the free trade relations, is increasingly taking trade formerly enjoyed by other countries, in

PAGE 9

MANILA. 7 addition to its own increased trade as a share in the general growth. In 1900 the share of the import trade taken by the United States was 8 per cent., in 1912 it was about 40 per cent. Exports to the United States likewise increased from 18 per cent. of the total in 1900 to over 40 per cent. in 1912. United Kingdom.-Imports from the United Kingdom amounted in 1912 to 1,198,0651. in value as against 1,165,8431. in 1911. The large falling-off in cotton goods was offset by increases in other merchandise, principally meat products and bread-stuffs. Exports rose from l,407,02ll. in 1911 to 1,905,7631. in 1912. The great rise in the price of hemp chiefly accounts for this. Brown sugar, to the value of over 100,0001., was also sent to the United Kingdom after three years without any business in this article. France's share of imports in 1912 shows a gain of 60,9631. over 1911, due chiefly to variations in the values of a large number of commodities. Exports were valued at 1,817,4251. in 1912 against 1,724,1761. in 1911, the large increase in the export of copra being offset by decreases in that of raw and knotted hemp. The French East Indies show the large advance in imports of 947,4031.-from 1,425,8121. in 1911 to 2,373,2151. in 1912. This is due entirely to the great increase in price and quantity of rice imports, due to the drought. The former flourishing cattle trade from Indo China is completely killed and there is no probability of its revival, so that, with the promise of an exceptional crop of rice in the Philip pines in 1913, the imports this year will probably show a large decrease as compared with preceding years. Germany.-Imports increased from 446,0501. in 1911 to 591,6031. in 1912. Cotton goods show a decrease, but this was counterbalanced by the increase in cement and other goods. The increase in exports from 268,86ll. in 1911 to 349,7001. in 1912 is chiefly due to copra. Japan.-Japan largely increased her supply of cotton goods at the expense of all other countries except the United States and British India, which both showed small gains, and this accounts for more than half of the increased value of imports from 557,9271. in 1911 to 633,3691. in 1912. Coal also showed a considerable gain at the expense of Australia, the rise in freights being the cause. With regard to exports, Japan took increased quantities of hemp, sugar and copra. Australia.-Imports increased considerably, from 533,79ll. in 1911 to 702,7321. in 1912, the growth in the cattle trade, in meat and dairy products and in flour more than making good the loss by the reduced importations of coal. British India.----:-Imports show an increase from 228,1461. in 1911 to 514,6571. in 1912, rice and, to a smaller degree, manufactures of vegetable fibres-principally bags-accounting for this; crude cacao showed a decrease. In exports copra, cigars and hemp advanced, while pearls, gums and resins fell off. Imports.-The chief increases in imports were made in rice, cotton goods, meat and dairy products and cereals, slight decreases taking place in the import of cattle, cement and coal.

PAGE 10

8 MANILA. Rice.-The large increase in value of rice imported in 1912 is due in part to the long-continued drought which did much damage to the crops in the Philippines and resulted in larger quantities than usual coming from abroad, and in part to the great rise in price, owing to the fact that neighbouring rice-producing countries also experienced a crop shortage. Importations come chiefly from Saigon and Rangoon, with a small quantity from Tonkin and Siam. The average quantity of Saigon rice available for export, taken over a number of years, is about 800,000 to 900,000 tons per annum, but, in 1912, the actual amount exported from Saigon fell short of 550,000 tons. In the Philippines a larger area than usual was planted under rice in the autumn of 1911 owing to the high price reached by rice in that year, but in spite of this the 1912 crop only turned out to be about 40 per cent. of the production of an average year. The unusually high prices ruling all through 1912 have caused still more land to be put under rice cultivation, and as the weather conditions from July onwards have been extremely favourable, an exceptionally large crop is anticipated for the year 1913. The Philippines have for long depended on foreign supplies for this the staple food of the people, although the islands could easily supply their needs if attention were given to the cultivation, and a scheme has now been put forward for utilising some of the Government lands suitable for the purpose, for growing rice as a Government under taking. The Acting Governor-General, in a public speech in July, 1912, stated that since 1898 more than 17,000,000l. had been paid by the Philippine people to foreign producers for rice alone, and that the prejudicial e:ffect of this drain on the financial resources, particularly in so far as it represented capital which would otherwise have been devoted to productive investment in the islands, was a very serious matter. He said further that to remedy this a proposal would be made at the next session of the Legislature for the Government to work, by modern methods and with modern machinery, extensive parts of the Cotabato Valley in Mindanao. This is one of the most fertile tracts of agricultural land suitable for rice growing belonging to the Government. It is about 100 miles in length and many miles broad, a flat alluvial plain, elevated very slightly above the Cotabato River, from which it would be possible at a minimum of expense to take water to irrigate the entire tract. It is thought that ample labour can be obtained from the thickly-populated islands, and the idea is, when a suitable tract is fully developed and producing rice, to dispose of it at a price which will reimburse the Government fully for its outlay, to private persons on the condition that at least one crop of rice per annum be raised, and then to proceed to develop another tract. The whole matter is now under investigation in order that the best means of carrying this or a similar scheme into execution may be settled in detail. Other cereals and cereal products.-The increase in the import of flour and other cereal products from 405,76ll. to 644,338l. is to some

PAGE 11

MANILA, 9 extent due to the critical situation in respect of rice, and was chiefly shared by Australia and the United States. The United Kingdom also enjoyed a gain, while the chief decrease was sufiered by Canada. Cottons.-Imports of cottons amounted to 2,289,392l. in 1912 and showed the considerable gain for the year of 388,468l., but in the improvement the United Kingdom is not a sharer, the free entry -0f goods from the United States having more and more e:fiect. The American manufacturers are paying increased attention to finish, with the result that their goods are steadily taking the place of British. This is even apparent in dearer lines, such as white ()Otton and other drills and the more expensive white shirtings, which at first competition could not touch. In muslins and bleached and dyed yarns the United Kingdom still leads, but as regards cloths, with the exception of a few drills and shirtings of known marks which have been established for many years, the trade of the United Kingdom is rapidly arriving at a vanishing point. The piece-goods market is very thoroughly worked by New York agents, many of whom stay several months, and very little escapes them. Iron and steel.-Imports reached a value of l,288,412l., an increase of l,176l. over 1911. The trade in iron and steel has been very satis factory, more especially for suppliers in the United States, who have gained a still firmer hold in all the most important branches of the trade. Trade in galvanised corrugated iron sheets has been good and there has been a slight improvement over the previous 12 months. This trade, which formerly was in the hands of manufacturers of the United Kingdom, is now almost entirely American, and importations from the former country are becoming less every year. In bar iron Belgium takes first place, with the United Kingdom second. In bar steel and rods the United States is in the leading position. Business has been good in both. A considerable trade has been done in pig iron, nearly all of which was supplied by the United Kingdom. Cutlery and small tools imported were chiefly of German and Con tinental manufacture, but, as in most other branches of the iron and steel trade, a marked increase of business has been done by American manufacturers. There has been an improvement in importations of steel rails, of which the United States supplied the greater part, though the increased business has been shared to some extent by Germany. In steam boilers, the trade has been divided between the United Kingdom and the States, with a few importations from Hong-Kong. In cane-sugar milling machinery the United Kingdom holds her own, and some considerable business has been done which is likely to increase on account of the improved conditions of the industry. The United States is making a very determined e:fiort to secure this trade, and her position is much improved. In all classes of agricultural, road-making, electrical and wood-working machinery the United States has taken the lion's share, with a few importations of rice-milling machinery, oil and steam motors from Germany and the United Kingdom.

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10 MANILA. A very good business has been done in automobiles and motor vehicles, which is almost entirely American, though a fair number of the higher grade cars have been supplied by France. This is a business which is likely to improve, especially in commercial vehicles, and manufacturers in the United Kingdom should make an effort to secure a share of the trade. Inquiries for the addresses of certain British makers were received at this Consulate-General during the year, the dealers stating that they had been asked to quote for certain British makes of cars. Meat and dairy products show an advance from 593,174l. in 1911 to 788,393l. in 1912. Fresh and canned meats increased largely owing to restrictions placed upon the import of cattle on account of disease. The closing of the local market through the operation of pure food regulations to a number of the meat products formerly supplied by China, notably hams and lard, largely accounts for a great decrease in imports from that country. Lard compounds from the United States entirely superseded China in this article, and Australia and Denmark increased largely their supplies of butter. Australia, the United States and the United Kingdom all showed increases in canned meats and dairy products. Cattle.-Attempts have been made to revive the trade in cattle from Hong-Kong and lndo-China, which was practically killed by the stringent quarantine regulations enforced since 1910. The authorities, however, refuse to modify these regulations, which are inspired by the fear of the spread of rinderpest-the scourge of cattle in the islands. The trade from Western Australia continues to flourish, and a proposal is now on foot to establish a large cattle run and breeding station in the highlands of Northern Mindanao, where there is a great extent of well-watered grass lands eminently suited for the purpose. A grant from Government of a large tract of land here is now being sought by an Australian cattle owner, who is prepared to undertake operations on a wide scale and to invest a large amount of money in it, stocking the run with Australian cattle. It is estimated that in this way the entire needs of the Philippines could easily be met without any further supply from outside. Exports. Hemp.-The total amount of hemp exported in 1912 was 172,347 tons, valued at 4,599,098l., an increase of 26,139 tons and l,574,062l. over 1911. The drought which commenced in October, 1911, continued till June, 1912, and, with other products, the hemp trees suffered con siderably from it. The effects of the drought, however, seem to have been greatly exaggerated during the latter half of the year 1912 in the hemp markets of the world, and the anticipated great shortage forced up prices from July onwards rapidly, values increasing during the six months 100 per cent. The figures for the year, however, show that the damage to the plantations has not yet been felt, and it remains to be seen to what extent it is going to affect production in 1913. It is quite possible that overstripping by cutting the immature trees, induced by the high prices ruling, has done more harm to the plantations than was done by the drought. Two destructive typhoons passed over the large hemp-producing country in Southern Samar

PAGE 13

MANILA. 11 and Leyte in October and November, and it is feared that production in these districts will be about 30 per cent. below the normal during 1913, say a reduction of about 80,000 bales or 10,000 tons. The largest of the miscellaneous items of export in 1912 is knotted hemp. This is a product consisting of specially selected threads of hemp, knotted together in long filaments, and is shipped principally to Italy, France and Switzerland, where it is woven into fine textiles. A considerable quantity of cheap fibre has been shipped to the United States for manufacture into paper. In former years this fibre was disposed of in European markets. The question of the refund of export duty on Manila hemp shipped to and consumed in the United States is now the subject of much controversy, and the abolition of this refund is being strenuously advocated by many of those interested in the trade, a petition to that effect having been made to Congress. The export duty is 7 dol. 50 c. gold per metric ton. The law fixing this duty was enacted by the Philippines Commission in 1901, and confirmed by Act of Congress in March, 1902, but the latter measure carried also the refund provision. The United States and Europe divide almost equally the consumption of Manila hemp, and, as the amount of duty on the total exports of hemp exceeds 1,000,000 dol. gold each year, the refund to American manufacturers reaches a sum of more than 500,000 dol. annually. It is contended that this discrimination is unreasonable and unfair, and that the hemp industry of the Philippines is taxed for the benefit of the American manu facturer or consumer, while at the same time the insular Government loses one-half of the revenue yielded by the tax, whereas the tax was originally imposed to raise revenue. The manufacturers in America, in opposing the abolition of the refund, contend that it is the consumer in America who profits by the rebate, and that if the law be repealed, prices of cordage and binder twine will have to be raised at once by jc. per lb., by which the rebate now enables them to reduce the price. This, it is said, will upset trade and be against the interests of American farmers. Moreover, the Canadian Government now gives a bounty of i c. per lb. on Manila hemp imported into Canada, and it is said that should the United States manufacturer lose the benefit of the rebate, he would be unable to co;mpete in Canada. It is further argued that the rebate assists in developing Manila cordage in the United States, in competition with European products, by offsetting to a large extent the cheapness of European labour compared with American, and that the United States manufacturer can now compete with foreign countries in Central and South America, Cuba, Mexico and the West Indies, which is entirely due to his obtaining the raw material more cheaply than his European competitors. On the other hand, it is contended by those in favour of abolishing the refund, that it influences prices and thus unfairly handicaps the industry in the islands to the extent of the amount now refunded in competition with foreign hemp-producing countries, such as Mexico, New Zealand, Russia and Italy, which compete in the large demand for cheap low grades.

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12 MANILA. A definite decision of the question whether the rebate is to be continued is to be expected shortly. Maguey.-The cultivation of the maguey plant is being greatly extended, and the fibre is now being produced in increasing quantities, which increase is likely to become more marked during the next few years. The production for 1912 was 2,500 tons more than that of the previous year, and the value of that exported was 114,436l. as against 61,158l. in 1911. Sugar.-The total value of sugar exported, viz., 2,020,904l., was 279,236l. less than in 1911. Prices ruled lower than in that year and the output was smaller. The crop in the Island of Luzon, as shown by shipments from the port of Manila, appears to have been some 5,000 tons less than that of the year 1911. A large crop was looked for, but the long drought during the first half of the year caused the decrease in production, owing to the standing cane not maturing. The present crop for the same cause is reported to be very small. Efforts are being made to improve the system of agriculture, and modern machinery, in the form of small centrals, is slowly being introduced. A gradual improve ment in the quality of the sugar, which is greatly needed, may be looked for in the future. In the southern islands several modern mills are in course of erec tion, or planned, and sugar machinery will without doubt be in con siderable demand for some time to come. Oopra.-There is a universally increasing demand for this product, whereby the islands are steadily profiting, and show signs of continuing to do so in the future. At the end of 1912, however, it was reported that supplies of copra were small and likely to remain so for some time to come, and it is evident that the damage to plantations by the destructive typhoons of the summer and autumn has not been exaggerated. France is the principal purchaser. Tobacco and manufactures. Cigars.-There has been a recovery in 1912 from the setback experienced in 1911 due to the complaints as to quality, which led to a great falling-off in the demand from the United States, the principal market. Reforms were instituted and special measures taken to secure uniformity and improvement of quality, and increased sales resulted, but, at the time of writing this report, it is stated in the local Press that large shipments made at the end of 1912 have again been found of inferior quality and in bad condition on arrival in America, and that the shipments have been rejected. Cigarettes.-The bulk of this manufacture is consumed locally, only a small quantity being exported. Other tobacco.-Most of the leaf, smoking and other manufactured and unmanufactured tobaccos exported go to Spain, the United States only taking a small proportion. During 1912 a general strike of cigar makers took place and lasted for several months. The cause of the strike was dissatisfaction at a certain form of registration which it was proposed to make compulsory for all cigar matters, and this was eventually modified by the Govern

PAGE 15

MANILA. 13 ment. Owing to the large stocks of cigars held by manufacturers, who anticipated the strike, orders in hand were able to be filled with out the price being raised, and although some new orders had to be refused, it is not likely that the strike will have any marked effects on the trade. Rubber.-Although no export of plantation rubber appears in 1912, the Basilian Plantation Company of the Moro province sent an exhibit to the Third International Rubber and Allied Trades Exhibition held in the autumn in New York, which exhibit, although it was entered too late for competition, was considered very good. Smoked and unsmoked Para, smoked Ceara block and Castilloa virgin scrap-the last-named the first of its kind ever tapped in the Philippines-were shown, and the whole exhibit was purchased by the Goodyear Rubber Tyre Company. The newly-formed America-Philippine Company is expected to include rubber growing on a considerable scale in its activities. Miscellaneous. Skipping.-653 vessels of a total tonnage of 1,545,603 tons entered at Manila from foreign ports during 1912, of which 338 vessels totalling 718,110 tons were British. Out of 681 vessels of 1,642,008 tons which cleared the port in the foreign trade, 347 vessels of 760,789 tons were British. (See Annex 4, and note thereto.) British shipping in 1912 thus continued to hold its old position as contributing about one-half of the total. It is, however, unlikely that this will occur again, not because any diminution in the number and tonnage of British vessels trading to the Philippines is to be antici pated, but because plans for increasing the number of calls by the large American, European and Japanese lines are to be put into effect from 1913. The American Pacific Mail Steamship Company and the Japanese Toyo Kisen Kaisha, which have a mutual arrangement as to sailings, will make 47 calls at Manila in 1913 with their big liners as against 13 in 1912. Several of the European liners of the Norddeutscher Lloyd Company will also call at Manila after Hong-Kong on their homeward run to Europe from Japan, which hitherto they have not done. Railways.-During 1912. the total length of new lines constructed amounted to 105 kiloms., all belonging to the Manila Railroad Company of Luzon. This brings up the total length of railways constructed in the islands to 1,051 kiloms. out of a total of 1,785 kiloms. authorised, the remainder of which is to be completed by 1917. During 1913 114 kiloms. of the main line south-east and south of Lucena is expected to be completed, 136 kiloms. in 1914, 62 kiloms. in 1915 and the re maining portion of the 352 kiloms. planned by smaller portions in the two following years. The line to Baguio, the summer capital, is being pushed forward, grading having been done at both ends of the line for several kilo metres and track laid at the Aringay end or 2 3 kiloms. out of the total of 39 kiloms. For a distance of 12 kiloms., up the mountains, it will be necessary to construct a rack track, and an expert is now in Europe to order material for this. Preliminary work has been done

PAGE 16

14 J\IANILA. with the view of placing orders for the steel bridge material which will be required, and work is progressing on the south tunnel. Five or more tunnels will have to be constructed on this line. Since 1910 the net earnings on the southern lines of the Manila Railroad Company, for which guaranteed Government bonds were issued, have been sufficient to pay all the fixed charges and leave a considerable surplus to be disposed of by the directors of the company. A train de luxe, with sleeping and dining compartments, the first in these islands, has been ordered in the United Kingdom for the Manila-Baguio service, and is expected to be in use by May, 1913. Mining.-There has been a steady advance in 1912 in the mining industry in the Philippines, and it has been proved beyond doubt that the islands are potentially rich in economic minerals. The difficulty of obtaining adequate capital is one of the most serious handicaps experienced. Gold.-The year 1912 has been marked by what gives evidence of being the beginning of a period of great increase in the gold output. The chief field of success was the Paracale district, where the big dredge of the New Zealand type on the Gumaus field, operated by the Philip pine Exploration Company, commenced work in December, 1912, and in 13 days produced over 1,000 ozs. of gold, valued at over 4,000l. It has since that time been steadily working with a continuation of like success, and the Gumaus Company is paying a monthly dividend of 10 per cent. The Exploration Company is the parent company and owns the greater part of the Gumaus Company's shares, and it is hoped that the debt on the older company will be completely paid off in this way by August, 1913. In other districts the companies working both quartz and alluvial deposits have continued operations steadily, and a considerable extension of work in both ways is in contemplation for the near future. It is forecasted that the gold output of the islands for 1913 will reach over 300,000l. in value. Coal.-The East Batan Coal Company, one of the two mines on the small Island of Batan, off the east coast of Luzon, which has been in operation since 1906, having met with difficulties, was bought up in November, 1912, for 21,000 pesos (2,200l.) by the Government, the other mine at the west end of the island having belonged to the United States Military Department from the beginning. Iron.-In the ironfields of the eastern cordillera of Luzon native mining and smelting continue as in past years. The existence of these magnetite and hematite deposits, together with the more promising one of hematite near Mambulao, Ambos Camarines, has caused con siderable interest recently among capitalists, who are investigating their possibilities. Besides the above, the following fields promise good returns for development :(1) The oilfield of Tayabas. (2) The Cebu, Sibuguey Bay (Mindanao) and Polillo coalfields. (3) The various sulphur and salt deposits. (4) The asbestos deposits of llocos Norte. (5) The lead deposits of Batangas province.

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MANII..A 15 Harbour works at Manila.-Work on the proposed new port and port district has not yet been commenced, but several sites for building offices and warehouses have been applied for and allotted to different firms. Gas company.-A gas company, the first in the Philippine Islands, was in 1912 established in Manila. The price of electric light, which at present has no competitor, is exceedingly high, and it is believed that there is a good opening for gas, which is also likely to be much used for cooking purposes. Most of the material for the preliminary work has already been ordered. Coal for manufacturing the gas will probably be obtained from Australia, and negotiations are proceeding with the view of making a contract for the amount which will be regularly required. It is expected that gas will be supplied by October, -1913. Wireless telegraphy.-A system of wireless telegraphy comprised of stations at various points connecting all the more important places in the archipelago, is now working under the direction of the Bureau of Posts. The stations already in operation are at Jolo, Zamboanga, Davao, Malabang, Cuyo and Puerto Princesa. The bureau is also now installing one at Mangarin, Mindoro. The Army wireless stations are at Fort Wint or Grande Island, at Fort Mills at Corregidor and at the Government ice-plant in Manila. The two inter-island transports are also fitted with the apparatus, and keep in touch with one land station or another during the whole of their voyages round the islands. The most powerful apparatus is that at Corregidor, which has a range of 1,000 to 1,500 miles, according to weather conditions. Those of least range are on the inter-island transports "Warren" and Merritt," which do not require a message radius of over 400 or 500 miles. Health. Plague.-During June two cases of plague were reported in Manila, these being the first cases in the Philippines, in human beings, for a period of over six years and in rats for a period of five years. Immediate sanitary steps were taken and active rat-catching measures bsgun, and by the end of the year, although 49 cases and 42 deaths had occurred meanwhile, the prevention of any spread of the disease seemed assured, as all the cases occurred within a radius of 10 blocks of houses in one district of Manila, and no new cases appeared at the end of the year. In July a case appeared in Iloilo and preventive measures were at once taken with similar success to that achieved in Manila, while careful outgoing quarantine measures were carried out at both places with the view of preventing the spread of the disease to other places in the islands. It is supposed that the infection was imported direct from China or Japan. Cholera.-No case reported since 1911. First Philippine Exhibition.-At the time of the annual carnival in February a Philippines Exhibition, to show as completely as possible the products and resources of "the islands, was held for the first time, and a sum of about 8,000l. of public money was granted for the purpose.

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16 MANILA. Thirty provinces showed fine exhibits of their varied products, and in addition there were exhibits by the different Government bureaux, showing steps taken and results achieved in the schools of industry and agriculture established all over the islands, as well as a live-stock exhibition of various breeds and types of imported and native horses, cattle, sheep, goats and poultry by the Bureau of Agriculture. Local importers also exhibited machinery and general imports, many British manufactures being included. Good results are said to have been obtained from this exhibition, which covered a large variety of articles and appliances. The second exhibition will be held in 1914, and will offer a good opportunity for British manufacturers to exhibit.

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Annex 1.-T0TAL Foreign Trade of the Philippine Islands during the Years 1910-12 by Countries. ~-----------------------------------,--------------------------,::! Country. l!HO. 1911. 1912. Imports. Ex:e_orts. Imports. Exports. Imports. Ex:e_orts. British Empire. .. \ United Kingdom ... ... 1,347,034 1,452,525 1,165,843 1,407,021 1,198,065 1,905,763 Australasia 521,557 103,248 533,791 95,634 702,732 120,406 ... ... .. I British East Indies ... .. I 220,065 217,715 228,146 219,269 514,657 252,524 Hong-Kong ... .. .. 122,888 236,014 171,946 193,964 173,255 329,935 Canada ... ... ... .. 18,875 10,736 3,698 15,092 10,443 1,980 Other colonies and dependencies ... 694 5,216 ... .. 2,860 443 Total, British Empire ... 2,231,113 2,025,454 2,103,424 1,930,980 2,602,012 2,611,051 United States .. .. .. 4,180,946 3,592,026 3,991,046 4,130,631 5,064,377 4,752,966 Austria-Hungary ... ... ... .. 28,950 64,441 40,515 11,807 47,201 49,009 Belgium ... ... .. .. .. I 82,259 148,387 60,424 291,147 65,014 219,125 China ... ... ... .. .. 536,786 154,319 415,947 109,931 401,226 226,292 France ... .. .. ... .. 238,801 1,601,628 239,322 1,724,176 300,285 1,817,425 French Indo-China ... ... ... .. 1,390,200 2,344 1,425,812 2,264 2,373,215 1,733 Germany ... ... .. .. .. 495,734 150,686 446,050 268,861 591,603 349,700 Italy ... ... ... .. .. .. 33,389 136,189 43,757 104,898 48,623 169,415 Japan ... ... ... .. .. 546,656 55,721 557,927 117,813 633,369 534,591 Netherlands .. .. .. 40,861 61,026 36,908 89,103 40,681 46,154 Dutch East Indies ... ... .. .. 54,520 11,540 79,996 8,665 113,886 8,643 Siam ... ... ... .. .. .. 23,967 3,270 95,987 1,487 74,921 1,380 Spain... .. ... ... .. .. 311,902 413,644 ~49,067 456,869 298,596 530,720 Switzerland ... ... ... .. ... i 119,884 14,770 97,211 10,103 99,692 29,017 Other countries ... ... ... 42,232 28,818 121,699 30,285 92,778 66,266 Grand total ... .. ... 10,358,200 8,464,263 10,005,092 I 9,289,020 12,847,479 11,413,487 I I b:I I r,"" I-'

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Annex 2.-l:MPORTS into the Philippine Islands during the Years 1910-12. Articles. 1910. 1911. 1912. 1910. AnimalsCattle ... .. Number 60,789 37,198 27,126 275,797 Horses ... ... 821 397 351 17,823 All other ... ... ... ... ... .. 1,244 Total ... .. .. ... ... .. 294,864 Brass and manufactures thereof ... ... .. ... 50,781 Cereals .and cereal products ... .. ... .. ... 497,463 Cars and carriages ... .. .. ... ... .. 153,600 Cement ... .. ... ... Lbs. 133,569,199 .. 138,122,859 125,159 Coal ... .. ... ... Tons 532,591 ... 407,472 349,853 Cotton and manufactures thereof ... ... ... ... 2,184,386 Iron and steel and manufactures thereof ... ... .. 1,158,222 Meat and dairy products ... ... ... .. ... 594,925 Oils ... .. ... .. ... ... ... ... 285,017 Rice ... ... .. ... Lbs. 435,025,385 ... 663,852,868 1,248,200 Silk and manufaotures thereof ... ... ... ... .... 152,998 Spirits, wines and malt liquors ... ... ... ... .. 97,614 Tobacco and manufactures thereof ... ... ... ... 46,721 Wool and manufactures thereof ... ... ... .. 67,191 All other articles ... ... ... ... ... ... .. 3,051,206 Grand total ... ... ... ... .. 10,358,200 1911. 202,740 9,773 3,661 216,174 44,732 405,761 258,737 131,336 253,963 1,900,924 1,287,236 593,174 362,031 1,410,885 159,084 100,610 36,932 63,492 2,780,021 10,005,092 1912. 157,536 8,431 1,351 167,318 56,636 644,338 301,239 107,964 219,816 2,289,392 1,288,412 788,393 446,919 2,710,105 190,110 98,348 51,092 88,445 3,398,952 12,847,479 I-' CX) z

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O'I Ol -;J '-' b:l t,,!) Annex 3.-EXPORTS from the Philippine Islands during the Years 1910-12. Articles. I 1910. I 1911. I 1912. I 1910. I Copra ... ... .. ... Lbs. 265,618,602 313,378,480 314,868,641 2,216,470 Fibres, vegetables, textile grasses and manufactures thereof. ... ... .. ... .. 119,662 Gums and resins ... ... .. .. .. ... .. 20,337 Hats ... .. ... Number ... .. 901,192 58,107 Hemp ... .. .. ... Tone 160,595 146,208 172,347 3,432,358 Kapok ... ... .. .. .. 119 24 .. Maguey ... ... ... .. 2,606 4,484 7,038 42,207 Oils ... ... .. .... .. .. .. .. 9,489 Sugar ... ... ... .. Lbs. 267,796,166 460,078,408 434,566,692 1;505,080 Tobacco, unmanufactured ... 21,926,744 27,656,359 31,273,504 331,946 Cigars ... ... ... Number 184,407,000 134,830,000 271,840,000 574,929 Cigarettes ... ... .. 35,629,000 30,170,000 49,316,000 8,467 All other exports ... ... .. .. .. .. .. 145,211 Total ... ... .. .. ... .. I8,464,263 1911. 2,712,409 18,500 26,161 82,064 3,025,036 3,835 61,158 11,535 2,300,140 388,934 396,220 6,528 256,500 9,289,020 1912. 2,954,889 243,368 20,005 96,366 4,599,098 1,457 114,436 15,453 2,020,904 461,752 644,180 11,440 230,139 11,413,487 /:s: ..... (C

PAGE 22

20 MANILA, Annex 4.-RETURN of all Shipping Entered and Cleared at the Port of Manila during the Year 1912. British United States Chinese Philippin,e Islands French German Japanese Norwegian Swedish Span,ish ENTERED. Total Vessels, 338 17 1 48 9 86 124 28 1 1 653 Ton,nage. 718,110 151,555 981 60,950 9,747 214,236 353,628 31,568 2,468 2,360 1,545,603 NoTE.-13 British vessels entered from the United Kingdom, 123 from Hon,g-Kong, 45 from Australia, 8 from Straits Settlemen.ts, 48 from China, 28 from Japan, 57 from the United States and 11 from French Cochin-China. CLEARED. Vessels. British Un.ited States Philippin,e Islands Fran.eh 347 17 41 13 88 Ton.nage. 760,789 151,559 54,045 15,457 218,468 German Japanese Norwegian Swedish 125 36. 1 13 362,667 45,589 2,468 30,966 Spanish Total 681 1,642,008 NoTE.-The above tabulated figures, kindly supplied by the customs, do not in.elude coastwise vessels, i.e., those which called at other Philippine ports either in or out, but only vessels comip.g direct to Manila from foreign. ports. Of 164 vessels, with a ton.nage of 275,750 ton,s, which entered coastwise, 92 were British, 34 Philippine inter-Island boats, 12 Spanish, 12 German, 4 Fran.eh, 8 Norwegian, and 2 Japanese. Similarly 131 vessels, of 201,685 tons, cleared coastwise from Manila, comprising 86 British, 33 in,ter-island, 7 German, 2 Japanese, 2 Norwegian. an.d 1 Chinese. These all appear under the returns from other ports. British vessels cleared for the following countries in foreign trade :ForUn.ited Kin,gdom 17 Hong-Kong... 144 Australia 21 Straits Settlements 7 India... 6 Chin.a... 50 Japan 20 United States 51 France 22 French Cochin,-Chin,a 5 German.y 2 Italy... l Netherlands .. l

PAGE 23

ILOILO. 21 !LOILO. Mr. Acting Vice-Consul Price reports as follows:Imports. Cotton piece-goods and yarns.-The market for the year 1912 has been very dull, resultant on poor rice crop and lower prices obtaining for raw sugar. American cotton piece-goods practically now rule the market, having the benefit of free entry as against duty paid goods imported from other countries. Trouserings.-American qualities have to a great extent replaced British trouserings and Madras cloths, which were formerly imported in considerable quantities. Prints.-The largest demand is for the cheap standard 24 to 25-inch width qualities made by United States of America manufacturers. A few of the finer grades still come from the United Kingdom. White shirtings and lawns.-American manufacturers have now been able to supply nearly all grades, and very small quantities of old established mark.'! are now imported from the United Kingdom. Nainsooks.-These are still imported in smaller quantities from the United Kingdom, but American mills have been successful in turn ing out some qualities which compete successfully. Bleached and coloured yarns.-The United Kingdom still holds the market for these yarns (excepting mercerised yarns, which are now imported practically solely from Japan). Small lots of bleached yarns have also been imported from Japan. Galvanised iron.-Demand has been good for all qualif!ies, as there is still a continued activity in the building trade both in Panay and Negros. With the exception of small importations of well-known British brands, American qualities command the market. Yellow metal sheathing and copper nails. Business has been poor in these articl~s, which are still imported from the United Kingdom and Continent. Many owners of lorchas (i.e., sailing lighters) have substituted galvanised plain iron for yellow metal. Linseed oil and paints.-These are still in fair demand. American paints are now imported to a larger extent. Bar iron.-A fair amount is still imported from Belgium, but the United States of America now compete strongly for this business. Reinforcing steel bars are imported from the United States of America, and an increasing business is now being done as concrete buildings are becoming more popular. Wire nails.-Nearly all importations are made from America, very small quantities now coming from the Continent. Enamelware and hollowware.-A fair importation of these goods is made from the Continent and Japan. Machinery.-Importations have been almost entirely for sugar mills, there being only a small demand for rice and saw mill machinery. Up to the present the sugar machinery business has been almost exclusively in the hands of British manufacturers, but part is now going to the United States of America and a little to Germany. During 1912 there was a big reduction in importations as com pared with 1911, due chiefly to the depression in the sugar market. British machinery still holds the first place ; about three-fourths

PAGE 24

22 ILOILO. came from the United Kingdom, the balance coming from the United States of America and Germany. Sugar central factories are becoming more common ; one of these complete, a. factory of British make, with machinery valued at about 20,000l., has been erected; while during the year orders were booked for two others of British make, with machinery valued at about 30,000l. The great majority of the inquiries are for British manufactures. America has almost a monopoly of light agricultural machinery, while France and America about divide the automobile business between them. Germany has the chief part of the supplying of light railway track, wagons and small locomotives, with the United States of America second and the Unit"ed Kingdom entirely out of this business. Rice.-Importations were 33,627 tons, a slight increase on last year ; practically all the rice imported comes from Saigon in Cochin China. Owing to damage done to the standing crop by typhoons it is probable more rice will be imported during 1913. Petroleum.-121,000 cases were imported as against 170,214 cases in 1911. Gasoline.-Importatiop.s were 12,000 cases. This is a new line. Ooal.-There is an appreciable decrease in the importation of this fuel, owing in some measure to the fact that the military camp in J ossman has been removed, so considerably less coal is required for trans ports and launches. Australian coal has dropped from 19,088 to 8,966 tons, chiefly owing to the high prices and freights ruling. Oattle.-Importations have greatly declined, only 5,175 head having been imported, this is owing to the fact that rinderpest broke out amongst the carabaos (water buffaloes) in a shipment early in 1912, since when no more have been imported. It is reported that a new quaran tine station will be shortly erected, when the importations will again be resumed. Cement shows a decrease, only 24,775 barrels being imported as against 37,356 barrels in 1911. Milk and soap.-An increasing business is being done in these articles, most of which come from the United Kingdom. Exports. Sugar.-The total crop was 131,715 tons, showing a decrease of 4,430 tons on last year. Prices ruled considerably lower. During the year 130,365 tons were exported as follows :United States Chin.a ... Japan, Total Tons. 86,128 29,292 14,945 130,365 Prospects for the present crop are not nearly so good owing to damage done by typhoon and locusts, &c. The estimate is 100,000 tons.

PAGE 25

ILOILO. 23 Oopra.-The production shows a slight increase, the crop amounting to 3,156 tons, as follows:Continent and United Kingdom United States Tons. 1,475 1,650 Japan 31 Total 3,156 Sapan wood.-Exports to China have been 1,635 tons, a slight increase on last year. Shipping,....:_This shows a slight decrease on last year's figures (in a measure due to the stopping of the imports of cattle from Cochin China), 174 vessels being entered as against 200 vessels in 1911. The United Kingdom is first with 97 steamers as against 99 steamers in 1911. Norway drops from 22 to 8 vessels, this being due as above mentioned to the ces~ation of the importation of carabaos (water buffaloes) "from Cochin-China. RETURN of Principal Articles of Import at Iloil<:> during the Year 1912. ----:::-,--= From----1 Quantity. I Value. Rice ... Saigon and Hong-Kong ... Tons 33,627 448,360 Petroleum United States ... Cases 105,000 33,156 Sumatra ... ,, 22,000 6,485 Cattle and carabaos Cochin-China ... Head 5,175 59,297 (water buffaloes) Coal ... Australia ... ... Tons 8,966 12,104 Japan ,, 10,312 11,858 Borneo 2,300 2,300 Cement Hong-Kong chiefly ... Casks 24,775 13,548 Flour ... United States and Australia Bags 136,371 32,317 Milk United States, United Kingdom and Switzerland ... Cases 19,105 19,901 Soap United Kingdom ... 23,013 13,184 RETURN of Principal Articles of Export from Iloilo during the Year 1912. Raw sugar ... Copra .... Sapan wood ... Tons. 130,365 3,156 1,635 1,303,650 61,546 2,451

PAGE 26

24 IL0IL0. RETURN of all Shipping at the Port of Iloilo during the Year 1912. British United States ... Spanish ... German .. Norwegian Japanese Fren,ch ... Chinese* STEAM Vessels. ENTERED. Total ... Vessels. 97 33 13 11 8 6 5 1 174 Tonnage. 170,974 53,427 31,913 23,850 7,206 17,091 4,920 120 309,501 Chinese steamer sold and put under American flag. British ... United States ... Spanish .. German .. Norwegian Japanese French ... CLEARED. Total Vessels. 97 34 13 11 8 7 5 175 Tonnage. 170,974 55,046 31,913 23,850 7,206 18,841 4,920 312,750 Countries from which they have entered and to which they have cleared with their net tonnage :ENTERED. FromWith Cargo. In. Ballast. Total. Vessels. Ton,nage. Vessels.Tonn,age. Vessels. Tonn,age. Hon,g-Kon,g ... .. 55 67,087 1 2,541 56 69,628 Japan, ... ... ... .. .. 10 31,518 10 31,518 United States ... ... 9 25,991 ... .. 9 25,991 Philippines ... .. ... .. 9 20,515 9 20,515 China ... ... .. 3 3,648 2 5,339 5 8,987 Straits Settlements ... 2 2,303 2 5,104 4 7,407 New South Wales ... 2 5,090 .. ... 2 5,090 Cochin-Chin.a ... ... 2 1,838 ... .. 2 1,838 Total ... .. 73 105,957 24 65,017 97 170,974

PAGE 27

ToHong-Kong .. United States .. China .. .' Philippin,es Straits Settlements Japan ... Coohin,-China .. Total .. ILOILO, CLEARED. With Cargo. In Ballast. 25 Total. Vessels. 42 21 Tonnage. 'Vessels:1 Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. 5 51,084 14 63,059 5,771 2 9 I 1 2 18,441 ... 2,432 23,234 2,736 2,539 1,678 56 69,525 21 63,059 7 8,203 9 23,234 1 2,736 I 2,539 2 1,678 68 i 119,914 I 29 I 51,060 I 97 I 170,974 CEBU. Mr. Acting Vice-Consul Walford reports as follows :1 mports. -General conditions of the market for the year have been unfavourable owing to losses in crops in the southern islands through drought and locusts, in the earlier part of the year, and the severe typhoon of October last. The year has been marked by a large proportionate increase in the consumption of piece-goods from the United States and a con sequent falling-off in importations of various classes from the United Kingdom. Grey drills, grey shirtings, &c.-British grey goods have almost entirely disappeared from the market now, owing to the free entry of goods from the United States of America. White drills.-Finer drills from the United Kingdom retain their position, but the lower qualities are now largely supplied by the United States of America. White shirtings.-Here the United Kingdom has lost a valuable business. Manufacturers in the United States of America have evidently realised that the volume of this business is of sufficient importance to warrant their adapting themselves to the requirements of the market in the matter of quality, finish and make up. The old-established qualities from the United Kingdom under old marks are fast disappearing. Prints.-The market for ordinary staple goods is entirely in the hands of American manufacturers, but the finer cloths, in special fancy designs, are still imported in fair quantities from Europe. Printed and dyed muslins, lenos, &c.-The business in these is still confined to British and Swiss productions. Lawns.-The old-established qualities from the United Kingdom still have a considerable outlet, but it -is only a matter of time until this business will also be controlled by the United States manu facturers, a number of suitable qualities already offering on the market. Yarns.-Bleached and coloured yarns continue to be imported from the United Kingdom and the Continent. Japanese grey yarns still control the market.

PAGE 28

26 CEBU. Trouserings and fancy cloths.-These are now supplied practically entirely by the United States of America, importations from the United Kingdom and Continent, from which sources the total consumption was formerly supplied, being now impossible owing to the free entry from the United States of America, where manufacturers now under stand local requirements. Galvanised iron sheets.-United States productions now supply the market, the advantage of free entry quite prohibiting the importation from other countries. Bar and angle iron.-Scotch and Belgian manufactures still supply most of the demand. Wire nails.-The United States of America has now the bulk of this business, but German goods are still to be seen on the market. Paints and oils.-Old-established brands from the United Kingdom still command the market. Varnishes, however, are supplied for the most part by the United States of America. Glass, earthenware and enamelled ware.-British and Continental manufactures are chiefly in demand still. Japanese glass and earthen ware goods have been coming in, but qualities are very poor and they have taken little hold. Tools and hardware generally.-The consumption of the United States of America productions is on the increase, though the bulk of the business is still in inferior German makes. Rice.-Importations amounted to 49,005 tons against 41,143 tons in 1911, being back to about the normal amount. Prices went very high and a good deal of distress was caused in consequence among the poor natives of the provinces. Ooal.-Importations amounted to 23,648 tons only as against 38,670 tons for last year. Stocks at the end of 1911 were very large, whereas at the moment they amount to practically nothing. This accounts for the difference between the importations for the two years. Petroleum.-lmports during the year amounted to 289,120 cases, a considerable increase over last year, when they were only 212,000 cases. The increased consumption amounts to about 33,000 cases, the difference being accounted for by larger stocks held now. Exports. Hemp production.-There has been practically no change in the Cebu receipts of hemp for 1912 as compared with those for 1911, being 42,600 tons against 42,300 tons in 1911. A considerable falling-off is expected for 1913, however, partly through drought, but principally owing to a severe typhoon which passed over this neighbourhood in October last. Although the production has remained much on the same scale as in 1911, there has been an unprecedented rise in prices of all grades of hemp, far beyond any rise since the Spanish-American war. From the beginning of the year until June 30 prices remained almost stationary, but a marked change came in July, when prices of better class hemp rose from 7l. to Bl. per ton and lower grades from Il. IOs. to 2Z. per ton. The rise continued more or less steady until the middle of November, when the highest prices of the year were reached. Cebu good current :reached a local price of 34 pesos per picul, equivalent

PAGE 29

CEBU. 27 to approximately 54l. 8s. per ton f.c. as compared with the lowest price during the previous months of the year of the equivalent of 26l. Lower grades also continued to improve considerably, reaching a f.c. price of double that of January 1, 1911. Prices have been more or less sustained to the end of the year and may be roughly said to be double to-day what they were at the beginning of the year. Quality.-High-grade hemp has continued scarce, in spite of the increased prices, and comes only from very few districts and in very small quantities. Hemp exports.-Total shipments during the year amounted to 42,305 tons as against 42,102 tons during 1911, the distribution being as follows :1911. 1912. Tons. Tons. United States ... 23,229 19,540 United Kingdom 7,443 6,550 Continent 780 560 Japan ... 99 100 Manila ... 10,551 15,555 Tota.I. .. 42,102 42,305 The great part of the hemp shipped to Manila was for transhipment to the United Kingdom and Continental ports. About 4,000 tons were for transhipment to the United States of America via Pacific ports. Maguey.-Exports have increased enormously during the year, amounting to 23,127 bales against only 9,029 bales for 1911. Sugar.-The crop amounted to about 5,500 to 6,000 tons against 6,500 tons last year. Oopra.-Exports for 1912 amount to 34,375 tons against 38,080 tons in 1911. This is contrary to expectation, but is accounted for by the long and serious drought. General.-Cebu and district has had a disastrous year. On top of a serious drought, which lasted practically without intermission from October, 1911, until the latter part of May, 1912, and plagues of locusts which have been far more numerous than usual, the district has been visited by a damaging typhoon on October 15, causing loss of life to the extent of 400 persons and incalculable damage to property. The idea that Cebu was out of the typhoon district, an idea prevalent for very many years, has been sadly dissipated recently. In addition to the one on October 15, the district felt the effects of two more severe ones shortly afterwards, one somewhat to the south and the other some way to the north, doing very considerable damage in Samar and Leyte of this district. Harbour works.-The extension referred to in the last report is taking considerably longer than was then anticipated and is barely half finished at the time of writing. It is doubtful whether the work will be completed before August or September of 1914. The usual disastrous conflagration in the Chinese store district has, fortunately, been conspicuous by its absence this year.

PAGE 30

COMPARATIVE List of Shipments of Hemp, Copra and Sugar during the last Five Years. Hemp. I Copra. I Sugar. Year. United I United I I United I United I I Kingdom. States. I Various. Kingdom. I States. Various. China. i I I I Bales. Bales. Bales. Piculs. Piculs. Picu!s. Piculs. 1008 ... .. ... ... 94,680 153,432 31,120 8,800 12,176 298,464 66,0]1 1909 ... ... ... ... 91,280 231,568 41,384 17,600 .. 381,528 20,332 1910 ... ... .. ... 56,043 212,962 96,638 44,800 5,200 470,121 468 1911 ... ... ... ... 59,545 185,822 91,446 35,200 38,000 536,082 .. 1912 ... ... ... ... 52,053 156,322 130,089 17,600 57,600 482,450 12,729 .. United States. Picu!s. .. .. 26,064 82,336 46,880 1':> 00 I

PAGE 31

CEBU. 29 IMPORTS of Rice, Coal and Petroleum during the Year 1912. FromRice. Coal. I Petroleum. Bags. Tons. Cases. Saigon ... ... .. .. 871,189 ... ... Australia ... ... .. .. 13,127 .. Japan... .. ... .. .. 10,521 ... United States ... ... .. .. 207,000 Sumatra ... ... .. .. .. 77,000 Sumatra (gasoline) ... ... .. .. 5,120 Total ... ... 871,189 23,648 289,120 COMPARATIVE Table showing Exports from Cebu during the Years 1902 and 1912. Sugar ... Hemp ... Copra .. Maguey .. ... Piculs .. Bales ... Piculs ... Bales 1902. 70,987 270,644 72,772 1912. 59,609 338,464 557,650 23,127 TONNAGE of Shipping Arrived in Cebu during the Year 1912. British ... United States : .. German ... Norwegian Japanese Fren,ch ... Swedish .. Chinese .. Total ... Vessels. 109 33 15 6 4 2 1 1 171 Registered Ton,nage. 198,319 46,470 21,954 5,242 12,640 2,955 :!,960 981 292,521

PAGE 32

REPORTS of the .Annual Series have been recently issued from His Majesty's Diplomatic and Consular Officers at the following places, and may be obtained from the sources indicated on the title-page: Price ABYSSINIA. ... 4893 Harrar. Trade, 1911-12 ... ld 5000 Gambela. Trade, 1911 ... d ARGENTINE 5029 Buenos Ayres. Trade, _, RICPURLIC 1911 ... ... .. o;,d AUSTRIA 5021 Fiume. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 2d HUNGARY 5028 Austria-Hungary. Finances, 1911-12... ... 2d 5067 Bosnia-Herzegovina. Trad~; &c., 1912 ... ... ... 4d 5069 Dalmatia. Trade, &c., 1912 ... 4d 5074 Aust,ria Hungary. Trade, &c., 1912 ... ... 2d 5079 Trieste. Trade, &c., 1912 2ld BELGIUM .. 5056 Antwerp. Shipping and navigation, 1912 ... ... 8d BOLIVIA. ... 4888 Bolivia. Trade, 1911 ... .. 6fd BRAZIL ... 4900 Siio Paulo. Trade, 1911 ... 4~d 4918 Pernambuco. Trade, 1911 ... 4d 5049 Rio de Janeiro. Trade, 1911-12 5d 5076 Bahia. Trade, 1912 ... .. 2d CHILE... .. 50U7 Valparaiso. Trade, 1910-11 ... ild 5053 Coquimbo. Trade, 1912 ... 5d CHINA... 4979 China. Trade, 1911 ... ... 3d 5002 Canton. rrade, 1911 ... .. ld 5035 North Manchuria and Harbin. Commercial Conditions and Trade, 1911 .. .. 8d 5050 Shasi. Trade, 1912 ... 2M 5051 Swatow. Trade, 1912... ... 3d 5058 Ichang. Trade, 1912 ... .. 2d 5059 Pakhoi. Trade, 1912 .. ... 3d 5061 Kiungchow. Trade, 1912 ... 4d 5062 Kiukiang. Tracle, 1912 3d 5071 Cheloo. Trade, 1912 ... ... 4d COLOMBIA. ... 4904 Antioquia. Tracle, 1911 ... jd 5025 Santa Marta. Trade, 1911 ... ld CONGO... 5043 Congo. Trade. &c., 1911 ... 4d COREA.... 4899 Corea. Trade, 1911 ... ... 3d COSTA RICA 4919 Costa. Rica. Trade, &c., 1911 4d CRETE... .. 4982 Crete. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 4id CUBA ... ... 4905 Cuba.. Trade,&c.,endedJune 30, 1911... ... .. .. 5d DRNMARK ... 5031 Denmark. Trarle, &c., 1911 ... 4d 4977 Fa.roe Islands. Tr:i.rle,&c.,1911 2,d 5010 St. Thomas, &c. Trade, 1912 id DoMIN!CAN 5066 Dominican Republic. Trade, RF.PUBLIC &c., 1912 ... ... UNY .. 4915 German South-West Africa. Trade, 1911 ... .. 3M 4939 Diisselrlorf. Trade, &c., }911 3ld 4947 Samoa. Trade, 1911 ... ... ld 4949 Stett.in, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 2d 4990 Bavaria. Trade, &c., 19 ll ... 9d 5013 Hamburg. Trade., &c., 1911 ... "5d 5019 Ger1nan Empire. .Fin:tnces, 1912 ... ... ... 2d 5072 Dresden. Trade, &c., 1912 ... Id GREECE ,., 4882 'l.'he Cyclades. Trarle, 1911 .. 4d 4887 Corfu. Trarle, &c., 1!)11 ... 2d 49~~ Thessaly. Tracie; &c., 1911 ... 4fd 5060 Patras. Trade, 1.ll2 ... .. 2 2 d HAYTI .. .., 5057 Hayti. Trade, &c., 1912 3d HONDURAS ... 5038 Honduras. Commerce and industry .., ... 4d ITALY ,.. ... 4871 Sicily. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 5d 4920 Rome. Trade, 1911 ... ld (657) 4944 Naples. Trade, 1911 .. ,.. 4d 4988 Milan. Trade, JOH ... .., 4d 4998 Leghorn. Trade, &c., 1911 lid 5005 Brindisi, &c. Trade, 1911 2jd Price ... 4972 Hakodate. Trade, 1911 .. 4~ 4975 Kobe. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 6d 4996 Formosa. Trade, 1911 ... 4}d 5023 Dairen. Trade, &c,, 1911 ... 6d 5042 Liaotung Peninsula Leased Territory . 6td 5086 Shimonoseki. Trade, 1912 ... 3 2 d ... 4943 Tampico, "rrade, &c., 1911 3d 4976 Mexico. Trade, &c., 1911 4d 5064 Colima. Trade, 1912 ... 2d JA.PAN ... MEXICO 5075 Yucatan. Trade, 1912 ... fd .. 5003 Casablanca. Trade, 1910-11 ... 5d 5006 Tangier. Trade, 19ll... ~d 5036 Morocco. Trade, 1911 5d MOROCCO MUSCAT .. 4922 Muscat. Trade, 1911-12 .. 5d NETHERLANDS 5044 Amsterdam. Trade, 1912 ... 2d NORWAY PANA.MA. PARA.GUAY PRRSIA PERSIAN GULF PERU .. 5082 Rotterdam. Trade, &c., 1912 :!jd 5083 Java, &c. Trarte, &c., 1912 .. 2d ... 5018 Norway (Supplementary). Trade, &c., 1911 ... .,. 2d 5081 Norway, Trade, &c., 1912 ... 2d ... 4978 Panama. Trade, &c., 1911 3d 5040 Para.e;uay. Trade, 1911 3d 5032 Lingah. Trade, &c., March 21, 1911, to March 20, 1912 3d 5033 Bunder Abbas. Trade, &c., March 21, 1911, to Ma.rch 20, 1912 ... ... .. 3M 5037 Persia. Trade, 1911-12 ... 2d 5048 Ispahan. Trade for the year ending March 20, 1912 ... 3d 5088 Azerbaijan. Trade tor the year ending March 21, 1912 2~d 5052 Bahrein Islands, Trade, 1911-12 ... .. ;!id ... 5008 Peru. Trade, &c., 1910-11 ... 2 2 d 5054 Iquitos. Trade, 1912 ... ld PORTUGAL ... 4927 Lisbon. Tra,le, 1911 .. .. 4d Russu ... SERVIA. SIAM ... SPAIN ... 4937 Oporto. rra.de, 1911 .. 4fd 5046 Goa. Trade, 1911-12 ... jd 5063 Cape Verde Islands. Trade, 1912 ... ,., .. 3d 4968 Russian Foreign Commerce and Trade of ;:; t. Petersburg, 1911 ... ... ... .. 5~ 4984 Poland, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 5d 5004 Moscow. Trade, 1911... .. 4 2 d 5022 Uiga. Trade, 1911 ... .. 5d 5030 Russian Budget, 1912 ... .., ld 5041 Vladivostok. Trade, 1911 ... 6M 5078 Batoum. Trarle, 1912 ... 4i\d .. 49 Servia. Finances, 19li ... ld ... 5020 Senggora. Trade, &c., April 1, 1911, to March ;JJ, 1912 .. 2d 5034 Bangkofc. Trade, 1911-12 .. 4d ,., 4907 Barcelona. rrade, &c., 1911... 5d 4921 Seville. 'rrade, &c., 1911 .. 5d 4946 Bilbao. Trade, 19'11 ... .. 5fd 4981 Spain. Industries, &c., 1911 3 2 d 4995 Malaga. Trade, 1911 .. ... 3d 5073 Canary Islands. Trade, &c., 1912 ... ... ... .. 2d SWEDEN .. 4957 Gothenburg. Trade, &c., 1911 4'd SWITZ~RLAND 4911 Swit,zerlancl., Trade, 1911 .. 21d TURKEY ... 4999 Baghdad. Trade, 1911 s,a 5011 Smyrna. Trade, 1911-12 ... 2-d 5014 Trebizond. Trade, &c., 1910-11 21d 5015 Adrianople. Trade, 1911 ... 3 2 d 5016 Damascus. Trade, 1911 ... 3d 5017 Salonica. Trade, 1911 ~d 5045 Constantinople. Trade, 1912 6 1 d 5055 Mosul. Trade, 1912 .. .. 2 d UNITED 4953 Galvest,on. Trane, &c., 1911 2M STATF.s 4958 Portland, &c. rrade, &c., 1911 6fd 49~9 New Orleans. Trade, &c., 1911 lid 4969 Savannah. Trade, 1911 .. 5 2 d 4997 Philippine Islands. Trade, &c., 1911 ... .. .. 2rl 5047 Hawaii. rrade, &c., 19ll-12 4d 5068 San Francisco. Trade, &c.,1912 2d 5087 St. Louis. Trade, 1912 ... 4d URUGUAY ... 5024 Uruguay. Trade, &c., 1911 .,. 4d VENEZUELA ... 4964 Venezuela and Ca.races, Trade, 1910-11 ... ... 5d 6085 CiudadBoliva.r.Tracle, &c.,1912 2d 1375 6/13 H & S