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Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs

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Title:
Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs
Series Title:
Annual reports, War Department
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Insular Affairs
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publisher:
G.P.O.
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 22 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Insular possessions -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication ( marcgt )
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
1924-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Report year ends June 30.

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SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
557807 ( ALEPH )
OCM03883729 ( OCLC )
sn 84032311 ( LCCN )
Classification:
HB325.3 ( ddc )

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United States. Bureau of Insular Affairs.Report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, War Department

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ANNUAL REPORTS - - - WAR DEPARTMENT

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS - 1938




ANNUAL REPORTS, WAR DEPARTMENT

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1938

ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS

1938

UNITED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1938

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Wasinghton, D. C.

Price 10 cents




ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

CHIEF, BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

War Department,

Bureau of Insular Affairs,

September 30, 1938.

The Secretary of War.

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the Bureau
of Insular Affairs for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1938:

CONGRESSIONAL CONSIDERATION OF PHILIPPINE QUESTIONS

The third session of the Seventy-fifth Congress convened on Jan-
uary 3, 1938, and adjourned June 16. Additional appropriations
were made for repatriating unemployed Filipinos. By June 30, 1938r
1,239 Filipinos had been returned to their homes under the act ap-
proved July 10, 1935. Provision was made for the maintenance of
the office of the United States High Commissioner to the Philippine
Islands. However, no measures of vital importance to the islands
were enacted.

Some of the bills under consideration evidence a sympathetic atti-
tude toward Filipinos in the United States, while others involve dis-
crimination against Filipinos residing here. For example, several
appropriation bills for the Federal Government departments for 1939 * 1
limited the payment of salaries to citizens of the United States and
would have barred Filipinos from employment in these departments.
The language appearing in bills regulating the Alaskan game and
fish laws 2 would have resulted in classifying Filipinos generally as
aliens. When it was brought to the attention of Congress that
Filipinos still owe allegiance to the United States the discriminatory
provisions of these bills were promptly eliminated. Furthermore,
Congress this year restored to needy Filipinos in the United States
the benefits of employment on Works Progress Administration proj-
ects and considered the restoration to Filipinos of certain other privi-
leges which had been withdrawn by previous legislation, such as the
privilege to serve on cargo or passenger vessels subsidized by the
United States Government.

Such discriminatory legislation has apparently resulted from a mis-
conception regarding the present status of Filipinos in the United
States. As citizens of the Philippine Islands they are “nationals” of
the United States, and, as such, owe allegiance thereto. With the
exception of those who have served not less than 3 years in the United

i Public, 453, 475, 534, 723.

i Public, 728, 731.

1


I REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

States Navy or Marine Corps or the Naval Auxiliary Service, the
Coast Guard, or in the World War, Filipinos cannot become citizens
of the United States.

The Bureau constantly has had in mind the prevention of enactment
of any legislation which would abridge the rights and privileges as
possessed by Filipinos in the United States at the time of the inaugura-
tion of the Commonwealth government. During the Common-
wealth period, while they still owe allegiance to the United States, it
seems desirable that our record of sympathetic treatment through-
out the 40-year period of Philippine-American relations be not marred
by abrogating rights and privileges heretofore accorded them. In
its report the Joint Preparatory Committee has considered the status
of Americans in the Philippines and of Filipinos in the United States.
Until Congress formulates a general policy covering the rights of
Filipinos in this country, the Bureau feels strongly that the status quo
should be maintained and that piecemeal dealings with the subject
should be carefully avoided.

It is gratifying to note that American citizens doing business in the
Philippines were, by the Revenue Act of 1938, granted relief from the
payment of interest and penalties on taxes imposed by certain previous
United States revenue acts. It is estimated that about $250,000 will
be refunded under the new law.

The President of the United States, upon request of the President
of the Commonwealth, by proclamation dated January 26, 1938,
extended for another 3 years the provisions of the Cordage Act of
June 14, 1935, providing for the importation into the United States,
free of duty, of yarns, twines, cordage, etc., from the Philippine Islands
in amount not to exceed 6,000,000 pounds yearly. The action taken
is acceptable to the United States cordage interests.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

Five sessions of the National Assembly were held during the period
of this report.

(1) Six bills and one resolution were passed during the special ses-
sion commencing August 28, 1937, and ending September 8. The
election law was amended in order to provide for the election of pro-
vincial, city, and municipal officials on December 14, 1937. Emer-
gency appropriations were authorized for school purposes. One of the
bills provided for the establishment of an office to take charge of allot-
ments for sugar production, formerly the responsibility of the United
States High Commissioner’s office.

(2) At the one-day special session held on September 9 an act was
passed to correct the inequities resulting from the application of the
acts liquidating the constabulary, education, and health pension funds
by restoring the annuities to the same figures paid before the Common-
wealth period.

(3) The regular session of the assembly began October 16 and
adjourned November 20. The general appropriation act for 1938
was approved in the amount of P69,051,310.3 Other appropriation
bills included F5,050,000 for elementary school buildings, F5,000,000
for compensation to local governments for the loss of the cedula tax,

3 The Philippine peso equals 50 cents U. S. Currency.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

3

which was abolished, FI,000,000 for public improvements in the city
of Manila, and P500,000 for typhoon relief. A bill was passed fixing
the fourth Monday of January of each year for the opening of regular
sessions of the assembly, instead of October 16.

(4) Operating under its new schedule, the National Assembly
convened for its regular 1938 session on January 24 and adjourned
May 19. One hundred and five measures were passed, the most
important being a P96,351,000 public works bill making provision
for a heavy government four-year construction program covering
such projects as national highways, improving drainage in Manila,
street pavements, -constructing and equipping provincial hospitals,
etc. Funds were provided for the acquisition of privately owned
lands and buildings in Manila, for the alteration and improvement
of the official residences of the President in Manila and Baguio, for
a new custom house in Manila, for the purchase of homesites on large
landed estates, and for reforestation and afforestation. The general
appropriation act for 1939 was in the amount of F76,316,703. In-
creased appropriations were made for the National Power Corpora-
tion. The powers of the National Development Co. were expanded.
The National Abaca Corporation was created for the purpose of
stabilizing the price of hemp and other fibers. The salaries of justices
of the peace were increased and a retirement fund provided for them.
Measures were passed increasing the membership of the Court of
Appeals from 11 to 15 and diminishing the jurisdiction of the Supreme
Court; increasing the number of judges in the Court of Industrial
Relations from 1 to 3; approving the London Sugar Agreement;
making provision to secure the United States against loss or damage
to any military or naval stores, supplies, and equipment loaned to the
Commonwealth government; abolishing the Manila Harbor Board;
abolishing General Aguinaldo’s pension; abolishing the state police
and reestablishing the Philippine Constabulary; putting a stop to the
sale of friar lands to occupants who are acting as dummies to enable
others to acquire them in large blocks; prohibiting the transfer of
private agricultural land to aliens, and providing means for the exten-
sion of the lines of the Manila Railroad Co. Two more chartered cities
were created—Bacolod and Tagaytay. Several bills were designed
for the improvement of labor conditions. New tax measures were
introduced but no action taken. A general revision of taxes is under
study.

(5) Thirty-four measures were passed during the special session
held on May 23 and 24.

Acts requiring approval of the President of the United States.—The
Independence Act, in section 2 (a) (9) provides that local legislation
affecting currency, coinage, imports, exports, and immigration re-
quires approval by the President of the United States before becoming
law. One bill (No. 2512) requiring such approval was passed during
the sessions enumerated. This bill continues until December 31,
1946, the duty-free entry into the Philippines of woods, barks, roots,
and similar natural products used for dyeing or tanning. It is in-
tended to augment the local supply of barks used in the cutch industry.
The bill was approved by the President of the United States on Febru-
ary 26, 1938.


4

REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

GENERAL CONDITIONS

Reports of the United States High Commissioner to the Philippine
Islands show that the year 1937 was marked by satisfactory progress.
General health conditions were good. Peace and order prevailed
except in the Lake Lanao district of the Island of Mindanao, where
armed clashes occurred between the Philippine army and Moros in the
campaign to destroy all Moro strongholds in Lanao.

The financial position of the islands is very satisfactory. Due
largely to the receipts from the United States Treasury of accumulated
taxes on coconut oil, the surplus of funds was the greatest in the
history of the islands. Trade continued to expand; the volume of
both imports and exports was considerably in excess of that of 1936.
Agricultural production also showed an increase over 1936. Educa-
tional opportunities were further extended. The enrollment now
numbers nearly one and one-half millions. In 1937 there were 8,913
public schools with an annual enrollment of 1,459,743 pupils, taught
by 32,485 teachers.

As a result of a recommendation of the Institute of National
Language, created by an act of the National Assembly passed in 1936,
the Tagalog dialect was adopted as the basis of the national language
of the Philippines.

During the year the islands were visited by two destructive typhoons
but prompt relief measures prevented the appearance of epidemic
diseases. In August 1937, there occurred in Manila and central
Luzon the worst earthquake in 30 years, but there was very little
loss of life and relatively little damage to property. Of special
interest was the eruption in June 1938, of the semi-active Mayon
volcano, in the province of Albay, for the first time in 10 years.
Inhabitants of nearby barrios and towns were forced to leave their
homes. No loss of life was reported, but there was heavy damage to
crops.

In August 1937, because of the Sino-Japanese conflict, it was neces-
sary to evacuate Americans and Filipinos from Shanghai and North
China to Manila. They numbered 987 Americans, 393 Filipinos,
and 73 aliens, mostly women and children. Many of them were
destitute. The American Red Cross, the United States Army, the
office of the High Commissioner, the Commonwealth government, and
the general public cooperated in taking care of the emergency in
Manila. About 150 of the Americans left almost immediately for
the United States.

In September 1937, there took place the formal ratification of the
fusion in June 1935, of the two major political parties headed by
Messrs. Quezon and Osmena. The newly formed party, known as
the Nationalist Party, swept the elections held in December 1937.

FINANCES

The total receipts and expenditures for the fiscal (and calendar)
year 1937 are shown in appendix F.

The finances of the Philippine government were in excellent condi-
tion. The public debt was small; the sinking funds for all outstand-
ing bonded indebtedness had been regularly provided for and segre-
gated; the currency reserves were in excess of the legal requirements
for the currency in circulation.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF IUSULAR AFFAIRS

5

During the fiscal year 1937 the central government realized from
alj sources a total income of $106,240,713.00, an increase of $54,-
4§9,594.19 over 1936. This amount included $47,753,613.65 rep-
resenting the first payment by the United States on July 1, 1937,
from sums collected as tax on coconut oil imported from the Philip-
pines. This tax was imposed under Section 602% of Public No. 216
(H. R. 7835) approved May 10, 1934, under the terms of which the
collections are held in the United States Treasury in a separate fund
to be paid to the Treasury of the Philippine Islands. The total
expenditures for the year amounted to $56,944,985.71, an increase
of $10,761,889.36 over the expenditures made in 1936.

The current general fund surplus as of December 31, 1937, as
reported by the auditor general of the Commonwealth of the Philip-
pines, was $40,055,587.82, an increase of $16,101,753.38 over the
corresponding balance on December 31, 1936.

The total current surplus (general, special, and bond funds) as of
December 31, 1937, as reported by the auditor general of the Common-
wealth of the Philippines, was $103,467,880.87 compared with
$45,012,853.13 in 1936, an increase of $58,455,027.74. This amount
represents the excess of income over expenditures for the fiscal year.

The invested surplus on December 31, 1937, as reported by the
auditor general of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, amounted
to $85,223,102.70 as compared with $74,777,570.73 for the previous
year, an increase of $10,445,531.97.

Bonded indebtedness.—On January 2, 1937, $694,000 par value of
city of Manila sewer and waterworks 4-percent bonds became due
and were retired. During the year 1937, $250,000 par value of bonds
were sold in the Philippine Islands by the insular government. The
net reduction in the total amount of the bonded indebtedness of the
Philippine Islands during the year of 1937 was $2,722,000. On
December 31, 1937, the bonded indebtedness of the insular govern-
ment amounted to $53,730,000, and that of its provinces and munici-
palities to $8,422,000, or a grand total of $62,152,000. Deducting
from this total collateral bonds with a face value of $6,939,000,
issued against provincial and municipal bonds, the net amount of
outstanding bonds on December 31, 1937, was $55,213,000, of which
$18,136,500 were owned by the Philippine government, having been
purchased from sinking or other funds.

In appendix F of this report, the statement of the bonded indebted-
ness is carried forward to June 30, 1938. The amount of the out-
standing indebtedness is well within the limits provided by law, and
the prescribed sinking funds are fully maintained for all outstanding
bonds.

Deposits of^Philippine public-funds in the United States.—The total
deposits of Philippine public funds in the United States on December
31, 1937, amounted to $159,633,140.90. Of this amount $154,036,-
234.39 was on deposit in the United States Treasury. On December
31, 1937, there remained only $1,344.31 outstanding from one national
bank still in process of liquidation.

Government-owned companies.—The Philippine National Bank main-
tained an excellent and sound financial condition during the year
1937, and made a substantial net profit.

The Manila Railroad Co. showed a net loss in the year 1937.
This loss was due principally to writing off retired road and equipment,


6

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

and to some extent to exchange requirements for the payment of
interest on railroad bonds held abroad.

The National Development Co., the Cebu Portland Cement Co.,
and the Manila Hotel Co. operated profitably during 1937.

TRADE

The total external trade of the Philippines with the United States
and foreign countries amounted to $261,659,142, an increase of
$24,088,002, or 10 percent over 1936. Both the outgoing and in-
coming trade show substantial increases, exports (not including $14,-
327,300 of gold and silver) being valued at $152,633,397, an increase
of 12 percent, with imports amounting to $109,025,745, or an 8-percent
increase. The favorable balance of commodity trade aggregating
$43,607,652, not including gold and silver, was larger than that of
any previous year on record. This balance, as heretofore, is the result
of the usual large favorable balance of trade with the United States.

Gold production from Philippine mines has steadily increased, ship-
ments to the United States amounting to over $25,000,000, on the
basis of United States customs returns for 1937.

Trade with the United States totaled $185,412,225, exclusive of
gold and silver, an increase of 10 percent, and made up 71 percent, or
practically the same percentage of the total external trade as in 1936.
Exports to the United States increased 13% percent, the $122,110,189
trade being 80 percent of the total exports, with imports 3 percent
over the previous year, amounting to $63,302,036, or 58 percent of all
imports.

Of the leading exports higher prices for manila hemp, coconut oil
and copra were obtained. Sugar shipments show' reduction in quan-
tity and value over the previous year.

The total quantity of sugar exports, practically all of which came
to the United States, amounted to 857,283 long tons, valued at $57,-
706,194, as compared with 885,621 long tons and value of $61,937,322
in 1936. Coconut oil, nearly all being shipped to the United States,
was exported at considerably higher prices and totaled 160,717 long
tons, valued at $20,525,537, compared with a value of $13,871,759 for
157,101 long tons in the previous year (appendix E).

Monthly trade reports for the period January-June, 1938, 6 months,
following the close of the last calendar (fiscal) year, indicate increased
value in the import trade with a marked falling off in exports as com-
pared with 1937.

THE UNITED STATES HIGH COMMISSIONER TO THE PHILIPPINE

ISLANDS

The High Commissioner, Honorable Paul V. McNutt, left Manila
on February 11, 1938, on a trip to the United States to confer with the
President and other officials regarding a number of pending matters.
He left Washington on March 15 and arrived in Manila on April 1.

Personnel.—The personnel of the High Commissioner's office con-
sists of 6 Presidential appointees and civilian employees numbering
in all 37. In addition, certain officers of the United States Army and
Navy are detailed as aides and assistants. The civilian personnel of
his staff as constituted on June 30 is shown in appendix D.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

7

Scope of work.—The functions of the High Commissioner remain
the same as outlined in the Bureau's Annual Report for 1937, except
that in accordance with the “Sugar Act of 1937” the authority to
administer the United States sugar quota was transferred from his
office to the Commonwealth government as of September 1, 1937.

Buildings.—Plans for the residence and offices for the High Com-
missioner in Manila and at Baguio, the summer capital, were made by
the Procurement Division, United States Treasury Department.
Bids for constructing the building in Manila were opened in Wash-
ington on April 29 and the contract was awarded to the Marsman
Building Corporation for $440,794. Bids for the construction of the
Baguio residence were opened on July 15. The contract was awarded
to H. R. Goyke & Co., Jacksonville, Fla., for $151,200.

JOINT PREPARATORY COMMITTEE ON PHILIPPINE AFFAIRS

The Joint Preparatory Committee on Philippine Affairs was created
on April 14, 1937, pursuant to an arrangement between the President
of the United States and the President of the Philippines for the pur-
pose of studying trade relations between the two countries and recom-
mending a program for the adjustment of Philippine economy to a
position independent of United States preferences. After public
hearings in Washington in June 1937, and in San Francisco in July,
the committee proceeded to Manila, P. I., where public hearings were
held during the month of September. During its 3 months’ stay in
the Philippines the committee spent about a month traveling in the
islands, visiting 34 of the 50 provinces and becoming thoroughly
familiar with all phases of Philippine life and economy. The dis-
cussions of the committee, which had been suspended in November
1937, due to the return of the American members to the United States,
were resumed in Washington after the arrival of the Filipino members
in February 1938, and pushed to final agreement. The exhaustive
report of the committee was signed on May 20, 1938, and copies were
transmitted to the Interdepartmental Committee on Philippine
Affairs and to the President of the Philippines. Following a study of
the report by the Interdepartmental Committee, it was submitted to
the President of the United States.

DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP

The annual inspection of the Dominican Customs Receivership was
made by Lt. Col. Howard Eager, assistant to Chief of the Bureau,
in December 1937. He was assisted in the inspection of the accounts
by Captain Robert S. Moore, Finance Department, United States
Army. The receivership continues to maintain a high degree of effi-
ciency and the accounts were in satisfactory condition.

The customs collections for 1937 amounted to $2,914,615.68, an
increase of $35,826.61 over the customs collections for 1936. Being
the second gain in as many years, in the volume of customs collec-
tions, after the long period of depression, the showing may be taken
as indicative of a gradual upturn in import trade.

Internal-revenue taxes, independent of customs duties, but collected
at the customhouses under administration of the receivership by
101316—38-------2


8

REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

virtue of a special agreement with the Dominican Government, pro-
duced the sum of $3,257,752.83, an increase of $149,238.65, compared
with 1936.

The cost of operating the receivership was well within the 5-percent
allowance provided in the convention, being 4.64 percent of the
customs receipts for the year. The cost of internal-revenue collec-
tions made through the receivership was 3.27 percent of the gross
collections, the allowance under the agreement with the Dominican
Government being 4 percent. The combined cost of the services
was 3.91 percent of the total receipts.

The interest payments on all bonded indebtedness were maintained
throughout the year, a total of $896,060.04 being paid for interest
accounts in 1937, and $60,760.08 for credit of the sinking-fund account
of both issues of outstanding bonds. At the close of December 1937
the total amount of Dominican foreign-dollar bonds outstanding was
$15,740,000. An additional amount of $552,000 of the bonds was held
uncanceled in the sinking fund, interest accruing on all bonds so held
being earmarked for purchase of additional bonds for the same account.

Charles Burnett,
Brigadier General, United States Army.


Appendix A

LAWS OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
ENACTED DURING THE THIRD SESSION OF THE SEV-
ENTY-FIFTH CONGRESS

Public, No. 440 (H. R. 9306), approved March 5, 1938: “First
Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal year 1938.”

Makes available the unexpended balance of the appropriation of
$150,000 contained in the First Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal
year 1937, for expenditures necessary to enable the Secretary of Labor
during 1938 to transport Filipinos to the Philippine Islands pursuant
to Public, No. 202, approved July 10, 19.35, as amended by Public,
No. 645, approved June 4, 1936, and by Public, No. 81, approved
May 14, 1937.

Public, No. 545 (H. R. 10193), approved May 25, 1938: “Authoriz-
ing the temporary detail of United States employees, possessing
special qualifications, to governments of American Republics and the
Philippines, and for other purposes.”

Authorizes the President, when the public interest renders such
course advisable, to detail employees of the United States Govern-
ment to temporary duty with the Commonwealth of the Philippines,
and in other specified countries, under certain conditions.

Public, No. 554 (H. R. 9682), effective May 28, 1938: “Revenue
Act of 1938.”

(1) Remits payment of interest paid and penalties on income, war-
profits, and excess-profits taxes imposed by the Revenue Acts of 1917
and 1918 upon American citizens in a possession of the United States,
if claims for refund are filed within specified periods.

(2) Authorizes refund to any taxpayers of interest paid on income,
estate and gift taxes at rates in excess of 6 percent which accrued
between October 24, 1933, and August 30, 1935.

(3) Provides that gains on sales of personal property in the Philip-
pines which was purchased in the United States constitute gross in-
come from sources in the Philippines. This amends the Revenue
Acts of 1926, 1928, 1932, 1934, and 1936 in this respect and is retro-
active

Public, No. 590 (H. R. 9995), approved June 11, 1938: “Military
Appropriation Act, 1939.”

Repeats the provision in the “Military Appropriation Act, 1938,”
which would bar Filipinos, with certain exceptions, from further en-
listment in the United States Army.

Public, No. 591 (H. R. 10291), approved June 11, 1938: “War
Department Civil Appropriation Act, 1939.”

Includes an appropriation of $181,930 for the maintenance of the
office of the United States High Commissioner to the Philippine
Islands as authorized by subsection 4 of section 7 of Public, No. 127,
approved March 24, 1934.

9


10 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Public, No. 706 (S. 3845), approved June 23, 1938: “Civil Aero-
nautics Act of 1938.”

The Philippine Islands are included in the terms of the act relating
to overseas and foreign air commerce and transportation; the operation
of civil aircraft within the jurisdiction of the Philippine Islands, how-
ever, shall be governed by laws enacted by the legislature of the
islands and by executive regulations designating air-space reservations
or other prohibited areas.

Public, No. 785 (S. 3), approved June 30, 1938: “Federal Firearms
Act.” #

Designed to regulate the manufacture of and shipment through
interstate or foreign commerce of all firearms. The Philippine Islands
are included in the terms of the act relating to interstate or foreign
commerce.

Public Resolution No. 122 (H. J. Res. 679), approved June 21,
1938: “Work Relief and Public Works Appropriation Act of 1938.”

Removes the discrimination appearing in a similar act for 1937
whereby needy Filipinos could not receive the benefits of the act
relating to employment on projects of the Works Progress Administra-
tion.


Appendix B

LIST OF PRINCIPAL MEASURES. AFFECTING THE PHILIP-
PINE ISLANDS CONSIDERED DURING THE THIRD
SESSION OF THE SEVENTY-FIFTH CONGRESS BUT NOT
ENACTED

S. 3253. “To prohibit the marriage, in any Territory or possession
of the United States, or in the District of Columbia, of any white
person and any person who is not a white person, and for other
purposes.”

This act would make illegal any marriage ceremony between a white
person and any person who is not white, and would thus have the
effect of preventing intermarriage between Americans and Filipinos,
among others. (Introduced January 15, 1938; referred to the Senate
Judiciary Committee.)

S. 3385. “To repeal the provisions of the Philippine Commonwealth
Act of 1934 relating to certain export taxes.”

Designed to repeal the export tax provisions of the Independence
Act in the interest of Philippine commerce and industries. (Intro-
duced February 3, 1938; referred to the Senate Committee on Terri-
tories and Insular Affairs.)

S. 3466. “To amend the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, to allow
certain Filipino seamen to serve on American vessels.”

This bill would amend section 302 of the Merchant Marine Act,
1936, by providing that Filipinos who are native citizens of the
Philippine Islands, lawfully admitted to the United States for perma-
nent residence prior to May 1, 1934, and who have served 3 years
upon any merchant or fishing vessel of the United States, shall be
deemed citizens of the United States for the purpose of serving, and
shall be eligible for employment on any such vessel, upon obtaining a
certificate of such prior service from the Bureau of Marine Inspection
and Navigation. (Introduced February 16, 1938; referred to the
Senate Commerce Committee.)

S. 3506. “Relating to certain Filipino residents of the United
States.”

To declare any Filipino who is a native citizen of the Philippine
Islands lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent resi-
dence prior to May 1, 1934, who was in the employ of the Federal
Government oil February 21, 1938, to be a citizen of the United
States, and thus be eligible for continued employment therein. (In-
troduced February 21, 1938; referred to the Senate Committee on
Immigration.)

S. 3629, H. R. 9787. “To authorize attendance of Philippine Army
personnel at service schools of the United States Army.”

To permit the attendance for a period of 7 years, beginning July 1,
1938, of officers or enlisted men of the Philippine Army at such service
schools as the Air Corps Training Center, infantry, and cavalry

II


12 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

schools, at the expense of the Philippine Commonwealth. (S. 3629
introduced March 8, 1938; Senate Report No. 1526, March 21, 1938;
passed the Senate March 25, 1938; referred to House Committee on
Military Affairs. H. R. 9787 introduced March 8, 1938; referred to
the House Committee on Military Affairs.)

S. 3645. “To authorize the naturalization of Filipinos who were
permanent residents of the United States on May 1, 1934.”

To allow any native Filipino citizen of the Philippine Islands who
was a permanent resident of the United States on May 1, 1934, to
become a citizen of the United States upon compliance with the
naturalization laws, except that Filipinos are exempted from the
requirements as to declarations of intention and certificates of arrival.
(Introduced March 10, 1938; referred to the Senate Committee on
Immigration.)

S. 3750. “To amend the immigration and naturalization laws with
respect to the naturalization of native-born Filipinos.”

Seeks to amend United States naturalization laws by adding to the
classes of Filipinos entitled to become citizens of the United States
those who have served not less than 3 years in the United. States
Army. (Introduced March 29, 1938; referred to the Senate Com-
mittee on Immigration.)

S. 3883, H. R. 6830. “To prohibit the exportation of tobacco seed
and plants, except for experimental purposes.”

To make unlawful the export of tobacco seed and live tobacco plants
from the United States or from any territory subject to the jurisdiction
thereof, to any foreign country, unless by written permission of the
Secretary of Agriculture. (S. 3883 introduced April 21, 1938; referred
to the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. H. R. 6830
introduced April 14, 1938; House Report No. 2144, April 14, 1938;
passed the House May 2, 1938; reported out of Senate Committee on
Agriculture and Forestry May 5, 1938.)

H. J. Res. 542. “To provide for the immediate and complete inde-
pendence of the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes.”

Provides that immediately upon adoption of this resolution and
notwithstanding the provisions of the Independence Act, the United
States shall withdraw all sovereignty from the islands (except such
naval and fueling stations as are reserved under that act); after inde-
pendence United States tariff and immigration laws applicable to
foreign countries to become effective. (Introduced December 17,
1937; referred to the House Committee on Insular Affairs.)

H. J. Res. 578. “To create a joint congressional committee to in-
vestigate certain racial problems.”

To investigate problems arising from the presence in the United
States of substantial numbers of persons not of the white race and the
methods and plans whereby these problems may be solved and the
United States may escape evils inimical to the welfare of its citizenry.
(Introduced January 28, 1938; referred to the House Committee on
.Rules.)


Appendix C

ACT OF THE FIRST NATIONAL ASSEMBLY, SECOND
SESSION, REQUIRING APPROVAL BY THE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNITED STATES

Bill No. 2512, entitled “An act amending further paragraph 64 of
group 2, class IV, of section 8 of the Philippine Tariff Act of 1909,
as amended, so as to extend the free entry of woods, barks, roots, and
similar natural products, for dyeing or tanning.” Approved by the
President February 26, 1938.

The purpose of this bill is to continue the duty-free importation into
the Philippines until December 31, 1946, of articles for dyeing or
tanning or for the manufacture of extracts therefrom.

13


Appendix D

STAFF OF UNITED STATES HIGH COMMISSIONER, EXCLU-
SIVE OF MINOR EMPLOYEES, AS OF JUNE 30, 1938

United States High Commissioner, Paul V. McNutt.

Financial expert, J. Weldon Jones.

Legal adviser, Leo M. Gardner.

Assistant legal adviser, George A. Malcolm.

Assistant financial expert, Evett D. Hester.

Administrative assistant, Wayne Coy.

Private secretary, Mrs. Margaret Buchanan Headdy.

Chief clerk and passport official, Richard R. Ely.

Chief statistician, Charles W. Franks.

Accountant statistician, Floyd J. Dubas.

Accountant statistician, Ricardo Dimalanta.

Assistant chief clerk and secretarial stenographer, Mrs. Edith M.
Keyes.

Cable clerk, Ora E. Lautzenheiser.

Confidential stenographer, Miss Mary Jo Keene.

Confidential stenographer, Helen Burke.

Confidential stenographer, Mrs. Janet White.

Record clerk, Constantino Tirona y Casimiro.

Stenographer, Macario Guevara y Cruz.

Stenographer, Victor Baltazar y Hilario.

Stenographer, Fabian de Guzman.

Clerk, Vicente Manuel.

(Minor employees, including clerks, chauffeurs, etc., bring the total
number up to 37.)

14


Appendix E
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
Total foreign trade

12 months ending Dec. 31— Consignments Shipments 1
From United States From other countries . Total To United States To other countries Total
IQ 9A $83,858,068 92,592,959 78,183,029 62,139, 683 51,297, 750 43,540,407 54,375,678 54,366,500 61,497, 263 63, 302,036 $50,798,830 54, 567,316 44,909, 925 37, 039,036 28,097,335 23,821,056 29,231,433 31,157,350 39, 628, 912 45,723,709 $134, 656, 898 147,160,275 123, 092,954 99,178, 719 79, 395,085 67, 361,463 83,607, 111 85, 523, 850 101,126,175 109,025, 745' $115,585,876 124,465,473 105, 342,061 83, 422, 397 82, 647,867 91,313,027 91,843,594 74, 935, 537 107, 525, 289 122,110,189 $39,468, 670 39,981,370 27, 825,067 20, 549, 677 12,690,214 14,458.026 18, 560,042 19, 310,143 28,919, 676 30, 523, 208 $155,054, 546 164,446,843 133,167,128 103,972,074 95,338,081 105,771,053 110,403,636 94,245,680 136,444, 965 152, 633,397
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937


1 Exclusive of gold and silver ore, bullion and coin amounting to $7,683,448 in 1935, $11,230,193 in 1936, and
$14,327,300 in 1937, approximately all of which was shipped to the United States.

Manila-hemp shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Value per ton Value per ton
Quantity Value Quantity Value
Long tons Long tons
1928 172,140 $26,593, 606 $154 60,304 $9,527.045 $189
1929 186,431 28, 420, 550 152 66,830 12, 276, 363 1«4
1930 166,616 18,426,676 111 57,782 7, 638, 029 133
1931 130,026 8, 942, 907 69 27,461 2, 511,734 91
1932 104,114 5,015,602 48 24, 740 1,481,576 60
1933 __ 149, 663 6, 873, 860 46 35.617 2,012,935 57
1934.. 171, 743 8,661,568 50 41,416 2,695,896 65
1935, 185, 227 11,473, 967 62 43, 771 3,811,010 87
1936 164,484 17,088, 599 104 37, 243 5, 336, 711 143
1937 162, 727 21,639, 687 133 40.032 6,851. 043 171

Coconut-oil shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons Cents Long tons Cents
1928 139,996 $23,489,173 7.49 138,608 $23,239, 521 7.49
1929 187,509 29,184, 942 6.95 185,707 28,900,587 6.95
1930 145, 036 19,155,382 5.89 143, 796 18, 961,827 5.89
1931 162, 364 15, 035, 322 4.13 146,383 13, 585, 684 4.14
1932. 112,861 7, 651,144 3.03 108, 517 7. 335, 830 3.03
1933 157, 099 9,169, 823 2. 60 155,020 9,025,075 2. 60
1934... 142, 547 6, 794, 871 2.13 133, 789 6, 396. 557 2.13
1935 162, 584 12, 254, 581 3.36 159, 626 12,005, 099 3. 36
1936 157,101 13, 871, 759 3.94 148, 541 13,137,171 3. 95
1937.... 160,717 20, 525, 537 5.70 157, 774 20,173, 703 5. 71

15


16 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Copra shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Value per ton Value per ton
Quantity Value Quantity Value
Long tons Long tons
1928.. 230,713 $22,542,341 $98 179,701 $17,603,832 $98-
1929 170,830 15, 565,821 91 127, 570 11,440,898 90
1930 171,546 13, 433,438 78 138,931 10,654,348 77
1931 171,486 9,150,404 53 118,975 6,052,329 51
1932 135,072 5,133, 227 38 81,716 3,056,067 37
1933 303,875 8, 956,029 29 204,714 5,951,227 29
1934 337, 291 8, 605,125 26 151, 059 3,900,060 26
1935 248, 903 10,987, 330 44 204,805 9,106, 010 44
1936 286,488 14,999,784 52 179,639 9,772,482 54
1937 232,806 15,984, 700 69 204,193 14,424,980 71

Desiccated-coconut shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds Cents Pounds Cents
1928 44,895,711 $3, 723, 586 8.29 44, 838,722 $3,718,269 8.29
1929 49,130,664 3, 540,124 7.20 49,094, 777 3, 537,004 7.20
1930 43, 943,820 2, 962, 845 6.74 43, 886,901 2,958,710 6.74
1931 37,084,972 1, 822,129 4.91 37,044, 928 1,819,691 4.91
1932.... 35,433, 785 1,616,701 4. 56 35,408, 847 1,615,446 4. 56
1933 39, 522, 470 1, 682, 805 4. 25 39,466,452 1,679,997 4. 25
1934 51, 886,886 2, 254, 540 4.34 51, 862,033 2, 253, 236 4.34
1935 74,885,943 3,962,315 5. 29 74, 550,903 3,941,938 5.29
1936. 74, 322, 798 4,397,063 5. 92 73,382, 830 4,353,138 5.93
1937 89, 826,198 6,346,632 7. 07 89,145,715 6,304,296 7.07

Sugar shipments

[Raw and refined]

12 months ending Dec. 31—

1928..

1929..

1930..

1931..

1932..

1933..

1934..

1935..

1936..

1937..

Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons 560,933 684,873 732, 225 741,036 1,000, 506 1,061, 610 1,134,626 508, 076 885, 621 857, 283 $47, 542,940 53, 244,149 52,240,226 49, 963,105 59,801,885 64,333,426 65,454, 581 32, 990,680 61,937, 322 57,706,194 Cents 3.78 3.47 3.18 3.00 2.67 2.70 2. 58 2.90 3.12 3.01 Long tons 525,786 660,352 725, 548 740, 397 1,000, 209 1,061, 554 1,134, 466 507,234 885,402 854, 293 $45, 691,238 62,153,930 62,038,657 49,944,465 59,792, 293 64,328,989 65,444,993 32,949,171 61, 927,184 57,610, 521 Cents 3.88 3.63 3.20 3.01 2.67 2.70 2.68- 2.90 3.12” 3. 01


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 17

Refined sugar shipments

[Included in table above]

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons Cents Long tons Cents
1928 7,917 $955,735 5.39 7,859 $947,945 5.38
1929 6,899 824,323 5.33 6,834 816,947 5.34
1930 26,939 2,722,819 4. 51 26,928 2,721,620 4.51
1931„._ 39,835 3, 329,866 3. 73 39,787 3,324,881 3. 73
1932 56,223 4,465, 238 3.55 56,185 4, 461, 713 3.55
1933 54, 354 4,471,990 3. 67 54,316 4,468,354 3.67
1934 57, 867 4,037,065 3.11 57, 773 4,028,844 3.11
1935 56, 980 5,242, 584 4.11 56, 849 5,230, 647 4.11
1936— 51,174 4, 716, 711 4.11 51,127 4, 712,362 4.11
1937 54,467 5,128,342 4. 20 54,157 5,107,926 4. 21

Leaf-tobacco shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31—

1928-

1929-

1930-

1931..
1932„

1933..

1934..

1935..

1936..

1937..

Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds 44, 571, 470 $3,029,633 Cents 6.80 Pounds 124, 617 $15,896 Cents 12. 76
60, 800, 643 4,392,435 7.22 104,009 12, 604 12.12
45, 790,900 3,725,879 8.13 422, 525 48, 695 11. 52
49,941,022 3, 501,496 7.01 236,106 41, 268 17. 48
47, 664,488 2,822,233 5. 92 426, 949 4.1,862 9.80
37, 250,088 1, 842,553 4.95 134, 476 8, 515 6.36
28, 943,356 1, 391, 046 4.81 44,357 3,659 8.25
49,410, 948 31, 839, 878 2,307,460 2, 266,303 4. 67 7.12 443 53 11.96
17,803, 906 1, 242, 877 6.98 3,404 404 11.87

Cigar shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per thousand Quantity Value Value per thousand
1928 Thousands 220,884 “ $4,765,140 $21.57 Thousands 179,570 $3,855,672 $21.47“
1929 188,333 3,824, 649 20.31 150,945 3,013,355 19.96
1930 178, 561 3, 545,223 19.85 144,767 2,810,279 19.41
1931 183,874 3,395,337 18.47 158, 520 2,885,366 18. 20
1932 182,575 3,231,218 17,70 164,616 2,885,524 17. 53
1933 196,141 3,157,933 16.10 180, 714 203,896 2, 823,117 15. 62
1934 222,820 3,606, 510 16.18 3, 231,772 15. 86
1935 223,117 3,399,380 15. 24 204,013 3,030, 218 14.86
1936 178,334 2,746,327 15.40 158,977 2,372,181 14.92
1937 204,620 3,072, 360 15.01 181,378 2,667,606 14.71


18 BEPOBT OF CHIEF OF BUBEATJ OF INSULAR AFFAIBS

Embroidery shipments 1

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1928 $4, 523,968 6,011,532 3, 591,737 2,657,130 3,349, 825 $4,483, 513 5,962,093 3, 544,036 2,625, 323 3,334,481 1933 $1,899,316 2,666,420 5,076,244 4,274, 555 3,688,803 $1,893,748 2,659,122 5,069,223 4, 266,336 3,670,179
1929 1934
1930 1935
1931. 1936
1932 1937


i Cotton and silk.

Cordage shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1928 Pounds 14,494,705 $1,775,435 Cents 12.25 Pounds 5,393,029 $721,120 Cents 13.37
1929 15, 667,016 13,858,457 1,904,272 12.15 6,850,770 932,730 13.61
1930 1, 553, 227 11. 21 6, 769,412 841,564 12.43
1931 10, 224, 805 887,408 8.68 4, 599,113 460,001 10.00
1932 8,452, 224 669, 047 7.80 4,447,882 411,207 9.24
1933 12,907,781 906,768 7.02 6,876, 227 567,345 8.25
1934 18,339,701 1,334,110 7.27 8,943,167 785,053 8.78
1935 17, 651, 445 1,161,815 6. 58 8,053, 278 628,959 7.81
1936 14, 561,103 1,198,870 8. 23 3,918,022 449,692 11.48
1937 16,449,336 1,436, 461 8.73 4,660,333 495,967 10.64

All other shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1928 _ $17,068,724 $6,729,770 6,235,909 5,845,916 3,496,536 2,693, 581 * 1933 $6,938,539 ' 9,635,865 10,631,908 13,664,383 20,990,146 $3,022,079 4,473,246 4,393,909 6,910,341 9,911,490
1929 18,358,369 14,532,495 8, 616,836 6,057,199 1934
1930 1935
1931 1936
1932 1937



Appendix F

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS

Under an act of Congress approved August 29, 1916, as amended
by an act approved May 31, 1922, it is provided that the entire
indebtedness of the Philippine government, exclusive of those obliga-
tions known as friar-land bonds and of bonds not to exceed $10,000,000
in amount issued by that government and secured by an equivalent
amount of bonds issued by the provinces and municipalities thereof,
shall not exceed at any one time 10 percent of the aggregate tax
valuation of its property.

It is further provided that the entire indebtedness of the city of
Manila shall not exceed lOpercent of the aggregate tax valuation of
its property, nor that of any province or municipality a sum in excess
of 7 percent of the aggregate tax valuation of its property at any one
time.

The assessed value of taxable real property of the Philippine
Islands as at December 31, 1937, was $935,307,774.00; that of the city
of Manila as at December 31, 1937, was $127,369,914.00.

The following statements show the bonded indebtedness of the
Philippine Islands and of its provinces and municipalities, respec-
tively, on June 30, 1938:

Insular government

Title of loan Rate Amount Dated Re- deem- able Due
Issued Outstand- ing June 30, 1938
Included in 10 percent limitation: Percent
Public improvements __ 4 $1,600,000 $628. 000 1909 1919 1939
Do 5 A 10,000,000 7,545,000 1921 1941
Gold bonds of 1916 4 4, 000,000 2,302,000 1916 1926 1946
General bonds 5 5, 000,000 3,562, 000 1922 1952
Do 414 23, 000, 000 15,870, 000 1922 1952
Irrigation and permanent public works... 4M 11,800,000 8, 098, 000 1922 1952
Metropolitan Water District. 5 3, 000,000 2,446, 000 1925 1935 1955
Do 4 H 1,500, 000 1,458, 000 1929 1959
Do 4 )4 250, 000 250, 000 1931 1941 1961
Do... 5 250, 000 250,000 1935 1945 1965
Do. 5 250, 000 250, 000 1935 1945 1965
Do 5 250, 000 250, 000 1937 1947 1967
Do 5 250, 000 250,000 1938 1948 1968
Cebu Port Works 4 A 750, 000 628, 000 1928 1958
Do 4lA 750, 000 710, 000 1929 1959
Do 4A 500, 000 500, 000 1930 1960
Iloilo Port Works 4 Vo 750, 000 631,000 1928 1958
Do 4 y2 500,000 488, 000 1929 1959
Do. 4V2 925, 000 925, 000 1930 1960
Total... 65, 225, 000 47, 041, 000

19


22 REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Sinking and other fund investments

Year ending June 30— Total
Prior years 1937 1938
Philippine government: Collateral bonds: due 1950 (Manila) $1,084,000 976, 500 400, 000 428, 500 274, 000 641, 000 90, 000 8, 000 $10,000 $206,000 $1,300,0001 976, 500' 400.00fr 428. 500 274, 000 864, GOO- 93, 000 11,000 55,000 500.000 11,376,000' 3, 278,000 2,076, 000' 379,000' 1,978, 000 941, 000- 4, 074, 000 7,355, GOO- 571, 000- 342.000 477, 000/ 36, 000 72, 000- 2,750, GOO- 421, 000 513,000- 1, 273,000
due 1956 (Iloilo)
4H’s; due 1956 (Occidental Negros)
4H’s, due 1956 (Pangasinan)
43-l’si due 1956 (Ilocos Norte):..
43^’s, due 1957 (Provincial): 115,000 3,000 2, 000 55,000 108,000
4}4’s, due 1957 (Camarines Sur)__
43^’s, due 1957 (Laguna) 1,000
43^’s, due 1957 (Marinduque)
43^’s, due 1958 (Manila) . 500, 000 9, 279, 000 2, 956, 000 2, 055, 000 225, 000 1,978,000 941, 000 4,074, 000 6,831, 000 571, 000 322, 000 405, 000 26, 000 72, 000 2, 750, 000 421,000 513, 000 1, 273, 000
General: 43^'s, due 1952 1,150,000 100, 000 21, 000 115, 000 947, 000 222,000
5’s, due 1952.
5’s, due 1955, metropolitan water district
4!4’s, due 1959, metropolitan water district Manila Railroad Co. purchase, 4’s, due 1946 39, 000
Public improvement: 4’s, due 1939
53^’s, due 1941
4H’s, due 1952, irrigation and permanent public works 110,000 414,000
4H’s, due 1958, Cebu port works
43/^’s, due 1959, Cebu port works 20,000 30,000 10, 000
4H’s, due 1958, Iloilo port works 42,000
434’s, due 1959, Iloilo port works
Municipal: City of Cebu, 4’s, due 1941
City of Manila, 534’s, due 1950
City of Manila, 434’s, due 1959
Railroad: Manila R. R. Co. 4’s, due 1939
Philippine Ry. Co. 4's, due 1937
Total
39,094, 000 1,723,000 1,997,000 42,814,000;

Under the provisions of section 2 of Act No. 3014, the following
bonds, included in the preceding list of bonds purchased, have been
canceled:

Collateral bonds:

4^,st due 1950 (Manila)______________________________________ $738, 000

4%’s, due 1956 (Iloilo)_______________________________________ 164, 500

4^’s, due 1956 (Occidental Negros)______________________________ 36, 000

4H,s, due 1956 (Pangasinan)___________________________________ 67,000'

4K’s, due 1956 (Ilocos Norte)__________________________________ 33, 000

4V2’s, due 1957 (Provincial)____________________________________ 246, 000

4^’s, due 1957 (Camarines Sur)___________________________________ 6, 000

4K’s, due 1957 (Laguna)__________________________________________ 2, 000'

4^’s, due 1958 (Manila)_________________________________________ 52, 000)

General bonds:

4^’s, due 1952________________________________________________ 7, 130, 000)

5’s, due 1952_________________________________________________ 1,438,000'

5’s, due 1955, metropolitan water district____________________ 554, 000’

4J4,s, due 1959, metropolitan water district------------------ 42, 000'

Manila R. R. Co. purchase 4’s, due 1946_______________________ 1, 698, 000)


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 23

Public improvement:

4’s, due 1939_________________________________________________ $872, 000

5%’s, due 1941________________________________________________ 2, 455, 000

4%’s, due 1952, irrigation and permanent public works_________ 3, 702, 000

4%’s, due 1958, Cebu port works_________________________________ 122, 000

4K's, due 1959, Cebu port works__________________________________ 40, 000

4J47s, due 1958, Iloilo port works_________________________________ 119, 000

4^'s, due 1959, Iloilo port works__________________________________ 12, 000

Municipal:

City of Cebu 4's, due 1941____________________________________ 53, 000

City of Manila 4y2’s, due 1959________________________________ 30, 000

Total _ _ ___________________________________________ $19,611,500

All canceled bonds have been shipped to the auditor of the Philippine
Islands. This leaves $23,202,500 in securities actually held in this
Bureau for account of the Philippine government on June 30, 1938.

RAILWAY BONDS

The bonds of railroads, guaranteed as to interest by the Philippine
government, outstanding are:

Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4-percent bonds, due 1939_________$10, 585, 000

Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4-percent bonds, due 1959_________ 1, 034, 000

Philippine Railway Co. first-mortgage 4-percent bonds, due 1937_____ 8, 549, 000

Total____________________________________________________ 20, 168, 000

Bonds with a par value of $92,000 of the Manila Railroad Co., due in
1939, were purchased during the past year from funds furnished by
the Manila Railroad Co.

Bonds with a par value of $12,000 of the Manila Railroad Co., due in
1959, were purchased during the year from funds furnished by the
Manila Railroad Co., making a total of $31,000 par value of these
bonds held uncanceled on June 30, 1938.

No bonds were canceled during the year.

COINAGE

On December 31, 1937, the total amount of coins in circulation and
available therefor was P41,324,259.75, consisting of the following:

Pesos i_____________________________________________________ P21, 016, 037. 00

50 centavos_____1______________J____________________________ 6, 264, 810. 50

Subsidiary coins____________________________________________ 10, 323, 527. 60

Minor coins_________________________________________________ 3, 719, 884. 65

Total________________________________________________ 41, 324, 259. 75

i The Philippine peso equals 50 cents United States currency.

INSULAR RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

The following is a statement of insular receipts and disbursements
of the Philippine Islands, exclusive of all items of a refundable charac-


24 REPORT OP CHIEF OP BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

ter, expressed in United States currency, for fiscal (calendar) years
1934, 1935, 1936, and 1937:

Year ending Dec. 31—

Balance from prior years-----------------

Revenues:

Customs------------------------------

Internal-----------------------------

Repayment of Philippine National

Bank losses, Act 3174______________

Coconut oil excise tax collected in

United States----------------------

Miscellaneous------------------------

Total revenues.
Total credits...

DEBITS

Expenditures:

Bureaus and offices________________

Revenue service____________________

Public debt------------------------

Public works and equipment_________

Miscellaneous______________________

Aid to provinces, cities, and municipali-

Purchase of investments and securities.

Pensions and gratuities____________

Transfers to government service insur-
ance system________________________

Adjustment of surplus______________

Surplus.............................

Total debits......................

1934

$33,612,013. 59

1935

$37, 589, 594. 71

10,878, 380.84
17,555,372.03

1,474,225. 09

9,429, 397.71

39, 337, 375. 67

72,949,389. 26

12, 598, 304. 27

3, 232, 250. 48

4, 418, 763. 86
2, 716, 744.10

262,135. 75

9,868,169.87
1,225,390. 34
1,038,035. 88

37,589, 594.71

72,949, 389.26

11,695, 493. 57
18, 349, 537. 21

1,025, 374.40

10,349, 235. 48

41,419,640. 66

79,009, 235. 37

13,185,118. 97

3, 726,115. 67

4, 249,627.49
3, 589,691.02

175,941. 51

10,955, 247. 54
1,217,260.00
867,594.07

41, 042,639.10

79,009,235.37

1936

$41,042,639.10

13, 718, 047. 32
22, 634, 386. 04

2, 339, 624.42

13,059,061.03

51,751,118.81

92, 793, 757. 91

13, 344,975. 65
4,029,191. 46
4,197,675. 06
5,406, 508.88
95* 290. 22

11, 818,.949.62
6, 442^970. 85
847,534.61

1, 597,808.43
45,032; 853.13

92,793, 757.91

1937

$45,012,853.13

15,088, 866.77
31,027, 231.17

47, 753, 613 65
12, 371,001.41

106,240, 713. 00

151,253, 566.13

16,791,882.00
5,278, 909. 38
4,032, 542. 32
7,039,061.83
120,319; 55

14,426, 633. 98
5,991,'409.-47
.873,158.28

2,391,068.90

94,308, 580.42

151,253,566.13


Appendix G

Arrivals and departures of Filipinos in and from continental United States and
Hawaii; and total remaining

CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Year ended June 30— Arrivals Depar- tures Net in- crease or decrease
19201 678 108 +570
1921 891 433 -458
1922_ 339 360 -21
1923. 1,394 259 +1,135
1924 3,951 323 +3,628
1925 2,187 467 +1, 720
1926... 6,806 711 +6, 095
1927. —- 9,047 811 +8, 236
1928 6,196 1,191 +5, 005
1929 11, 560 1,146 +10.414

Year ended June 30— Arrivals Depar- tures Net in- crease or decrease
1930 2 5,866 1, 563 +4,303
1931 4,363 2,394 +1,969
1932.. 1,243 2,710 -1,467
1933 623 2,166 -1, 543
1934 1, 462 1,137 +325
1935 128 979 -851
1936... 155 1, 053 -898
1937 303 1,048 -745
1938 8 306 1,201 -895

TERRITORY OF HAWAII

19304 7,763 5,723 +2,040 +1, 595 -1, 424 —6, 049 1935 189 2,613 1,759
1931 6,389 4,794 5,771 6,630 4,944 1936 152
1932 4,347 581 1937 295 1,311 1245
1933 1938 3 422
1934 433 -4, 511

1 Total within continental United States, census of Jan. 1,1920, 5,603.

2 Total within continental United States, census of 1930, 45,203.

8 Subject to revision.

< Total within Territory of Hawaii, census of 1930, 63,052.

Note.—Upon the acceptance of the Independence Act by the Philippine Legislature on May 1, 1934
the Immigration Acts of 1917 and 1924, and other laws relating to immigration were made applicable to
citizens of the Philippine Islands who are not citizens of the United States as regards entry into conti-
nental United States. “For such purposes the Philippine Islands shall be considered as a separate country
and shall have for each fiscal year a quota of 50” (sec. 8 (a) 1, Public, No. 127, 73d Cong.).

Source: Insular Collector of Customs, Philippine Islands, and Bureau of Immigration, U. S. Department
of Labor.

25


Appendix H

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP

ship during the fiscal (calendar) year ended December 31, 1937:

Statement of the customs service, Dominican Republic, year ended Dec. 31, 1937

RECEIPTS

Balance from Dec. 31, 1936______________________________________ $126, 301. 41

Gross collections_______________________________________________2, 914, 615. 68

Miscellaneous receipts__________________________________________ 2, 927. 01

Provisional receipts pending cancelation as of Dee. 31, 1937____ 119, 817. 00

Total___________________________________________________ 3, 163, 661. 10

EXPENDITURES

Customs expense________________________________________________ 105, 679. 54

Sinking-fund payments__________________________________________ 60, 760. 08

Interest on bonds______________________________________________ 896, 060. 04

Paid to Dominican Government_____________________________________ 1, 898, 671. 06

Paid for account of Dominican Government, as per special au-
thority________________________________________________________! 26, 278. 79

Exchange on funds transmitted_______________________________— 3, 629. 27

Accrued liability general fund_____________________________________ 5, 283. 51

Accrued liability retirement fund__________________________________ 6, 851. 17

Refund of duties collected in excess_______________________________ 2, 005. 47

Personal fees refunded____________________________________________ 11, 006. 95

Provisional receipts pending cancelation on Dec. 31, 1936, can-
celed during 1937._____________________________________________ 82, 939. 00

Balances on hand Dec. 31, 1937:

Accrued liability general fund________________________________ 5, 751. 63

Accrued liability retirement fund___________________________ 32, 503. 65

5-percent convention fund account_____________________________ 7, 024. 70

Due Dominican Government______________________________________ 4, 354. 32

In transit from deputy receivers_____________________________ 14, 861. 92

Total________________________________________3, 163, 661. 10

26

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