Citation
United States : Report for the year 1911 on  the trade and commerce of the Philippine Islands

Material Information

Title:
United States : Report for the year 1911 on the trade and commerce of the Philippine Islands
Series Title:
Diplomatic and consular reports
Creator:
Great Britain. Foreign Office.
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Harrison & Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce
Komersyo
International trade
Internasyonal na kalakalan
Genre:
Government Document
serial ( sobekcm )
Temporal Coverage:
19110101 - 19111231
Spatial Coverage:
Asia -- Philippines
Asya -- Pilipinas
Asia -- Filipinas
Coordinates:
14.63 x 121.03

Notes

General Note:
"Presented to both Houses of Parliament by command of His Majesty, September, 1912."
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue number: Cd. 6005-170
Funding:
Funded with resources from SOAS Archives and Special Collections and with the generous support of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs and the Office of Senator Loren Legarda.

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
CF327.42 /23894 ( SOAS classmark )
291455 ( aleph )
Cd. 6008-170 ( Publisher_ID )

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Full Text
No. 4997 Annual Series.
DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR REPORTS.

UNITED STATES.

REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1911

on the

TRADE AND COMMERCE OF THE PHILIPPINE

ISLANDS.

Edited at the Foreign Office and the Board of Trade.

REFERENCE TO PREVIOUS REPORT, Annual Series No. 4810.

Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty,
SEPTEMBER, 1912.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE.
To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from
WYMAN and SONS, Ltd., Fetter Lane, E.C., and 32, Abingdon Street, S.W.; or
OLIVER and BOYD, Tweeddale Court, Edinburgh; or
E. PONSONBY, Ltd., 116, Grafton Street, Dublin ;
or from the Agencies in the British Colonies and Dependencies,
the United States of America, the Continent of Europe and Abroad of
T. FISHER UNWIN, London, W.C.

printed by

HARRISON and SONS, Printers in Ordinary to His Majesty,
45-47, St. Martin's Lane, W.C.

1912.

Od. 6005170.] Price Twopence.




CONTENTS.

Manila Page

Currency ............................................................................................................................................................4

Weights and measures ........................................................................................................................4

Population and industries of principal towns ............................................................4

Trade and commerce

General remarks ....................................................................................................................................5

Imports.....................................................................................6

Animals (cattle) ......................................................................................6

Cotton ............................................................................................................................................................6

Iron and steel ..........................................................................................................................................7

Rice ................................................................................................................................................................7

Wines and sjririts ..............................................................................................................................7

Coal ................................................................................................................................................................7

Exports ..................................................................................................................................................................v

Copra..................................................................................................................................................................7

Hemp..................................................................................................................................................................7

Kapok ...................................................................................................8

Maguey............................................................................................................................................................8

Sugar..................................................................................................................................................................8

Tobacco............................................................................................................................................................8

Cigars...................... ....................................................................................................................8

Agriculture ......................................................................................................................................................8

Stock raising.........................................................................................................9

Forestry..................................................................................................................................................................9

Mining .........................................................................................................10

Harbour works................................................................................................................................................11

Slapping ............................................................................................................................................................11

Health ................................................................................................................................................................11

Hotel........................................................................................................................................................................11

Publicity ..................................................................................11

Carnival..................................................................................................................................................................12

Annexes

1.Trade by countries ........................................................................................................................13

2.Imports ......................................................................................................................................................14

3.Exports ......................................................................................................................................................15

4.Agricultural products..................................................................................................................16

5.Foreign shipping ..............................................................................................................................17

6.British shipping ..............................................................................................................................18

Iloilo report ........................................................................................................................................19

Cebu report .........................................................................................................................................................22

Note.The figures given in the tables relating to British shipping are
exclusive of vessels arriving at the port to which the tables relate from other
ports in the same country, unless they landed cargo at that port from another
country ; and similarly of vessels departing for other ports in the same country,
unless they loaded cargo for another country. The figures differ in consequence
in some cases from the figures given in the tables relating to shipping of all
nationalities, which are based on the local shipping returns.

(679) a 2


4

Currency.

s. d.

1 peso (100 centavos) ... =21 (nominally)

The unit of value in the Philippine Islands is the theoretical gold peso,
containing 12 *9 grains of gold, nine-tenths fine, representing gold value exactly
equal to 50 c. United States currency. This parity is maintained by the
sale of drafts in the Philippines by the Government on its redemption fund in
New York and the sale of drafts in New York by the agent of the Philippine
Government on the Government's redemption fund in Manila. The Govern-
ment's rates of exchange are fixed and represent as nearly as practicable the
-cost of shipping gold bars between New York and Manila.

Weights and Measures.

Only the metric system is now permitted to be used officially except in the
case of lumber, for which British measurements are retained.

Scales, steelyards and the like imported from abroad must be marked in
kilos., &c., only ; otherwise, if bearing any marks other than those of the metric
system they will not be accepted for registration by the Bureau of Internal
Revenue.

The following table contains a list of the principal towns, giving the
provinces, industries and products :

Town.

Province. Population.

Industry or Products.

Manila ...
Laoag ...
Batangas
Oebu

Tabaco ...
^Zamboanga

Dagupan
IHoilo ...
Oapiz ...
Aparri ...
Nueva Caceres
Ormoc ...
San Fernando
Calbayog
Silay ...
Vigan ...
Dumaguete
Borongan
.Sorsogon
Tarlac ...
Romblon
Lucena ...
Catbalogan
Surigao...
Cavite ...
Mas bate
Jolo

Xiegaspi...

234,409

Tlocos Norte ... 34,454
Batangas... ... 41,102
Cebu ...... 57,181

Tarlac ......! 29.132

Albay ......j 22,197

Mindanao ...: 20,692

Pangasinan ...' 20,357

Iloilo ......| 39,812

Capiz ............20,800

Cagayan......! 20,138

Ambos Camarines 12,411

Leyte ............30,924

La Union ... 16,095

Samar ............17,220

Negros Occidental 24,597

Ilocos Sur ... 33,226

Negros Oriental...1 14,894

Samar ............14,245

Sorsogon............13,512

Tarlac ............12,718

Romblon............16,180

Tayabas............9,375

Samar ............7,758

Surigao............7,749

Cavite ............16,556

Masbate............5,237

Jolo ......| 1,270

Albay ......' 27,901

Distributing centre

Tobacco

Sugar

Greatest hemp port in the
southern islands
Sugar

Hem]) and copra

Hemp, copra, shells, almaciga

and lumber
Paddy
Sugar

Paddy and hemp
^Tobacco and maguey
Hemp and paddy
Hemp

Maguey, sugar and tobacco

Hemp

Sugar

Maguey, sugar and tobacco
Sugar, hemp and tree cotton
Copra
Hemp

Provincial capital

Hemp and copra

Copra

IJemp

Hemp

Naval station
Gold dredging
Hemp and shells
Greatest hemp port


No. 4997. Annual Series.

Reference to previous Report, Annual Series No. 4810.

Report on the Trade and Commerce of the Philippine Islands for the

Year 1911

By Me. Acting Vice-consul M. Paske Smith.

General remarks.The total volume of the trade of the Philippine
Islands, according to figures kindly supplied by the Bureau of Custcms,
Manila, amounted to 19,294,112?., of which 10,005,0922. represented
imports and 9,289,0202. exports. The trade as a whole has improved
by 471,6492., and this improvement indicates the prosperous con-
dition of the islands at the present time. The excess of imports
over exports, w^hich last year (1910) was 1,893,9372. against the islands,
has this year been reduced to 716,0722.

The following table gives the figures of the total trade for the
last five years :

Year. Imports. i 1 i Exports. Total
1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 £ I 6,344,544 | ...j 6,080,442 j J 6,475,920 ..J 10,358,200 i ...i 10,005,092 ' 1 £ 6,895,385 6,791,890 7,275,903 8,464,263 9,289,020 £ 13,239,929 "12,872,332 13,751,823 18,822,463 19,294,112

The position occupied by the various countries is shown in Annex 1.
As foreshadowed in last year's report the United States has acquired
a still larger share of the trade. When considering the figures of the
imports from the United States it must be borne in mind that the
supply officers for the military forces and the Civil Government used,
in former years, to declare their purchases on free entries under the
provisions of the tariff law then in force, but that now large quantities
of these supplies are purchased through local merchants. Accordingly
these figures, which formerly were excluded from the returns, are now
included.

The amount of such importations was about 1,000,0002. In
imports the United States fell off, due largely to over-stocking in
1910 and the general depression towards the end of the year, felt
throughout the islands on account of damage done to the crops by
storms and typhoons, and later by drought. These conditions were
reflected in the trade of foreign countries, the imports from many of
(679)


6

MANILA.

which declined. French Indo-China shows an increase, due to increased
mportations of rice. The same remark applies to the Dutch East
Indies.

Taking into consideration the above described conditions, the
export trade shows a creditable increase. The United States took
over 500,0002. worth more than in 1910. This was due to increased
purchases of copra and sugar. Exports to the United Kingdom
and Italy fell off slightly, while those to Belgium and France increased
owing to their larger purchases of copra. Austria-Hungary took
reduced quantities of leaf tobacco. The exports to Germany and
Japan show increases, principally owing to larger shipments of
hemp and maguey. On the whole the slight increase of the export
trade for 1911 leads one to expect that, provided conditions
improve, the excess of imports over exports will soon disappear.

The main resources of the islands are still agricultural. The
purchasing power depends on the yield from hemp, sugar, copra
and tobacco. The year 1910 must be looked upon (especially in the
case of imports) as an abnormal and experimental year. Large
imports were made from the United States and much stock was held
over. In 1911 the country suffered much damage from storms and
typhoons, and during the last quarter a drought set in, which con-
tinued into 1912. The crops have been severely damaged, and this
means a decreased purchasing power. Already the effects are being
felt, notably in the cotton cloths trade. The effects, however, of
the customs tariff are making themselves felt, and should internal
conditions improve the islands will soon make up the setback
occasioned by present weather conditions.

Imports.The import trade in 1911 was valued at 10,005,0922.,
a decrease of 353,1082. Decreases were experienced in many lines.
The largest decrease was in cotton cloths. There were increases in
cars and carriages, cement, iron and steel, oils, rice, silks, and wines
and spirits. The disturbing factor in the imports of the islands is
the large quantities of rice which in recent years it has been found
necessary to import.

Animals. Cattle.A thriving business in this trade was commenced
in 1911 with Western Australia. The cattle are brought to a
quarantine station specially built at Mariveles, some 20 miles from
Manila, where they are held in quarantine for slaughter. Cattle
continued to be imported from Pnom penh, Indo-China. The cattle
trade between Hong-Kong and the Philippines, which was once
flourishing, has been killed by stringent quarantine regulations. It
is hoped that it will be revived in the near future.

Cottons.The value of the imports of cotton was 1,900,924?., a
decrease of 283,4622. Over-stocking in goods from the United States
accounts for some of the loss ; but the heavy drought, with storms and
typhoons early in the year and the consequent damage to the crops, is
also a factor. The United States held the market in prints, grey cloths
and white shirtings. In other dearer lines, such as printed muslins,
bleached and dyed yarns, the trade remained with the United
Kingdom. Large importations of grey yarns were made from Japan.
The United Kingdom will find it difficult to keep her share in this trade


manila,

7

against the 27 per cent, ad valorem duty. Orders which might have
gone to the United Kingdom went to the United States. Already a
further decrease is observed for 1912. The heavy drought has
continued into 1912, and thus the purchasing power of the people
has become much impaired. Business is now being done in the
cheapest lines.

Iron and steel.This trade was valued at 1,287,236?., an increase
of 129,014?. over 1910. The volume of this trade is an exception
to the general decrease in imports, but the increase has gone to the
credit of the United States. Aided by the protective tariff the United
States made during 1911 still further inroads into almost every branch
of the iron and steel trade. The chief exception was in rails for
railways, in which the imports from the United States decreased. In bar
iron and iron and steel sheets and structural material the United States
dominated the market; the same remark applies to the automobile
trade. European countries supplied the larger part of the trade in
small tools and cutlery. In sugar machinery the United Kingdom
still held her own. The United States has also entered this market
during 1911. The increase in sugar machinery will continue, due
to the boom in this industry which free trade in sugar with the United
States has caused.

Rice.The situation in the rice trade became so acute during
1911 that the Government were compelled to intervene and enter
the market as sellers in order to keep down the rising prices, which
went as high as 9 pesos 50 c. per cavan. The source of supply
wras, as usual, Indo-China, with smaller quantities from Java and
Japan.

Wines and spirits.This trade showed a slight improvement over
1910. Business conditions improved somewhat during the latter
half of the year under review.

Coal.As usual coal imports were divided between Australia and
Japan.

Exports.The export trade for 1911 was valued at 9,289,020?.,
an increase of 824,757?. The increase is due to larger exports of sugar
to the United States and of copra to Europe. Hemp and cigars show
a decline.

Copra.The year 1911 shows a still further increase in the pro-
duction of copra and a corresponding decrease in the manufacture
of cocoanut oil for local consumption. As in former years the largest
purchaser was France. Increased shipments went to the United
Kingdom, United States, Belgium, Spain and Japan. Netherlands,
Mexico and Hong-Kong appeared as new buyers. Germany and
Italy both took less.

The increasing price of the staple has given a great impetus to
the industry, and much land is being sought for the purpose of cocoanut
cultivation. The demand, however, still keeps pace with the supply.

Hemp.The export of hemp further declined, being 146,208 tons,
valued at 3,025,036?., in 1911 compared to 160,595 tons, valued at
3,432,358?., in 1910. The hemp situation is causing serious thought
amongst both producers and merchants. Efforts are being made
to improve the quality by introducing better methods of collection


8

MANILA.

and purchase in the provinces. This matter has the attention of the
Hemp Association. The United States took considerably less than
in 1910. Manila hemp, handicapped by the exportation tax, cannot
compete with the Mexican sisal. Attempts are now being made to
get this tax removed. As regards grade a certain improvement was
shown, but so long as the present prices for low grade continue little
increase in this line can be expected.

Kapok.Philippine kapok was for the first time an article of export;
the total quantity exported was 119 tons. The United States was the
principal buyer at from 32 to 34 c. gold per lb. c.i.f. New York.
In time the supply from the Philippines should increase.

Maguey.The export of this fibre increased over 1910. The
United Kingdom took an increased quantity, while other buyers
were France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and British India.

Sugar.The quantity exported was 205,392 tons, the highest
since 1896. The largest amount went to the United States. The
prices obtained were fair, averaging about 6 pesos 50 c. basis 88
Iloilos to July, when the shortage in the European b^et crop put up
values of all sugar, and transactions were made at 9 pesos for the said
grade in August.

The quantity of sugar, however, then held was small and chiefly
in the hands of the export houses and middlemen. Thus the planters
did not derive much benefit from the phenomenal rise in prices.

Capital is being attracted to this industry, thus facilitating the
establishment of larger sugar centrals. In general the system of
cultivation and polarisation is still antiquated, and the gradual
introduction of modern methods will increase both quality and
output.

The year 1912 crop shows a considerable falling-off in quantity
owing to the prolonged drought since last October.

Tobacco, unmanufactured.The export in this trade increased.
The bulk going to Spain as usual. Nearly all European countries,
except Austria-Hungary, increased their purchases.

Cigars and cigarettes.The trade in cigars, while showing an increase
over 1909, suffered a severe setback from 1910. The reason is the
over-stocking of the American market, which is easily the largest
buyer. Efforts are now being made to advertise the better grades
of Philippine cigars in the United States. The Tobacco Association
took the matter up, and certain regulations were made as to the size
and grades of tobacco to be used for the manufacture of cigars for
the United States.

The trade in cigarettes shows a slight decrease all round with
the exception of Hong-Kong, which colony took an increased quantity.

Agriculture.Agricultural conditions show a decided improve-
ment. The four main resources of the islandssugar, cocoanuts,
tobacco and hemp:are receiving much attention. Both local and
foreign capitalists are investing money in sugar land and putting up
modern mills. The high price now being realised for copra has added
to the number of acres of land allotted to the cultivation of cocoa-
nuts. Efforts are being made by co-operation between the Bureau
of Agriculture and planters to improve the quality of tobacco, and


manila.

9

when improvement comes there should be a corresponding demand
for Philippine tobacco.

During the latter half of 1911 severe storms and floods were
experienced, and later a general drought set in, which has worked
considerable harm to all crops. A tabulated statement is annexed
(Annex 4) showing the crops for the fiscal year 1911, and the following
are the estimates for the fiscal year 1912 :

Rice

Abaca (hemp)
Copra
Sugar
Corn

Tobacco ...

50 per cent, of the 1911 production
95
110
80
70
90

The total area of the Philippines is 119,542 square miles, of which
approximately 7 per cent, is given up to the above crops. Other
areas cultivated are maguey, 13,366 hectares, and coffee, 1,948
hectares.

Stock raising and animals.The campaign against rinderpest
continues. The use of anti-rinderpest serum has been abandoned.
The Veterinary Department have been using every effort to separate
and quarantine animals known to be infected, and to effect this
their attention has been confined to areas known to be badly
infected. The assistance of scouts and constabulary has been
enlisted to aid in effectual quarantine. Already good results have
been obtained and the situation is improving. Unfortunately a-
fresh outbreak has occurred in the south (Island of Panay), but by
applying the above methods it is hoped to have the disease soon
under control. The efforts of the authorities being centred on rinder-
pest but little attention has been given to surra. This latter,
however, has shown no signs of spreading. Foot-and-mouth disease
has appeared occasionally amongst imported cattle from Indo-China.
Pleuro-pneumonia exists amongst the cattle arriving for slaughter
from Australia, but, as they are held at Sisiman, no danger exists.

Note.Detailed reports on the agriculture of the islands are
issued by the Bureau of Agriculture, Manila, and those interested
can obtain them from the Director of that Bureau.

Forestry.The following figures have been taken from a publication
of the Bureau of Forestry, being an estimate in round numbers of the
commercial forest area and the stand of the different types :


10

MANILA.

Class. Per Cent, Area. Stand, Board Feet per Acre. Total Stand in 1,000,000 Board Feet.
Dipterocash Molave ...... Pine ...... Mangrove ... Mountain...... 75 10 5 2 8 Sq. miles. 30,000 4,000 2,000 800 3,200 Acres. 19,200,000 2,560,000 1,280,000 512,000 2,048,000 10,000 3,000 2,000 2,000 192,000 2,680 2,560 1,024 *
Total 100 40,000 25,600,000 ... j ...

* Purely protective forest.

During the year three concessions have been granted to lumbering
companies over large areas, and providing these companies are
sufficiently capitalised good results should be obtained.

The total wood produced during the fiscal year 1911 was 184,628
cubic metres. Minor forest products were produced as follows :

Tan bark ...
Dye bark ...

Wood oils......

Almaciga ...
Bejuco (bent wood)
Guttapercha
Rubber ......

Kilos.

>5

Litres
Kilos.

2,012,385
87,229
77,540
707,732
4,593,655
115,674
1,466

The following table shows the gum and resins actually exported :

Kilos.1! £

Copal............762,745 9,940

Rubber ... 318 60

Guttapercha... 101,478 8,200

Mining.Mining is gradually recovering from the setback caused
by storms and floods. The output of gold was considerably
curtailed by destructive typhoons, which crippled mining operations
in Benguet, formerly the largest producing district.

The following are figures of production for 1909-11 :

Articles. 1909. 1910. 1911.
£ ...... £ £
Iron... ... ...... 3,107 2,002 2,915
Gold ... ...... 49,519 30,886 37,990
Copper 60
Coal...... ...... 19,718 17,625 13,000
Clay products 42,284 43,000 45,000
Salt...... ...... 37,536 38,000 35,000


manila.

11

Railways.The various railway companies are gradually extending
their lines. The following sections were opened in 1911:

Line. J From To Length Opened.
Paniqui-Tayug Noveleta-Naic ...... Calamba-Santa Cruz Luta-Batangas Main line south ... Cuyapo ...... Salinas ... Bay ...... Lipa Luta ...... Rosales...... Naic ...... Magdalena Batangas San Pablo Kiloms. 14,393 15,600 18,632 24,940 18,853
Total length opened... 92,418

Harbour works.Practically no change has been made in the
harbour, beyond a certain amount of dredging. The recommendation
of the Collector of Customs to build additional piers has not yet been
carried out, owing to lack of funds.

Shipping.Tables showing the total foreign shipping and British
shipping are annexed. The British flag still retains its place by a
large margin. The transfer of two local vessels to the American
flag and the extension of the run of another local line to include Iloilo
and Cebu, caused a slight fall in the tonnage of the British flag ; but
British shipping is nevertheless on the increase and the number of
freighters calling regularly has increased. Efforts are being made
by local merchants to obtain direct communication with the United
States, and will, no doubt, soon be successful. At the time of writing
the German Lloyd European Mail Line have commenced a monthly
call. It is expected that the Japanese Mail Line (Nippon Yusen
Kaisha) may do the same. Other established services are to be found
ia last year's (1910) report.

Health, &c.At the close of the year 1911 health conditions were
most promising. The death-rate among adults compares not un-
favourably with that of the United States and Europe. Efforts
are now being made to deal with the great infant mortality.
Owing to the prevalence of plague in China, stringent quarantine
regulations were made, with the result that the disease was kept
out of the islands. Cholera is non-existent. Small-pox has found but
few victims, and of those the greater number were children who had
not been vaccinated. The leper colony at Culion has proved a
complete success, and all known cases of leprosy are segregated there.

Hotel.The new hotel (Manila Hotel) has, at the date of writing,
been finished, and guests are already being received. Other hotel
accommodation has been improved.

Publicity.The Manila Merchants' Association, to which most
merchants, both native and foreign, belong, is co-operating with the
Government in spreading literature on the resources of the islands.
A Trade Commissioner has been appointed to represent the islands
in the United States.


12

manila.

Exhibition and carnival.An exhibition of Philippine products-
was held in February, 1912, during carnival week, and proved a.
complete success. Local importers took the opportunity to exhibit
imports, especially machinery. The next exhibition is fixed for 1914,,
but no doubt a smaller one will, as usual, be held in conjunction
with the carnival.


Annex 1.Total Trade of the Philippine Islands during the Years 1909-il by Countries,

1909. 1910. 1911.
Country.

Imports. Exports. Imports. Exports. Imports. | Exports.
British Empire United Kingd om Australasia British East Indies Hong-Kong Canada Other colonies and dependencies £ 1,134,838 517,471 195,043 91,708 5,243 487 £ 1,097,578 | 99,622 161,389 450,852 1,076 3,544 £ 1,347,034 521,557 220,065 122,888 18,875 694 £ 1,452,525 103,248 217,715 236,014 10,736 5,216 i £ 1,165,843 533,791 228,146 171,946 3,698 £ 1,407,021 95,634 219,269 193,964 15,092
Total, British Empire United States Austria-Hungary ... Belgium China France French Indo-China... Germany Italy............... J apan Netherlands Dutch East Indies ... Siam ... Spain... Switzerland ... Other countries 1,944,790 1,342,777 20,572 68,561 544,212 219,838 981,176 378,392 32,330 337,708 46,590 91,091 31,433 294,981 110,956 30,513 1,814,061 3,068,023 35,658 162,890 313,565 986,649 2,265 189,774 138,927 56,953 37,528 9,534 2,511 436,149 4,252 17,164 2,231,113 4,180,946 28,950 82,259 536,786 238,801 1,390,200 495,734 33,389 546,656 40,861 54,520 23,967 311,902 119,884 42,232 2,025,454 3,592,026 64,441 148,387 154,319 1,601,628 2,344 150,686 136,189 55,721 61,026 11,540 3,270 413,644 14,770 28,818 2,103,424 3,991,046 40,515 60,424 415,947 239,322 1,425,812 446,050 43,757 557,927 36,908 79,996 95,987 249,067 97,211 121,699 1,930,980 4,130,631 11,807 291,147 109,931 1,724,176 2,264 268,861 104,898 117,813 89,103 8,665 1,487 456,869 10,103 30,285
Grand total ... ...... 6,475,920 7,275,903 | 1 10,358,200 8,464,263 10;005,092 | 1 , 9,289,020


Annex 2.Imports into the Philippine Islands during the Years 1909-11.

Articles. 1909. 1910. 1911. 1909. 1910. 1911.
Animals £ £ £
Cattle ... Number 39,161 60,789 37,198 177,797 275,797 202,740
Horses ... 386 821 397 8,444 17,823 9,773
All other 7,152 1,244 3,661
Total ......... 193,393 294,864 216,174
Brass and manufactures thereof 36,561 50,781 44,732
Cereals and cereal products 333,282 497,463 405,761
Cars and carriages ......... 51,153 153,600 258,737
Cement .........Lbs. 72,857,502 133,569,199 64,153 125,159 131,336
Coal .........Tons 220,533 532,591 130,488 349,853 253,963
Cotton and manufactures thereof 1,498,892 2,184,386 1,900,924
Iron and steel and manufactures thereof 499,185 1,158,222 1,287,236
Meat and dairy products ...... 444,706 | 594,925 593,174
Oils 260,126 285,017 362,031
Rice ... Lbs." 368,442,959 435,025,385 998,751 1,248,200 1,410,885
Silk and manufactures thereof...... 111,874 1 152,998 159,084
Spirits, wines and malt liquors... 130,777 97,614 100,610
Tobacco and manufactures thereof 16,855 46,721 36,932
Wool and manufactures thereof 29,748 67,191 63,492
All other articles...... 1,675,976 3,051,206 2,780,021
Grand total 1 | 6,475,920 1 i 10,358,200 10,005,092


Annex 3.Total Exports from the Philippine Islands during the Years 1909-11.

Articles. 1909. 1910. 1 1911. 1909. 1910. 1911.
£ £ £
Copra ......... ... Lbs. 240,374,599 265,618,602 ! 313,378,480 1,598,514 | 2,216,470 2,712,409
Fibres, vegetables, textile g] rasses and
manufactures thereof ... 27,571 | 119,662 18,500
Gums and resins...... 20,890 20,337 26,161
Hats ......... 49,810 58,107 82,064
Hemp ... Tons 165,299 160,595 146,208 3,520,000 3,432,358 3,025,036
Kapok ......... I 119 3,835
Maguey ......... ,, 4,066 2,606 4,484 60,103 42,207 61,158
Oils ......... 15,722 9,489 11,535
Sugar ......... ... Lbs." 285,116,244 267,796,166 -460,078,408 1,168,392 1,505,080 2,300,140
Tobacco, unmanufactured ... ,, 20,976,743 21,926,744 27,656,359 320,072 331,946 388,934
Cigars ......... Number 151,457,000 184,407,000 | 134,830,000 365,527 574,929 396,220
Cigarettes...... ? t 23,337,000 35,629,000 | 30,170,000 4,380 ; 8,467 6,528
All other exports...... 124,922 145,211 256,500
Total ... 1 ... i i i 7,275,903 j 8,464,263 9,289,020


Annex 4.Statistics on Principal Crops for Fiscal Year 1911. Compiled from the Official Reports submitted by the Executive
Officers of 1 City, 716 Municipalities, 80 Townships, 22 Rancherias and 7 Settlements.

Crop. Area Cultivated. Product. | Amount Produced. Approximate Average Value per Unit in Provincial Markets. Approximate Value of Cocoanut Products in Provincial Markets. ! Approximate Total Value in Provincial Markets.
Rice ... ... ..J Abaca Cocoanuts ... | J i Hectares. 1,043,757 404,160 208,476 Cleaned rice Philippine hemp Ripe nuts, used as food Copra ... Cocoanut oil ...... Tuba (a beverage) ...Kilos. Number ...Kilos. ...Litres ... ,, 574,842,688 171,879,598 154,980,726 118,323,114 6,602,966 37,649,880 Pesos. 0-1148 0-16 0 03 0-15 0-30 0-05 Pesos c. i 4,649,421 78 17,748,467 10 1,980,889 80 1,882,494 0 Pesos c. 65,991,940 58 27,500,735 68 26,261,272 68 24,392,457 40 8,723,739 96 6,889,895 64
Sugar cane...... Corn ... Tobacco 120,313 302,516 69,015 Crude sugar and panochas Shelled corn Leaf tobacco ... ...Kilos. ...Litres ...Kilos. 243,924,574 186,404,700 25,518,132 0-10 0 -0468 0-27
Total... 2,148,237 i 159,760,041 94

Note.10 pesos = \l. (approximately).


manila.

17

Annex 5.Statement of the Number and Registered Net Tonnage
of Foreign Steamers and Sailing Vessels Entered and Cleared at
all Ports in the Philippine Islands during the Calendar Year
1911.

Entered.

Steam Vessels.

Port. With Cargo. In Ballast.
Vessels. Registered Tonnage. Vessels. Registered Tonnage.
Manila ... Cebu ... Iloilo ... Jolo Zamboanga Balabac... Total 546 144 65 14 33 22 1,269,427 209,487 105,618 15,562 38,503 689 48 12 17 2 122,269 36,465 49,700 1,500
! 824 1 1,639,286 79 209,934
Sailing Vessels.
Port. With Cargo. In Ballast.
Vessels. i Registered Tonnage. Vessel. Registered Tonnage.
Manila ... Zamboanga Total 1 1 181 34 1 40
2 215 1 40
Cleared. Steam Vessels.
Port. With Cargo. In Ballast.
TT Registered Vessels, j T(fnnage> i Vessels. Registered Tonnage.
Manila ... Cebii ... Iloilo ... Jolo Zamboanga Balabac... Total ...... 400 90 14 13 17 20 1,012,939 189,376 37,185 13,260 17,524 432 218 35 30 1 12 2 401,322 54,917 44,197 2,302 13,871 257
554 1,270,716 298 516,866

(679)

B


18

MANILA.

Sailing Vessels (in Ballast).

Port
Jolo ...
Zamboanga

Vessels.

1
I

Total

Registered
Tonnage.
34
34

68

Annex 6.Statement of British Vessels Entered and Cleared at
Manila during the Year 1911.

Entered.

With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.
T-I
iJ rom
| Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
United Kingdom 11 63,897 11 63,897
Hong-Kong 107 144,204 15 35,105 122 179,309
Australia 46 106,858 1 3,460 47 110,318
Straits Settlements ... 7 14,468 1 69 8 14,537
British India ... 1 3,203 1 3,203
China......... 48 77,123 2 6,556 50 83,679
Japan ......... 9 24,636 12 33,768 21 58,404
Dalny ... 1 1,192 1 3,020 2 4,212
United States...... 47 183,259 47 183,259
France ......... 1 1,041 ... 1 1,041
French Cochin-China... 6 6,891 ... 6 6,891
Egypt......... 1 3,209 1 3,209
Total ...... 285 629,981 32 81,978 317 711,959

Cleared.

With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.

0
Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
United Kingdom 16 77,330 16 77,330
Hong-Kong ...... 119 160,948 17 26,158 136 187,106
Australia 9 13,147 11 24,980 20 38,127
Straits Settlements ... 1 2,896 2 2,064 3 4,960
British India ... 2 6,151 2 6,151
China ... 26 37,038 21 33,147 47 70,185
Japan ... 8 24,324 4 10,425 12 34,749
United States...... 47 187,058 47 187,058
France......... 23 69,413 23 69,413
French Cochin-China... 1 5,747 6 12,514 7 18,261
Italy 1 2,667 1 2,667
Java 2 6,039 2 6,039
Netherlands ...... 1 3,020 1 3,020
Total ...... 252 583,588 65 121,478 317 705,066


ILOILO.

19

Iloilo.

Mr. Acting Vice-Consul Price reports as follows :

Imports. Piece-goods and yarns {cotton).The market for these
goods was unusually dull in 1911. The shortage in the rice crop
was in some measure to blame. The large quantities of American
trouserings imported last year are being gradually worked off, but
very few lines have found a permanent market. It is most likely
that as soon as supplies of these goods are cleared buyers will again
turn their attention to British and Continental cloths as being more
suited to the climate and produced in more varied assortments. Printed
cottons of the cheap standard quality are all imported from the
United States of America, but some of the better class goods still
come from the United Kingdom, although in small quantity. Mer-
cerised yarns, which were formerly imported from Europe, now come
almost exclusively from Japan. The quality is good and the price lower
than similar yarns can be brought from Europe. White shirtings
have been receiving a good deal of attention from United States'
manufacturers and fair quantities have been coming to this market.
In the cheaper grades it may be said that they have come to stay,
and will compete strongly with qualities that formerly came from the
United Kingdom.

Galvanised iron.The demand for both plain and corrugated sheets
continues good. During the past year there has been considerable
activity in the building trade, both in Panay and Negros, and prospects
are good for the continuance for the next few years. American sheets
practically command the market, but some well-known British brands
are still imported, although in decreasing quantities.

Yellow metal sheeting and copper nails.There has been fair business
doing in these articles, both British and Continental, the former
having the larger consumption owing to the brands being better
known. Some owners of craft are substituting plain galvanised
iron for yellow metal, and claim to get satisfactory results.

All yellow metal sheetings are entitled to free entry under the
present tariff arrangements.

Hollowware.The demand is small but steady. Japanese manufac-
tures are coming in in increasing quantities, and may ultimately cut
out goods from other sources.

Linseed oil and paints are always in good demand. British pro-
ductions still hold the market, although the Americans are pushing
hard to get into the business.

Bar iron.Belgian iron still holds the market, but demand is small.

Reinforcing steel bars.There is an increasing demand owing to
the erection of up-to-date concrete buildings. United States products
command the market.

Wire nails.The Americans are trying hard to control this business,
but quantities continue to come from the Continent.

Machinery.The importations into this port are principally for
use in connection with sugar plantations, and consist chiefly of small
three-roller sugar cane crushing mills with boilers, practically all of.


20

ILOILO.

which are of British manufacture ; light portable tramway rails
and cane wagons largely of German manufacture with a small amount
of American and still less of French, with little or no British make.
There were quite a number of small single furrow ploughs, all of
American manufacture. A few sets of steam ploughs of British
manufacture were imported.

Two small sugar factories capable of producing about 15 tons
each of sugar per day of 12 hours are in course of erection, the
machinery for which being all of British manufacture. These factories
are for the production of 96 centrifugal sugar.

During the early part of the year there was a good demand for new
British machinery, but towards the close of the year there was no
demand or inquiries.

Rice.Imports were 31,345 tons against 25,050 tons in 1910.
Importations for the coming year should be heavier, as the local crop
has been very light owing to scarcity of rain.

Petroleum.Importations amounted to 170,214 cases. This is
an increase of over 85,000 cases on last year's figures.

Goal.34,994 tons were imported during the year as against
39,747 tons in 1910.

Cattle.The importations have fallen off somewhat, 9,107 head
against 14,328 head last year.

Cement shows an increase, 37,356 barrels imported during the
year against 30,500 barrels in 1910.

Exports. Sugar.The total crop for the year was 136,145 tons,
showing an increase of 47,891 tons over the crop of 1910. Prices
ruled higher the latter part of the year and touched 14?. 5s. per ton
in August to September; the lowest price was in January, viz., SI, 15s.
per ton. During the year 136,616 tons were exported as follows :

Prospects for the coming crop are not so good owing to the
drought. The estimate is 100,000 tons.

Copra.Production shows a small increase, doubtless due to the
high prices ruling. The total exports for the year were 3,022 tons.

Sapanwood.The export has fallen off considerably, only 1,154 tons
being shipped against 2,000 tons in 1910. This is chiefly due to the
trouble in China, which country takes practically all the sapanwood
exported from this port.

Shipping shows a further increase, 200 vessels having entered
the port with a net tonnage of 343,789 tons against 172 vessels in
1910.. The United Kingdom again heads the list with 99 steamers,
Norway drops to third place and the United States now occupies the
second. The increase in the American trade is due to the fact that the
steamers Zafiro and Rubi (previously under the British flag),
running from Hong-Kong to the Philippines, were put under the
American flag during the latter part of last year.

To-

United States
China

Tons.
129,750

6,866


iloilo.

21

Return of Principal Articles of Import at Iloilo during the Year

1911.

Articles. Quantity. Value. From
Rice ......Tons 31,345 £ 376,197 Saigon and Hong-Kong
Petroleum ... Cases 21,000 5,468 Sumatra
149,214 41,797 United States
Coal ... Tons 19,086 23,858 Australia
7,226 6,503 Borneo
8,682 8,682 Japan
Cattle and carabaos
(water buffaloes) Head 9,107 104,730 Cochin-China
Cement ... Casks 37,356 18;678 Hong-Kong chiefly
Flour ... Sacks 138,000 32,344 United States and Aus- tralia
Milk ...Cases 10,686 11,687 United Kingdom, United States and Switzerland

Return of Principal Articles of Export from Iloilo during the Year

1911.

Raw sugar

Copra

Sapanwood

British

United States

Spanish

Norwegian

German

Japanese

French

Chinese

British
United States
Spanish
Norwegian
German
Japanese
French
Chinese

Entered.

Total.,

Cleared.

Total...

Tons. £
136,616 1,536,900
3,022 56,672
1,154 2,020
during the Year '
Vessels. Tonnage.
99 181,685
35 56,665
13 31,303
22 24,009
12 23,993
7 14,886
7 7,203
5 4,045
200 343,789
Vessels. Tonnage.
101 185,509
34 55,046
13 31,303
22 24,009
12 23,993
6 13,136
7 7,203
5 4,045
200 344,244

Note.The British steamships Strathgyle," of 2,837 tons, and Kaifong,"
of 987 tons, were in port on the evening of December 31, 1910, and were cleared
in 1911. The Japanese steamship Shinmei Mara," of 1,750 tons, and the
United States steamship Zaffro," of 1,619 tons, were in port on the evening of
December 31, 1911, uncleared.


22

ILOILO.

Return of British Vessels Entered and Cleared at the Port of Iloilo,
with their Net Tonnage.

Entered.

With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.
From - - |
Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.
Hong-Kong 50 60,997 6 18,153 i 56 79,150
Newcastle, New South
Wales 7 18,241 7 18,241
United States ... 6 17,384 6 17,384
China ... 3 3,648 3 7,708 6 11,356
Cochin-China ... 5 4,603 ... 5 4,603
Singapore ...... 3 3,142 1 2,932 4 6,074
Borneo......... 1 1,227 1 1,227
Japan ... 5 15,871 5 15,871
Total ...... 75 109,242 15 44,664 90 153,906

Cleared.

To With Cargo. In Ballast. Total.
Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. i Vessels. Tonnage.
Hong-Kong ...... United States ... China ... Marseilles Newcastle, New South Wales ...... Cochin-China...... Total ...... 1 1 28 1 25 1 2 1 1 i 1 | 1. 34,356 76,470 2,444 3,124 1 3 6 3,005 8,292 5,830 28 25 3 1 3 6 34,356 76,470 5,449 3,124 8,292 5,830
! 56 1 116,394 10 17,127 66 133,521

Cebu.

Mr. Vice-Consul Knowles reports as follows :
Imports.The feature of the year has again been the large increase
in importations from the United States of America as a result of
favourable tariff legislation, referred to in last report, but there has
also been a marked increase in import trade generally. The United
Kingdom obtained little share of the increase, but the total value
of importations of cotton goods from the United Kingdom is slightly
in excess of that of the previous year.


CEBU.

23

Business in the early part of the year was bad, with stocks in first
and second hands heavy and unwieldy, partly as a result of too free
importations from the United States and too free purchases by
dealers of new goods, which later proved unsuitable for native trade
in the shops.

A fire which destroyed property to the value of 100,0002.mostly
covered by insuranceoccurred in the Chinese business section in the
month of July.

Prices for both hemp and copra, which had ruled low during the
early part of the year, improved from June onwards, and the improve-
ment was soon reflected in the import market, business in the latter
half of the year being somewhat over normal.

White shirtings.United States manufacturers are steadily im-
proving the finish of their goods, and while they have still much to do
in this respect to meet native ideas, yet it seems certain that they
will eventually capture the trade in low and medium qualities. The
trade in fine cloths is still almost confined to Manchester goods.

White drills.American goods have made some headway during
the year, but Manchester goods are still superior, and most of the old-
established marks continue to find a ready sale. American coloured
drills and coverts are replacing these goods as suiting cloths to some
extent in native favour.

Grey drills, grey sheetings.Supplies are drawn entirely from
the United States of America, where manufacturers have readily
met the requirements of the trade.

Prints.United States manufacturers are gradually monopolising
the trade in both plain and fancy goods.

Printed muslins, lawns, &c.British goods still keep their hold
on the market, and so far American competition has been little felt.
For printed muslins especially there is a large outlet for attractive
designs.

Yams.For British white and Turkey-red yarns there is a steady
outlet, and they continue to hold their position in the market. There
is a small outlet for fancy, coloured yarns, also of British manu-
facture.

Iron and steel.United States manufacturers have strengthened
their hold on this business during the year, the total importations of
sheets and plates into the islands from the United States having
increased from 6,674,469 kilos, in 1910 to 9,307,335 kilos, in 1911.
Importations from all sources for 1911 were 11,000,000 kilos, against
8,000,000 kilos, for the previous year, of which British manufacturers
supplied 1,799,731 kilos, in 1911 against 1,571,870 kilos, in 1910.
Only a few of the best known British marks of galvanised iron sheets
are now inquired for.

Bar iron.British and Belgian manufacturers have secured the
bulk of this trade during the year.

Wire nails.There has been no change in the position during the
year. United States manufacturers continue to do the bulk of the
business, the total value of importation from the United Kingdom into
the islands only amounting to 1,944 dol. against 55,926 dol. from
the United States of America.


24

CEBU.

Paints.Well known British brands have held their place in the
market during the period under review, and importations from the
United Kingdom show a slight increase over those of the previous
year.

Oil, linseed.More than 50 per cent, of the total importations came
from the United Kingdom. Importations from British India were
second in point of quantity.

Glassware.Importations from the United Kingdom show a falling-

off.

Tools.The United States of America is now the largest exporter
to this market, but importations from the United Kingdom show no
diminution as compared with those of the previous year.

Earthenware, &c.While total importations into the islands
from the United Kingdom increased during the year, those from
Germany show a still larger increase and exceeded British importations
in value.

Petroleum.Imports during the year amounted to 212,000 cases
as compared to 190,838 cases during 1910.

Coal.Imports amounted to 38,670 tons, an increase of 3,195 tons
as compared to 1910 ; 34,044 tons came from Newcastle, New South
Wales, and the balance came from Japanese mines.

Rice.Importations amounted to 41,143 tons as compared to
50,800 tons in 1910, the falling-off being due entirely to the British
and French Governments prohibiting exportation from Rangoon and
Saigon during the latter part of the year.

Exports. Hemp.There had been a falling-off in production during
1911 as compared to 1910, the figures being 42,300 and 45,296 tons
respectively. Prices varied comparatively little during the 12 months
and were never sufficiently good to encourage planters, consequently
estates have been gradually abandoned, or where the land is suitable
the trees have been cut down and cocoanuts planted in their place. It
appears probable that the production during next year will show a
further considerable falling-off through this cause.

High-grade hemp, owing to the low prices ruling, has become
very scarce, medium to low grades forming fully 90 per cent, of the
total production. The very coarse hemp, so greatly in evidence in
1910, has to a great extent been eliminated.

Total shipments amounted to 42,102 tons against 45,705 tons in
1910, the distribution being as follows :

1910. 1911.
Tons. Tons.
United States ... 26,620 23,229
United Kingdom 7,005 7,443
Continent 602 780
Japan ... 292 99
Manila...... 11,186 10,551

Practically all the hemp shipped to Manila was transhipped to the
United Kingdom and Continental ports.

Maguey production has suffered greatly, owing to the low
prices ruling throughout the year, and many plantations have been
cleared in order to utilise the ground for more remunerative products.


cebu. 25

Exports only amount to 9,029 bales as compared to 10,958 bales
during 1910. The prospects for 1912 are still less favourable.

Sugar.The prices ruled comparatively high during the year,
and a great impetus has been given to this branch of the trade owing
to the sugar having free entry into America. The crop was about
6,500 tons, which is greatly in excess of the crops for some years
past. The 1912 crop is expected to be almost double that of 1911.

Copra.The production shows a steady increase, the exports
amounting to 38,080 tons against 32,507 tons in 1910. A great deal
of land has been put to the cultivation of cocoanuts, and in the
course of five or six years there is little doubt that this industry will
take first place in rank of importance in the export trade of this port.

Harbour works.An extension is now being made to the wharf,
which will enable vessels of not exceeding 30 feet draught to load along-
side with perfect safety. The work is expected to be finished by
December next.

Water system.The work was completed in November, and will
be opened to the public soon.

The reservoir holds 400,000,000 gallons, which feeds into a distribu-
tion tank holding 4,000,000 gallons, situated 6 kiloms. from Cebu,
at a height of 80 metres above the city.

The source of supply is impounded rainwater.

Comparative Table showing Exports from Cebu during the Years

1901 and 1911.

Sugar
Hemp
Copra
Maguey

Pieuls

Bales

1901.
128,650
125,968
45,263

1911.

82,336
336,813
597,282
9,029

Imports of Rice, Coal and Petroleum during the Year 1911.

From Rice. Coal. Petroleum.
Saigon...... Australia Japan...... United States Sumatra i Bags. 735,841 Tons. 34,044 4,626 Cases. 157,000 55,000
Total 735,841 38,670 212,000

(679)

c


oa

Comparative List of Shipments of Hemp, Copra and Sugar during the last Five Years.

Year. Hemp. Copra. Sugar.
United Kingdom. United A7 C4, Various. States. United Kingdom. United States. Various. ! China. United States.
.1907 ............ 1908 ............ 1909 ............ 1910 ............ 1911 ............ Bales. 80,530 94,680 91,280 56,043 59,545 Bales. 107,701 153,432 231,568 212,962 185,822 Bales. 7,253 31,120 41,384 96,638 91,446 Piculs. 25,712 8,800. 17,600 44,800 35,200 Piculs. 12,176 5,200 38,000 Piculs. 239,776 298,464 381,528 470,121 536,082 Piculs. 48,010 66,0.11 20,332 468 Piculs. 26,064 82,336


cebu.

27

Comparative Note of Tonnage Arrived in Cebu during the Year

1911.

Vessels. Tonnage
British 121 237,319
United States 38 52,744
German 7 12,526
Norwegian 4 3,562
French 3 3,267
Japanese ... 4 10,956
Total... 177 320,374


Rkports of the Annual Series have been recently issued from His Majoshv's
Diplomatic and Consular Officers at the following- places, and may be obtained rroin
the sources indicated on the title-page:

Belgium

Bolivia
Brazil

Bulgaria
Chile ...

China ...

Pricc

Abyssinia ... 4893 Harrar. Trade, 1011-12 ... Id
Argentine 4785 Buenos Ayres. Trade, &c., 1910 2id

Republic 4790 Kosario. Trade, 1910...... J1

Austria- 4878 Hungary. Trade, &c., 1911 ...
Hungary 4923 Dalmati'a. Commerce, &c.,
1910-11 ............

4992 Bohemia. Trade, 1911......

4993 Austria Hungary. Foreign
trade, 1911 ".........

... 4807 Belgium. Trade, &c., 1910
and first half of 1911 ...
4840 Antwerp Trade, 1911...
... 4888 Bolivia. Trade, 1911 ...
4803 Santa Catharina. Trade, &c.,

1910 .........

4876 Bahia. Trade, 1911 ...
4900 Sao Paulo. Trade, 1911
4918 Pernambuco. Trade, 1911

... 4817 Bulgaria. Trade, 1910 ...
... 4842 Antofagasta. Trade, 1911
4843 Coquimbo. Trade, &c., 1911
4952 Iquique. Trade, 1911 ...
... 4930 Ningpo. Trade, 1911 ...

4933 Chungking. Trade, &c., 1911

4934 Teng Yueh. Trad, 1911

4935 Tsinan and Tsingtau. Trade,

1911 ............Id

4950 Mengtsz, &c. Trade, 1911 ... 4Ad

4951 Kiukiang. Trade, 1911 ... 3?,d
4963 Wuchow. Trade, 1911......

4966 Shanghai. Trade, 1911

4967 Chefoo. Trade, 1911 ......

4973 Wuhu. Trade, 1911 ......

4979 China. Trade, 1911 ......

... 4788 Cartagena. Trade, &c., 1910 ...
4904 Antioquia. Trade, 1911

4924 Katanga. Trade, 1911......

... 4899 Corea. Trade, 1911 ......

... 4919 Costa Jlica. Trade, &c., 1911...
... 4982 Crete. Trade, &c., 1911
... 4905 Cuba. Trade, &c., ended June

30. 1911............bhd

... 4845 St. Thomas and St. Croix.

Trade, 1911 .........£d

4962 Denmark. Finances, 1911-13 Id
4977 Faroe Islands. Trade, &c., 1911 2^d
> San Pedro de Macoris. Trade,

1911 ............

4831 Ecuador. Trade, &c., 1910 ...
. 4938 Alexandria. Trade, &c., 1911

4970 Port, Said. Trade, 1911
. 4883 Cochin-China. Trade, &c., 1911
4884 Rouen. Trade, &c., 1911

4C89 Calais. Trade, 1911 ......

4895 Lyons. Trade, &c., 1911
4906 Corsica. Trade, 1911 ...
4948 Nice. Trade, 1911
4954 Madagascar. Trade, 1911
4961 Society Islands. Trade, &c.,

1911 ............ Id

4987 New Caledonia. Trade, 1911... 2id
4989 Marseilles. Trade, &c., 1911... 53d
Germany ... 4352 Dresden. Trade, &c., 1911 ... Id
4913 Mannheim. Trade, &c., 1911... 4|d
4915 German South-West Africa.

Trade, 1911 .........

4939 Diisseldorf. Trade, &c., 1911...
4947 Samoa. Trade, 1911

Japan ...

Colombia

Congo ...
Corea ...
Costa Rio a
Crete ...
Cuba ...

Denmark

Dominican

Republic
Ecuador
Egypt ...

France

4d
2d

4d

Id

2d

3d
, 2hd
, 6id

Id

. 3d
, UA
, 4d
. 3r,d
. hi
. 2|d
. 4kd
3^d
5d
Id

3d
2d
Id
3d
3.1
Id

Id

3d
4 d
4Ad

Id
, Id

5|d
6d
Id
7d
4d
6d
, 2},d
ld
3d

3£d
3M
Id

4949 Stettin, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 2hd
4990 Bavaria. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 9cl
Greece ... 4870 Patras, &c. Trade, 1911 ... 2£d
4882 The Cyclades. Trade, 1911 ... 4d
4887 Corfu. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 2d
4926 Thessaly. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 4d
Guatemala ... 4832 Guatemala. Trade, &c., 1910 2£d
Hayti& Santo 4638 Hayti and Santo Domingo.

Domingo
Honduras
Italy ...

(679;

Trade, 1910
4960 Honduras. Trade, 1911

4836 Italy.
4839 Italy.
4858 Genoa.
4871 Sicily.
4920 Rome.
4944 Naples.
4988 Milan.

Trade, 1910
Finances, 1911 ...
Trade, 1911 ...
Trade, &c., 1911
Trade, 1911 ...

Trade, 1911 ...
Trade, 19il ...

Mexico

Morocco

Muscat

Netherlands

Nicaragua
Norway

Panama

Paraguay

Persia

Persian

Gulf
Peru ...
Portugal

4d
4d
2d
, lfd
. 5ld
5d
Ud
4d
4d

Russia...

Servia..
Si am ..

Spain

Sweden

4931 Nagasaki. Trade, 1911......

4932 Japan. Trade, 1911 ......

4971 Yokohama. Trade, 1911

4972 Hakodate. Trade, 1911

4975 Kobe. Trade, Ac., 1911

4996 Formosa. Trade, 1911......

4864 Yucatan. Trade, 1911......

4873 Vera Cruz. Trade, &c., 1911 ...

4880 Colima. Trade, 1911 ......

4917 Salina Cruz. Trade, 1911
4943 Tampico. Trade, &c., 1911 ...

4976 Mexico. Trade, &c.f 1911

4833 Morocco. Trade, 1910......

4922 Muscat. Trade, 1911-12

4879 Netherlands. Commerce,

1910-11 ............

4925 Java, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 ...
4956 Curapoa. Trade, &c., 1911
, 4859 Nicaragua. Trade. 1910
, 4830 Norway (Supplementary),

Trade, &c., 1910 ......

49^3 Norway. Trade, &c., 1911 ...
, 4978 Panama. Trade, &c., 1911 ...
, 4815 Paraguay. Trade, 1910
. 4838 Ispahan' and Yezd. Trade for
the year ending March 20,

1911' ............

4955 Persia. Trade, 1910-11......

4986 Kerman. Trade. 1911-12
4991 Khorasaiu Trade, 1911-12 ...
4994 Kermanshah. Trade for the

year ending March 20, 1912
4820 Bahrein Islands. Trade,

1910-11 ............

.. 4867 Iquitos. Trade, 1911......

.. 4874 Azores. Trade, &c., 1911
4881 East African Possessions.

Trade, 1911 ........

4903 Angola. Trade, 1911 ......

4908 Chinde. Trade, &c., 1911

4916 Madeira. Trade, 1911......

4927 Lisbon. Trade, 1911 ......

4937 Oporto. Trade, 1911 ......

.. 4849 Batoum. Trade, 1911......

4910 Ilelsingfors. Trade, 1911
4965 Odessa. Trade, &c., 1911
4968 Russian Foreign Commerce
and Trade of SI. Petersburg,
1911

Price

.. ;u-d

.. 5d

.. 4id

.. 4?,d

.. 6d

.. 4-*d

.. Id

2d
3d
Id
3d
4d
5H
5d

lid
7d

5.i-d
2£d

2d

3d
3d

4jd
Hd

3d
3£d

3d

3d

4id
2d

M
3d
4d
2d
4d
. 4d
, 3d
. 4 Sd
7M

5id

4984 Poland, &c. Tradr &c., 1911... 5|d

&c., 1910

Id

Switzerland

Tunis.....

Turkey

United

States

Venezuela

4945 Servia. Finances, 1912
4814 Senggora. Tra-le,

and part of 1911 .....

4824 Bangkok. Trade, 1910-11
4974 Chiengmai. Trade, Ac., 1911

4862 Canary Islands. Trade, &c.,

1911 ...........

4866 Corunna, &c. Trade, &c., 1911
4907 Barcelona. Trade, &c., 1911 ..
4921 Seville. Trade, &c., 1911

4946 Bilbao. Trade, 1911 .....

4981 Spain. Industries, &c., 1911..

4995 Malaga. Trade, 1911.....

4837 Swedish Budget, 1913.....

4957 Gothenburg. Trade, &c., 1911 4£d
4911 Switzerland. Trade, 1911 ... 2Jd

4795 Tunis. Trade, 1910 ......

4835 Constantinople. Trade, 1910-11
4850 Jerusalem. Trade, 1911

4863 Beirut, &c. Trade, &c., 1911...

4885 Mosul. Trade, 1911 ......

4886 Jeddah. Trade, &c., 19U3-10...
4942 Aleppo. Trade, 1911
4980 Basra. Trade, 1911
4985 Erzeroum. Trade, 1911

2 d
4d
3§d

3d
4*d
5d
5d
5*d
Sid
3d
id

3d
8d
2id
3d
,'d
... 3d

... i.7<1
... 2}d
... Id

4936 St. Louis. Trade. 1911 ... 5d

4940 Hawaii. Trade, Ac.. 1909-11... 4d

4941 San Francisco. Trade, 1911 ... 4d
4953 Galveston. Trade, Ac.. 1911 ... 2id

4958 Portland, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 6|d

4959 New Orleans. Trade, &c., 1911 lid
4969 Savannah. Trade, 1911 ... 5ld
4875 Ciudad Bolivar. Trade, &c., 1911 4 4964 Venezuela and Caracas

Trade, 1910-11.........6c

1375 9/12 h&s


Full Text

PAGE 1

No. 4997 Annual Series. DIPLOMATIC AND CONSUL.AR REPORTS. UNITED STATES. REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1911 ON THE TRADE AND COMMERCE OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. EDITED AT THE FOREIGN OFFICE AND THE BOARD OF TRADE. REFERENCE TO PREVIOUS REPORT, Annual Series No. 4810. Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty, .SEPTEMBER, 1912. LONDON: PUBLISHED BY HIS M.A.JES1'Y'S STATIONERY OFFICE. To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 'WYMAN AND SONS, LTD., FET'l'ER LANE, E.C., and 32, ABINGDON STREET, S. \V,; or OLIVER AND BOYD, TWEEDDALE COURT, EDINBURGH; or E. PONSONBY, LTD., 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN; or from the Agencies in the British Colonies and Dependencies, the United States of America, the Continent of Europe and .A.broad of T. FISHER UNWIN, LONDON, W.C. PlUNTED BY HARRISON AND SO:NS, PRINTERS IN ORDINA1;1-Y TO HIS MAJESTlC, 45-47, ST. MARTIN'S LANE, \,\ .C. 1912. Cd. 6005-170.] Price Twopence.

PAGE 3

CONTENTS. ---+-MANILAPAGls Currency .............................................................................. 4 Weights and measures .............................. ..................... ...... ... 4 Population and industries of principal towns . . .. . . . . 4 Trade and commcrce-G eneral remarks ................................................................. Imports ................................................................................. Animals (cattle) ................................................................. Cotton ............................................................................. Iron aud steel .................................................................... Rice ............................................................................... Wines and spirits .............................................................. Coal .............................................................................. Exports ................................................................................ Copra ................................................................................ I-Iemp ................................................................................ Kapok ............................................................................. Maguey ............................................................................. Sugar ................................................................................ Tobacco ............................................................................. Cigars ................................................................................ Agr.iculture .......................................................................... Stock raising .......................................................................... ~/~~~;y: :: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :: : : : : :.: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Harbour works ....................................................................... Shipping ............................................................................. Health ............................................................................... Hotel ................................................................................... Publicity ............................................................................ .. Carnival. ............................................................................... Annexes1.--Trade by countries ........................................................... 2.-Imports ......................................................................... .. 3.-Expor.ts .......................................................................... 4.-Agri?ultur'."l ~roducts ........................................................ 5.-Foreign sh1ppmg .............................................................. 6.--British shipping .............................................................. ILOILO report ........................................................................... CEBU report .. .......................................................................... f> 6 6 G 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 10 11 11 11 11 11 12 13 14 ]5 16 17 18 19 22 NoTE.-The figures given in the tables relating to British shipping are exclusive of vessels arriving at the port to which the tables relate from other ports in the same country, unless they landed cargo at that port from another country ; and similarly of vessels departing for other ports in the same country, unless they loaded cargo for another country. The figures differ in consequence in some cases from the figures given in the tables relating to shipping of all nationalities, which are based on the local shipping returns. (679) A 2

PAGE 4

4 CURRENCY. s. d. 1 peso (100 centavos) 2 1 (nominally) The unit of valuA in the Philippine Islands is the theoretical gold peso, .:,-ontaining 12 grains of gold, nine-tenths fine, representing gold value exactly equal to 50 c. United States currency. This parity is maintained by the sale of drafts in the Philippines by the Government on its redemption fund in New York and the sale of drafts in New York by the agent of the Philippine GovernmAnt on the Government's redemption fund in Manila. The Govern ment's "rates of exchange are fixed and represent as nearly as practicable the cost of shipping gold bars between New York and Manila. WEIGHTS and Measures. Only the metric system is now permitted to be used officially except in the cease of lumber, for which British measurements are retained. Scales, steelyards and the like imported from abroad must be marked in kilos., &c., only ; otherwise, if bearing any marks other than those of the metric system they will not be accepted for registration by the Bureau of Internal Re,enue. The following table contains a list of the principal towns, giving the !Provinces, industries and products :~---Town. I Province. Population. Industry or Products. Manila ... I ... 234,409 Distributing centre ""I Laoag ... llocos Norte ... 34,454 Tobacco Batangas ... Batangas ... ... 41,102 Sugar Cebu ... ... Cebu ... .. 57,181 Greatest hemp port in th I I southern islands Camiling ... I Tarlac ... .. i 29.132 Sugar Tabaco ... Albay ... 22;197 Hemp and copra Zamboanga Mindanao i 20,692 Hemp, copra, shells, almacig .... i and lumber Dagupan ... Pangasinan .. 20,357 Paddy lfloilo Iloilo 39,812 Sugar ... ... .. e Capiz ... ... Capiz ... .. I 20,800 Paddy and hemp Apani ... ... Cagayan ... .. 20,138 1Tobacco and maguey N ueva Caceres ... Ambos Camarines 12,411 Hemp and paddy Ormoc ... Leyte ... .. 30,924 Hemp San Fernando ... La Union ... 16,095 Maguey, sugar and tobacco Ualbayog Samar ... ... 17,220 Hemp Silay ... ... N egros Occidental 24,597 Sugar Vigau ... :::1 Ilocos Sur ... 33,226 Maguey, sugar and tobacco Dumagnete Negros Oriental...' 14,894 Sugar, hemp and tree cotton '.Borongan ... i Samar ... .. 14,245 Copra Sorsogon I Sorsogon ... 13,512 Hemp ... ... Tarlac ... .. Tarlac ... .. 12,718 Provincial capital Romblon ... Romblon ... ... 16,180 Hemp and copra Lucena ... ... Tayabas ... .. 9,375 Copra Catbalocrau ... Samar ... ... 7,758 Hemp Surigao~ .. ... Surigao ... .. 7,749 Hemp Cavite ... ... Cavite .. ... 16,556 Naval station Masbate ... Masbate ... ... 5,237 Gold dredging .Jolo ... ... Jolo .. I 1,270 Hemp and shells Legaspi ... .. Albay .. .. i 27,901 Greatest hemp port

PAGE 5

No. 4997. Annual Series~ Reference to previoits Report, .Annual Series No. 4810. Rep01t on the Trade and Oorm1ie1ce of the Pliili[Pine Islands for the Year 1911 By MR. ACTIKG VICE-CONSUL M. PASKE S)lllTH. General remarks.-The total volume of the trade of the Philippine Islands, according to figures kindly supplied by the Bureau of Custcms, Manila, amounted to 19,294,112Z., of which 10,005,092Z. represented imports and 9,289,020Z. exports. The trade as a whole has improved by 471,649l., and this improvement indicates the prosperous con dition of the islands at the present time. The excern of imports over exports, which last year (1910) was l,893,937l. against the islands, has this year been reduced to 716,072l. The following table gives the figures of the total trade for the last five years :---I Year. Imports. I Exports. Total. 1907 6,344,544 6,895,385 13,239,929 1908 6,080,442 6,791,890 12,872,332 1909 I 6,475,920 7,275,903 13,751,823 1910 10,358,200 8,464,263 18,82:l,463 1911 1 10,005,092 9,289,020 19,29-1,112 -------~-The position occupied by the various countries is shown in Annex 1. As foreshadowed in last year's report the United States has acquired a still larger share of the trade. When considering the figures of the imports from the United States it must be borne in mind that the supply officers for the military forces and the Civil Government used, in former years, to declare their purchases on free entries under the provisions of the tariff law then in force, but that now large quantities of these supplies are purchased through local merchants. Accordingly these figures, which formerly were excluded from the returns, are now included. The amount of such importations was about 1,000,000Z. In imports the United States fell off, due largely to over-stocking in 1910 and the general depression towards the end of the year; felt throughout the islands on account of damage done to the crops by storms and typhoons, and later by drought. These conditions were reflected in the trade of foreign countries, the imports from many of (679)

PAGE 6

6 l'IIANILA. which declined. French Indo-China shows an increase, due to increased mportations of rice. The same remark applies to the Dutch East Indies. Taking into consideration the above described conditions, the export trade shows a creditable increase. The United States took over 500,000l. worth more than in 1910. This was due to increased purchases of copra and sugar. Exports to the United Kingdom and Italy fell off slightly, while those to Belgium and France increased owing to their larger purchases of copra. AustriaHungary took reduced quantities of leaf tobacco. The exports to Germany and Japan show increases, principally owing to larger shipments of hemp and maguey. On the whole the slight increase of the export trade for 1911 leads one to expect that, provided conditions improve, the excess of imports over exports will soon disappear. The main resources of the islands are still agricultural. The purchasing power depends on the yield from hemp, sugar, copra and tobacco. The year 1910 must be looked upon (especially in the case of imports) as an abnormal and experimental year. Large imports were made from the United States and much stock was held over. In 1911 the country suffered much damage from storms and typhoons, and during the last. quarter a drought set in, which con tinued into 1~12. The crops have been severely damaged, and this means a decreased purchasing power. Already the effects are being felt., notably in the cotton cloths trade. The effects, however, of the customs tariff are making themselves felt, and should internal conditions improve the islands will soon make up the setback occasioned by present weather conditions. Imports.-The import trade in 1911 was valued at 10,005,092l., a decrease of 353,108l. Decreases were experienced in many lines. 'l'he largest decrease was in cotton cloths. There were increases in cars and carriages, cement, iron and steel, oils, rice, silks, and wines and spirits. The disturbing factor in the imports of the islands is the large quantities of rice which in recent years it has been found necessary to import. Animals. Cattle.-A thriving business in this trade was commenced in 1911 with Western Australia. The cattle are brought to a quarantine station specially built at Mariveles, some 20 miles from Manila, where they are held in quarantine for slaughter. Cattle continued to be imported from Pnom penh, Indo-China. The cattle trade between HongKong and the Philippines, which was once flourishing, has been killed by stringent quarantine regulations. It is hoped that it will be revived in the near future. Cottons.-The value of the imports of cotton was l,900,924l., a decrease of 283,462l. Over-stocking in goods from the United States accounts for some of the loss; but the heavy drought, with storms and typhoons early in the year and the consequent damage to the crops, is also a factor. The United States held the market in prints, grey cloths and white shirtings. In other dearer lines, such as printed muslins, bleached and dyed yarns, the trade remained with the United Kingdom. Large importations of grey yarns were made from Japan. The United Kingdom will find it difficult to keep her share in this trade

PAGE 7

MANILA, 7 against the 27 per cent. ad valorem duty. Orders which might have gone to the United Kingdom went to the United States. Already a further decrease is observed for 1912. The heavy drought has continued into 1912, and thus the purchasing power of the people has become much impaired. Business is now being done in the cheapest lines. Iron and steel.-This trade was valued at l,287,236l., an increase of 129,014l. over 1910. The volume of this trade is an exception to the general decrease in imports, but the increase has gone to the credit of the United States. Aided by the protective tariff the United States made during 1911 still further inroads into almost every branch of the iron and steel trade. The chief exception was in rails for railways, in which the imports from the United States decreased. In bar iron and iron and steel sheetsand structural material the United States dominated the market ; the same remark applies to the automobile trade. European countries supplied the larger part of the trade in small tools and cutlery. In sugar machinery the United Kingdom still held her own. The United States has also entered this market during 1911. The increase in sugar machinery will continue, due to the boom in this industry which free trade in sugar with the United States has caused. Rice.-The situation in the rice trade became so acute during 1911 that the Government were compelled to intervene and enter the market as sellers in order to keep down the rising prices, which went as high as 9 pesos 50 c. per cavan. The source of supply was, as usual, Indo-China, with smaller quantities from Java and Japan. Wines and spirits.-This trade showed a slight improvement over 1910. Business conditions improved somewhat during the latter half of the year under review. Coal.-As usual coal imports were divided between Australia and Japan. Exports.-The export trade for 1911 was valued at 9,289,020l., an increase of 824,757l. The increase is due to larger exports of sugar to the United States and of copra to Europe. Hemp and cigars show a decline. Copra.-The year 1911 shows a still further increase in the pro duction of copra and a corresponding decrease in the manufacture of cocoanut oil for local consumption. As in former years the largest purchaser was France. Increased shipments went to the United Kingdom, United States, Belgium, Spain and Japan. Netherlands, Mexico and Hong-Kong appeared as new buyers. Germany and Italy both took less. The increasing price of the staple has given a great impetus to the industry, and much land is being sought for the purpose of cocoanut cultivation. The demand, however, still keeps pace with the supply. Hemp.-The export of hemp further declined, being 146,208 tons, valued at 3,025,036l., in 1911 compared to 160,595 tons, valued at 3,432,358l., in 1910. The hemp situation. is causing. serious thought amongst both producers and merchants. Efforts are being made to improve the quality by introducing better methods of collection

PAGE 8

8 MANILA. and purchase in the provinces. This matter has the attention of the Hemp Association. The United States took considerably less than in 1910. Manila hemp, handicapped by the exportation tax, cannot compete with the Mexican sisal. Attempts are now being made to get this tax removed. As regards grade a certain improvement was shown, but so long as the present prices for low grade continue little increase in this line can be expected. Kapok.-Philippine kapok was for the first time an article of export; the total quantity exported was 119 tons. The United States was the principal buyer at from 32 to 34 c. gold per lb. c.i.f. New York. In time the supply from the Philippines should increase. Maguey.-The export of this fibre increased over 1910. The United Kingdom took an increased quantity, while other b'uyers were France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and British India. Sugar.-The quantity exported was 205,392 tons, the highest since 1896. The largest amount went to the United States. The prices obtained were fair, averaging about 6 pesos 50 c. basis 88 Iloilos to July, when the shortage in the European b~et crop put up values of all sugar, and transactions were made at 9 pesos for the said grade in August. The quantity of sugar, however, then held was small and chiefly in the hands of the export houses and middlemen. Thus the planters did not derive much benefit from the phenomenal rise in prices. Capital is being attracted to this industry, thus facilitating the establishment of larger sugar centrals. In general the system of cultivation and polarisation is still antiquated, and the gradual introduction of modern methods will increase both quality and output. The year 1912 crop shows a considerable falling-off in quantity owing to the prolonged drought since last October. Tobacco, unmanufactured.-The export in this trade increased. The bulk going to Spain as usual. Nearly all European countries, except Austria-Hungary, increased their purchases. Cigars and cigarettes.-The trade in cigars, while showing an increase over 1909, suffered a severe setback from 1910. The reason is the over-stocking of the American market, which is easily the largest buyer. Efforts are now being made to advertise the better grades of Philippine cigars in the United States. The Tobacco Association took the matter up, and certain regulations were made as to the size and grades of tobacco to be used for the manufacture of cigars for the United States. The trade in cigarettes shows a slight decrease all round with the exception of Hong-Kong, which colony took an increased quantity. Agriculture.-Agricultural conditions show a decided improve ment. The four main resources of the islands-sugar, cocoanuts, tobacco and hemp:-are receiving much attention. Both local and foreign capitalists are investing money in sugar land and putting up modern mills. The high price now being realised for copra has added to the number of acres of land allotted to the cultivation of eocoa nuts. Efforts are being made by co-operation between the Bureau of Agrfoulture and planters to improve the quality of tobacco, and

PAGE 9

:MANILA. 9 when improvement comes there should be a corresponding demand for Philippine tobacco. During the latter half of 1911 severe storms and floods were experienced, and later a general drought set in, which has worked considerable harm to all crops. A tabulated statement is annexed (Annex 4) showing the crops for the fiscal year 1911, and the following are the estimates for the fiscal year 1912 :-Rice Abaca (hemp) Copra Sugar Corn Tobacco ... 50 per cent. of the 1911 production 95 110 80 70 90 The total area of the Philippines is 119,542 square miles, of which approximately 7 per cent. is given up to the above crops. Other areas cultivated are maguey, 13,366 hectares, and coffee, 1,948 hectares. Stock raising and animals.-The campaign against rinderpest continues. The use of anti-rinderpest serum has been abandoned. The Veterinary Department have been using every effort to separate and quarantine animals known to be infected, and to effect this their attention has been confined to areas known to be badly infected. The assistance of scouts and constabulary has been enlisted to aid in effectual quarantine. Already good results have been obtained and the situation is improving. Unfortunately a fresh outbreak has occurred in the south (Island of Panay), but by applying the above methods it is hoped to have the disease soon under control. The efforts of the authorities being centred on rinder pest but little attention has been given to surra. This latter, however, has shown no signs of spreading. Foot-and-mouth disease has appeared occasionally amongst imported cattle from Indo-China. Pleura-pneumonia exists amongst the cattle arriving for slaughter from Australia, but, as they are held at Sisiman, no danger exists. NorE.-Detailed reports on the agriculture of the islands are issued Hy the Bureau of Agriculture, Manila, and those interested can obtain them from the Director of that Bureau. Forestry.-The following figures have been taken from a publication of the Bureau of Forestry, being an estimate in round numbers of the commercial forest area and the stand of the different types :

PAGE 10

10 MANILA. Class. Per Cent. .Area. --------~ _____ S_q ____ -miles.Stand, Board Feet per Acre. Total Stand in 1,000,000 Board Feet. Dipterocash Molave Pine 75 10 5 2 8 30,000 4,000 2,000 800 3,200 Acres. 19,200,000 2,560,000 1,280,000 512,000 2,048,000 10,000 3,000 2,000 2,000 192,000 2,680 2,560 1,024 Mangrove .. Mountain .. .. ... Total 100 40,ooo 25,600,000 -~::___ I __ ___ Purely protective forest. During the year three concessions have been granted to lumbering companies over large areas, and providing these companies are sufficiently capitalised good results should be obtained. The total wood produced during the fiscal year 1911 was 184,628 cubic metres. Minor forest products were produced as follows :Tan bark ... ... Kilos. 2,012,385 Dye bark .. ,, 87 ,229 Wood oils .. .. Litres 77 ,540 Almaciga ... ... Kilos. 707,732 Bejuco (bent wood) 4,593,655 Gutta percha 115,674 Rubber 1,466 The following table shows the gum and resins actually exported :Copa!... Rubber Gutta percha ... Kilos.i 762,745 9,940 318 60 101,478 8,200 Mining.-Mining is gradually recovering from the setback caused by storms and floods. The output of gold was considerably curtailed by destructive typhoons, which crippled mining operations in Benguet, formerly the largest producing district. The following are figures of production for 1909-11 :---------------------.Articles. 1909. 1910. 1911. -----Iron ... 3,107 2,002 2,915 Gold 49,519 30,886 37,990 Copper 60 Coal... 19,718 17,625 13,000 Clay products 42,284 43,000 45,000 Salt ... 37,536 38,000 35,000 -------

PAGE 11

J\,IANILA. 11 Railways.-The various railway companies are gradually extending their lines. The following sections were opened in 1911 :Line. Paniqui-Tayug N oveleta-N aic Calamba-Santa Cruz Luta-Batangas .. Main line south .. Total length opened ... I -;::=---To-----i;~!!~ Cuyapo .. Salinas .. Bay Lipa Luta Rosales ... Naic Magdalena Batangas San Pablo Kiloms. 14,393 15,600 18,632 24,940 18,853 92,418 Harbour works.--Practically no change has been made m the harbour, beyond a certain amount of dredging. The recommendation of the Collector of Customs to build additional piers has not yet been carried out, owing to lack of funds. Shipping.-Tables showing the total foreign shipping and British shipping are annexed. The British flag still retains its place by a large margin. The transfer of two local vessels to the American flag and the extension of the run of another local line to include Iloilo and Cebu, caused a slight fall in the tonnage of the British flag; but British shipping is nevertheless on the increase and the number of freighters calling regularly has increased. Efforts are being made by local merchants to obtain direct communication with the United States, and will, no doubt, soon be successful. At the time of writing the German Lloyd European Mail Line have commenced a monthly call. It is expected that the Japanese Mail Line (Nippon Yusen Kaisha) may do the same. Other established services are to be found i:1 last year's (1910) report. Health, &c.-At the close of the year 1911 health conditions were most promising. The death-rate among adults compares not un favourably with that of the United States and Europe. Efforts are now being made to deal with the great infant mortality. Owing to the prevalence of plague in China, stringent quarantine regulations were made, with the result that the disease was kept out of the islands. Cholera is non-existent. Small-pox has found but few victims, and of those the greater number were children who had not been vaccinated. The leper colony at Culion has proved a complete success, and all known cases of leprosy are segregated there. Hotel.-The new hotel (Manila Hotel) has, at the date of writing, been finished, and guests are already being received. Other hotel accommodation has been improved. Publicity.-The Manila Merchants' Association, to which most merchants, both native and foreign, belong, is co-operating with the Government in spreading literature on the resources of the islands. A Trade Commissioner has been appointed to represent the islands in the United States.

PAGE 12

12 MANILA. Exhibition and carnival.-An exhibition of Philippine products. was held in February, 1912, during carnival -week, and proved a. complete success. Local importers took the opportunity to exhibit imports, especially machinery. The next exhibition is fixed for 1914,, but no doubt a i,maller one will, as usual, be held in conjunction with the carnival.

PAGE 13

Annex 1.-ToTAL Trade of the Philippine Islands during the Years 1909-11 by Countries. British Empire United Kingdom Austral Country. Other colonies and dependencies Total, British Empire United States ... .. .. Austria-Hungary ... .. ... Belgium ... .. ... ... China ... ... .. .. France ... ... .. .. French In do-China ... ... ... Germany ... ... .. ... Italy ... ... ... .. ... .Japan ... ... ... ... Netherlands ... .. ... Dutch East Indies ... ... .. Siam ... ... ... ... ... Spain... .. ... ... ... Switzerland ... ... ... .. Other countries ... ... ... Grand total ... .. I ... 1 ... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ... .. ... .. ... Imports. 1,134,838 517,471 487 1,944,790 1,342,777 20,572 68,561 544,212 219,838 981,176 378,392 32,330 337,708 46,590 91,091 31,433 294,981 110,956 30,513 6,475,920 1909, Exports. 1,097,578 99,622 .1.v1.,ouv 450,852 1,076 3,544 1,814,061 3,068,023 35,658 162,890 313,565 986,649 2,265 189,774 138,927 56,953 37,528 9,534 2,511 436,149 4,252 17,164 7,275,903 I j I Imports. 1,347,034 521,557 .:..~v,vuu 122;s88 18,875 694 2,231,113 4,180,946 28,950 82,259 536,786 238,801 1,390,~00 495,734 33,389 546,656 40,861 54,520 23,967 311,902 119,8$4 42,232 10,358,200 1910. I I Exports. 1,452,525 103,248 "1.1.l,IJ.V 236,014 10,7:36 5,216 2,025,454 3,592,026 64,441 148,387. 154,319 1,601,628 2,344 150,686 136,189 55,721 61,026 11,540 3,270 413,644 14,770 28,818 8,464,263 Imports. 1,165,843 533,791 ..:J"-'U,.1.':t:U 171,946 3,698 ... 2,103,424 3,991,046 40,515 60,424 415,947 239,322 1,425,812 446,050 43,757 557,927 36,908 79,996 95,987 249,067 97,211 121,699 1();005,092 1911. I I Exports. 1,407,021 95,634 .""11..V,J!JVV 193,964 15,092 .. 1,930,980 4,130,631 11,807 291,147 109,931 1,724,176 2,264 268,861 104,898 117,813 89,103 8,665 1,487 456,869 10,103 30,285 9,289,020 >"d ::I1 H !Z t;,;j H Ul t-< tj 11 f--' c,:,

PAGE 14

Annex 2.-IMPORTS into the Philippine Islands during the Years 1909-11. I I Articles. I I AnimalsCattle ... Number Horses ... All other ... .. Total ... .. ... Brass and manufactures thereof ... Cereals and cereal products ... ... Cars and carriages ... ... ... Cement ... ... ... .. Lbs. Coal ... ... ... ... Tons Cotton and manufactures thereof ... Iron and steel and manufactures thereof Meat and dairy products ... .. Oils ... .. ... .. ... Rice ... .. ... ... Lbs. I Tobacco and manufactures thereof Wool and manufactures thereof All other articles ... ... :::1 Grand total I I I 1909. I 1910. I 39,161 60,789 386 821 .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. 72,857,502 133,569,199 220,533 532,591 .. .. ... ... ... ... ... .. 368,442,959 435,025,385 I ... I ... I I 1911. I 37,198 397 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. I .. .. .. .. ... .. i .. 1909. 177,797 8,444 7,152 193,393 36,561 333,282 51,153 64,153 130,488 1,498,892 499,185 444,706 260,126 998,751 111,874 130,777 16,855 29,748 1,675,976 6,475,920 I I I 1910. 275,797 17,823 1,244 294,864 50,781 497,463 153,600 125,159 349,853 2,184,386 1,158,222 594,925 285,017 1,248,200 152,998 97,614 46,721 67,191 3,051,206 10,358,200 I 1911. --202,740 9,773 3,661 216,174 44,732 405,761 258,737 131,336 253,963 1,900,924 1,287,236 593,174 362,031 1,410,885 159,084 100,610 36,932 63,492 2,780,021 10,005,092 >--' z

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Annex 3.-ToTAL Exports from the Philippine Islands during the Years 1909-11. Articles. Copra ... Lbs. Fibres, vegetables, textile grasses and manufactures thereof ... Gums and resins ... Hats Hemp Kapok Maguey Oils Sugar Tobacco, unmanufactured Cigars Cigarettes ... All other exports ... Total ... Tons Lbs. Number 1909. 240,374,599 165,299 4,066 285,116,244 20,976,743 151,457,000 23,337,000 1910. 265,618,602 160,595 2,606 267,796,166 21,926,744 184,407,000 35,629,000 1911. 313,378,480 146,208 119 4,484 460,078,408 27,656,359 134,830,000 30,170,000 -~ 1909.~_ I __ 1910. 1,598,514 27,571 20,890 49,810 3,520,000 60,103 15,722 1,168,392 320,072 365,527 4,380 124,922 7,275,903 2,216,470 119,662 20,337 58,107 3,432,358 42,207 9,489 1,505,080 331,946 574,929 8,467 145,211 8,464,263 1911. 2,712,409 18,500 26,161 82,064 3,025,036 3,835 61,158 11,535 2,300,140 388,934 396,220 6,528 256,500 9,289,020 ;;:: i> z ...... a,

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Annex 4.-STATISTICS on Principal Crops for Fiscal Year 1911. Compiled from the Official Reports submitted by the Executive Officers of 1 City, 716 Municipalities, 80 Townships, 22 Rancherias and 7 Settlements. Approximate Approximate Area Amount J Value of Cocoanut Approximate Crop. Cultivated. Product. Produced. Products in Total Value in Provincial Provincial Markets. Markets. I Hectares. Pesos. Pesos c. Pesos c. Rice ... ... .. 1,043,757 Cleaned rice .. .. ... Kilos. 574,842,688 0 .. 65,991,940 58 Abaca ... ... 404,160 Philippine hemp .. .. ,, 171,879,598 0 ... 27,500,735 68 Cocoanuts ... ... 208,476 Ripe nuts, used as food Number 154,980,726 0-03 4,649,421 78 Copra ... .. .. ... Kilos. 118,323,114 0 17,748,467 10 I Cocoanut oil ... ... ... Litres 6,602,966 0 1,980,889 80 I Tuba (a beverage) 37,649,880 0 1,882,494 0 ... .. ,, i i 26,261,272 68 Sugar cane ... ... I 120,313 Crude sugar and panochas ... Kilos. 243,924,574 0-10 I .. 24,392,457 40 Corn ... ... ... 302,516 1 Shelled corn ... .. ... Litres 186,404,700 0-0468 i .. 8,723,739 96 Tobacco ... .. 69,015 : Leaf tobacco ... ... ... Kilos. 25,518,132 0-27 I .. 6,889,895 64 Total ... 2,148,237 I I I 159,760,041 94 I ... ... i ... NOTE.-10 pesos = ll. (approximately). ..... 0, ,... ?'

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MANILA. 17 Annex 5.-STATEMENT of the Number and Registered Net Tonnage of Foreign Steamers and Sailing Vessels Entered and Cleared at all Ports in the Philippine Islands during the Calendar Year 1911. ENTERED. STEAM Vessels. With Cargo. I In Ballast. Port. Vessels. Registered I ~essel~I Registered Tonnage. Tonnage. -----------Manila ... ... 546 1,269,427 48 122,269 Cebu ... ... 144 209,487 12 36,465 Iloilo ... ... 65 105,618 17 49,700 Jolo ... ... 14 15,562 ... ... Zamboanga ... 33 38,503 2 1,500 Balabao ... ... 22 689 ... .. i Total ... 824 1 639 286 79 209 934 SAILING Vessels. ------------------------I With Cargo. In Ballast. Port. I I Vessel. Vessels. I Registered Registered Tonnage. Tonnage. Manila ... ... 1 .181 ... ... Zamboanga ... 1 34 1 40 Total ... 2 I 215 I 1 40 CLEARED. STEAM Vessels. With Cargo. I In Ballast. Port. I I Vessels.: Vessels. Registered Registered I Tonnage. Tonnage. --Manila 400 I 1,012,939 218 401,322 ... ... Cebu ... ... 90 189,376 35 54,917 Iloilo ... ... 14 37,185 30 44,197 Jolo ... ... 13 13,260 1 2,302 Zamboanga ... 17 17,524 12 13,871 Balabao ... ... 20 432 2 257 Total ... ... 554 I 1,270,716 298 516,866 (679) R

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18 PortJolo ... Zamboanga ... MANILA. SAILING Vessels (in Ballast). Total Vessels. 1 1 2 Registered Tonnage. 34 34 68 Annex 6.-STATEMENT of British Vessels Entered and Cleared at Manila during the Year 1911. Fromnited Kingdom ... ong-Kong ... ... ustralia ... ... traits Settlements ... ritish India ... ... hina ... ... ... apan ... ... ... alny ... ... .. nited States ... ... ranee ... ... .. u H A s B C J D u F F E rench Cochin-China ... gypt ... .. ... Total ... .. Tonited Kingdom ... ong-Kong ... ... ustralia ... ... traits Settlements ... ritish India ... ... hina ... ... ... apan ... .. ... nited States ... ... ranee ... ... .. u H A s B C J u F F I J N rench Cochin-China ... taly ... ... ... ava ... ... ... etherlands ... ... Total ... ... ENTERED. With Cargo. In Ballast, Total. I Vessels. I Tonnage. jv essels, I Tonnage. Iv essels, I 'l'onnage~ 11 63,897 I .. 35:io5 I 11 63,897 107 144,204 I 15 122 179,309 46 106,858 1 3,460 47 110,318 7 14,468 1 69 8 14,537 1 3,203 ... .. 1 3,203 48 77,123 2 6,556 50 83,679 9 24,636 12 33,768 21 58,404 1 1,192 1 3,020 2 4,212 47 183,259 ... .. 47 183,259 1 1,041 I .. .. 1 1,041 6 6,891 ... ... 6 6,891 1 3,209 ... .. 1 3,20 285 I I 629,981 I 32 81,9781 317 I 711,959 I CLEARED. With Cargo, In Ballast. Total, Vessels.I Tonnage.JVessels,I Tonnage.JVessels,I Tonnage. -. ---------16 77,330 I 16 77,330 .. .. 119 160,948 17 26,158 136 187,106 9 13,147 11 24,980 20 38,127 1 2,896 2 2,064 3 4,960 ... .. 2 6,151 2 6,151 26 37,038 21 33,147 47 70,185 8 24,324 4 10,425 12 34,749 47 187,058 ... .. 47 187,058 23 69,413 .. .. 23 69,413 1 5,747 6 12,514 7 18,261 1 2,667 ... .. 1 2,667 ... .. 2 6,039 2 6,039 1 3,020 ... ... 1 3,020 252 I 583,588 65 121,478 317 I 705,066

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ILOILO. 19 !LOILO. Mr. Acting Vice-Consul Price reports as follows:Imports. Piece-goods and yarns (cotton).-The market for these goods was unusually dull in 1911. The shortage in the rice crop was in some measure to blame. The large quantities of American trouserings imported last year are being gradually worked off, but very few lines have found a permanent market. It is most likely that as soon as supplies of these goods are cleared buyers will again turn their attention to British and Continental cloths as being more suited to the climate and produced in more varied assortments. Printed cottons of the cheap standard quality are all imported from the United States of America, but some of the better class goods still come from the United Kingdom, although in small quantity. Mer cerised yarns, which were formerly imported from Europe, now come almost exclusively from Ja pan. The quality is good and the price lower than similar yarns can be brought from Europe. White shirtings have been receiving a good deal of attention from United States' manufacturers and fair quantities have been coming to this market. In the cheaper grades it may be said that they have come to stay, and will compete strongly with qualities that formerly came from the United Kingdom. Galvanised iron.-The demand for both plain and corrugated sheets continues good. During the past year there has been considerable activity in the building trade, both in Panay and Negros, and prospects are good for the continuance for the next few years. American sheets practically command the market, but some well-known British brands are still imported, although in decreasing quantities. Yellow metal sheeting and copper nails.-There has been fair business doing in these articles, both British and Continental, the former having the larger consumption owing to the brands being better known. Some owners of craft are substituting plain galvanised iron for yellow metal, and claim to get satisfactory results. All yellow metal sheetings are entitled to free entry under the present tariff arrangements. Hollowware.-Thedemandis small but steady. Japanese manufac tures are coming in in increasing quantities, and may ultimately cut out goods from other sources. Linseed oil and paints are always in good demand. British pro ductions still hold the market, although the Americans are pushing hard to get into the business. Bar iron.-Belgian iron still holds the market, but demand is small. Reinforcing steel bars.-There is an increasing demand owing to the erection of up-to-date concrete buildings. United States products command the market. Wire nails.-The Americans are trying hard to control this business, but quantities continue to come from the Continent. Machinery.-The importations into this port are principally for use in connection with sugar plantations, and consist chiefly of small three-roller sugar cane crushing mills with boilers, practically all of.

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20 ILOILO. which are of British manufacture ; light portable tramway rails and cane wagons largely of German manufacture with a small amount of American and still less of French, with little or no British make. There were quite a number of small single furrow ploughs, all of American manufacture. A few sets of steam ploughs of British manufacture were imported. Two small sugar factories capable of producing about 15 tons each of sugar per day of 12 hours are in course of erection, the machinery for which being all of British manufacture. These factories are for the production of 96 centrifugal sugar. During the early part of the year there was a good demand for new British machinery, but towards the close of the year there Was no demand or inquiries. Rice.-Imports were 31,345 tons against 25,050 tons in 1910. Importations for the coming year should be heavier, as the local crop has been very light owing to scarcity of rain. Petroleiim.-Importations amounted to 170,214 cases. This is an increase of o:ver 85,000 cases on last year's figures. Coal.-34,994 tons were imported during the year as against 39,747 tons in 1910. Cattle.-The importations have fallen off somewhat, 9,107 head against 14,328 head last year. Cement shows an increase, 37,356 barrels imported during the year against 30,500 barrels in 1910. Exports. Sugar.-The total crop for the year was 136,145 tons, showing an increase of 47,891 tons over the crop of 1910. Prices ruled higher the latter part of the year and touched 14Z. 5s. per ton in August to September; the lowest price was in January, viz., 8l. 15s. per ton. During the year 136,616 tons were exported as follows :ToUnited States China Tons. 129,750 6,866 Prospects for the coming crop are not so good owing to the drought. The estimate is 100,000 tons. Oopra.-Production shows a small increase, doubtless due to the high prices ruling. The total exports for the year were 3,022 tons. Sapanwood.-The export has fallen off considerably, only 1,154 tons being shipped against 2,000 tons in 1910. This is chiefly due to the trouble in China, which country takes practically all the sapanwood exported from this port. Shipping shows a further increase, 200 vessels having entered the port with a net tonnage of 343,789 tons against 172 vessels in 1910 .. The United Kingdom again heads the list with 99 steamers, Norway drops to third place and the United States now occupies the second. The increase in the American trade is due to the fact that the steamers "Zafiro" and "Rubi" (previously under the British flag), running from Hong-Kong to the Philippines, were put under the American flag during the latter part of last year.

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ILOILO. 21 RETURN of Principal Articles of Import at Iloilo during the Year 1911. Articles. Quantity. I Value. FromRice Petroleum Coal ... Tons ... Cases ... Tons Cattle and carabaos (water buffaloes) Head Cement ... Casks Flour Sacks Milk .:. Cases 31,345 21,000 149,214 19,086 7,226 8,682 9,107 37,356 138,000 10,686 376,197 Saigon and Hong-Kong 5,468 Sumatra 41,797 United States 23,858 Australia 6,503 Borneo 8,682 Japan 104,730 Cochln-China 18,678 Hong-Kong chiefly 32,344 United States and Australia 11,687 United Kingdom, United States and Switzerland RETURN of Principal Articles of Export from Iloilo during the Year 1911. Raw sugar Copra Sapanwood Tons. 136,616 3,022 1,154 1,536,900 56,672 2,020 RETURN of all Shipping at the Port of Iloilo during the Year 1911. ENTERED. Vessels. Tonnage. British 99 181,685 United States 35 56,665 Spanish 13 31,303 Norwegian 22 24,009 German 12 23,993 Japanese 7 14,886 French 7 7,203 Chlnese 5 4,045 Total. .. 200 343,789 CLEARED. Vessels. Tonnage. British 101 185,509 United States 34 55,046 Spanish 13 31,303 Norwegian 22 24,009 German 12 23,993 Japanese 6 13,136 French 7 7,203 Chinese 5 4,045 Total. .. 200 344,244 No-rE.-Thc British steamships 8trathgyle," of 2,837 tons, and "Kaifong," of !J87 tons, were in port on the evening of December 31, 1910, and were cleared in 1911. The Japanese steamship "Shinmei Maru," of 1,750 tons, and the United States steamship Zafi,ro," of 1,619 tons, were in port on the evening of December 31, 1911, uncleared.

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22 ILOILO. RETURN of British Vessels Entered and Cleared at the Port of Iloilo, with their Net Tonnage. ENTERED. With Cargo. I In Ballast. I Total. From' I I -I I Vessels. [ Tonnage. [Vessels: Tonnage. I Vessels. I Tonnage. I I Hong-Kong ... ... 50 60,997 6 18,153 56 79,150 Newcastle, New South Wales ... ... 7 18,241 ... .. 7 18,241 United States ... ... 6 17,384 .. ... 6 17,384 China ... .. ... 3 3,648 3 7,708 6 11,356 Cochin-China ... ... 5 4,603 ... 5 4,603 Singapore ... .. 3 3,142 1 2,932 4 6,074 Borneo ... ... ... 1 1,227 ... ... 1 1,227 Japan ... ... ... ... ... 5 15,871 5 15,871 Total 75 109,242 15 I I 90 153,906 ... 44,664 I I CLEARED. ---------------------------With Cargo. In Ballast. Total. ToVessels. I Tonnage. [Vessels.I Tonnage. :Vessels. I Tonnage. -------~----"----Hong-Kong ... ...I United States . .. I China ... ... .. 1 Marseilles .. .. 1 Newcastle, New South : Wales ... .. Cochin-China . .. I I Total ... 28 25 2 1 56 34,356 76,470 2,444 3,124 116,394 CEBU. 1 3 6 10 3,005 8,292 5,830 17,1271 Mr. Vice-Consul Knowles reports as follows:28 I 25 3 1 3 6 66 I 34,356 76,470 5,449 3,124 8,292 5,830 133,521 Imports.-The feature of the year has again been the large increase in importations from the United States of America as a result of favourable tariff legislation, referred to in last report, but there has also been a marked increase in import trade generally. The United Kingdom obtained little share of the increase, but the total value of importations of cotton goods from the United Kingdom is slightly in excess of that of the previous year.

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CEBU. Business in the early part of the year was bad, with stocks in first and second hands heavy and unwieldy, partly as a result of too free importations from the United States and too free purchases by dealers of new goods, which later proved unsuitable for native trade in the shops. A fire which destroyed property to the value of 100,000l.-mostly covered by insurance-occurred in the Chinese business section in the month of July. Prices for both hemp and copra, which had ruled low during the early part of the year, improved from June onwards, and the improve ment was soon reflected in the import market, business in the latter half of the year being somewhat over normal. White shirtings.-United States manufacturers are steadily im proving the finish of their goods, and while they have still much to do in this respect to meet native ideas, yet it seems certain that they will eventually capture the trade in low and medium qualities. The trade in fine cloths is still almost confined to Manchester goods. White drills.-American goods have made some headway during the year, but Manchester goodsare still superior, and most of the old established marks continue to find a ready sale. American coloured drills and coverts are replacing these goods as suiting cloths to some extent in native favour. Grey drills, grey sheetings.-Supplies are drawn entirely from the United States of America, where manufacturers have readily met the requirements of the trade. Prints.-United States manufacturers are gradually monopolising the trade in both plain and fancy goods. Printed muslins, lau:ns, &c.-British goods still keep their hold on the market, and so far American competition has been little felt. For printed muslins especially there is a large outlet for attractive designs. Yarns.-For British white and Turkey-red yarns there is a steady outlet, and they continue to hold their position in the market. There is a small outlet for fancy, coloured yarns, also of British manu facture. Iron and steel.-United States manufacturers have strengthened their hold on this business during the year, the total importations of sheets and plates into the islands from the United States having increased from 6,674,469 kilos. in 1910 to 9,307,335 kilos. in 1911. Importations from all sources for 1911 were 11,000,000 kilos. against 8,000,000 kilos. for the previous year, of which British manufacturers supplied 1,799,731 kilos. in 1911 against 1,571,870 kilos. in 1910. Only a few of the best known British marks of galvanised iron sheets are now inquired for. Bar iron.-British and Belgian manufacturers have secured the bulk of this trade during the year. Wire nails.-There has been no change in the position during the year. United States manufacturers continue to do the bulk of the business, the total value of importation from the United Kingdom into the islands only amounting to 1,944 dol. against 55,926 dol. from the United States of America.

PAGE 24

24 CEBU. Paints.-Well known British brands have held their place in the market during the period under review, and importations from the United Kingdom show a slight increase over those of the previous year. Oil, linseed.-More than 50 per cent. of the total importations came from the U!lited Kingdom. Importations from British India were second in point of quantity. Glassware.-Importations from the United Kingdom show a falling off. Tools.-The United States of America is now the largest exporter to this 'market, but importations from the United Kingdom show no diminution as compared with those of the previous year. Earthenware, &:c.-While total importations into the islands from the United Kingdom increased during the year, those from Germany show a still larger increase and exceeded British importations in value. Petroleum.--Imports during the year amounted to 212-,000 cases as compared to 190,838 cases during 1910. Ooal.-Imports amounted to 38,670 tons, an increase of 3,195 tons as compared to 1910; 34,044 tons came from Newcastle, New South Wales, and the balance came from Japanese mines. Rice.-Importations amounted to 41,143 tons as compared to 50,800 tons in 1910, the falling-off being due entirely to the British and French Governments prohibiting exportation from Rangoon and Saigon during the latter part of the year. Exports. Hemp.-There had been a falling-off in production during 1911 as compared to 1910, the figures being 42,300 and 45,296 tons respectively. Prices varied comparatively little during the 12 months and were never sufficiently good to encourage planters, consequently estates have been gradually abandoned, or where the land is suitable the trees have been cut down and cocoanuts planted in their place. It appears probable that the production during next year will show a further considerable falling-off through this cause. High-grade hemp, owing to the low prices ruling, has become very scarce, medium to low grades forming fully 90 per cent. of the total production. The very coarse hemp, so greatly in evidence in 1910, has to a great extent been eliminated. Total shipments amounted to 42,102 tons against 45,705 tons in 1910, the distribution being as follows:1910. 1911. Tons. Tons. United States ... 26,620 23,229 United Kingdom 7,005 7,443 Continent 602 780 Japan ... 292 99 Manila ... 11,186 10,551 Practically all the hemp shipped to Manila was transhipped to the United Kingdom and Continental ports. Maguey production has suffered greatly, owing to the low prices ruling throughout the year, and many plantations have been cleared in order to utilise the ground for more remunerative products.

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CEBU. 25 Exports only amount to 9,029 bales as compared to 10,958 bales during 1910. The prospects for 1912 are still less favourable. Sugar.-The prices ruled comparatively high during the year, and a great impetus has been given to ~his branch of the trade owing to the sugar having free entry into America. The crop was about 6,500 tons, which is greatly in excess of the crops for some years past. The 1912 crop is expected to be almost double that of 1911. Oopra.-The production shows a steady increase, the exports amounting to 38,080 tons against 32,507 tons in 1910. A great deal of land has been put to the cultivation of cocoanuts, and in the course of five or six years there is little doubt that this industry will take first place in rank of importance in the export trade of this port. Harbour works.-An extension is now being made to the wharf, which will enable vessels of not exceeding 30 feet dranght to load along side with perfect safety. The work is expected to be finished by December next, Water system.-The work was completed in November, and will be opened to the public soon. The reservoir holds 400,000,000 gallons, which feeds into a distribu tion tank holdi,ng 4,000,000 gallons, situated 6 kiloms. from Cebu, at a height of 80 metres above the city. The source of supply is impounded rainwater. COMPARATIVE Table showing Exports from Cebu during the Years 1901 and 1911. Sugar Hemp Copra Maguey ... Pieuls ,, ... Bales 1901. 128,650 125,968 45,263 1911. 82,336 336,813 597,282 9,029 IMPORTS of Rice, Coal and Petroleum during the Year 1911. FromSaigon ... Australia Japan ... United States Sumatra Total (679) Rice. ----Bags. 735,841 735,841 Coal. I Petroleum. Tons:----Cases. 34,044 4,626 38,670 157,000 55,000 212,000 C

PAGE 26

COMPARATIVE List 0 Shipments 0 Hemp, Copra and Sugar during the last Five Years. Hemp. l Copra. I Sugar. Year. I i I I I United I United Various. I United I United Various. China. I Kingdom. States. I Kingdom. States. Bales. I Bales. Bales. Piculs. Piculs. I Piculs. Piculs. .1907 ... .. ... ... 80,530 107,701 7,253 25,712 ... 239,776 48,010 1908 94,680 I 153,432 31,120 8,800 12,176 298,464 66,01 l ... ... .. ... I 1909 ... ... .. .. 91,280 231,568 41,384 17,600 ... 381,528 20,332 HJlO 56,043 I 212,962 96,638 44,800 5,200 470.121 468 ... ... .. .. 1911 ... ... .. .. 59,545 I 185,822 91,446 35,200 38,000 536,082 .. i I United States. Piculs. .. .. .. 26,064 82,336 t-,:; 0) 0 53 !=1

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CEBU. 27 COMPARATIVE Note of Tonnage Arrived m Cebu during the Year 1911. British United States German Norwegian French Japanese ... Tot.al ... Vessels. 121 38 7 4 3 4 177 1'onnage. 237,319 52,744 12,526 3,562 3,267 10,956 320,374

PAGE 28

R1~PORTS of the Annual Series have been rccent)y hisued from His 1\fo.j<';;t._y's Diplomatic and Consular Officers at the followingplaces, and may be oblained from the sources indicated on the title-page:Price ABYSSINIA 4893 Harrar. 'l'rade, 1911-12 ... 1o. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 2~d 4952 Iquique. 'l'rade, 1911 ... ... 4~d CHINA.,. .. 4930 Ningpo. Trade. 1911 ... .. 3J,l 49:13 Chung!dng. Trnrle, &c., 1911 ;ld 4934 'l'eng :i ueh. 'frarle, 1911 ... ld 4935 Tsinan and Tsingtau. Trade, 1911 ... ... ... ... Id 4950 Mengtsz, &c. Trade, 1911 ... -1/,d 4951 Kiukiang. 'l'rarle, 1911 ... ajd 4963 Wuchow. 'l'rarle, 1911... 3d 4966 Shanghai. Trnde, 1911 2rl 4967 Chefoo. Trade, 1911 ... !cl 4973 Wuhu. Trade, 1911 3rl 4979 China. Trade, 1911 ... 3,1 COLOMBIA ... 4788 Carta.gena. Trnrle, &c., 1910 ... ld CONGO ... COREA .. 00S'l'.A RI:NMARK ... 4846 stJ;~~~~~ and. st .... Croi~: 5 ~d Trade, 1911 ... ... d 4962 Denmark. Finances, 1911-13 Id 4977 Faroe Islands. Trade, &c., 1911 2~d DOMINICAN 4890 San Pedro de Macoris. Trade, HEPUHT.IC 1911 ,., ... ... ... ld ECUADOR ... 4831 Ecuador. Trade, &c., 1910 ... Id EGYPT... ... 4938 Alexandria, Trade, &c., I 911 5d 4970 Port, Said. Trade, I 911 ... 6d ... 4883 Cochin-China. Trarle, &c., 1911 Id 4884 ltouen. Trarle, &c., 1911 7d 4[89 Calais. Trarle, 1911 .. 4d 4895 Lyons. Trade, &c., 1911 6d 4906 Corsica. Trade, 1911 .. ... 2ld 4948 Nice. Trade, 1911 .. ... l!d 4954 Madagascar. Trade, 1911 ... 3d FRA.JIOE 4961 Society Islanrls. Trade, &c., 1911 ... .. .. ... Id 4987 New Caledonia. Trade, 1911. .. 2d 4989 Marseilles. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 5;\d GERMANY ... 4852 Dresrlen. Trade, &c., 1911 ... id 4913 Mannheim. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 4jd 4915 German South-West Africa. Trade, 1911 ... ... .. 3d 4989 Dilsseldorf. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 3/,d 4947 Samoa. Trarte, 1911 ... ... id 4949 Stettin, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 2Arl 4990 Bavaria. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 9rl ... 4870 Patras, &c. 'l'rade, 1911 ... 2d 4882 The Cyclades. Trade, 1911 .. 4d 4887 Corfu. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 2d GREEOE 4926 Thessaly. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 4~d GUATEMALA ... 4S:l2 Guatemala. Trade, &c., 1910 2d HAYTI & SAN'l'O 4638 Hayti and Santo Domingo. DOMINGO 'l'rade, 1910 ... ... ... 4d HONDURAS ... 4960 Honduras. Trade, 1911 ... 4d hALY ... ... 4836 Italy. Trade, 1910 ... ... 2d 4889 Italy. Finances, 1911 ... ... ltaragun.y. '1 1 rade, 1910 3d 4838 Jspuhan arnl Yezd. Trn.rle for the year enrling March ~O, 1911 ... ... ... .. 4d 4951i Persia. Trade, 1910-11... .. l~d 4986 Kerman. Trade. 1911-12 ... :Jd 4991 Khorasan. Tra,le, l9ll-12 ... 3d 4994 Kermanshah. '1 1 rac1e for the yen.ending March 20, 1912 3d 4820 Bahrein Islands. 'l'rade, 1910-11 ... ... ... .. 3d ... 4867 Iqnit.os. Trade, 1911 ... .. 4,ld 4874 Azores. 'l'rade, &c., 1911 2d 4881 East African Possessions. Trade, I 911 .. 4d 4903 Angola. 'fro.de, 1911 ... ... 3d 490d Chinde. 'l'rade, &c., 1911 ... 4d 4916 Madeira. Tracie, 1911 ... 2d 4927 Lisbon. Tra,le, 1!111 ... ... 4d 4937 Oporto. Triule, 1911 ... ... 4~d ... 4849 B>ttoum. Trade, 191 l ... ... 3M 4910 Helsingfors. Trade, 1911 4\d 496:) Odessa. Trac1e, &c., 1911 ... 7d 4968 Itussian Ji'oreign Commerce am! Trade of SL. Petersburg, 1911 ... ... ... .. 5\d 4984 Poland, &c. Tradr, &c., 1911 ... 5 2 d ... 4945 Servia. Finances, 1912 ... ld ... 4814 Senggora. Tl'll.i<', &c., 1910 arnl part of 1911 ... ... 2d 4824 Bangkok. 'l'ra,le, 1910-11 ... 4d 4974 Chiengmai. Trarte, &c .. 1911 3d ... 4862 Canary Islands. ~I.1rade, &c. 1 1911 ... ... ... ... 3d 4866 Corunna, &c. Trade, &c., 1911 4d 4907 Barcelona. Trade, &c., 1911 ... 5d 4921 Seville. 'l'rade, &c., 1911 ... 5d 4941l Bilbao. Trnde, 1911 ... .. 5.\d 4981 Rpain. Industries, &c., 1911. .. 3jd 4995 Malaga. Trade, I 911 ... .. 3d SWEDEN ... 4837 Swedish llndget, 1913 ... ..; !,d 4957 Gothenhurg. 'l'rade, &c., 1911 4!d Swr~z,mLAND 4911 Swit.zerland. Trade, J!II 1 ... 2id TUNIS ... ... 4795 Tunis. 'frnde, 1910 ... ... 3d 'l'uRKEY .., 4885 Constantinople. 'l'rade, 1910-11 8d 4850 Jerusalem. 'l'rade, 1911 ... 2d 4863 Beirut, &c. 'J'rarle, &c., 1911 ... 3d 4885 Mosul. 'l'rade, 1911 ... ... .\d 4886 J erldah. Trarle, &c., l!IU~-10 ... :id 4942 Aleppo. 'l'rade, I 911 ... .. ;JJ,1 4980 llasra. Trade, 1911 ... ... 2lrt 4985 Erzeroum. 'frade, 191! id UNITED 4936 St. Louis. 'l'rn.rl.e. l 011 ... 5l1 STATES 4940 Hawaii. Trade, &c .. 1909-11... 4d 4941 San Francisco. 'l'rn,le, 1911 ... 4d 4953 Galveston. 'l'rade, &c .. 1911 ... 2yd 4958 Portland, &c. 'l'i-a,le, &c., 1911 6fd 4959 New Orleans. 'l'mde, &c., 191 I ltd 4969 Savannah. 'l'rarle, 1911 ... 5.,d VENEZUELA ... 4875 CinrladBolivar. 'frade, &c., Hli I ,id 4964 Venezuela Rnd Caracas Trade, 1910-11 ... ... 64 13'75 9/12 H.& S