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Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs

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Title:
Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs
Series Title:
Annual reports, War Department
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Insular Affairs
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publisher:
G.P.O.
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 22 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Insular possessions -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication ( marcgt )
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
1924-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Report year ends June 30.

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Source Institution:
SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
557807 ( ALEPH )
OCM03883729 ( OCLC )
sn 84032311 ( LCCN )
Classification:
HB325.3 ( ddc )

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Preceded by:
United States. Bureau of Insular Affairs.Report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, War Department

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ANNUAL REPORTS - - - WAR DEPARTMENT

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS - 1937

HB

325.3

849,850




ANNUAL REPORTS, WAR DEPARTMENT

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1937

ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS

1937

UNI TED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1937

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C.

Price 10 cents




ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

CHIEF, BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

War Department,

Bureau of Insular Affairs,

September 23, 1937.

The Secretary of War.

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the Bureau
of Insular Affairs for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1937.

CONGRESSIONAL CONSIDERATION OF PHILIPPINE QUESTIONS

The first session of the Seventy-fifth Congress convened on January
5, 1937, and adjourned on August 21. No measures of vital impor-
tance to the Philippine Islands were enacted during the period of this
report.1 The acts passed provided appropriations for the maintenance
of the office of the United States High Commissioner to the Philippine
Islands, for the expenses of the American group of the committee en-
gaged on work preparatory to the calling of a trade conference, and for
additional funds for the return of unemployed Filipinos from the
United States to the Philippine Islands. Up to June 30, 1937, 737
Filipinos have been returned to the islands under the act approved
February 11, 1936. The period for receiving such benefits was ex-
tended to December 31, 1938. One measure authorizes the adminis-
tration of oaths by the chief clerk and assistant chief clerk of the
office of the United States High Commissioner. This legislation was
necessary because American corporations insisted upon authentica-
tion of legal documents, such as deeds to property, etc., by some
Federal officer and there was no such official in the Philippines with
notarial powers.

The number of bills relating to sugar quotas and to taxes on oil
show the continuing interest of Congress to prevent competition with
domestic products. The efforts of the Bureau were directed to the
prevention of any legislation that would infringe the provisions of
the Tydings-McDuffie Independence Act.

1 On Sept. 1,1937, the “Sugar Act of 1937" was approved. Sec. 202 provides the method for establishing
sugar quotas for domestic areas, United States possessions, and foreign countries. It further provides that
“In no case shall the quota for the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands be less than the duty-free quota
now established by the provisions of the Philippine Independence Act.”

The Secretary of Agriculture established the Philippine quota for the calendar year 1937 at 1,085,304
short tons, raw value; revised quota as of Sept. 10, duty free sugar in amount 998,499 short tons.

Sec. 205 (g) provides that “The Government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall make
allotments of any quota established for it pursuant to the provisions of this act on the basis specified in
sec. 6 (d) of Public Law No. 127, approved Mar. 24, 1934.” Accordingly, the President of the United
States, on Sept. 4, revoked, as of Sept. 1, 1937, the designation of and the powers heretofore conferred by
him upon the United States High Commissioner to constitute the “United States Sugar Authority in the
Philippine Islands."

Sec. 503 authorizes appropriations for the benefit of the Philippine Government of amounts collected in
the United States on the manufacture of Philippine sugar.

1


2

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

During the period covered by this report there were two sessions of
the National Assembly—a regular session from June 16 to October 9,
1936, and a special session from October 19 to October 30. The date
for the opening of the regular sessions of the assembly, which was
originally fixed for June 16 of each year by Commonwealth Act No. 17,
was subsequently changed by Commonwealth Act No. 49 to Octo-
ber 16.

An unusually large number of new laws were enacted during the
first year of the Commonwealth. Two hundred and thirty-six
measures were passed, the average number enacted during the 5 pre-
ceding years being 117. Broadly speaking, the legislative program
embodied plans which will initiate sweeping changes in the agricul-
tural, industrial, and social structures of the islands. Much of the
legislation was designed to encourage and strengthen the national
defense and law enforcement. A considerable body of laws affected
overseas trade. Closer relations between the government and labor
were provided by the reestablishment of a Bureau of Labor, the
creation of a Court of Industrial Relations, by increasing the rates
of salaries and wages paid to employees and common laborers of the
government, and by surrounding the workers in mines and quarries
and other enterprises with better safety regulations. Measures were
passed to promote economic development, to nationalize the natural
resources, to stimulate the consumption of native commodities, to
reorganize the judiciary and other branches of the government, and
to revise the tax system. Some 20 measures are calculated to pro-
duce additional revenues in 1937. An important measure provided
for the conservation, disposition, and development of mineral lands
and minerals. The Bureau of Non-Christian Tribes was abolished
and in its stead there was created a commission for the government
and control of Mindanao and Sulu, which is expected to play an
important part in plans for the economic development of Mindanao.
Four new chartered cities were created—Cebu, Iloilo, Zamboanga,
and Davao. Legislation was enacted providing for taking a popula-
tion census of the Philippines with classified social and economic
information; for the organization of a language institute to develop
a national language; and for the authorization of a plebiscite on
women’s suffrage as contemplated in the constitution.

Acts requiring approval oj the President of the United States.—Under
the provisions of section 2 (a) (9) of the Independence Act, local
legislation affecting currency, coinage, imports, exports, and immi-
gration requires approval by the President of the United States before
becoming law. Six bills were passed which require such approval
because they affect imports and exports. These prohibit the expor-
tation of buntal fiber; increase duties on imported beer, aerated
waters, and certain nonalcoholic beverages; exempt natural rock
asphalt from the payment of wharfage charges; empower the President
of the Philippines to increase or decrease the rates of duty on imported
products within specified limits; concern the shipment or exportation
of shells; and authorize the imposition of duties on eggs according to
gross weight instead of net weight, to correct an inadvertent omission
in the tariff law. (For list, see appendix C.) Two of these acts
were approved by the President on March 9, 1937, the other four are
awaiting action by the President.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

3

GENERAL CONDITIONS

The first annual report of the United States High Commissioner
to the Philippine Islands shows general conditions to be excellent.
A marked improvement was shown in commerce and industry during
the fiscal year just closed. Expansion in the production of gold was
the outstanding feature, its export value having gone ahead of all
other industries except sugar, abaca (manila hemp), and the coconut
group. The financial position is satisfactory. Peace prevailed
throughout the year, with the exception of tribal differences between
Kalingas and Christians and sporadic minor disturbances in Lanao
among Moro outlaws.

The first anniversary of the establishment of the Philippine Com-
monwealth was celebrated throughout the islands on November 15,

1936. Other events of popular interest were the Thirty-third Euchar-
istic Congress held in Manila from February 3 to 7, 1937, the number
of visitors being estimated at between 600,000 and 1,000,000; the
establishment on October 21 of regular weekly commercial air service
between Manila and the United States; the opening on April 28,

1937, by Pan American Airways of commercial air service between
Manila and Hong Kong; and the vote on woman suffrage, the plebis-
cite on April 30 resulting in 447,681 affirmative votes and 44,307
negative.

FINANCES

The total receipts and expenditures for the fiscal (and calendar)
year 1936 are shown in appendix F.

The finances of the Philippine government were in excellent con-
dition. The public debt was small; the sinking funds for all out-
standing bonded indebtedness had been regularly provided for and
segregated; the currency reserves were in excess of the legal require-
ments for the currency in circulation.

During the fiscal year 1936 the central government realized from all
sources a total income of $51,751,118.81, an increase of $10,331,478.15
over 1935. The total expenditures for the year amounted to
$46,183,096.35, an increase of $8,216,500.08 over the expenditures
made in 1935.

The current general fund surplus as of December 31, 1936, was
$23,953,834.44, an increase of $4,171,086.65 over the corresponding
balance on December 31, 1935.

The total current surplus (general, special, and bond funds) as of
December 31, 1936, was $45,012,853.13 compared with $41,042,639.10
in 1935, an increase of $3,970,214.03. This amount represents the
excess of income over expenditures for the fiscal year.

The invested surplus on December 31, 1936, amounted to $74,777,-
570.73 as compared with $62,921,688.15 for the previous year, an
increase of $11,855,882.58.

Bonded indebtedness.—On February 1, 1936, $395,000 par value of
public works 4-percent bonds became due and were retired. During
the year 1936, $536,150 par value of bonds were sold in the Philippine
Islands by the insular government against a like amount of provincial
and municipal bonds issued by provinces and municipalities and sold
to the Commonwealth during the year. The net reduction in the
total amount of the bonded indebtedness of the Philippine Islands
during the year of 1936 was $1,639,500. On December 31, 1936, the


4

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

bonded indebtedness of the insular government amounted to $55,-
684,000, and that of its provinces and municipalities to $9,316,000,
or a grand total of $65,000,000. Deducting from this total collateral
bonds with a face value of $7,065,000, issued against provincial and
municipal bonds, the net amount of outstanding bonds on December
31, 1936, was $57,935,000, of which $20,902,500 were owned by the
Philippine government, having been purchased from sinking or other
funds.

In appendix F of this report, the statement of the bonded indebted-
ness is carried forward to June 30, 1937. The amount of the outstand-
ing indebtedness is well within the limits provided by law, and the
prescribed sinking funds are fully maintained for all outstanding
bonds.

Deposits of Philippine public funds in the United States.—The total
deposits of Philippine public funds in the United States on December
31, 1936, amounted to $95,376,162.32. Of this amount $90,174,620.74
was on deposit with the Treasurer of the United States. On Decem-
ber 31, 1936, there remained only $1,344.31 outstanding from one
national bank still in process of liquidation.

Government-owned companies.—The Philippine National Bank
maintained an excellent and sound financial condition during the year
1936, and made a substantial net profit. Although there was a great
reduction in the output of sugar of all sugar centrals due to crop limi-
tations under the Jones-Costigan Act, those centrals under control of
the Philippine National Bank were able further to reduce their in-
debtedness to the bank during the year.

The Manila Railroad Co. showed a net loss in the year 1936. This
loss was due principally to a decrease in freight revenue because of a
reduction in the amount of sugar handled by the xailroad in 1936,
and to some extent to exchange requirements for the payment of
interest on railroad bonds held abroad. The National Assembly, on
December 31, 1935, by Commonwealth Act No. 4, authorized a loan
of $6,675,000 to the Manila Railroad Co. for the purpose of purchasing
outstanding 4-percent gold bonds of the Manila Railroad Co., due
May 1, 1939. In accordance with the foregoing authority, $8,170,000
par value of these bonds were acquired and are held by the Philippine
government and the Philippine National Bank as security for the loan
to the Manila Railroad Co. Of the total outstanding $10,585,000 par
value bonds of this issue, the Philippine government or its agencies
control approximately $8,683,000, which leaves approximately
$1,902,000 in the hands of the public.

The National Development Co., the National Rice & Corn Corpora-
tion, the Cebu Portland Cement Co., and the Manila Hotel Co.
operated profitably during 1936.

TRADE

The total external trade of the Philippines with the United States
and foreign countries amounted to $237,574,227, an increase of
$57,804,697, or 32 percent over 1935. Exports (not including $11,-
230,193 in gold and silver ore and bullion) were valued at $136,448,052,
an increase of 45 percent while imports amounted to $101,126,175, an
increase of 18 percent. A commodity trade balance of $35,321,877 in
favor of the islands, the largest for the past 3 years, is shown as com-
pared with $8,721,830 in 1935. As in previous years this favorable


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 5

balance is the direct result of the usual large favorable balance of trade
with the United States amounting in 1936 to $46,028,063.

Gold production from Philippine mines, shipped to the United
States, amounted to approximately $22,000,000 on the basis of United
States customs returns for 1936.

The trade of the islands with the United States amounted to $169,-
022,589, representing 71 percent of the total external trade. Pur-
chases from the United States were valued at $61,497,263, or 61 per-
cent of the total imports into the islands as compared with 64 percent
imported in 1935. Shipments to the United States amounted to
$107,525,326, or 79 percent of the islands' total exports and represent
an increase of 44 percent over 1935.

Sugar shipments approximating 45 percent of the total export trade
for the islands, aggregated 885,621 long tons valued at $61,937,322, as
compared with last year's reduced total of 508,076 long tons valued at
$32,990,680. Coconut products including copra, coconut oil, and
desiccated coconut shipped at higher prices during 1936, amounted to
$33,268,605, nearly one-fourth the value of all exports and show an
increase of approximately $6,000,000 over the 1935 value. In the
Manila hemp trade, with considerable improvement over the low
prices prevailing in recent years, there was a reduction in quantity
from 185,227 long tons exported last year to 164,484 long tons in 1936,
the value however increasing from $11,473,967 to $17,088,599.

Tobacco, as the remaining agricultural product of major import-
ance, was exported in reduced quantity at higher prices for leaf, the
value being about the same as last year, while cigar shipments de-
creased from 223,117 thousand in 1935 to 178,334 thousand in 1936,
prices being practically the same in each year (appendix C).

Reports on external trade for the 6-month period January-June
1937, following the close of the calendar (fiscal) year, indicate in-
creased value of trade in both imports and exports as compared with
the corresponding period of 1936.

THE UNITED STATES HIGH COMMISSIONER TO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

The High Commissioner, Hon. Paul V. McNutt, was appointed by
the President February 17, 1937, to succeed High Commissioner
Murphy. He took his oath of office in Washington on February 27
and arrived in Manila on April 26.

Personnel.—The personnel of the High Commissioner's office con-
sists of six Presidential appointees, certain United States Army and
Navy officers detailed as aides and assistants, and civilian employees,
numbering in all, 39. The personnel of his staff as constituted on
June 30 is shown in appendix D.

On May 13, 1936, High Commissioner Murphy, with certain mem-
bers of his staff, left the Philippines for the United States, having been
called to Washington by the President, Mr. J. Weldon Jones, finan-
cial expert on his staff, acted as High Commissioner during his absence
and until the arrival of his successor.

High Commissioner Murphy's resignation was accepted by the
President, effective December 31, 1936, and on the same date the
following persons resigned from his staff:

Edward G. Kemp, legal adviser, and Norman H. Hill, administra-
tive assistant, Presidential appointees; William Teahan, private sec-


6

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

retary, and Eleanor Bumgardner, assistant chief clerk and secretary-
stenographer.

Scope of work.—Besides the functions of the High Commissioner
outlined in the Independence Act, additional duties vested in his
office include the issuance of passports, duties relating to the docu-
mentary requirements for aliens desiring to enter the Philippines,
extradition of fugitives from justice, alien deportation matters, mak-
ing allotments of sugar under the provisions of the Agricultural Ad-
justment Act as amended, acting as “The United States Sugar Author-
ity in the Philippine Islands,” and issuing licenses for the export and
import of arms, ammunition, and implements of war from and into
the Philippines.

The office has been helpful to American residents of the Philippines
and has established cordial relations with the Commonwealth govern-
ment.

Buildings.—The retaining wall enclosing the site in Manila for the
residence and office buildings for the High Commissioner was com-
pleted in November 1936; the work of filling in the area is nearing
completion, and everything is in readiness for an early start on the
building. Pending its completion, suitable quarters for office and
residence have been leased.

At Baguio, the summer capital, the High Commissioner, through
the courtesy of the Commonwealth government, occupies temporarily
the Mansion House, which had previously been used as a summer
residence of the Governor General. Plans are being made for the
early construction of a residence and office for the High Commissioner
at Camp John Hay, a United States military reservation at Baguio.

JOINT TRADE CONFERENCE

Interdepartmental Committee on Philippine A fairs.—Upon the sug-
gestion of the senatorial committee which visited the Philippines in
the latter part of 1934, the President of the United States directed
the appointment of an Interdepartmental Committee to study United
States-Philippine trade to facilitate the work of the Joint Trade Con-
ference provided for in the Tvdings-McDuffie Independence Act, and
also suggested that the Philippine government inaugurate similar
studies in the Philippine Islands. Special committees of the United
States and of the Philippine Interdepartmental Committees rendered
preliminary reports in 1935.

Joint Preparatory Committee of American and Filipino Experts.—In
November 1936 the National Assembly, by Commonwealth Act No.
191, authorized the President of the Philippines to negotiate with
the President of the United States for the holding of an economic and
trade conference between the United States and the Philippines and
appropriated the necessary funds to defray the expenses of technical
advisers, assistants, and other needed personnel. The Filipino com-
mittee, headed by the President of the Philippines, arrived in Wash-
ington in February 1937, and on April 14 there was appointed a Joint
Preparatory Committee of American and Philippine Experts to study
trade relations between the United States and the Philippines and to
recommend a program, for the adjustment of Philippine national
economy to a position independent of preferential trade relations with
the United States.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 7

The members of this joint committee are:

Chairman, Hon. John V. A. MacMurray.

American group

Joseph E. Jacobs, vice chairman of the committee and chairman of
the American group.

Louis Domeratzky, Chief, Division of Regional Information, Bureau
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Department of Commerce.

Lynn R. Edminster, Chief Economic Analyst, Division of Trade
Agreements, Department of State.

Col. Donald C. McDonald, Assistant to the Chief, Bureau of
Insular Affairs, War Department.

Carl Robbins, Assistant Chief, Sugar Section, Agricultural Adjust-
ment Administration, Department of Agriculture.

Frank A. Waring, senior economist, United States Tariff Commis-
sion.

Philippine group

Jose Yulo, vice chairman of the committee and chairman of the
Philippine group.

Conrado Benitez, dean, College of Business, University of the
Philippines.

Joaquin M. Elizalde, member of National Economic Council.

Quintin Paredes, Resident Commissioner of the Philippines.

Jose E. Romero, floor leader, Majority Party in the National
Assembly.

Manuel Roxas, floor leader, Minority Party in the National
Assembly.

The committee began its work under the direction of the chairman
of the Interdepartmental Committee on Philippine Affairs, the
Honorable Francis B. Sayre. It held its first meeting on April 19, 1937.

On May 24, in a letter to the chairmen of the committees of Con-
gress handling Philippine affairs, Mr. Sayre gave the agenda of the
committee and notified the Congress of its studies. In this he started:

President Quezon, as you doubtless know, has suggested advancement of the
date of independence to December 1938 or July 4, 1939. With reference to this
suggestion, the Interdepartmental Committee and President Quezon have agreed
that, insofar as they are authorized to speak, complete political independence of
the Philippines shall become effective not later than July 4, 1946, the date fixed
under the terms of the Independence Act. The joint committee, however, is
instructed, in making its recommendation, to consider the bearing an advancement
in the date of political independence to 1938 or 1939 would have on determining
the date of termination of trade preferences between the United States and the
Philippine Islands and on facilitating or retarding the execution of a program of
economic adjustment in the Philippines. Legislation by Congress would, of
course, be required to effect any change in the date of independence.

The functions of the joint committee, in general, are to consider proposals which
have been made for changing the political and economic relations of the United
States with the Philippines; to hold public hearings for interested parties both in
the United States and in the Philippines; to study the problem of making adjust-
ments in Philippine national economy; to prepare the way for a trade conference;
and to make recommendations * * *.

It is anticipated that the report and recommendations of the joint committee
will be submitted sometime before the close of 1937 to the President of the United
States through the Interdepartmental Committee on Philippine Affairs and to the
President of the Commonwealth government. It is hoped that this report may be
available in ample time for consideration by the Congress and by the Philippine
Assembly this coming autumn and winter.

18880—37--2


g REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

For over a quarter of a century successive administrations of our Government
have based their policy with reference to the Philippines upon an abiding confi-
dence in the ability of the Philippine people ultimately to govern themselves as a
free and independent nation. The task is one which involves problems of great
magnitude. These problems are not merely those relating to trade between the
two peoples but political and economic considerations of far-reaching significance
to the United States, to the Philippines, and to all nations having interests in the
Far East. The attainment of the objectives which both peoples have had in mind
will require patience, a sense of fair play, and cooperation. It is believed that the
leaders of both peoples, imbued with the highest ideals, will be able to surmount
the difficulties that yet lie ahead of them. I can assure you that, with such ideals
in mind, the joint committee will endeavor to make some contribution toward the
successful conclusion of this great undertaking.

The committee has completed the first phase of its work in the
United States and is preparing to leave for the Philippine Islands in
July to carry on its studies there.

DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP

The annual inspection of the Dominican customs receivership was
made by Lt. Col. Howard Eager, assistant to Chief of the Bureau, in
December 1936. The receivership continues to maintain a high de-
gree of efficiency and the accounts were in satisfactory condition.

The customs collections for 1936 amounted to $2,878,789.07, an
increase of $39,725.72 over the customs collections for 1935. While
the percentage is only nominal, it is believed to indicate a definite
upturn in the country’s foreign trade movement.

Internal-revenue taxes, independent of customs duties, but collected
at the customhouses under administration of the receivership by virtue
of a special agreement with the Dominican Government, produced the
sum of $3,108,514.18, an increase of $291,726.77, or 10 percent, com-
pared with 1935.

The cost of operating the receivership was well within the 5-percent
allowance provided in the convention, being 4.54 percent of the cus-
toms receipts for the year. The cost of internal-revenue collections
made through the receivership was 3.27 percent of the gross collections,
the allowance under the agreement with the Dominican Government
being 4 percent. The combined cost of the services was 3.88 percent
of the total receipts.

The interest payments on all bonded indebtedness were maintained
throughout the year, a total of $896,060.04 being paid for interest
accounts in 1936, and $60,760.08 for credit of the sinldng-fund account
of both issues of outstanding bonds. At the close of December 1936
the total amount of Dominican foreign-dollar bonds outstanding
was $16,292,000.

CHANGES IN PERSONNEL, BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

The undersigned was appointed Chief of the Bureau for 4 years
beginning May 24, 1937. I assumed the duties of the office on that
date, relieving Brig. Gen. Creed F. Cox, whose term expired on May 23.

Lt. Col. Edward A. Stockton, Jr., who had been an assistant to the
Chief of Bureau since August 24, 1932, was relieved from duty as of
August 23, 1936. He was succeeded by Lt. Col. Howard Eager.

Charles Burnett,
Brigadier General, United States Army.


Appendix A

LAWS OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

ENACTED DURING THE FIRST SESSION OF THE SEVENTY-FIFTH

CONGRESS

Public, No. 4 (H. R. 3587), approved February 9, 1937: “First
Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal year 1937."

Includes an appropriation of $150,000, together with the unexpended
balance of the appropriation for this purpose contained in the Supple-
mental Appropriation Act, fiscal year 1936, for expenditures in trans-
porting Filipinos to the Philippine Islands under Public, No. 202,
approved July 10, 1935, as amended by Public, No. 645, approved
June 4, 1936.

Public, No. 81 (H. R. 2305) approved May 14, 1937: “To extend
the time for applying for and receiving benefits under the act entitled
‘An act to provide means by which certain Filipinos can emigrate
from the United States', approved July 10, 1935."

Amends section 6 of Public, No. 202, 1935, as heretofore amended
by Public, No. 645, 1936, by extending the terminating date for
applying for and receiving the benefits of this act from December 31,
1937, to December 31, 1938.

Public, No. 121 (H. R. 6730), approved May 28, 1937: “Second
Deficiency Appropriation Act, fiscal year 1937."

Includes an appropriation of $42,000, to remain available until
June 30, 1938, for the expenses of the American section of a joint
committee of American and Philippine experts in making preparations
for the trade conference as authorized by section 13 of Public, No.
127, 1934.

Public Resolution No. 27 (S. J. Res. 51), approved May 1, 1937:
“To amend the joint resolution entitled ‘Joint resolution providing
for the prohibition of the export of arms, ammunition, and implements
of war to belligerent countries; the prohibition of the transportation
of arms, ammunition, and implements of war by vessels of the United
States for the use of belligerent states; for the registration and licensing
of persons engaged in the -business of manufacturing, exporting or
importing arms, ammunition, or implements of war; and restricting
travel by American citizens on belligerent ships during war', approved
August 31, 1935, as amended."

The terms of this neutrality bill include the Philippine Islands.

LEGISLATION ENACTED AFTER JUNE 30, 1937

Public, No. 208 (H. R. 7493), approved July 19, 1937: “War De-
partment Civil Appropriation Act, 1938."

Includes an appropriation of $148,200 for the maintenance of the
office of the United States High Commissioner to the Philippine
Islands as authorized by subsection 4 of section 7 of Public, No. 127,
approved March 24, 1934.

9


10 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Public. No. 256 (H. R. 7727), approved August 11, 1937: “To
authorize the administration of oaths by the Chief Clerk and the
Assistant Chief Clerk of the Office of the United States High Com-
missioner to the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes.”

Provides for the authentication of legal document^ of American
corporations in the Philippines by a United States representative in
the islands.

Public, No. 414 (H. R. 7667), approved September 1, 1937: “The
Sugar Act of 1937.”

Designed to regulate commerce among the several States, with the
Territories and possessions of the United States, and with foreign
countries; to protect the welfare of consumers of sugars and of those
engaged in the domestic sugar-producing industry; to promote the
export trade of the United States; to raise revenue.


Appendix B

LIST OF PRINCIPAL MEASURES AFFECTING THE PHILIPPINE

ISLANDS CONSIDERED 'DURING THE FIRST SESSION OF THE

SEVENTY-FIFTH CONGRESS BUT NOT ENACTED

S. 3. “Federal Firearms Act.” To regulate commerce in firearms.

The Philippine Islands are included in the terms of this bill referring
to “interstate or foreign commerce.” (Introduced Jan. 6, 1937;
referred to Senate Committee on Commerce; S. Kept. No. 82, Feb. 11,
1937; passed the Senate Feb. 24, 1937; referred to House Committee
on Interstate and Foreign Commerce Feb. 25, 1937.)

S, 892. “To repeal the act entitled ‘An act relating to Philippine
currency reserves on deposit in the United States.’ ”

Designed to repeal Public, No. 419, 1934, authorizing an appropria-
tion of $23,862,750 to reestablish the Philippine currency reserves on
deposit in the United States. (Introduced Jan. 16, 1937; referred to
Senate Committee on Banking and Currency; S. Kept. No. 704, June
10,1937.)1

S. 1644. “To amend section 21 of the Permanent Appropriation
Repeal Act, 1934.”

Designed to correct existing legislation by excluding from the
provisions of section 21 of the act mentioned checks issued by the
Treasurer on account of public-debt funds of the Philippine Islands
and Puerto Rico, thus avoiding the requirement that the funds
involved be covered into the United States Treasury and allowing
them to be returned to the Philippine Islands or Puerto Rico. (Intro-
duced Feb. 19, 1937; referred to Senate Committee on Banking and
Currency.)

S. 788, II. R. 1988. “To amend section 602# of the Revenue Act of
1.934.”

To provide that no tax shall be imposed on coconut oil which is
wholly the production of the Philippine Islands, or produced wholly
from materials grown in the Philippine Islands, when such coconut oil
shall have been rendered unfit for use as food. (S. 788 introduced
Jan. 14, 1937; referred to Senate Committee on Finance. H. R. 1988
introduced Jan. 6, 1937; referred to House Committee on Ways and
Means.)

H. R. 1581, H. R. 1955. “To increa.se the processing tax on certain
oils, to impose a tax upon imported soybean oil, and for other pur-
poses.”

To amend section 602% of the Revenue Act of 1934 by increasing
the tax on processing of coconut oil from 3 cents per pound to 5 and
6 cents respectively. (H. R. 1581 introduced Jan. 5, 1937; H. R.
1955 introduced Jan. 6, 1937; both referred to House Committee on
Ways and Means.)

i S. 892, passed the Senate Aug. 6, 1937; referred to House Committee on Insular Affairs, Aug. 9, 1937.

11


12 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

H. E. 19, H. E. 65, H. E. 66, H. E. 93, H. E. 95, H. E. 1487, H. E.
2255, H. E. 4088. Imposing taxes and restrictions on manufacture
and shipment of oleomargarine.

To impose taxes on oleomargarine varying from 5 to 10 cents; to
prohibit the shipment in interstate commerce of adulterated oleo-
margarine; to tax oleomargarine containing any foreign-grown or
foreign-produced fat or oil ingredient; to prohibit the importation,
manufacture, or transportation of oleomargarine made from any fat
other than that of milk or cream. (All bills referred to House Com-
mittee on Agriculture.)

H. E. 5813. “To authorize the Director of the Census to collect
and publish monthly statistics concerning the quantities of soybeans,
peanuts, flaxseed, corn germs, copra, sesame seed, hemp seed, babassu
kernels and nuts, rapeseed, and other oil seeds, nuts, and kernels re-
ceived at oil mills, and for other purposes. ”

To authorize the Director of the Census to collect for statistical
purposes the quantity of the above-mentioned oil seeds received,
crushed, and held at the mills; the quantity of oil and of cake and meal
produced, shipped out, or held; the quantity of vegetable shortening
and lard compound manufactured and the several oils and fats used
in their production. (Introduced Mar. 22, 1937; referred to House
Committee on the Census.)

H. E. 246. “To apply the quota system to immigration from the
Eepublic of Mexico and the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes.”

To provide that, for immigration purposes, citizens of the Philippine
Islands who are not citizens of the United States shall be considered
as if they were aliens. For such purposes the Philippine Islands shall
be considered as a separate country and be allowed a quota of 50 for
each fiscal year. Philippine citizens who are not citizens of the United
States shall not be admitted to the continental United States from the
Territory of Hawaii. (Introduced Jan. 5, 1937; referred to House
Committee on Immigration and Naturalization.)

S. 1363, S. 1364, S. 1365, S. 1366, H. E. 264, H. E. 1980, H. E. 2010,
H. E. 2532, H. E. 2553, H. E. 4353, H. E. 4355, H. E. 4356.

Designed to restrict immigration, and/or to provide for the deporta-
tion of aliens inimical to public interest, or for the registration of
aliens. (All Senate bills referred to Senate Committee on Immigra-
tion ; all House bills referred to House Committee on Immigration and
N aturalization.)

H. E. 7561. “To amend the act entitled ‘An act to provide for the
complete independence of the Philippine Islands, to provide for the
adoption of a constitution and a form of government for the Philippine
Islands, and for other purposes’, approved March 24, 1934.”

To repeal that part of the Independence Act which permits the entry
of Filipinos for work in the industries of the Territory of Hawaii.
(Introduced June 17, 1937; referred to House Committee on Insular
Affairs.)1

S. 2196. “To amend the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, to allow cer-
tain Filipino seamen to serve on American vessels.”

To amend section 302 of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, by pro-
viding that citizens of the Philippine Islands who were lawfully ad-
mitted to the United States for permanent residence prior to May 1,

i H. R. 7561, H. Rept. No. 1212, July 13,1937; passed the House July 19,1937; referred to the Senate Com-
mittee on Territories and Insular Affairs, July 20, 1937; S. Rept. No. 1015, Aug. 2, 1937; passed the Senate
Aug. 19. 1937; vetoed by the President Aug. 25, 1937.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

1934, and who have served 3 years upon any merchant or fishing ves-
sels of the United States, shall be deemed citizens of the United States
for the purpose of serving, and shall be eligible to serve, on vessels of
the United States during the period ending with the complete relin-
quishment of sovereignty over the islands by the United States.
(Introduced Apr. 19, 1937; referred to Senate Committee on Com-
merce.)

H. R. 6700. “To provide that 100 per centum of the crews of vessels
of the United States shall be citizens of the United States.”

To amend Public, No. 808, 1936, to provide that upon departure
from ports of the United States, 100 per centum of the crew of vessels
of the United States shall be citizens of the United States, native-born
or completely naturalized, unless the Secretary of Commerce shall
ascertain that qualified citizen seamen are not available, in which
case the above percentage may be reduced. (Introduced Apr. 27,
1937; referred to House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fish-
eries.)

S. 1195, H. R. 3423. “To provide for the preferred employment of
American citizens by the Government of the United States.”

To provide that no existing or future appropriation made by
Congress shall be available to pay the compensation of aliens unless
the appointing officer certifies under oath that no qualified American
citizen is available for employment; or to compensate any alien who
is illegally in the United States or its possessions. (S. 1195 intro-
duced Jan. 29, 1937; referred to Senate Committee on Expenditures
in Executive Departments; H. R. 3423 introduced Jan. 21, 1937;
referred to House Committee on Expenditures in ExecutiveDepart^
ments; H. Rept. No. 804, May 12, 1937.) 1

H. R. 2541. “Alien Employment Act.” Making it illegal to employ
persons who are not citizens of the United States while there are
American citizens unemployed who are qualified, able, and willing to
work, and fixing the penalty for willful and knowing violation thereof.

Designed to protect citizens of military age in time of peace by
guaranteeing them preference over aliens for employment. (Intro-
duced Jan. 11, 1,937; referred to House Committee on Labor.)

S. 956, H. R. 5459. “To protect American and Philippine labor and
to preserve an essential industry, and for other purposes.”

To provide that effective January 1, 1937, and for 3 years there-
after, the total amount of footwear composed of certain specified
materials produced or manufactured in the Philippine Islands and
coming into the United States duty free shall not exceed 200,000 pairs
per year. (S. 956 introduced Jan. 19, 1937; referred to Senate Com-
mittee on Finance. H. R. 5459 introduced Mar. 9, 1937; referred
to House Committee on Ways and Means.)

H. R. 267, H. R. 5849. “To amend the Revenue Act of 1926 by
reducing the rates of taxation on tobacco products.”

To impose a tax of 75 cents per thousand on cigars weighing not
more than 3 pounds per thousand, and a tax in varying amounts
from $1 to $13.50 per thousand on cigars to retail at from 3 to 20 cents
each. (H. R. 267 introduced Jan. 5, 1937; H. R. 5849 introduced
Mar. 23, 1937; both referred to House Committee on Ways and
Means.)

i H. R. 3423, passed the House July 19, 1937; referred to Senate Committee on Education and Labor,
July 20, 1937.


14- REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

H. R. 1993, H. R. 6830. “To prohibit the exportation of tobacco
seed and plants, except for experimental purposes.”

To make unlawful the export of tobacco seed and/or live tobacco
plants from the United States or from any territory subject to the
jurisdiction thereof, to any foreign country, unless by permission of
the Secretary of Agriculture. (H. R. 1993 introduced Jan. 6, 1937;
H. R. 6830 introduced May 4, 1937; both referred to House Com-
mittee on Agriculture.)

H. R. 2281. “To provide for the admission of 50 Filipinos to the
United States Military Academy pending the consummation of the
independence of the Philippine Islands.”

To provide for the admission of 30 Filipinos in addition to the
number otherwise authorized by law to be admitted to the United
States Military Academy at the beginning of the academic year next
following the date of enactment of this act and 5 additional Filipinos
each year for the next succeeding 5 years. (Introduced Jan. 8, 1937;
referred to House Committee on Military Affairs.)

H. R. 2282. “To provide for the admission, of 50 Filipinos to the
United States Naval Academy pending the consummation of the
independence of the Philippine Islands.”

To provide for the admission of 30 Filipinos in addition to the num-
ber otherwise authorized by law to be admitted to the United States
N aval Academy at the beginning of the academic year next following
the date of enactment of this act and 5 additional Filipinos each year
for the next succeeding 5 years. (Introduced Jan. 8, 1937; referred to
House Committee on Naval Affairs.)

. H. R. 1617. “For the relief of former officers of the Philippine

Scouts.”

To provide for the retirement of former officers who forfeited their
commissions in the Philippine Scouts to accept temporary commis-
sions in the armed forces of the United States between April 6, 1917,
and November 11, 1918, with the rank and three-fourths of the pay
of the grade they would have reached in the Philippine Scouts had their
commissions not been so forfeited, provided their service as tem-
porary officers was terminated by honorable discharge. (Introduced
Jan. 5, 1937; referred to House Committee on Military Affairs.)

H. R. 3615. “The Water Carrier Act.”

To amend the Interstate Commerce Act, as amended, by providing
for the regulation of the transportation of passengers and property
by water carriers operating in interstate and foreign commerce. The
Philippine Islands are included in the terms of the bill, but provision
is made that the Philippine government may exclude its application
for transportation to or from ports of the islands. (Introduced Jan.
25, 1937; referred to House Committee on Merchant Marine and
Fisheries.)

H. R. 8321. “To amend an act approved February 6, 1905, being
chapter 453, Fifty-eighth Congress, third session, to provide for the
more efficient administration of civil government in the Philippine
Islands, and for other purposes.”

To amend the act of February 6, 1905, providing aid for the con-
struction of railroads in the Philippine Islands by extending the time
of payments to be made under the contract of guaranty. (Introduced
Aug. 21, 1937; referred to House Committee on Insular Affairs.)


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 15

S. Res. 188. Requests the Attorney General to institute an official
inquiry into the circumstances attending the contract for constructing
the Philippine Railway Co. lines and the issuance of bonds particu-
larly as to the obligation upon the Government of the United States
or of the Philippine Islands to save the holders of said bonds from loss
on account of default. (Introduced Aug. 21, 1937; referred to the
Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs.)


Appendix C

ACTS OF THE FIRST NATIONAL ASSEMBLY, FIRST SESSION,

REQUIRING APPROVAL BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED

STATES

APPROVED

Bill No. 1535, entitled “An act amending further section 14 of the
Philippine Tariff Act of 1909, as amended, so as to exempt natural
rock asphalt from the payment of wharfage charges.” Approved by
the President March 9, 1937, and became Commonwealth Act No. 232.

(The purpose of the act is to stimulate the production and expor-
tation of natural rock asphalt by adding it to the list of commodities
exempted from payment of the tax of $1 per metric ton.)

Bill No. 2357, entitled “An act to amend paragraph 269 of section
8 of the act entitled 'An act to raise revenue for the Philippine Islands,
and for other purposes/ approved by the Congress of the United
States on August 5, 1909, as amended.” Approved by the President
March 9, 1937, and became Commonwealth Act No. 231.

(The purpose of the act is to provide that the duties on imported
fresh or preserved eggs in natural form shall be assessed on the basis
of gross weight of the eggs and containers instead of on the net weight.)

AWAITING ACTION BY THE PRESIDENT OR NOT SUBMITTED TO HIM BY
THE CLOSE OF THE FISCAL YEAR

Bill No. 2396, entitled “An act to amend section 37 of Act No.
4003, commonly known as the Fisheries Act.”

(The bill refers to the shipment of shells and is intended to conserve
the shell supply in the Philippines, to protect the local button industry,
and to produce additional revenue for the Commonwealth govern-
ment by requiring a 20-percent ad valorem grading and inspection
fee on the export from the Philippines of certain shells.)

Bill No. 11 entitled “An act prohibiting the exportation of fibers
(buntal), seeds, or seedlings of the plant commonly known as the
'burP.”

(The primary purpose of the bill is to forestall adverse effect on
the buntal and buri hat industry in the Philippines by prohibiting
the exportation from the Philippines to any foreign country of the
seeds, seedlings, and fibers of the buri palm.)

Bill No. 1490, entitled “An act amending paragraphs 264 and 265,
group 6, class 13, of the act of Congress entitled 'An act to raise
revenue for the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes’, approved
by the Congress of the United States on August 5, 1909, as amended,
for the purpose of revising the classification of the article and rates
of customs duty provided therefor.”

(The purpose of the bill is to protect local beer and nonalcoholic
beverages from foreign competition.)

16


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 17

Bill No. 2336, entitled “An act to amend the act of Congress
approved August 5, 1909, entitled ‘An act to raise revenues for the
Philippine Islands, and for other purposes’, as amended, by em-
powering the President of the Philippines to increase or decrease the
rates of duty on imported products within certain specified limits.”
(The object of the act is to protect and develop industries in the
Philippines and to provide, by a flexible clause in the tariff, an instru-
ment for quick adjustment of the tariff to changing conditions. The
President of the Philippines would be permitted, from time to time,
to increase or decrease the rates of duty on any or all articles imported
into the Philippines up to 400 percent or down to 25 percent of the
rates as now or hereafter fixed by legislative action.)


Appendix D

STAFF OF UNITED STATES HIGH COMMISSIONER, EXCLUSIVE OF
MINOR EMPLOYEES, AS OF JUNE 30, 1937

United States High Commissioner, Paul V. McNutt.

Financial expert, J. Weldon Jones.

Legal adviser, Leo M. Gardner.

Assistant legal adviser, George A. Malcolm.

Assistant financial expert, Evett D. Hester.

Administrative assistant, Wayne Coy.

Private secretary, Mrs. Margaret Buchanan Headdy.

Chief clerk and passport official, Richard R. Ely.

Chief statistician, Charles W. Franks.

Accountant statistician, Floyd J. Dub as.

Accountant statistician, Ricardo Dimalanta.

Assistant chief clerk and secretarial stenographer, Mrs. Edith M*
Keyes.

Cable clerk, Ora E. Lautzenheiser.

Confidential stenographer, Posey W. Reeves.

Confidential stenographer, Miss Mary Jo Keene.

Confidential stenographer, Miss Janet White.

Record clerk, Constantino Tirona y Casimiro.

Stenographer, Macario Guevara y Cruz.

Stenographer, Victor Baltazar y Hilario.

Stenographer, Fabian de Guzman.

Clerk, Vicente Manuel.

(Minor employees, including a statistical draftsman, a housekeeper*
clerks, chauffeurs, etc., bring the total number up to 39.)

18


Appendix E

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

Total foreign trade

12 months ending Dec. 31— Consignments Shipments 1
From United States From other countries Total To United States To other countries Total
1027— $71,478,297 83, 858, 068 92, 592,959 78,183, 029 62.139,683 51, 297, 750 43, 540, 407 54, 375, 678 54,366 500 61, 417,263 $44, 373,175 50, 798, 830 54, 567, 316 44,909,925 37, 039, 036 28, 097, 335 23, 821, 056 29,231, 433 31,157, 350 39, 628, 912 $115,851,472 134, 656,898 147,160, 275 123, 092,954 99,178,719 79, 395, 085 67, 361, 463 83, 607, 111 85, 523, 850 101,126,175 $116, 038, 250 115, 585, 876 124,465, 473 105, 342,061 83,422,397 82, 647, 867 91, 313, 027 91, 843, 594 74, 935, 537 107, 525, 326 $39, 535, 835 39, 468, 670 39,981,370 27,825, 067 20, 549,677 12, 690. 214 14,458, 026 18, 560, 042 19, 310, 143 28,922, 726 $155, 574, 085 155, 054, 546 164, 446, 843 133,167,128 103.972, 074 95,338,0S1 105, 771,053 110,403,636 94, 245, 680 136, 448, 052
1928
1929
1930
1931 —
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936


1 Exclusive of gold and silver ore and bullion amounting to $7,633,448 in 1935 and $11,230,193 in 193G, ap-
proximately all of which was shipped to the United States.

Manila-hemp shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per ton Quantity Value Value per ton
1927— Long tons 146,474 $29, 687,129 $203 Long ions 47, 779 $12, 261.975 $257
1928 172,140 26, 593,606 154 50,304 9. 527,045 1S9
1929 186, 431 28, 420, 550 152 66.830 12. 276, 363 184
1930— 166, 616 18,426, 676 111 57,782 7. 638, 029 133
1931 130. 026 8,942,907 69 27, 401 2. 511, 734 91
1932 104,114 149,663 5, 015, 002 48 24! 740 1,481,576 60
1933 6, 873, 860 46 35, 617 2, 012, 935 57
1934— 171. 743 8, 661, 568 50 41,416 2, 695,896 65
1935 185. 227 11,473. 967 62 43, 771 3,811.010 87
1936 164,484 17,088, 599 104 37, 243 5, 336, 711 143

Coconut-oil shipments

Total Shipments to United ! States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1927 Long tons 142, 515 $24, 840, 683 Cents 7.78 Long tons 139, 352 $24, 284,301 Cents 7. 78
1928 139, 996 23,489,173 7. 49 138, 608 23, 239, 521 7. 49
1929 187,509 29,184, 912 6. 95 185, 707 28, 900. 587 6. 95
145, 036 19,155,382 5. 89 143, 796 18,961. 827 5. 89
1931 162, 364 15. 035,322 4.13 146, 383 13, 585, 684 4. 14
1932— 112, 861 7, 651,144 3.03 108, 517 7. 335. 830 3. 03
1933 157, 099 9,169, 823 2. 60 155, 020 133,789 9, 025, 075 2. 60
1934 142. 547 6, 794, 871 2. 13 6, 396, 557 2.13
1935 162, 584 12, 254, 581 3. 36 159, 626 12, 005. 099 3.36
1936 157,101 13,871, 759 3.94 148,541 13,137, 171 3. 95

19


20 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Copra shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per ton Quantity Value Value per ton
1927 Long tons 196,170 $19,155,741 $98 Long tons 154,350 $15,238,157 $98
1928 230,713 22, 542,341 98 179,701 17,603,832 98
1929 170,830 15, 565,821 91 127,570 11,440,898 90
1930 171, 546 13, 433,438 78 138,931 10,654,348 77
1931 171,486 9,150, 404 53 118,975 6,052, 329 3, 056, 067 51
1932 135, 072 5,133,227 38 81,716 37
1933 303, 875 8, 956, 029 29 204, 714 5,951, 227 29
1934 337, 291 8, 605,125 26 151,059 3,900,060 26
1935 248,903 10,987,330 44 204,805 9,106,010 44
1936 286,488 14,999, 784 52 179, 639 9, 772, 482 54

Desiccated-coconut shipments

Total

12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds Cents Pounds Cents
1927— 33,472,877 $2,850,060 8.51 33,370,655 $2,840, 286 8.51
1928— 44,895,711 3,723, 586 8.29 44,838,722 3,718, 269 8.29
1929- 49.130, 664 3, 540,124 7. 20 49,094, 777 3, 537,001 7.20-
1930 43,943,820 2,962, 845 6. 74 43,886, 901 2,958,710 6.74
1931 37,084,972 1,822,129 4.91 37,044, 928 1,819, 691 4.91
1932... 35,433,785 1,616,701 4. 56 35,408, 847 1,615, 446 4. 56
1933 39,522,470 1, 682,805 4. 25 39,466,452 1, 679,997 4*25
1934 51,886,886 2, 254, 540 4. 34 51, 862, 033 2, 253, 236 4.34
1935 74,885,943 3,962,315 5. 29 74, 550,903 3,941,938 5.29
1936 74,322,798 4,397,063 5.92 73, 382, 830 4,353,138 5.93

Shipments to United States

Sugar shipments

[Raw and refined]

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1927 Long tons 544,581 $50,295,960 Cents 4.12 Long tons 500,284 $47,886,987 Cents 4.27
1928 560,933 47,542,940 3.78 525,786 45,691, 238 3.88
1929 684,873 53, 244,149 3.47 660,352 52,153,930 3.63
1930.... 732, 225 52, 240, 226 3.18 725,548 52,038,657 3. 20'
1931 741,036 49,963,105 3.00 740,397 49,944,465 3.01
1932 1,000,506 59,801,885 2.67 1,000,209 59,792,293 2.67
1933 1,061,610 64,333,426 2.70 1,061,564 64,328,989 65,444,993 2.70-
1934. 1,134,626 608,076 65,454,581 2.58 1,134,466 2.58
1935 32,990,680 2.90 507, 234 32,949,171 2.90
1936 885, 621 61,937,322 3.12 885, 402 61,927,184 3.12*


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 21

Refined sugar shipments

[Included in table above]

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1927 Long tons 1,809 $219,183 Cents 5.41 Long tons 1,790 $216, 423 Cents 5.40
1928 7,917 955, 735 5.39 7,859 947, 945 5.38
1929 — 6,899 824,323 5.33 6,834 816,947 6.34
1930 26,939 2, 722,819 4. 51 26,928 2,721, 620 4.51
1931 39, 835 3, 329, 866 3.73 39,787 3,324,881 3.73
1932 56, 223 4,465, 238 3. 55 56,185 4,461, 713 3.55
1933 54, 354 4, 471,990 3. 67 54,316 4,468, 354 3.67
1934 57,867 4, 037, 065 3.11 57,773 4, 028,844 3.11
1935 56, 980 5, 242, 584 4.11 56, 849 5, 230, 647 4.11
1936 51,174 4, 716, 711 4.11 51,127 4, 712, 362 4.11

Leaf-tobacco shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31—

1927.

1928.

1929.

1930.

1931.

1932.

1933.

1934.

1935.

1936.

Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds 52,004,303 44,571,470 60,800, 643 45, 790, 900 49, 941,022 47, 664,488 37. 250, 088 28; 9i3, 356 49, 410, 948 31,839,878 $3,918,749 3,029,633 4,392,435 3, 725, 879 3, 501,496 2,822, 233 1,842, 553 1,391, 046 2, 307, 460 2, 266, 303 Cents 7.54 6.80 7. 22 8.13 7.01 5. 92 4. 95 4.81 4. 67 7.12 Pounds 157,175 124, 617 104, 009 422, 525 236,106 426,949 134, 476 44,Zol $28,898 15,896 12, 604 48, 695 41, 268 41,862 8,515 3, 659 Cents 18.39 12.76 12.12 11.52 17.48 9.80 6. 35 8. 25
443 53 11.96

Cigar shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per thousand Quantity Value Value per thousand
1927 Thousands 207,578 220,884 $4, 652, 258 $22.41 Thousands 167,300 179,570 $3,768.916 $22. 53
1928 4, 765,140 21. 57 3,855, 672 21.47
1929 188, 333 . 3,824,649 20.31 150,945 3,013,355 19.96
1930_ 178, 561 ' 3.545,223 19.85 144,767 2,810, 279 19.41
1931 183,874 3, 395,337 18.47 158,520 2,885, 366 18.20
1932 182,575 3. 231, 218 17.70 164,616 2,885,524 17.53
1933. 196,141 222,820 3; 157, 933 16.10 180,714 2,823,117 15. 62
1934 3, 605, 510 16.18 203, 896 3,231, 772 15. 85
1935 223,117 3,399,380 15. 24 204,013 3,030, 218 14.85
1936 178,334 2, 746,327 15. 40 158,977 2,372,181 14.92


22 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Embroidery shipments 1

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1927 $4, 003,476 4, 523, 968 6.011,532 3. 591.737 2, 657,130 $3,976,126 4, 483, 513 5.962,093 3. 544, 036 2, 625, 323 1932 $3, 349,825 1.899,316 2,666,420 5, 076, 244 4, 274, 555 $3,334,481 1.893,748 2. 659,122 5,069, 223 4, 266,336
1928 1933
1929 1934
1930 1935
1931 1936


1 Cotton and silk.

Cordage shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds Cents Pounds Cents
1927. 12, 283, 839 $1, 666, 706 13. 57 4,135,609 $640,745 15. 49
1928 14, 494. 705 1, 775, 435 12. 25 5,393,029 721,120 13. 37
1929 15, 667, 016 1, 904. 272 12.15 6 850. 770 932,730 13. 61
1930 13,858,457 1, 553, 227 11. 21 6. 769, 412 841, 564 12.43
1931 10, 224, 805 8S7, 408 8. 68 4. 599,113 460, 001 10.00
1932 8,452. 224 659,047 7. 80 4, 447,882 411,207 9. 24
1933 12,907, 781 906, 768 7. 02 6, 876, 227 567, 345 8. 25
1934 18, 339, 701 1,334, 110 7. 27 8, 943, 167 785, 053 8.73
1935 17, 651, 445 1, 161,815 6. 58 8, 053, 278 628, 959 7.81
1936 14. 561,103 1,198, 870 8.23 3, 918, 022 449, 692 11.48

All other shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1927 $14, 503,323 17,068,724 18, 358,369 14, 532, 495 8, 616, 836 $5. Ill, 799 6, 729,770 6, 235.909 5,845,916 . 3,496,536 1932 $6.057,199 6; 938, 539 9,635,865 '10,631,908 13,667,470 $2.693,581 3; 022,079 4.473, 246 4,393,909 5,910,378
1928 1933
1929 1934
1930 ... 1935
1931 1936



Appendix F
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS

Under an act of Congress approved August 29, 1916, as amended
by an act approved May 31, 1922, it is provided that the entire in-
debtedness of the Philippine government, exclusive of those obliga-
tions known as friar-land bonds and of bonds not to exceed $10,000,000
in amount issued by that government and secured by an equivalent
amount of bonds issued by the provinces and municipalities thereof,
shall not exceed at any one time 10 percent of the aggregate tax valua-
tion of its property.

It is further provided that the entire indebtedness of the city of
Manila shall not exceed 10 percent of the aggregate tax valuation of
its property, nor that of any province or municipality a sum in excess
of 7 percent of the aggregate tax valuation of its property at any one
time.

The assessed value of taxable real property of the Philippine
Islands as at December 31, 1936, was $913,915,161.50; that of the
city of Manila as at December 31, 1936, was $127,271,191.50.

The following statements show the bonded indebtedness of the
Philippine Islands and of its provinces and municipalities, respectively,
on June 30, 1937:

Insular government

Title of loan Rate Amount Dated Re- deem- able Due
Issued Outstand- ing June 30,1937
Included in 10 percent limitation: Percent
Public improvements 4 $1, 500, 000 $628,000 1909 1919 1939
Do 6 H 10,000. 000 7, 545, 000 1921 1941
Gold bonds of 1916 4 4,000, 000 2, 422,000 1916 1926 1946
General bonds 5 5, 000, 000 3, 716,000 1922 1952
Do 4 y2 23, 000, 000 17,080, COO 1922 1952
Irrigation and permanent public works i.. 4 X 11,800,000 8, 562, 000 1922 1952
Metropolitan Water District 5 3, 000. 000 2, 510, 000 1925 1935 1955
Do . 4A 1, 500; 000 1, 469, 000 1929 1959
Do 4 M 250, 000 250,000 1931 1941 1961
Do 6 250, 000 250, 000 1935 1945 1965
Do 5 250, 000 250, 000 1935 1945 1965
Do 5 250, 000 250, 000 1937 1947 1967
Cebu Port Works _ _ 4A 750, 000 663, 000 1928 1958
Do 4 M 750, 000 711, 000 1929 1959
Do 500, 000 500, 000 1930 1960
Iloilo Port Works 4 A 750, 000 648, 000 1928 1958
Do 4H 500, 000 490, 000 1929 1959
Do 4'A 925, 000 925, 000 1930 1960
T'ota.l 64, 975, 000 48,869, 000
Not included in 10 percent limitation:
Collateral bonds:
Of 1922 (Manila) _ _ 4 H 2, 750, 000 2, 055, 000 1922 1950
Of 1926 (Iloilo) 4M 976, 500 837, 000 1926 1936 1956
Of 1936 (Iloilo) 5 175, 000 175,000 1936 1966
Of 1926 (Pangasinan) 4'A 42S, 500 369, 500 1926 1956
Of 1926 (Occidental Negros) 4Vz 400, 000 364, 000 1926 1956

23


24 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Insular government—Continued

Title of loan Rate Amount Dated Re- deem- able Due
Issued Outstand- ing June 30,1937
Not included in 10 percent limitation—Con. Collateral bonds—Continued. Of 1933 (Occidental Negros) Of 1936 (Occidental Negros) Of 1926 (Marinduque)- Of 1926 (Ilocos Norte) ._ Of 1927 (Laguna) Of 1927 (Provincial) Of 1927 (Camarines Sur) Of 1928 (La Union) Of 1928 (Manila). Of 1936 (Cebu) Total Percent 5 5 4 A 4H 4M *A 4H *A 4 H 5 $638,850 111, 150 55,500 274, 000 98,000 1, 405, 000 111, 000 110, COO 500, 000 250,000 $638,850 111, 150 55, 500 249, 000 97, 000 1,197,000 106, 000 110,000 450, 000 250, 000 1933 1936 1926 1926 1927 1927 1927 1928 1928 1936 1937 1963 1966 1956 1956 1957 1957 1957 1958 1958 1966
8, 283, 500 7, 065, 000
Grand total
73, 258, 500 55,934, 000


Provinces and municipalities

Title of loan Rate Amount Dated Re- deem- able Due
- Issued Outstand- ing June 30, 1937
City of Manila: Percent
Sewer and waterworks. 4 $1,000,000 $606,000 1908 1918 1938
Public improvements 5A 2, 750,000 2, 055, 000 1920 1930 1950
Do 4 A, 500,000 450,000 1928 1958
Do. 4J/4 500,000 470, 000 1929 1959
Do 5 " 250,000 250,000 1935 1965
City of Cebu: Sewer and waterworks... 4 125,000 74,000 1911 1921 1941
Bangued, Abra Province: Water supply 5 20,000 20,000 1919 1929 1949
Mayjayjay, Laguna Province: Public im-
provements 5 20, 000 20,000 1919 1929 1949
Santa Cruz, Laguna Province: Public im-
provements.. 5 45, 000 45, 000 1919 1929 1949
Iloilo, Iloilo Province: Public improvements. 5 175, 000 175, 000 1936 1966
Province of Iloilo and 9 municipalities (Caba-
tuan, Dingle, Iloilo, Jaro, La Paz, Maasin,
Pavia, Pototan, and Santa Barbara): Pub-
lic improvements 4A 976, 500 837,000 1926 1936 1956
Province of Occidental Negros:
Public improvements 4 A, 400, 000 364,000 1926 1956
Do . ... 5 638,850 638,850 1933 1963
Do. _. ._ . 5 111, 150 111, 150 1936 1966
Province of Pangasinan: Public improve-
ments.. ... __ 4H 428, 500 369, 500 1926 1956
Province of Marinduque: Public improve-
ments. ... 4 H 55, 500 55, 500 1926 1956
Province of Ilocos Norte and 3 municipalities
(Bacarra, Laoag, and Pasuquin): Public
improvements 4A 274, 000 249,000 1926 1956
Province of Laguna: Public improvements. __ 4K 98,000 97,000 1927 1957
Province of Ilocos Sur and municipality of
Vigan: Public improvements 4 A. 175,000 152,000 1927 1957
Province of Tarlac: Public improvements 4M 171, 000 145, 000 1927 1957
Province of Pampanga: Public improvements. 4M 477,000 408,000 1927 1957
Province of Nueva Ecija: Public improve-
ments 4 H 345,000 286,000 1927 1957
Province of Bulacan: Public improvements__ 4M 237,000 206,000 1927 1957
Province of Camarines Sur and 4 municipali-
ties (Naga, Magarao, Canaman, and Cama-
ligan): Public improvements 4 ^ 111,000 106,000 1927 1937 1957
Province of La Union: Public improvements. 4 M 110,000 110,000 1928 1958
Province of Cebu: Public improvements 5 250,000 250,000 1936 1966
Total 10, 243,500 8,550,000



REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 25
SINKING AND OTHER FUNDS

Under the provisions of Act No. 3014 of the Philippine Legislature,
approved March 8, 1922, sinking funds for the retirement of bonds
issued by the Philippine government are to be invested only in secur-
ities of the government of the Philippine Islands or the Government
of the United States after the approval of this act.

Under the provisions of Act No. 3723 of the Philippine Legislature,
approved November 21, 1930, as amended by Act No. 3828. approved
October 28, 1931, funds derived from the sale of financial interests
protection bonds, issued under Act No. 2999, may be invested (a) in
bonds or other evidences of indebtedness of the government of the
Philippine Islands; (b) in bonds or other evidences of indebtedness of
the Government of the United States; (c) in bonds or other evidences of
indebtedness of a chartered city, province, or municipality of the
Philippine Islands; (d) in securities the principal and interest whereof
are guaranteed by the Government of the United States or of the
Philippine Islands; (e) in Manila Railroad Co. Southern lines bonds
issued under Act No. 1905.

Since the passage of these acts the treasurer of the Philippine
Islands has transferred the following amounts to this Bureau for
investment:

Prior years Year ending June 30— Total
1936 1937
Sinking funds $34, 835,451.90 3,387,069. 34 4,010,000. 00 $2,879,073.44 206,787. 50 $2, 678,144.34 107,307. 50 16,000.00 $40,392, 669. 68 3,701,164. 34 4,026,000.00
Trust funds Financial interest protection bonds fund Total
42,232, 521. 24 3,085,860. 94 2,801,451.84 48,119,834. 02

At a cost of $41,675,924.23, bonds of the face value of $41,668,000
have been purchased from the above funds. During December 1936,
funds totaling $694,000 were transferred to the Treasurer of the
United States for the redemption of the bonds of Manila sewer and
waterworks 4-percent loan due January 2, 1937, outstanding in the
hands of the public.

All bonds purchased, except those that have been matured and
have been redeemed, are included in the following statement of
securities, either purchased by this Bureau for account of the govern-
ment of the Philippine Islands or purchased by the Insular Treasurer
and deposited with this Bureau to be held for his account in the
United States pending cancelation or other disposition.


26 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Sinking and other fund investments

Prior years Year ending June 30— Total
1936 1937
Philippine government: Collateral bonds: 4^’s, due 1950 (Manila) ___ $979, 000 976,500 400,000 428, 500 274, 000 550.009 90, 000 2,000 $105,000 $10,000 $1,094,000 976, 500 400.000 428, 500 274.000 756.000 93.000 10, 000 55.000 500, 000 10,429, 000 3,056, 000 2, 076,000 340, 000 1, 978,000 941.000 4,074,000 6, 941, 000 571.000 322, 000 447.000 26.000 72, 000 590.000 2,750, 000 421, 000 513, 000 1, 273,000
\x/z s, due 1956 (Iloilo)
4^4’s, due 1956 (Occidental Negros) _
414’s, due 1956 (Pangasinan)
4>6’s, due 1956 (Ilocos Norte)
4}4’s, due 1957 (Provincial) __ 91,000 115, 000 3, 000 2,000 55,000
43/2’s, due 1957 (Camarines Sur) ___
4.1'l’s, due 1957 (Lacuna) 6,000
41/2,s, due 1957 (Marinduque)
4}4’s, due 1958 (Manila) 500,000 8.111,000 2, 728,000 1,884.000 159. 000 1, 830. 010 941, 000 4, 074, 000 6, 652, 000 571, 000 300, 000 370, 000 10, 000 72, 000 590, 000 2. 750,009 421, 000 363, 000 1, 273, 000
General: 4W’s, due 1952 1,168.000 223, 000 171,000 66, 000 148, 000 1,150, 000 100, 000 21. 000 115, 000
5’s, due 1952
5’s, due 1955, metropolitan water district 4Vo’s, due 1959, metropolitan water district Manila Railroad Co. purchase, 4’s, due 1946 Public improvement: Vs, due 1939

oVo’s, due 1941
4Vi’s, due 1952, irrigation and permanent public works. 179, 000 110, 000
4V»’s, due 1953, Cebu port works
due 1959, Cebu port works 22. 000 35, 000 i6, 000
45.-<>'s, due 1958, Iloilo port works 42, 000
43-4’s, due 1959, Iloilo port works
Municipal: City of Cebu 4’s, due 1941
Citv of Manila 4’s, due 1938
City of Manila 5'yo’s, due 19,10
Citv of Manila 4}4’s, due 1959
Railroad: Manila R. R. Co. 4’s, due 1939 150, 000
Philippine Rv. Co. 4’s, due 1937
Total.
37, 299, 000 2, 385, 000 1,723,000 41,407,000


Under the provisions of section 2 of Act No. 3014, the following
bonds, included in the preceding list of bonds purchased, have been
canceled:

Collateral bonds:

4H’s, due 1950 (Manila)_______________________________________ $695, 000

4H’s; due 1956 (Iloilo)________________________________________ 139, 500

4^’s, due 1956 (Occidental Negros)______________________________ 36, 000

4K’s, due 1956 (Pangasinan)_____________________________________ 59, 000

4J4’s, due 1956 (Ilocos Norte)___________________________________ 25, 000

4%’s, due 1957 (Provincial)______________•_______________________ 208,000

4%’s, due 1957 (Camarines Sur)___________________________________ 5, 000

4}£;s, due 1957 (Laguna)__________________________________________ 1, 000

4%’s, due 1958 (Manila)________________________________________ 50, 000

General bonds:

4#s, due 1952__________________________________________________ 5, 920, 000

5fs, due 1952__________________________________________________ 1, 284, 000

5’s, due 1955, metropolitan water district_____________________ 490, 000

4^’s, due 1959, metropolitan water district-------------------- 31, 000

Manila R. R. Co. purchase 4's, due 1946________________________ 1, 578, 000


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 27

Public improvement:

4’s, due 1939___________________________________________________ $872, 000

SJffs, due 1941_________________________________________________ 2, 455, 000

4J4’s, due 1952, irrigation and permanent public works__________ 3, 238, 000

4H’s, due 1958, Cebu port works____________________________________ 87, 000

4^’s, due 1959, Cebu j)ort works___________________________________ 39, 000

4%,s, due 1958, Iloilo port works_________________________________ 102, 000

4^'s, due 1959, Iloilo port works__________________________________ 10, 000

Municipal:

City of Cebu 4’s, due 1941______________________________________ 51, 000

City of Manila 4’s, due 1938____________________________________ 394, 000

City of Manila 4#s, due 1959____________________________________ 30, 000

Total__________________________________________________ 17,799,500

All canceled bonds have been shipped to the auditor of the Philip-
pine Islands. This leaves $23,607,500 in securities actually held in
this Bureau for account of the Philippine government on June 30,
1937.

RAILWAY BONDS

The bonds of railroads, guaranteed as to interest by the Philippine
government, outstanding are:

Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4-percent bonds, due 1939_________$10, 585, 000

Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4-percent bonds, due 1959--------- 1, 034, 000

Philippine Railway Co. first-mortgage 4-percent bonds, due 1937-_ 8, 549, 000

Total_____________________________________________________ 20, 168, 000

Bonds with a par value of $55,000 of the Manila Railroad Co. due
in 1959 were purchased from sinking funds of said company.

Pursuant to instructions received from the Manila Railroad Co.,
there were canceled by the trustee during the past year, bonds due in
1959 with a par value of $36,000, leaving $19,000 par value of bonds
held uncanceled on June 30, 1937.

Manila Railroad Co. 7% Sinking Fund bonds in amount of
$1,500,000, the interest and principal of which were guaranteed by
the Philippine government, became due on May 1, 1937, and were
retired.

COINAGE

On December 31, 1936, the total amount of coins in circulation and
available therefor was ¥*41,085,253.05, consisting of the following:

Pesos 1_________

50 centavos_____

Subsidiary coins.
Minor coins_____

f21, 802, 541. 00
6, 272, 494. 50
9, 549, 041. 10
3, 461, 176. 45

Total_________________________________________

i The Philippine peso equals 50 cents United States currency.

41, 085, 253. 05


28 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

INSULAR RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

The following is a statement of insular receipts and disbursements
of the Philippine Islands, exclusive of all items of a refundable char-
acter, expressed in United States currency, for fiscal (calendar) years
1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936:

Year ending Dec. 31—
1933 1934 1935 1936
CREDITS Balance from prior years Revenues: Customs Internal Repayment of Philippine National Bank losses, Act 3174. Miscellaneous. Total revenues. Total credits.. DEBITS Expenditures: Bureaus and offices i $33,366, 561. 62 $33,612,013.59 $37, 589,594. 71 $41,042,639.10-
10,183,353. 71 15,679,107. 33 500, 000. 00 8,650, 505. 86 10,878,380. 84 17, 555,372. 03 1,474,225. 09 9, 429,397. 71 11,695,493. 57 18,349,537.21 1,025,374. 40 10,349,235. 48 13, 718,047.32. 22,634,386.04 2,339,624. 42 13,059,061. 03
35, 012, 966. 90 39,337, 375. 67 41,419,640.66 51,751,118. 81
68, 379, 528. 52 72,949,389. 26 79,009,235.37 92,793,757. 91
12,068,148.79 4, 017, 272. 85 4, 640, 692. 73 3,479,557. 31 78, 382. 20 8, 553, 463. 05 1,122,461. 54 807, 536. 46 12,598,304. 27 3,232,250. 48 4, 418,763. 86 2,716, 744. IQ 262,135.75 9,868,169.87 1,225,390.34 1, 038,035.88 13,185,118.97 3,726,115. 67 4,249, 627.49 3, 589,691.02 175,941. 51 10,955,247. 54 1,217,260.00 867,594. 07 13,344,975. 65 4,029,191.46 4,197,675.06 5,408,508. 88 95,290.22 11,818,949.62. 6,442,970.85. 847,534.61 1,597,808.43. 45,012,853.13-
Revenue service Public debt Public works and equipment Miscellaneous Aid to provinces, cities, and munici- palities Purchase of investments and securi- ties. Pensions and gratuities 1 2 Adjustment of surplus
Surplus Total debits 33,612, 013.59 37, 589,594.7l 41,042,639.10
68,379,528. 52 72,949,389.26 79,009,235.37 92,793,757.91

1 Adjusted.

2 Prior to 1931 included in item of bureaus and offices.


Appendix G

Arrivals and departures of Filipinos in and from continental United States and
Hawaii; and total remaining

CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Year ended June 30— Arrivals Depar- tures Net in- crease or decrease
1920 i. 678 108 +570
1921 891 433 -458
1922__ 339 360 -21
1923__ 1,394 259 +1,135
1924 3,951 323 +3, 628
1925__ 2,187 467 +1, 720
1926 6,806 711 +6, 095
1927 9,047 811 +8, 236
1928 6,196 1,191 +5, 005

Year ended June 30— Arrivals Depar- tures Net in- crease or decrease
1929___ 11, 560 1,146 +10,414
1930 2 5.866 1,563 +4,303
1931 4, 363 2, 394 +1,969
1932___ 1,243 2, 710 -1,467
1933 623 2,166 -1,543
1934 1, 462 1,137 +325
1935 128 979 -851
1936 155 1,053 -898
1937 3 254 992 -738

TERRITORY OF HAWAII

7, 763 5,723 +2, 040 1934__ 433 4, 944 -4,511
6,389 4, 794 +1, 595 1935— 189 2, 613 -2, 424
4,347 5, 771 -1,424 1936_ 152 1,759 -1,607
581 6, 630 -6, 049 1937 3 295 1,311 -1,016

1 Total within continental United States, census of Jan. 1, 1920, 5,603.

2 Total within continental United States, census of 1930, 45,208.

3 Subject to revision.

4 Total within Territory of Hawaii, census of 1930, 63,052.

Note—Upon the acceptance of the Independence Act by the Philippine Legislature on May 1, 1934,
the Immigration Acts of 1917 and 1924, and other laws relating to immigration were made applicable to
citizens of the Philippine Islands who are not citizens of the United States as regards entry into conti-
nental United States. “For such purposes the Philippine Islands shall be considered as a separate country
and shall have for each fiscal year a quota of 50" (sec. 8 (a) 1, Public, No. 127, 73d Cong.).

Source: Insular Collector of Customs, Philippine Islands, and Bureau of Immigration, U. S. Department
of Labor.

29


Appendix H

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP

The following table shows the financial transactions of the receiver-
ship during the fiscal (calendar) year ended December 31, 1936:

Statement of the customs service, Dominican Republic, year ended Dec. 81, 1986

RECEIPTS

Balance from Dec. 31, 1935_______________________________________ $69, 345. 20

Gross collections________________________________________________ 2, 878, 789. 07

Miscellaneous receipts___________________________________________ 2, 591. 22

Provisional receipts pending cancelation as of Dec. 31, 1936_____ 82, 939. 00

Total___________________________________________________ 3, 033, 664. 49

EXPENDITURES

Customs expense__________________________________________________ 107, 529. 14

Sinking-fund payments_____________________________________________ 60, 760. 08

Interest on bonds________________________________________________ 896, 060. 04

Paid to Dominican Government___________________________________ 1, 725, 460. 22

Paid for account of Dominican Government, as per special au-
thority____________________________________________________________ 2, 975. 09

Exchange on funds transmitted______________________________________ 3, 625. 52

Accrued liability general fund______________________________________2, 126. 90

Accrued liability retirement fund__________________________________ 1, 377. 19

Refund of duties collected in excess_______________________________ 3, 544. 70

Personal fees refunded____________________________________________ 10, 569. 20

Provisional receipts pending cancelation on Dec. 31, 1935, can-
celed during 1936______________________________________________ 93, 335. 00

Balances on hand Dec. 31, 1936:

Accrued liability general fund------------------------------- 7, 538. 23

Accrued liability retirement fund_____________________________ 6, 500. 34

5-percent convention fund account---------------------------- 21, 213. 97

Due Dominican Government_____________________________________ 78, 985. 38

In transit from deputy receivers_____________________________ 12, 063. 49

Total__________________________________________________ 3, 033, 664. 49

30

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