Citation
Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs

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Title:
Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs
Series Title:
Annual reports, War Department
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Insular Affairs
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publisher:
G.P.O.
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 22 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Insular possessions -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication ( marcgt )
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
1924-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Report year ends June 30.

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SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
557807 ( ALEPH )
OCM03883729 ( OCLC )
sn 84032311 ( LCCN )
Classification:
HB325.3 ( ddc )

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Preceded by:
United States. Bureau of Insular Affairs.Report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, War Department

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Full Text
ANNUAL REPORTS - - - WAR DEPARTMENT
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS - 1932
HB
325.3
849,850




ANNUAL REPORTS, WAR DEPARTMENT
FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1932
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS
1932
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1932




CONTENTS
Page
Periods to which the several sections of the report respectively pertain--------1
The Philippine Islands______________________________________________________________________________________1
Visit of the Secretary of War----------------------------------------------------------------------1
Visit of the Chief of Bureau of Insular Affairs----------------------------------------1
Changes in official personnel------------------------------------------------------------------------2
Policy of the Governor General------------------------------------------------------------------2
Congressional consideration of Philippine questions--------------------------------3
The Philippine Legislature--------------------------------------------------------------------------4
Philippine mission to the United States----------------------------------------------------5
General conditions in the islands----------------------------------------------------------------5
Public finances______________________________________________________________________________________________fr
Bonded indebtedness------------------------------------------------------------------------------------8
External trade________________________________________________________________________________________________8
Education________________________________________________________________________________________________________9
Health------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10;
Government-owned companies--------------------------------------------------------------------11
Provincial and municipal governments------------------------------------------------------11
Justice______________________________________________________________________________________________________________12
Public works and communications______________________________- 12
Agriculture and natural resources--------------------------------------------------------------12
Filipino emigration to the United States and Hawaii------------------------------13
Elections_________________________________________________________13
Puerto Rico________________________________________________________13
Changes in official personnel________________________________________________________________________13
Policy of the governor__________________________________________________________________________________14
Congressional consideration of Puerto Rican affairs--------------------------------14
The Puerto Rican Legislature--------------------------------------------------------------------14
General conditions________________________________________________________________________________________15
General financial conditions------------------------------------------------------------------------15
M unicipalities________________________________________________________________________________________________18
External trade________________________________________________________________________________________________19
Public works__________________________________________________________________________________________________20
Agriculture------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------20
Education________________________________________________________________________________________________________21
Health________________________________________________________________________________________________________________22
Election laws__________________________________________________________________________________________________23
Workmen's compensation act.__----------------------------------------------------------------24
Puerto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission----------------------------------------------24
Hurricane of September 27, 1932.----------------------------------------------------------24
Dominican Customs Receivership--------------------------------------------------------25
Changes in personnel, Bureau of Insular Affairs----------------------------------------------27
Appendixes:
A—Laws of special interest to the Philippine Islands and Puerto Rico
enacted during the first session of the Seventy-second Congress. 28
B—List of principal measures affecting the Philippine Islands and
Puerto Rico introduced during the first session of the Seventy-
second Congress but which were not enacted--------------------------------29
C—Philippine external trade tables-----------------------------------------------------35
D—Philippine financial statements------------------------------------------------------------38
E—Puerto Rican external trade tables------------------------------------------------------43;
F—Puerto Rican financial statements------------------------------------------------------45-
G—Financial transactions, Dominican customs receivership--------------------51
hi




ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
CHIEF, BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
War Department,
Bureau of Insular Affairs,
October 5, 1932.
The Secretary of War.
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the Bureau
of Insular Affairs for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1932.
Periods to which the several sections oj the report respectively pertain.—
In the Philippine Islands the fiscal year is identical with the calendar
year. The Philippine section of this report, being based largely
upon the latest annual report of the Governor General and the sta-
tistical data pertaining thereto, reflects, therefore, in general, the
operations of the Philippine government for the calendar and fiscal
year ending December 31, 1931. In certain cases, however (specifi-
cally indicated in the text), the bureau's report regarding Philippine
affairs also includes data pertaining to the period January 1 to June
30, 1932.
In Puerto Rico the fiscal year corresponds to that of the United
States Government (July 1-June 30), and the period covered, in
general, by this report is from July 1, 1931, to June 30, 1932.
The accounts and statistics pertaining to the Dominican Customs
Receivership are based upon the calendar year, and the period to
which the present report specially pertains is January 1 to December
31, 1931.
THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
Visit oj the Secretary oj War.—An event of primary interest and
importance to the people of the Philippine Islands was the visit paid
the islands by the Hon. Patrick J. Hurley, Secretary of War, who
arrived in Manila September 1, 1931, and embarked for the return
voyage to the United States on September 26. This was the first
visit of a Secretary of War to the islands since 1910, when the Hon..
J. M. Dickinson spent about six weeks in the Philippines.
Visit oj the Chiej oj Bureau oj Insular Affairs.—With a view to
gaining a more intimate knowledge of current local conditions, to
having the benefit of renewed personal contact with the people of the
Philippine Islands, and to promoting effective cooperation between
the bureau and the insular government, the Chief of the Bureau of
Insular Affairs also visited the Philippine Islands in 1931. Leaving
Washington on May 20, he arrived in Manila on June 18, remaining
in the islands throughout the period of the visit of the Secretary of
l


2
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
War, with whom the chief of bureau returned to the United States,
arriving in Washington on October 26. Advantage was taken of the
stay of over 14 weeks in the archipelago to travel extensively in most
of the larger islands and the several provinces thereof and to confer
with officials and others of the localities visited. Governor General
Davis, officials of all branches of the insular government—executive,
legislative, and judicial—and of the various provinces and cities
visited, extended every courtesy and facility and, together with
citizens engaged in many lines of nongovernmental activities, gener-
ously contributed of their time and experience in the effort to promote
the purpose for which the trip was undertaken.
Changes in official personnel.—The following changes among those
officials of the Government of the Philippine Islands who are appointed
by the President occurred during the year 1931 or shortly thereafter:
Governor General Dwight F. Davis left the Philippine Islands on
leave of absence on November 21,1931, and after arriving in the United
States felt compelled, due to the continued serious illness of a mem-
ber of his immediate family, to submit his resignation, which the
President accepted effective January 9, 1932. To succeed him the
President appointed Hon. Theodore Roosevelt, who had been Gover-
nor of Puerto Rico since October 7, 1929. Governor General Roose-
velt arrived in Manila on February 29, 1932, and assumed office the
same day. The Vice Governor, Hon. George C. Butte, was Acting
Governor General during the interim between the departure of
Governor General Davis and the arrival of Governor General
Roosevelt.
Five appointments as associate justices of the supreme court were
made during the first half of the year 1932. Two of these appoint-
ments—those of Hon. Jose Abad Santos, secretary of justice of the
Philippine Islands, and of Maj. Gen. John A. Hull, United States
Army (retired), legal adviser on the staff of the Governor General—
were to fill original vacancies created by Act No. 3816, mentioned later
in this report under the heading "Justice.77 Three vacancies in the
supreme court were created during the early part of 1932 by the death
of Associate Justice Charles A. Johns and the resignation and retire-
ment of Associate Justices E. Finley Johnson and Norberto Romualdez.
To fill these vacancies the President appointed Judge James C. Vickers
and Judge Carlos Imperial, both of the court of first instance, and
Hon. George C. Butte, who resigned as Vice Governor in order to
accept the appointment. Justices Vickers and Hull took the oath of
office on June 1, 1932; Justice Santos on June 10; Justice Imperial
on June 22; and Justice Butte on July 1.
The President, on August 13, 1932, conferred an ad interim appoint-
ment as Vice Governor of the Philippine Islands on Hon. John H.
Hollidav, of Missouri. Vice Governor Holliday, who had been serv-
ing for some months as one of the legal advisers on the staff of the
Governor General, entered upon the duties of his new office on Au-
gust 20, 1932.
Policy oj the Governor General.—Governor General Davis continued
during the last year of his administration his previous emphasis upon
economic development, economy and honesty in public administra-
tion, and cooperation between the various agencies of government.
The general policies which he earnestly endeavored to promote
throughout the two and one-half years of his term of office are well


3 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
indicated in the following quotations from his final report covering
the year 1931:
In government, and particularly in a government such as exists in the islands,
constructive cooperation within the executive branch and between the executive
and the legislature is of the utmost importance.
In administration, efficient economy was strongly stressed. The aim was to
give the people a peso of service for every peso of taxes paid by them. Much
progress was made and the foundations laid for greater progress in the future.
I have so often inveighed against graft that I will not add anything here.
Suffice it to say that the campaign against grafting brought about the elimination
of a large number of dishonest public servants of high and low position. Graft
has certainly not been entirely eliminated from the government, but it has been
greatly reduced and is no longer a conventional offense. As a result of constant
reiteration the people have begun to learn that the grafter steals schools from
their children, hospitals from their sick, and necessities and improvements from
them all.
* * * Economic development is the foundation upon which the economic
and political future of the islands will depend.
Economics rather than politics was therefore constantly and continually
emphasized, particularly as the people are by nature far more inclined to political
than to economic lines of thought. It was repeatedly brought out that the
existing governmental revenues were inadequate and stationary; that the essen-
tial needs were constant^ increasing; that a scientific system of taxation bearing
fairly on all the people did not exist; and that the only sure, sound, and solid
advance toward permanent financial stability would be to increase the taxable
wealth of the country.
Closely related to economic development, and an essential factor in social
stability as well, is the important problem of land titles, valid against the machina-
tions of unscrupulous land seekers and free from the rapacity of usurers, which
would promote social stability, prosperity, and good order. * * * The set-
tlement of the public domain was expedited. The importance of the problem
was constantly emphasized by the administration. An independent middle class
is the greatest safeguard of a country; an oppressed peasantry is the greatest
danger.
Diversification of commodities produced; development of tropical crops needed
by the world, together with the limitation of crops of which there is already world
overproduction; the encouragement of so-called "cottage industries" for part-
time labor; development of our mineral resources; raising locally certain com-
modities such as foodstuffs; these and many other things were constantly urged.
The prohibition of cattle importation greatly stimulated the livestock industry.
In my opinion, measures should be adopted as soon as possible to bring about
the progressive development of a firm economic base, not dependent upon outside
aid, upon which the islands could develop their own economic future. If, then,
their future political status was to be independence, they would have an inde-
pendent economic foundation upon which to build. If it was to be some form of
partnership freely entered into between the islands and the United States—they
would be partners on an equal and independent basis.
Following the elections in June the new legislature met for its opening session
on July 16. In my message delivered on that occasion I particularly stressed
the need for economic development to provide sources of new revenue, pointing
out that the expenditures were constantly increasing yet new sources of taxation
were not becoming available. The need of further diversification of crops, legis-
lation to increase crop yields, to encourage cattle raising and mining, was particu-
larly stressed.
Mention will be found, under appropriate headings elsewhere in
this report, of phases of executive policy applicable to the respective
special subjects there discussed.
Congressional consideration of Philippine questions.—Appendix A
to this report lists certain acts of Congress, enacted during the period
to which this report pertains, the provisions of which extend to the
Philippine Islands. In Appendix B to the report will be found a list
of principal measures affecting the Philippine Islands introduced


4
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
during the first session of the Seventy-second Congress but which
were not enacted.
Early in the first session of the Seventy-second Congress a number
of bills providing for the independence of the Philippine Islands, or
directed to that end, were introduced in one or both Houses of
Congress. A list of these measures will be found in Appendix B.
In January and February, 1932, hearings were held before the House
Committee on Insular Affairs on one of these bills—H. R. 7233—
known as the Hare bill; and in February, 1932, hearings were held
before the Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs on
another of the bills—S. 3377—known as the Hawes-Cutting bill.
The Hare bill passed the House by a vote of 306 to 47 on April 4,
1932, and on April 26 it was introduced in the Senate with amend-
ments directed to making it substantially identical with the Hawes-
Cutting bill as then pending before the Senate. The Hare bill, as
thus introduced in the Senate, was discussed and further amended
by that body during the latter part of June. Prior, however, to the
completion of the discussion, the Senate, by resolution adopted on
July 1, postponed further consideration of the bill until after the
opening of the second session of the Seventy-second Congress in
December next.
The Philipjnne Legislature.—The first session of the Ninth Philip-
pine Legislature convened on July 16, 1931, and adjourned November
9, 1931. Reports of the various Governors General for previous
years have commented unfavorably upon the common practice of the
legislature of leaving the great bulk of legislation to be acted upon
hurriedly during the last few days of the session. In his annual
report for 1931 the Governor General notes a marked improvement
in this respect "due largely to the ability and initiative of the presiding
officers of the two houses." One hundred and twenty-four bills were
passed, of which the Governor General vetoed 28, or somewhat over
22 per cent, as compared with about 30 per cent vetoed at the last
previous session.
Among the more important measures enacted and approved were
acts: Authorizing the secretary of commerce and communications to
commence negotiations for coordinating the systems of electrical
communications throughout the islands and to report a plan to the
next session of the legislature; to promote credit facilities for small
farmers (three acts); clarifying the provisions of the tariff law directed
to the protection of American manufacturers selling to the Philippine
government; creating a national economic planning board; regulating
aviation and radio communications; amending the cooperative
marketing law.
An appropriation for a special committee for the consideration of
taxation and tariff laws was revived.
The following five measures, which under the provisions of the
organic act required the approval of the President before they could
become law, were submitted to the President and approved by him
as follows:
Act No. 3914, approved January 20, 1932, clarifying the meaning
of the tariff act with regard to the payment of duty on Philippine
government supplies.
Act No. 3915, approved February 1, 1932, providing for the estab-
lishment of national parks, declaring such parks game refuges, and
for other purposes.


5 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Act No. 3916, approved March 11, 1932, amending the tariff act as
to rates of duty when dutiable and free merchandise or merchandise
dutiable at different rates are packed together.
Act No. 3917, approved March 16, 1932, exempting forest products
exported from payment of the wharfage tax.
Act No. 3918, approved April 8, 1932, increasing the customs duties
on rice and corn.
Philippine mission to the United States.—The Philippine Legislature,
by concurrent resolution No. 12, adopted November 9, 1931, created
a committee of the legislature composed of three members from each
house (the president of the senate, the Hon. Manuel L. Quezon;
the speaker of the house of representatives, the Hon. Manuel Roxas;
the president pro tempore of the senate, the Hon. Sergio Osmena;
the majority floor leader of the house, the Hon. Pedro Sabido; the
minority floor leader of the senate, the Hon. Ruperto Montinola;
and the minority floor leader of the house, the Hon. Emiliano Tirona),
which committee was instructed, jointly with the two Resident Com-
missioners in Washington, to petition "the Government and Congress
of the United States for the early concession of independence to the
Philippine Islands, and to submit to them from time to time the views
of the legislature on any matter concerning the Philippines under
consideration by the Washington Government/'
The committee thus constituted, with the exception of the Hon.
Manuel L. Quezon, the president of the senate, arrived in Washington
on January 2, 1932, and were in the course of the following several
days received by the President and the Secretary of War. The five
members of the mission and the two Resident Commissioners appeared
before committees of both the Senate and House of Representatives
at hearings held on independence bills. The members of the mission
remained in Washington throughout the first session of the Seventy-
second Congress and were still in the United States at the date of the
writing of this report.
General conditions in the islands.—The unfavorable economic con-
ditions generally prevalent throughout the world were more noticeably
reflected in the Philippine Islands than during the preceding year,
being manifested in a general decline of business, with consequent
unemployment and decrease in private incomes and government
revenues. The secretary of commerce and communications reports
that sales of commodities declined 23 per cent in value, that the
general price level was 27 per cent lower, and that the registration of
new corporate investments decreased by 63 per cent from the preceding
year.
Due to the tropical climate and the generally simple social organiza-
tion, the people of the islands were relatively fortunate in that there
was little, if any, actual suffering from lack of the necessities of life-
General health conditions were improved over the preceding year.
Peace and order were in general maintained. There were some
disturbances of public order, usually minor in character and confined
to the scattered localities in which they originated. Varied causes
were assigned for these incidents, such as labor strikes in the vicinity
of Iloilo; disputes between landlords and tenants in Batang s and
Pangasinan; activities of secret societies with communistic affiliations
in central Luzon; and lawless activities of certain unruly elements
among the Moros and Negritos resulting in encounters with the con-
143558—32-2


6 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
stabulary. The most serious of the disturbances occurred at Tayug,
Pangasinan, where a mob numbering about 70 men and women
armed with bolos attacked the local constabulary detachment, with
the resulting deaths of 2 officers and 3 enlisted men of the constabulary
and 4 of the attackers, and the damage by fire of several government
and private buildings. Commenting on this incident, the Governor
General, in his annual report, says:
The causes of such uprisings are difficult to determine. Those who participate
are usually ignorant people, who, led on by unscrupulous leaders, may have
widely varying reasons. Probably many who took part in this affair did not
realize, until it was too late to withdraw, just how serious a venture they had been
led into. There is always a combination of religious fanaticism, genuine or
fancied grievances against government officials, coupled with the hope of spoils.
The leading spirits are usually men of some intelligence who do not scruple to
take advantage of latent agrarian unrest and mislead their followers for their own
purposes which are frequently wholly financial.
In the bureau's last annual report mention was made of a trip
which the Governor General, in company with members of his official
family, made to the neighboring countries of French Indo-China,
Si am, British Malayia, and Netherland India. In his annual report
for 1931 the Governor General sets forth in some detail deductions
resulting from the information obtained during the trip. Summariz-
ing briefly the reports of the observations of the several officials who
accompanied him, he says:
The reports brought out forcibly the fact that the islands have fallen far behind
many of our neighbors in economic development, and that if we are to compete
successfully with these countries radical steps must be taken to overcome existing
deficiencies. The reports also showed that labor is better paid and cared for in
the Philippines than in the countries visited and the standard of living is much
higher. Also a much larger portion of the revenues are disbursed for the benefit
of the people. The cost of public defense is eliminated and a larger control over
the government is exercised by the people themselves. The benefits not only
materially but socially accruing to the people through their association with the
United States were obvious.
The Governor General mentioned, as among the activities which
appear to be in a more advanced stage of development in one or more
of the countries than in the Philippine Islands, scientific research,
experimentation, and rural credits as factors in promoting agriculture;
electrical communications; and aviation.
Losses from typhoons, floods, and fires during the year in the
Philippines are estimated to amount to approximately $7,500,000.
The Visayan group of islands was the scene of the heaviest suffering
from typhoons and floods; and the Provinces of Occidental Negros,
Pampanga, and Albay experienced destructive fires. In April, 1932,
a destructive storm visited the island of Jolo in the Sulu Province.
Public finances.—The total receipts and expenditures for the fiscal
(and calendar) year 1931 are shown in Appendix D. The revenues
from ordinary sources—customs, internal revenue, and miscellaneous
receipts—as shown in the annual report of the secretary of finance
for the year 1931 amount to $32,881,587, a decrease of $5,345,905
from 1930.1 The total ordinary expenditures amounted to $38,207,-
978, a decrease from the preceding year of $1,728,419. This decrease,
the Governor General states in his annual report, "represents the
1 In his report for 1930 the secretary of finance reported the ordinary revenues to amount to $40,819,405,
which amount included revenues from certain sources not included in the corresponding figures of the
1931 report.


7 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
/jg&JZt,
efforts by all concerned to reduce expenses,'/but still left an excess of
expenditures over revenues of $5,05d,8IQc Fortunately, a surplus
accumulated from prior years was sufficient to make up this deficit and
leave an unappropriated balance amounting to $2,925,338.
The greatest decrease in revenues was in the sales-tax receipts,
which form one of the most important sources of revenue to the
government and which declined 23 per cent from the 1930 figures.
This decrease was due not only to the smaller volume of business but
also to the low prices of commodities. Income-tax receipts declined
10 per cent and customs duties 9 per cent.
In his message to the legislature of July 16, 1931, the Governor
General called attention to the fact that the revenues were falling
behind the estimates upon which the budget for the year had been
based and admonished that expenditures for the remainder of the
year would have to be kept "down to the absolute minimum." On
July 27, 1931, by authority of a provision incorporated in the 1931
appropriation act, the Governor General issued an executive order
specifying the amounts that would have to be saved from current
appropriations by each of the government entities, totaling almost a
million dollars.
Information that has been received to include May, 1932, relative
to the current year (fiscal and calendar 1932) indicates that the reve-
nues for 1932 will approximate the revenues for 1931. In order to
adjust budgetary requirements to the anticipated revenues available
to meet them, Governor General Roosevelt has, since his arrival in
the islands early in 1932, taken vigorous measures along several lines.
In March of this year the secretary of finance advised the Governor
General that the estimates of receipts upon which the 1932 budget
had been based were not being realized and presented an estimate of
receipts for 1932 amounting to $26,000,000, while appropriations for
the year total about $35,000,000. The Governor General addressed
himself with energy to the difficult problem of adjusting govern-
mental expenditures to the indicated revenues. Salaries of govern-
ment officials and employees have been reduced and other steps have
been taken, or are under consideration, with a view to effecting econ-
omies in administration. As these measures pertain to the year 1932,
they will be more appropriately covered in a subsequent annual report.
In his message to the legislature of July 16, 1932, the Governor
General enumerates as follows the administrative economies which
had then been inaugurated": (a) Reduction of salaries and leaving
unfilled all possible vacancies; (b) reduction of per diems of emplo}^ees
traveling on official business; (c) cheap transportation for employees
traveling on official business has been prescribed and inspection trips
that were not vital have been eliminated; (d) telephones have been
reduced; (e) economy in the purchase of equipment and supplies
and of their use has been instituted; (/) the construction of all non-
essential public works has been halted; (g) special appropriations for
nonessential projects, such as participation in the Chicago Fair, have
been suspended; (h) unnecessary units, such as various vessels of the
government, have been eliminated.
The Governor General indicates that the application of these econ-
omies is expected to result in a saving to the government during the
current year of approximately $3,250,000, or about 9 per cent of the


8 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
total of the original 1932 budget authorizations. As these economies
will be operative during only part of the present year, they should, if
continued in force throughout the full year 1933, result in larger total
savings.
Bonded indebtedness.—The Governor General in his report for the
fiscal and calendar year 1931 shows an increase in the bonded indebted-
ness of $250,000 during the year. In Appendix D of this report the
statement of the bonded indebtedness is carried forward to June 30,
1932. The amount of outstanding indebtedness is well within the
limit provided by law and sinking funds are fully maintained to cover
all outstanding bonds. Total additions to the sinking funds during
the year greatly exceeded the amount of new bonds issued.
External trade.—The world depression continued to be reflected in
the further reduction of the external trade of the islands. The highest
point in Philippine external trade was reached in 1929, in which 3^ear
the total trade with the United States and foreign countries amounted
to $311,607,118, which was 7.5 per cent greater than the corresponding
total for the previous year. In 1930 this trade dropped to $256,260,-
081 (a decrease of 17.8 per cent) and in 1931 to $203,150,793 (a
decrease of 20.7 per cent from 1930), representing the lowest level
reached since 1922, and a total decrease from 1929 (the highest year)
of 34.8 per cent. A favorable balance of commodity trade was
maintained, although this shrank from $10,074,174 in 1930 to $4,793,-
355 in 1931. Exports (including shipments to the United States)
decreased from $133,167,128 to $103,972,074, or 21.9 per cent. With
the exception of abaca (manila hemp), this decrease is accounted for
chiefly by the drop in prices, as the volume of commodities shipped
abroad remained generally about the same. In the cases of both
sugar and coconut oil, there was an increase in the quantities exported
but a decrease in value thereof. Imports fell from $123,092,954 in
1930 to $99,178,719 in 1931, or 19.4 per cent. (Appendix C.)
The United States continued to predominate in Philippine external
trade, receiving 80 per cent of the total Philippine exports (an increase
of over 1 per cent over the preceding year) and supplying 63 per cent
of the imports (a decrease of almost 1 per cent from the preceding year).
The total trade with the United States amounted to $145,562,080,
representing 71 per cent of the total external trade of the islands,
compared with 72 per cent in 1930 and 70 per cent in 1929. The
shipments from the United States amounted to $62,139,683, while
the shipments to the United States amounted to $83,422,793 (in both
cases a decrease of about 20 per cent).
With the exception of silk and its manufactures, 57 per cent of which
came from Japan, the United States was the main source of the prin-
cipal imports of the islands. Thus, of cotton goods imports, valued
at $16,401,048 and constituting 17 per cent of the total Philippine
imports and the largest single import item, almost one-half came from
the United States. Of iron and steel imports amounting to $13,364,-
883, more than three-fourths came from the United States. Of
mineral oils imported to the amount of $9,457,895 about four-fifths
came from the United States. Less than 2 per cent of the imports
of automobiles, parts, and accessories, valued at $4,515,436, came
from countries other than the United States. The United States
was also the principal source for imports consisting of meat and dairy
products, electrical machinery, paper and its manufactures, wheat


9 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
flour, and tobacco products. It is noted that the only principal
imports which showed increases in this year of lowered purchasing
power were mineral oils and meat and dairy products, for which the
United States is the main source.
Of the principal Philippine exports, the United States receives prac-
tically the entire quantity of sugar, coconut oil, embroideries, and
desiccated coconut; more than 50 per cent of the copra, lumber, and
cordage; and substantial percentages of tobacco products and manila
hemp. The only principal export of which the United States was not
in 1931 the largest purchaser was copra meal, or cake, two-thirds of
which went to Germany.
Speaking of this mutually advantageous trade relationship, the
Governor General in his annual report for the year 1931 says:
What the loss of the free-trade privilege with the United States would mean
in the economic situation and living conditions in the islands may be readily
seen from these figures. Unable with present living standards to compete in
the open market with their neighbors and deprived of the tremendous unseen
subsidy which they now enjoy, the people little realize what a drastic change in
their mode of living any interruption of the present trade relations with the
United States would mean.
And, on the other hand, he continues:
With the abolition of free entry of Philippine products in the American market
the natural result will be similar treatment for American products in the Philip-
pines. It is doubtful if these American products could then hold their own in
the Philippines, and an exchange of products which seems to have been mutually
profitable would be almost if not wholly wiped out.
Although the Philippine Islands maintained a favorable balance of
commodity trade with the world and with the United States, it con-
tinued to have an unfavorable balance with countries other than the
United States, amounting in 1931 to $16,489,759 (a decrease of 3 per
cent from 1930). This unfavorable balance is largely accounted for
by the unfavorable balance with Japan of $7,388,430 (13.9 per cent
less than 1930) and an unfavorable balance with China of $4,551,944
(28.9 per cent greater than 1930). A large portion of the imports
from Japan is made up of cotton goods and silks.
In the Philippine carrying trade American vessels continued to lead
those of other countries, but the percentage of the total cargo carried
declined from 44 per cent in 1930 to 39 per cent in 1931, while the
corresponding British percentage increased from 24 to 26 and the
Japanese from 12 to 15.
Education.—The public-school enrollment for the school year 1930-
31 of 1,224,548 was the highest on record. The economic situation
caused the enrollment for the school year 1931-32 to drop to 1,175,380
(approximately the same as the 1930 enrollment), of which all but
75,000 were in the primary and intermediate grades. Of the
secondary enrollment, 16,811 were in vocational schools.
The secretary of public instruction in his annual report for the year
1931 gives the following brief historical summary of the extension of
educational opportunities in the Philippines:
During the school year 1899-1900 the public schools were started with an
enrollment of 6,900. This figure constantly increased, so that in the school year
1909-10 it rose to 587,317. During the 10 years that followed the enrollment
was not quite consistently on the increase, although in the school year 1919-20
it was already as large as 791,626. As early as the school year 1921-22 this
figure began to exceed a million.


10 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
The report indicates that the percentage of enrollment in the general
academic secondary course has dropped since 1925, except that the
secondary commercial course showed an increase in 1931 over 1930.
The secondary agricultural courses have, however, shown an increased
attendance, although inconsistently. In the nautical, trade, and
home-economics courses the increase has been rapid and continuous.
The placement service conducted in connection with the vocational
work was able to place graduates trained in farming, mechanics,
mining, and carpentry.
In Manila and five other divisions night schools were conducted for
adults and for children who could not attend school in the daytime.
The enrollment in these schools during the last school year attained
7,492.
The Filipino people are intensely eager for education for their
children and have been accustomed to allot a large proportion of their
revenues for school purposes. With its reduced revenues, the govern-
ment is confronted with the necessity for strict economy in expendi-
tures for schools as for other activities. At the time of writing his
report for the year 1931, the Governor General's indicated view was
that, in order to keep appropriations within necessary limits without
lowering educational standards, it would be necessary to effect a
general reduction of salaries and to give greater governmental support
to elementary education and less to advanced education. In this
connection he states:
In education more empliasis should be given to primary rather than to
advanced education. From my observation of the condition of the mass of the
Filipino people I am convinced that their educational needs will best be served
by a more widespread elementary' education in the primary schools. The exten-
sion of elementary education would bring far more practical and beneficial
results and accomplish much more with the limited funds available than would
be brought about by increasing the opportunities for the few to secure advanced
education. Agricultural and vocational training should also be given greater
emphasis. Health education and the development of the bodies as well as the
minds of the children should not be neglected.
The Philippine Islands are well supplied with excellent private
schools where advanced education may be obtained. The number of
private schools operating with government approval increased from
355 in December, 1930, to 363 in December, 1931. The total enroll-
ment for 1930-31 was 100,399, an increase of 1,755, principally in
the collegiate courses.
Health.—An improvement in general health conditions is evidenced
in the estimated general mortality rate of 22.07 per 1,000 in com-
parison with the revised rate of 22.78 for 1930. In the city of Manila
the rate declined from 27.26 to 25.61; the infant-mortality rate fell
from 160.24 to 151.58.
Cholera, which had appeared in the islands in 1930 after an ab-
sence of several years, causing 3,079 deaths, continued into 1931, but
with abated force, the deaths from this disease falling to 766. There
were no deaths from smallpox during the year. Dysentery and in-
fluenza cases increased. There was a decline in the number of deaths
from typhoid, measles, and beriberi.
Health statistics indicate that there has been a steady increase in
deaths from tuberculosis during the past decade. The number of
deaths from this disease attains annually serious proportions and in
1931 is estimated to have amounted to over 26,000. The Governor


11 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
General, commenting on the seriousness of this in his annual report,
says:
In health matters I feel that far more time and money should be expended
on tuberculosis (from which I am informed over 10 per cent of the population
is suffering) than has been spent in the past. A good start was made in the
appointment of a tuberculosis commission. Emphasis should be laid upon pre-
ventative measures, which are particularly difficult to initiate, involving, as they
do, changes in the fundamental social habits and customs of the people.
The Governor General notes the gratifying increasing tendency on
the part of sufferers from leprosy, their families, and the public to
report cases of leprosy. It is being more and more recognized that
the earlier the disease is reported the better the chance of ultimate
cure. During the year 1931, 325 lepers were declared negative and
released.
Government-owned companies.—The Philippine National Bank, the
Manila Railroad Co., the Cebu Portland Cement Co., and the Manila
Hotel Co. are all reported as having net profits for the year 1931,
although, except in the case of the Manila Hotel Co., such profits
were less than for the preceding year.
Of the Philippine National Bank, the Governor General, in his
annual report, states:
The conservative policies were continued during the year. * * * Instead
of being a source of weakness in these times of financial stress, the bank was
able to aid other institutions which deserved assistance and to help tide over
periods of strain and stress.
The sugar centrals in Negros, which on October 31, 1926, owed
the bank over $20,000,000, reduced their debt during the year by
$2,585,589, leaving a balance due on December 31,1931, of $10,009,440.
The net profit of the Manila Railroad Co. declined from $556,000
in 1930 to $264,000 in 1931, or more than 52 per cent. The decline
is attributed to the economic depression and increased competition
from motor transportation.
While the position of the Cebu Portland Cement Co. at the close
of the year was satisfactory, it is faced with a prospect of severe
competition on that part of its product which must be sold to the
public.
Provincial and municipal governments.—The general revision of
property assessment referred to in the bureau's report of last year
continued, bringing the total value of taxable property in the 40
regularly organized Provinces up to $766,706,815 ($1,359,855 more
than the preceding year), and up to $33,154,298 in the 9 specially
organized Provinces under the bureau of non-Christian tribes
($3,015,143 more than the preceding year), or a total of $819,861,113
for the Provinces. Including the chartered cities of Manila and
Baguio, the total assessed value of taxable real property becomes
$960,948,534 for the archipelago.
Local revenues in the 40 regularly organized Provinces decreased
from $20,621,695 in 1930 to $18,552,302 in 1931. Of the amount
collected in 1931, $4,733,663 accrued to the insular government.
Collections in eight specially organized Provinces (totaling nine in
number) from which complete reports were received amounted to
$6,171,937, or about 12.2 per cent less than for the preceding year.
The Governor General reports that, with the exception of a few
cases of a local nature, conditions of peace and order were better than
usual in the non-Christian Provinces.


12
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Justice.—One of the most serious problems with which the Philip-
pine government has been confronted in recent years is the conges-
tion in the dockets of the courts. The steps which have been taken
to relieve the situation in the lower courts have been touched upon
in previous reports of the bureau.
With a view to relieving the congestion in the supreme court, Act
No. 3816 of the Philippine Legislature, approved by the Governor
General December 8, 1930, provided for an increase in the total
membership of the court from 9 to 15 members and made important
changes in certain of the rules applicable to the transaction of the
court's business. Full effect has not been given to so much of Act
No. 3816 as contemplated the addition to the court of six associate
justices. Two of these vacancies have, however, been filled. As now
constituted, the court is composed of five Filipinos (one of whom is
the chief justice) and six Americans. The present total membership
of 11 is reasonably adapted to the transaction of business under Act
No. 3816 and no further increase in the membership is deemed neces-
sary nor is contemplated.
The courts of first instance were able to decrease the number of
civil and criminal cases pending from 22,675 at the beginning of the
year to 20,357 at the end. The situation with regard to cadastral
cases was not so satisfactory. The number of lots decided during
the year decreased and the number of lots pending at the end of the
year registered a noticeable increase.
As a result of the administrative investigation of the bureau of
prisons, mention of which was made in the bureau's report of last
year, two more high-ranking officials were separated from the bureau
for causes during the year.
Public works and communications.—The new post-office building in
Manila, which the Governor General describes as "an imposing
building, well located and well equipped," was occupied in March,
1931. Reconstruction of the residences of the Governor General in
Manila and Baguio is expected to save the considerable sums which
it has been necessary to expend annually on repairs in recent years.
During 1931 there were constructed 414.2 kilometers (257 miles) of
new first-class roads, 260.8 kilometers (162 miles) of second-class
roads, and 251.8 kilometers (156 miles) of third-class roads, making
a total of 14,332.5 kilometers (8,886 miles) of roads of all classes now
in existence in the islands. The new construction in 1931 included
32 reinforced-concrete bridges.
Two new government cutters were put in service during the year,
which will enable the government to dispose of some older vessels
which have become expensive to maintain.
Motor vehicles registered during the year number 37,889, a slight
increase over 1930. Passenger cars to the number of 2,574 and
trucks to the number of 1,652 were imported, all but 3 coming from
the United States.
A division of aviation was established in the department of com-
merce and communications, negotiations were instituted with the
Provinces for the acquisition of landing fields, and provision was made
for an air mail service.
Agriculture and natural resources.—The total area under cultiva-
tion and the volume of production of crops remained much the same
as for the previous year, although the total value of crops underwent


13 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
a reduction of about 25 per cent. The losses suffered from typhoons
and plant pests and diseases were less than in recent previous years.
There was a slight decrease in the production of rice, with a resulting
increase of importation, but this commodity no longer figures, as for-
merly it did, among the principal imports; the Philippines have in
recent years become practically self-sufficient in regard to rice.
In his message to the legislature of July 16, 1931, the Governor
General pointed out that less than one-fourth of the arable land of
the islands was under cultivation. One of the main impediments
to the settlement and cultivation of the land is the uncertainty and
delay incident to obtaining titles. A committee to study the situa-
tion was appointed which made a comprehensive report and many of
its recommendations were adopted. The related questions, however,
continue among the most serious problems confronting the Philippine
government.
There was an increase in gold mining during the year. Bullion
was shipped out of the islands to the value of approximately three
and a half million dollars.
There was a decrease in lumber exports, due principally to the
destruction by fire of four of the principal sawmills. All of these
mills are expected to be rebuilt. The investment in sawmills and
machine-logging operations is estimated to be over $20,000,000.
Filipino emigration to the United States and Hawaii.—The annual
report of the Governor General for 1931 includes the following:
A total of 4,768 Filipinos of all classes left the Philippine Islands for Hawaii
during the year, while 4,162 returned from there. During the last five years a
total of 40,348 Filipinos have gone to Hawaii and 19,970 have returned from there
to the Philippine Islands.
A total of 8,144 Filipinos left for the United States and insular possessions
during the year and 6,864 returned to the islands. Thus the net increase of de-
partures over arrivals was 1,280, of whom 606 went to Hawaii, leaving a net
increase of 674 who went to continental United States. This is by far the smallest
in recent years and indicates that the question of Filipino immigration to America
is by no means as serious as it has been pictured.
Elections.—The regular triennial general election of the Philippine
Islands was held on June 2, 1931. The figures available at the date
of writing this report reveal that 1,489,693 voters registered for this
election, representing about 54 per cent of the voting population, a
percentage about 10 per cent higher than that for the election of
1928. The percentage of those registered who actually cast their
votes was slightly over 80, or about the same as that for the election
of 1928.
The election resulted in the election of 6 senators, 69 representa-
tives, 30 provincial governors, and 45 members of provincial boards
from the Nacionalista-Consolidado Party and 4 senators, 12 repre-
sentatives, 8 provincial governors, and 13 members of provincial
boards from the Democrata Party.
PUERTO RICO
Changes in official personnel.—The Hon. Theodore Roosevelt
resigned as Governor of Puerto Rico January 18, 1932, to accept an
appointment as Governor General of the Philippine Islands. The
President appointed to succeed him the Hon. James R. Beverley, who
had served as attorney general of Puerto Rico since May 22, 1928,
143558—32-3


14 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
and who had been acting governor since December 17, 1931. Gov-
ernor Beverley assumed the duties of governor on January 30, 1932.
The President appointed the Hon. Charles E. Winter, of Wyoming,
as attorney general of Puerto Rico to succeed Governor Beverley.
Mr. Winter took the oath of office on March 30, 1932.
The Hon. Jacinto Texidor, associate justice of the Supreme
Court of Puerto Rico, died on October 5, 1931. The President ap-
pointed as his successor the Hon. Felix Cordova Davila, who had for
many years served as Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico to the
United States. Justice Cordova assumed his new duties on April
11, 1932.
To complete the unexpired term of Hon. Felix Cordova Davila as
Resident Commissioner to the United States, the Governor of Puerto
Rico appointed Hon. Jose L. Pesquera. Mr. Pesquera presented his
credentials and took his seat in the House of Representatives on
April 28, 1932.
Policy of the governor.—In the report which he has submitted for
the year ended June 30, 1932, Governor Beverley makes the following
statement:
The present governor was closely associated with Governor Roosevelt's ad-
ministration in Puerto Rico and no major changes in policy have been made.
On the contrary, every effort has been made to continue the policies previously
undertaken so far as circumstances have not altered and to attempt to bring them
to their proper fruition.
These policies, directed toward the economic and social improve-
ment of the island, have been outlined generally in the last two annual
reports of this bureau. Certain of them will be more specifically
referred to hereafter in this report under the appropriate subjects.
Congressional consideration of Puerto Rican affairs.—In Appendix A
of this report is listed certain legislation of special interest to Puerto
Rico enacted by the Congress during the period to which this report
pertains.
Specially important among these measures are Public No. 302,
which extends to Puerto Rico the benefits of the Reconstruction
Finance Corporation act, and Public No. 304, the Federal Home
Loan Bank act.
Public Resolution No. 20 restores to the island the official desig-
nation of "Puerto Rico." This is the name by which the island was
known during its 300 years under Spanish sovereignty. In the
English text of the treaty of Paris, by which Spain ceded the island
to the United States, the spelling was "Porto Rico." Later the
United States Geographic Board made the decision that the correct
spelling was "Puerto Rico." However, Congress, in passing the act
of April 12, 1900, which established civil government in the island,
followed the spelling of the treaty, which had the effect of making
"Porto Rico" the official designation of the island.
In Appendix B are listed certain measures of special interest to
Puerto Rico which were introduced in the first session of the Seventy-
second Congress but which were not enacted into law.
The Puerto Rican Legislature.—The Twelfth Puerto Rican Legis-
lature was in session for three periods during the fiscal year 1931-32.
Governor Roosevelt called the second special session for a 14-day
period from November 25, 1931, for the special consideration of
election matters. (See "Elections" hereinafter.)


15 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
The fourth and last regular session convened February 8, 1932, and
adjourned April 15, at the expiration of the period prescribed by the
organic act.
Governor Beverley called a third special session, which convened
June 21, 1932, to consider matters which he considered urgent and
which had not been disposed of during the regular session. These
matters were: Amendments to the election law in the interest of fair
elections, amendments to the workmen's compensation act, and
consideration of much-needed municipal reform. Each of these
subjects will be taken up hereafter under appropriate headings,
Among the more important measures which were passed during
these three sessions and which received the approval of the governor
were: An act to authorize the treasurer of Puerto Rico to purchase
in the open market insular and municipal bonds, to consolidate
issues, and to borrow money temporarily in anticipation of tax
collections; an act creating an emergency fund; an act canceling and
remitting certain taxes owed by coffee and coconut plantations: a
reenactment of the authorization to issue bonds to purchase lands
for farms under the homestead law so as to eliminate certain legal
objections that had been raised; amendments of the election law;
levying a special tax of 2 per cent on the assessed valuation of every
cuerda (acre, approximately) of coffee land for the purpose of creating
a coffee insurance and rehabilitation fund.
General conditions.—The governor, in his annual report for the
year ended June 30, 1932, referring to conditions in the island, says:
The economic condition of the island during the year has not been good,
although the world-wide depression has probably been felt less here than in
more highly industralized areas. The amount of poverty, malnutrition, and
unemployment has been distressing in spite of the fact that this year saw the
largest crop of sugar ever raised in the island—over 992,000 tons. A great deal
of unemployment in Puerto Rico is seasonal, and we have had for many years a
high percentage of workers unemployed in whole or in part whose condition lias
been aggravated by the world-wide depression.
With respect to the ever-serious problem of overpopulation, Gover-
nor Beverley states in his annual report:
According to the 1930 census the population of Puerto Rico was 1,543,913
persons, or an average of 449.5 people to the square mile * * *. The esti-
mated population as of July 1, 1932, was 1,599,142 persons, or a density of 465.5
per square mile. Conditions demonstrate that this popmation is too large
for an area which is and must always remain largely agricultural. Organization
of agriculture, encouragement of industries, and vocational training can all
help to alleviate the situation, but they will never be sufficient to raise the average
standard of living of the people to a satisfactory point with the present density
of population ana in the present state of technical and agricultural development
For the problem of overpopulation a number of partial solutions have been
advocated. Up to the present time the government has given attention to
the encouragement of new industries and the expansion of established ones,
but it seems clear that it is rapidly becoming necessary to attempt otner and fur-
ther solutions. Without some extraordinary and unexpected changes in economic
conditions, further net additions to population in the island must inevitably
result in greater distress and poverty and ultimately in a rising death rate. The
population question is fundamental and is intimately related to the standard of
living, to labor conditions, and especially to health conditions.
General financial conditions.-—The governor reports that the finan-
cial condition of the insular treasury at the close of the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1932, was "satisfactory beyond all expectations."
The revenue of $12,662,359.76 was the largest ever collected in one


16
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
year by the treasury and $1,608,162.20 more than was collected dur-
ing the previous year. This increase was largely accounted for by an
increase of $1,140,000 in the customs receipts over those of the pre-
vious year and the importation by the South Porto Rico Sugar Co.
of sugarcane from the Dominican Republic, accounted in turn for a
large part of the increased customs collections. There was also an
increase in excise taxes, but receipts from the sales tax and income tax
declined. Collections of property taxes during the year amounted to
nearly $1,000,000 more than for the preceding year, a fact which the
governor attributes directly to the efficient and energetic work of the
treasurer of Puerto Rico. The property tax is the chief source of
income of the municipalities.
General fund of the insular treasury.—Cash receipts and disburse-
ments, under the general fund, for the fiscal year 1931-32 are sum-
marized as follows in the annual report of the auditor of Puerto Rico:
Balance on hand July 1, 1931______________________________ $553, 026. 85
Insular revenue receipts____________________$12, 662, 359. 76
Proceeds, coffee fund______________________________________________72, 476. 50
Surplus, insurance fund__________________________________________18, 562. 85
Total receipts into general fund_______________________ 12, 753, 399. 11
Total general-fund resources for the year_______________ 13, 306, 425. 96
Total cash disbursements___________________ 12, 305, 597. 09
Transfers to various trust funds_____________ 126, 406. 81
Total disbursements and transfers_____________________ 12, 432, 003. 90
Balance on hand June 30, 1932_______________________ 874, 422. 06
Current assets payable to general fund:
Advance to Isabela irrigation fund_______ 257, 500. 00
Advance to Guayama irrigation service— 94, 312. 50
Advances to municipalities______________ 1 91, 255. 98
Total______________________________________________ 443, 068. 48
Total current assets_________________________________ 1, 317, 490. 54
Total of carry-over appropriation liabilities to fiscal year
1932-33____________________________________________... 679,251. 97
Excess of resources over appropriation liabilities fiscal
year 1931-32_____________________________________ 638, 238. 57
At the end of the previous fiscal year a surplus of $203,969.21 in the
general fund was shown over appropriation liabilities.
Final liquidation of general-fund operations for the fiscal year
1931-32 as of June 30, 1932, shows:
Excess of cash resources over appropriation liabilities____________$195, 170. 09
Other resources reimbursable to general fund___________________ 443, 068. 48
Total excess of resources over appropriation liabilities______ 638, 238. 57
This indicates an improvement in the general fund for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1932, in the amount of $434,269.36.
Notes payable.—The balance of notes payable as of June 30, 1932,
amounts to $379,494.54. The balance as of June 30, 1931, was
$730,494.54. The net change represents a considerable decrease in
outstanding indebtedness under "Notes payable" in the amount of
$351,000.
i Includes $43,275.32 for advances made during previous fiscal years.


17 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Bonded indebtedness.—The bonded indebtedness of the government
of Puerto Rico amounted to $28,761,000 on June 30, 1932, compared
with $29,097,000 on June 30, 1931. Bonds in the total amount of
$570,000 were issued during the year; bonds in the total amount of
$906,000 were redeemed during the year. The net decrease in the
bonded indebtedness for the year was $336,000. It must be noted,
however, that the sinking funds for the redemption of bonds were
$1,458,577.14 on June 30, 1931, while on June 30, 1932, these funds
amounted to $1,370,527.80, or a decrease of $88,049.34. Taking into
consideration both bonds outstanding and sinking funds, the net
change in the bonded indebtedness was a decrease of $247,950.66.
Insular emergency fund.—One of the most important laws passed
during the past regular session of the Puerto Rico Legislature was
Act No. 33, approved April 28, 1932, which created a permanent
emergency fund, designated "Insular emergency fund."
Pursuant to this act, at the close of operations of each fiscal year,
there shall be covered into this fund any part of the cash balance of
the general fund plus advances to other funds reimbursable to the
general fund exceeding the balances of the appropriations provided
for in the budget and of all other appropriations in force. This is
the first step taken since the establishment of civil government in
Puerto Rico toward the creation of a treasury reserve fund.
The "Insular emergency fund" was constituted initially by the
transfer of the unincumbered balance of the " Reserve for contin-
gencies in special fund" created under the provisions of Act No. 5
of 1930.
The status of the "Insular emergency fund" as of June 30, 1932,
was as follows:
Cash balance______________________________________________________________________________________________$234, 071. 06
Reimbursable loan made to sanitation fund______________________________________49, 197. 09
Reimbursable loan made to cafeteros de Puerto Rico----------------------100, 000. 00
Reimbursable loan made to bureau of supplies__________________________________200, 000. 00
Reimbursable loan made to water resources fund______________________________100, 000. 00
Reimbursable advances made to Isabela irrigation fund------------------257, 500. 00
Reimbursable advances made to Guayama irrigation fund--------------94, 312. 50
Reimbursable advances made to various municipalities--------------------91, 255. 98
Total_______________________________________________ 1,126,336.63
The status of the "Insular emergency fund" as of June 30, 1932,
compared with the "Reserve for contingencies in special fund" as
of June 30, 1931, is as follows:
Total assets, "Insular emergency fund"_____________________$1, 126, 336. 63
Less reimbursable advances considered in general
funds:
Isabela irrigation fund_____________________$257, 500. 00
Guayama irrigation fund___________________ 94, 312. 50
Various municipalities_____________________ 91, 255. 98
Cash surplus as of June 30, 1932, considered
in general funds_________________________ 195, 170. 09
- 638, 238. 57
Balance____________________________________________________________________________________488, 098. 06
Balance "Reserve for contingencies in special fund" as of June
30, 1931______________________________________________________________________________________________551, 098. 06
Less balance "Insular emergency fund" as of June 30, 1932________448, 098. 06
Retrogression for 1932 of "Insular emergency fund"_____ 63, 000. 00


18
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Financial progress.—Considering the general fund, notes payable,
the bonded indebtedness, and the "Insular emergency fund," the
government of Puerto Rico shows financial progress for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1932, of $970,220.02, arrived at as follows:
Progress:
General fund__________________________________________ $434, 269. 36
Notes payable__________________________________________________________________________________351, 000. 00
Bonded indebtedness______________________________________________________________________336, 000. 00
Total progress_______________________________________ 1, 121, 269. 36
Retrogression:
Decrease in sinking funds___________________$88, 049. 34
Decrease in "Insular emergency fund" 1______ 63, 000. 00
- 151, 049. 34
Net progress________________________________________ 970, 220. 02
The above figures show a decidedly favorable trend in the finances
of Puerto Rico during the year ended June 30, 1932, in spite of the
general economic depression.
For further data regarding the revenues and financial condition of
the insular government see Appendix F.
Municipalities.—The unsatisfactory condition of municipal finances
has been commented upon in previous reports of this bureau. The
care exercised during the past year by the executive council and the
auditor of Puerto Rico in supervising municipal loans and in check-
ing estimated receipts of the municipalities in order to prevent infla-
tion of budgets has prevented the majority of the municipalities from
incurring debts during the year in excess of their budgetary appro-
priations.
During the fiscal year the executive council approved municipal
loans to the extent of $850,595.47. The total indebtedness of the
municipalities as of June 30, 1932, was $18,882,541.25, plus interest
accrued and payable amounting to $40,007.66. This shows an im-
provement when compared with the total indebtedness of $19,957,-
352.15, plus accrued interest of $27,603.47, reported on June 30,
1931.
The fact remains that in spite of the supervision given the munici-
pal finances are not in good condition. During the past year the
insular treasury was forced to advance the municipalities the sum
of $47,980.66 for the payment of principal and interest on municipal
bonds to prevent defaults; this brings the total of such advances to
$91,255.98.
The total receipts of the municipalities for the fiscal year 1931-32
amounted to $7,123,121.05, while the disbursements totaled $7,383,-
452.85. The total cash balances as of June 30, 1932, amounted to
$3,819,732.65, as compared with $4,080,064.45 on June 30, 1931.
The foregoing figures indicate a reduction in the cash balances of
$260,331.80 as of June 30, 1932. Of the total cash balance as of
June 30, 1932, $109,092.62 pertains to the general funds of the sev-
eral municipalities and $66,073.65 to their school funds, and these
items, aggregating $175,166.27, represent the only cash to meet
budgetary liabilities, the remaining balance consisting of cash bonds
and deposits, loan funds, and other special funds.
1 This is the net retrogression in the "Insular emergency fund" compared with the amount reported in
the "Reserve for contingencies in special fund" as of June 30, 1931, excluding reimbursable items and
cash balances in the amount of $038,238.57 already considered as assets in the general fund.


19 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
The net debt-incurring margin of municipalities as of June 30, 1932,
amounted to $4,411,438.60, as compared with $4,027,732.90 at the
close of the previous year. In this connection it should be noted that
35 municipalities have exceeded their combined debt-incurring limi-
tations by $1,247,845.22, while 41 municipalities still have a margin
of $5,659,283.82.
The Governor of Puerto Rico states in his report for 1932:
The municipal financial problems of Puerto Rico can not be solved through
additional borrowing nor through direct advances from the insular government.
It is the opinion of the administration that this policy would only tend to retard
their financial and economic recovery. Fundamental correctives, not palliatives,
must be applied, and the system of local government must be made simpler and
more economical.
Certain changes in the organization of the municipalities were
effected in 1931, but the legislation then enacted neither accomplished
the desired simplification of the municipal governmental system nor
followed the repeated past recommendations of successive governors
that the number of the municipalities be reduced by consolidation.
That the present situation in this respect is unsatisfactory is indicated
by the following quotation from the governor's latest annual report:
* * * it is the opinion of this administration, as it was of the preceding admin-
istration, that the governmental set-up of the smaller municipalities is too
elaborate and expensive in comparison with the services actually rendered to
the people. For several years governors have been recommending to the legis-
lature that municipal organization be simplified. It is also believed that the
existing number of municipalities is too large, and that in many instances con-
solidation of neighboring municipalities could be made in the interests of economy
and good government and without sacrificing services. The principal objection
to consolidation either of municipalities or of municipal services comes from
interested local political groups. * * *
External trade.—The total trade with the United States and foreign
countries for the year ended June 30, 1932, amounted to $147,698,039,
as compared with $174,838,337 for the preceding year—a decrease of
about $27,140,298, or about 16 per cent. This decline is represented
by a falling off in imports 1 of $15,156,309, and in exports 2 of
$11,983,989. The favorable commodity trade balance, recovered
after the adverse balance during the hurricane year 1928-29, con-
tinues to be maintained, the excess of exports over imports being
$25,135,837, or 17 per cent of the total trade. The trade with the
continental United States represented about 92.4 per cent of the total
external trade. Shipments to the United States comprise 96.8 per
cent of the total exports and shipments from the United States
amounted to 86.2 per cent of the total imports from all outside
sources. Coffee shipments, valued at $154,903, dropped to the 1930
level; sugar exports, valued at $55,118,211, registered a slight increase
over 1931. During the year ended June 30, 1932, Puerto Rico ranked
first as a.customer of the United States in the Central and South
American area. Puerto Rico bought from the continental United
States goods valued at $52,826,794, this being 29 per cent in excess of
United States sales in Cuba. During the year mentioned, the
Republic of Cuba, which ranked first after Puerto Rico as the largest
Latin American importer from the continental United States, took
goods valued at $37,340,151. The purchases of Puerto Rico from the
1 Including shipments from the United States.
2 Including shipments to the United States.


20
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
United States during the year ended June 30, 1932, showed a per
capita of $34.20, as compared with combined per capita purchases of
all Latin American countries from the United States amounting to
approximately $2.50. (Appendix E.)
Public works.—Public-works activities continued to be confined
practically to the maintenance of those already in existence and the
completion of those already commenced. Work on the topographic
map to which reference was made in the bureau's report of last year
was stopped on account of lack of funds. New road construction
consisted of the completion of 12.3 kilometers of macadamized roads.
During the year, 295.5 kilometers of road were asphalted with funds
of the Puerto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission, making a total of
549.8 kilometers of road asphalted by the commission. The asphalt-
ing of these roads has performed the double service of reducing road-
maintenance costs for the insular government and furnishing much-
needed employment.
Of the $1,433,348.57 expended for road maintenance, $463,248.65
came from insular appropriations, and $970,099.92 was spent by the
Puerto Rican Hurrican Relief Commission from Federal funds appro-
priated in accordance with Public Resolution No. 33 of the Seventy-
first Congress, approved January 22, 1930.
Agriculture.—The insular government has devoted its special atten-
tion during the past several years to the encouragement of small
farming units and the development of crops suitable for this class of
farming, such as coffee and vegetables for home consumption and for
the winter market of the continental United States.
Coffee is especially well adapted to cultivation in small units in
the hilly interior regions of the island. At the International Colonial
and Overseas Exposition held in Paris in 1931, Puerto Rican coffee
was awarded the grand prix, the highest award possible. A coffee
cooperative marketing association, known as "Cafeteros de Puerto
Rico, Inc.," was organized in 1925 and operated successfully until
after the hurricane of 1928, when it found itself in financial difficulties.
The government has taken the lead in having this cooperative reor-
ganized and placed on a sound basis. The legislature authorized a
loan of $100,000 during the regular session of 1932. Coffee seedlings
to the number of 1,583,050 were distributed in addition to those dis-
tributed by the Puerto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission.
A large quantity of vegetable seeds were distributed. Several
vegetable crops new to Puerto Rico were successfully initiated by the
field force of the Department of Agriculture and Commerce in its
campaign for crop diversification.
The sugar year was marked by the lowest price paid for sugar since
1898 and by the largest crop ever produced on the island. Sugar
prices, duty paid New York, went as low as $2.58 per hundred pounds
and only the very large crop of 992,432.84 short tons and favored
access to United States markets for its disposition saved the island
from serious economic consequences. The fourth congress of the
International Association of Sugar Cane Technologists met in San
Juan in March, 1932.
The tobacco crop for the year is estimated to have dropped to
5,500,000 pounds, as against over 37,000,000 pounds for the preceding
year. This drop was mainly due to an antiplanting campaign pur-
sued by the tobacco planters, induced b}r the low prices and lack of a
profitable market for tobacco already in warehouses.


21 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Thirteen new farm bureaus, with a membership of 1,625, were
organized as a part of the campaign for organizing the farmers for
production and distribution. In addition to coffee plantings, 1,537,-
037 tree seedlings of other kinds were distributed during the year.
Agricultural demonstrations and lectures were continued. Agents- of
the department made over 32,000 visits to individual farmers and the
eight demonstration farms received over 7,000 visits from farmers,
Reference was made in the bureau's report of last year to the act
of Congress of March 4, 1931, which authorized the extension to
Puerto Rico of the benefits of certain Federal agricultural aid legis-
lation, relating to experiment station and extension work, on the
same basis as to the States. One of the conditions precedent to the
extension of the benefits of these laws was the transfer to the College
of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico of the agricultural
experiment stations conducted by the insular government. The
Legislature of Puerto Rico attempted to comply with the require-
ment, but was prevented from doing so by certain conditions attached
to the property to be transferred, so that the island has not as yet
benefited from the legislation. Attempts are being made to adjust
the matter to the satisfaction of the Federal authorities.
Education.—According to the annual report of the governor, at
the end of the fiscal year 1931-32 there were in operation in Puerto
Rico 23 public high schools; 20 incomplete, or continuation, high
schools; 39 second-unit rural schools; 1,813 elementary urban schools;
and 1,899 elementary rural schools; with a total teaching staff of 4,601
(an increase of 78 over the preceding year), of which 4,429 were paid
by the insular government and 172 by municipal governments. The
expenditures for educational purposes from insular funds amounted
to $4,363,007.59, in addition to which the municipalities expended
$1,166,692.73. The schools of Puerto Rico were housed in 1,997
school buildings, comprising 4,477 classrooms. Of these buildings
1,096 belonged to the people of Puerto Rico and 901 were either
rented or free. Of the public-school buildings, 1,609 are situated in
the rural "barrios" and 388 are situated in the urban centers. The
total enrollment during the year in all public schools was 229,169, an
increase of 2,954 over the preceding year. Organized school lunch
rooms numbered 779, and an average of 36,018 children were served
daily during the year. The governor, in his annual report, says:
These school lunch rooms are supported by the insular government and the
municipal government, by private organizations such as parent-teacher associa-
tions and by donations. The Puerto Rico Child Health Committee contributed
approximately one-half of the money used during the year for this work. Grate-
ful acknowledgment is made to this organization for its splendid help.
The Puerto Rico Child Health Committee was formed in 1930,
largely through the efforts of Governor Roosevelt, by representatives
of several national health and child-welfare organizations of the
continental United States.
The outstanding feature of Puerto Rican educational work during
the past several years has been the successful development of a new
type of consolidated vocational rural school. During the school year
1928-29, as an experiment in advancing the policy of the Puerto Rico
government of adapting the courses in the rural schools to the needs
and conditions of the country people, the department of education
opened in five rural communities what are called second-unit rural
143558—32-4


22 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
schools. The success of the new schools was immediate and pro-
nounced, and before the completion of the first experimental year
plans for expansion were in progress. Thirteen schools were in
operation in 1929-30; in 1930-31 the number increased to 36; and
in 1931-32 to 39. In his annual report the governor says with respect
to these schools:
During the year the policy of coordinating the department of health and agri-
culture with the department of education has continued. The insular govern-
ment is devoting preferential attention to the establishment of vocational and
agricultural schools, the latter known locally as second-unit rural schools. These
schools, in addition to giving elementary instruction in the basic academic sub-
jects, devote half the school day to practical instruction in agriculture and
various industries. Attached to each of these schools is a social worker, who in
addition to teaching classes also visits the families in her district and instructs
them in the elements of sanitation, preventive medicine, and home management.
For the training of these social workers special courses are given during the
summers at the University of Puerto Rico. These schools cooperate closely with
the department of agriculture and commerce and form an effective method of
disseminating valuable information to adults as well as to the school children.
This type of school is intended to be and is becoming a social and community
center; and where the demand warrants it, night classes for adults are given.
The importance to the island of the development of these rural agricultural and
vocational schools can not be overestimated. They are vital to our future
welfare, and it is regretable that they were not developed and pushed from the
time of the American occupation of the island.
Congress on March 3, 1931, extended to Puerto Rico Federal aid in vocational
training and civilian rehabilitation, and during the year the sum of $13,876.48
of Federal funds and the sum of $26,066.84 of insular funds were used in this
work by the insular board for vocational education set up in accordance with the
requirements of the Federal acts. * * *
In further pursuance of the policy of directing its major effort to
rural and vocational education, the governor recommended to the
legislature in February that the commissioner of education be per-
mitted to charge tuition fees in all high schools in order to release
funds for this work. The recommendation, however, was not acted
upon.
The commissioner of education reports 41 private schools accredited
by the department of education, with a total enrollment of 7,734 and
359 teachers, an increase of 740 in enrollment and 56 teachers over
the preceding year.
Satisfactory progress of the University of Puerto Rico is reported.
The enrollment for the year 1931-32 was 2,308, as compared with
1,703 during the preceding year. Under the personal direction of the
chancellor, Dr. Carlos E. Chardon, the university initiated an exten-
sive program of research bearing upon the physical, economic, and
social problems of Puerto Rico.
Health.—The general death rate for the calendar year 1931 was 20.4
per 1,000 population, which is 1.8 points higher than the rate for the
preceding year of 18.6 per 1,000 population, but is lower than the
rate for any other year since 1924. The increased death rate for 1931
is attributed to the high incidence of malaria for the year. The
governor reports that the efforts of the government toward malaria
control have not met with great success, due primarily to the extensive
areas of swamp and low lands of the coastal plains, to the draining of
which the government can not devote sufficient funds. The Rocke-
feller Foundation was aiding in a malaria demonstration, which was
in progress at the end of the year.


23 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
In his report for the year ended June 30, 1932, the governor makes
the following statement with reference to health conditions in Puerto
Rico :
All of the major health problems in Puerto Rico are closely allied with the
economic condition of the island and the standard of living of the people. The
low standard of living prevalent throughout the masses of the people and the
pressure of population are reflected in a high incidence of hookworm, malaria,
tuberculosis, and diet-deficiency diseases, and these diseases in turn lower
the vitality of the laboring classes and have a great influence in keeping the
standards of living low.
The governor reports the number of cases of tuberculosis in the
island to be variously estimated at from 30,000 to 50,000. In addition
to its general policy of teaching disease-prevention methods in the
schools and through the health units and by cooperation with the
municipalities, the insular government specifically attempts to cope
with the problem of tuberculosis by hospitalization in government
institutions and subsidies to private charitable sanitariums. The
health units and subunits operated 64 milk stations for infant feeding
and gave aid in 3,125 cases during the year.
Serious efforts are being made to control hookworm; the bureau of
rural sanitation conducted campaigns in 11 municipalities.
The Puerto Rican Government continued the program which it has
been pursuing during the past several years for the consolidation of
insular and municipal public health activities through the extension
over the island of a system of health units. This program, which has
been described in detail in recent previous annual reports of this
bureau and of the governor of Puerto Rico, calls for the division of the
island into from 20 to 25 districts, each served by a health unit, and
is designed to widen the scope of public-health work and reduce the
expense of such work. During the year covered by the latest report
of the governor 17 of these units were in operation, serving 29 munic-
ipalities. Since the close of the year two additional units have been
opened which serve five additional municipalities. Nurses attached
to the units made a total of 54,453 visits during the year. A feature
of the health work is cooperation with the department of education.
The Rockefeller Foundation contributed a total of $72,399.36 to
health work in Puerto Rico during the year 1931-32, and the Puerto
Rico Child Health Committee contributed a total of $40,000. " With-
out this aid," states the governor, "the department of health would
have been seriously embarrassed in its program."
Election laws.—Governor-Roosevelt called the legislature in special
session from November 25 to December 9, 1931, for the express
purpose of considering legislation to provide for fair and adequate
representation in the insular and local boards of elections during the
registrations which were scheduled to begin November 30, 1931.
An act was passed to postpone the registrations, but the legislature
adjourned at the end of the 14-day period allowed under the organic
act without having taken the remedial action requested by the
governor. In his message to the legislature at the opening of its
regular session in February of this year, Governor Beverley gave
prominence to his recommendations for certain revisions of the election
laws. A bill was passed embodying some of the governor's recom-
mendations, but the governor felt compelled to veto the bill because
of certain objectionable features which had been incorporated into it.


24 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
A third special session of the twelfth legislature was called by the
governor to convene June 21, 1932, and consider, among other things,
amendments to the election law in the interest of fair elections. In
his message to the legislature at the opening of this special session,
the governor outlined the following points deemed necessary to
secure just and impartial elections in the island: (a) Observers in
the insular and local election boards for parties by petition of 10
per cent or more of the total vote cast at the last preceding general
elections; (6) full representation for such parties on the insular and
local election boards in case the principal parties combine in any
form either by fusion or by nominating the same candidates for
Resident Commissioner to the United States, or by nominating the
same candidates for a majority of the senatorial and representative
positions; (c) permission for candidates to appear on more than one
ticket; (d) safeguarding the secrecy of the ballot; (e) eliminating the
declaration of void ballots by the poll boards.
Two laws were enacted by the legislature and approved by the
governor designed to give all important political groups fair repre-
sentation in the insular and local election boards and in polling places
and to extend for a few days the time given by law to the insular
board of elections to exclude new registrants from the election lists.
These laws correct the more obvious of the previously existing defects.
Workmen's compensation act.—Governor Beverley in his annual
report stated in regard to workmen's compensation:
The present law covers all labor of every kind, from the highest official of a
great corporation down to the lowest-paid da}^ laborer. The only exceptions
made are domestic servants, government employees doing clerical work only,
and casual laborers. For example, a small farmer employing one day laborer
must take out a policy and pay the minimum premium rate. The administra-
tion considers that a law with such a broad coverage is entirely too ambitious
for the island, considering the conditions prevalent among the working classes
and small employers, and considering the financial resources of the island and of
its people. Both in the regular session of the legislature of 1932 and in the
special session which convened June 21, 1932, the governor made urgent recom-
mendation that the industrial accident act be modified by narrowing the cover-
age, excluding all agricultural laborers not working with power machinery, and
excluding from the compulsory operation of the act all employers employing
fewer than five persons. The administration also recommended that the indus-
trial commission be divested of all administrative power and that-the admin-
istration of the law be concentrated in the hands of the treasurer of Puerto
Rico in place of being scattered as at present. These amendments were not
enacted into law.
Puerto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission.—During the fiscal
year 1932 an additional Federal appropriation of $1,000,000 (inde-
pendent offices appropriation act, 1932) was made available for the
Puerto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission for repairing and con-
structing roads in Puerto Rico. The road work carried out by the
commission under this and prior appropriations is approaching com-
pletion. The total expenditures of the commission up to June 30,
1932, in connection with hurricane relief and rehabilitation work in
Puerto Rico amounted to $9,504,322, of which $2,183,030 pertained
to the fiscal year 1931-32.
Hurricane of September 27, 1932.—As this report was being pre-
pared for submission, word was received that on September 27 Puerto
Rico again experienced the misfortune of being visited by a hurricane
of extraordinary severity. From his cabled report of a survey which
Governor Beverley made by airplane as soon as practicable after the


25 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
subsidence of the storm and from subsequent reports, it appears that
the hurricane entered the eastern end of the island and pursued a
northwesterly course, the most severely stricken area being the eastern
end and northern coast, roughly comprised in the section between
Fajardo and Arecibo on the north and Naguabo and Ciales on the
south. Considerable damage was sustained as far south as Yabucao
and Rincon.
While the devastated area was not so great as in the case of the 1928
hurricane, it appears that the destruction within the storm area is
greater. The list of known dead exceeds 200; the injured number
almost 3,000; those in need of shelter are estimated at 246,000.
Property losses are tentatively estimated at between thirty and fifty
million dollars. Estimated crop losses in the storm area are as fol-
lows: Sugarcane, 40 to 50 per cent; fruit, 100 per cent; tobacco, 50
per cent; vegetables and similar crops, 75 per cent. Coffee-crop
losses are estimated at 50"per cent. There seems to be reason for
hoping at present that most of the coffee trees escaped destruction.
Relief work was promptly underaken by the American Red Cross.
The Puerto Rico child health and child feeding committees have
renewed the very valuable activities they have been pursuing in the
interest of the children of the island.
DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP
The annual inspection of the receivership was made by Col. Creed
F. Cox, assistant to the chief of bureau, in December, 1931. The
receivership was found to be operating efficiently and the accounts
to be in generally satisfactory condition.
The customs receipts for the year 1931 amounted to $2,883,476.92,
a decline of $711,091, or 19.78 per cent, compared with 1930 and the
lowest since 1921. The decline became more pronounced as the
year progressed. The general receiver in his annual report for the
calendar year 1931 attributes the decreased revenues to diminishing
markets and falling prices for the staple export products of the
Dominican Republic, to the consequent curtailment of buying power
within the country, and to the fact that importations are confined to
the pressing needs of actual consumption. The cost of operation of
the receivership was within the limits prescribed in the convention of
1924. (Appendix G.)
Under the arrangement, inaugurated in September, 1930, at the
request of the President of the Dominican Republic and referred to
in the bureau's report of last year, the general receiver continued to
collect the internal-revenue taxes on goods passing through the
customs houses. The amount of such revenue collected during 1931
was $1,652,669.58, of wdiich amount 4 per cent was retained for
operating expenses and the remainder transmitted to the Dominican
Government.
Under the terms of the convention of 1924 between the United
States and the Dominican Republic, no part of the proceeds of the
customs collections were to be paid over by the general receiver to
the Dominican Government and thus become available for meeting
the general operating expenses of that government unless and until
there remained in the general receiver's hands a balance for the year
in question over and above the total amount required for the full
payment of certain preferred charges. The charges to be thus given


26 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
priority included, in addition to the expenses of operating the receiv-
ership, the amounts necessary to discharge the interest and sinking-
fund payments of the Dominican public debt serviced through the
general receivership. For a number of years previous to 1930 the
customs collections bad been sufficient both to meet all preferred
charges and also to permit the general receiver to turn over to the
Dominican treasury an annual balance equivalent in amount to a
very substantial part of the operating expenses of the Dominican
Government for the year in question. During the year 1930 the
effects of the world-wide depression were reflected in diminished
customs receipts, and this condition was markedly accentuated by the
disastrous hurricane which visited Santo Domingo in September of
that year. The 1930 collections were only about 72 per cent of the
total for 1929. This decrease in customs collections was coincident
with the inauguration of large amortization payments on the bonds.
The net result of this situation was that the total available for the
Dominican Government from customs collections during the year 1930
amounted to less than $849,000, as contrasted with over $3,461,000
in 1929. The decline in customs receipts continued in 1931.
Early in that year it became apparent that if the preferred charges
against customs receipts were duly met there would probably be no
balance available to be turned over by the general receiver to the
Dominican Government, which had come to rely upon such annual
payments as an important supplement to the public revenues derived
from other sources.
Interest and sinking fund charges on all loans were met in full from
the customs receipts up to and including the month of July. By
August, however, the collections had declined to a point where the
net proceeds, after deduction of the operating expenses of the general
receivership, were insufficient to meet fully the payments incident to
the service of the debt. Under these circumstances the Dominican
Government advanced the sum ($36,595.74) necessary to complete
the August payments, but this was the last month for which full
payment was made. The September and October payments were
met only to the extent made possible by the customs collections and
these continued to decline. Meantime the Dominican Government
was facing a financial crisis the difficulties of which were increased
by the aftermath of the hurricane of the previous September and
the discontinuance of the important item of revenue formerly received
from the customs collections as the balance remaining after the pay-
ment, by the general receiver, of all preferred charges. Efforts to
reconcile budgetary requirements with available income having proven
ineffectual, the Dominican Government had recourse to a measure
in the nature of an emergency law, which became effective October
26, 1931. This law provided, in effect, for the disposition of customs
revenues in the following order: First, payment of expenses of the
general receivership; second, payment of interest installments on
Dominican Government bonds; third, payment of $125,000 monthly
to the Dominican Government.
Under the emergency law the priority of the charges against the
customs collections represented by both the operating expenses of the
general receivership and interest payments on the bonds continues
undisturbed; but there are made available monthly for the general
purposes of the Dominican Government certain proceeds of the cus-
toms collections which, in accordance wuth the provisions of the con-


27 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
vention between the United States and Dominican Governments,
should instead be applied to reducing the principal of the bonded
debt.
The attitude of the United States Government with respect to the
action taken by the Dominican Government was announced in a
statement prepared and released to the press by the State Depart-
ment for publication on November 11, 1931. That statement, after
referring to the seriousness of the financial situation in which the
Dominican Government found itself, continued as follows:
Having in mind the provisions of the convention between the United States
and the Dominican Republic, and in view of the circumstances set forth above,
this Government is not disposed at this time to take any action other than to
continue to follow with attention and care the developments in the Dominican
Republic. It is the belief of the department that this policy will be the best for
all concerned, including the bondholders upon whose bonds the Dominican
Government proposes to continue to pay interest regularly.
The general receiver of Dominican customs, in his annual report
for the year 1931, states:
The administration of the customs service is not affected by the radical depar-
ture from the requirements of the convention, and remains with the receivership,
exactly as heretofore, except for the provisions of Decree No. 251, which directs
that all collections at the three principal ports—Santo Domingo, San Pedro de
Macoris, and Puerto Plata—be diverted and placed to the credit of the special
agent for the emergency appointed by the Dominican Government.
Receipts for duties collected at those ports are now given by " interventores
especiales," representing the special agent. But in all other respects the admin-
istration of the office routine continues with the receivership. In other words,
there is a minimum of change from the old order.
One practical effect of the operation of the emergency law has
been the suspension of all sinking-fund payments subsequent to the
month of October, 1931. Payment of interest on the bonds was,
however, made for the entire year 1931 and is being continued during
the year 1932. According to its provisions, the law will cease to have
effect at the end of the year 1933, or at any time during the years
1932 and 1933 when for any 6-month period the general revenues
of the Dominican Republic shall amount to $2,250,000 United States
currency.
The customs revenues so far have been more than sufficient to fulfill
the requirements of the emergency law.
CHANGES IN PERSONNEL, BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Maj. Donald M. Ashbridge, Coast Artillery Corps, assistant to chief
of bureau, was relieved from duty and left the bureau on June 17,1932.
He was succeeded by Maj. Karl F. Baldwin, Coast Artillery Corps,
who reported for duty at the bureau on June 30, 1932.
The tour of duty of Col. Creed F. Cox, Field Artillery, as senior
assistant to the chief of bureau, terminated on August 23, 1932—sub-
sequent to the close of the fiscal year 1931-32. He was succeeded by
Lieut. Col. Walter C. Short, Infantry, who has been attached to the
bureau for duty since September 20, 1930. Lieut. Col. Edward A.
Stockton, jr., Coast Artillery Corps, reported for duty on August 24,
1932, to succeed Colonel Short in duties which include special super-
vision of the purchasing, disbursing, and accounts division.
F. LeJ. Parker,
Brigadier General, United States Array, Chief of Bureau.
By W. C. S.


28
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Appendix A
LAWS OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS AND
PUERTO RICO ENACTED DURING THE FIRST SESSION OF THE
SEVENTY-SECOND CONGRESS
philippine islands and puerto rico
Public No. 53, Seventy-second Congress (S. 3514), approved March,
8, 1932: "Regulating the use of appropriations for the military and
nonmilitary activities of the War Department."
Directs that in purchases by the War Department in the United
States preference be given to domestic articles, thereby largely exclud-
ing from War Department purchases articles grown, produced, or man-
ufactured in the Philippine Islands or Puerto Rico.
Public, No. 216, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 11452), approved
June 30, 1932: "Making appropriations for the Navy Department
and the naval service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1933, and for
other purposes."
Contains restrictions similar to Public, No. 53 (above), with reference
to purchases by the Navy Department.
Public, No. 212, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 11267), approved
June 30, 1932: "Making appropriations for the legislative branch of
the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1933, and for other
purposes."
Authorizes the President at any time to disband the Philippine
Scouts or reduce the personnel thereof; and reduces the amount
authorized to be appropriated for vocational education and civilian
rehabilitation which had been allotted to Puerto Rico by previous
legislation enacted March 3, 1931.
puerto rico
Public Resolution No. 20, Seventy-second Congress (S. J. Res. 36),
approved May 17, 1932.
Changes the name of the island of "Porto Rico" to "Puerto Rico."
Public, No. 302, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 9642): "Emer-
gency relief and construction act of 1932," approved July 21, 1932:
"To relieve destitution, to broaden the lending powers of the Recon-
struction Finance Corporation, and to create employment by provid-
ing for and expediting a public-works program."
Amends the Reconstruction Finance Corporation act (Public, No. 2,.
72d Cong.) and includes Puerto Rico in its terms.
Public, No. 5, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 6660), approved.
February 2, 1932: "First deficiency act, fiscal year 1932T
Appropriates $45,000 for vocational work in Puerto Rico.
Public, No. 227, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 10022), approved
June 30, 1932, "Independent offices appropriation act, 1933."
Appropriates $75,000 for vocational work in Puerto Rico.
Public Resolution No. 12, Seventy-second Congress (S. J. Res. 110),
approved March 7, 1932: "Authorizing the distribution of Govern-
ment-owned wheat to the American National Red Cross and other
organizations for relief of distress."
Applicable to Puerto Rico.


29 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Public Resolution No. 33, Seventy.second Congress (H. J. Res. 418),
approved July 5, 1932: "Authorizing the distribution of Government-
owned wheat a,nd cotton to the American National Red Cross and
other organizations for relief of distress."
Applicable to Puerto Rico.
Public Resolution No. 43, Seventy-second Congress (II. J. Res.
461), approved July 22, 1932, makes appropriations to enable the
Federal Farm Board to carry into effect the provisions of Public
Resolution No. 33.
Public, No. 269, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 7912), approved
July 7, 1932: "Making appropriations for the Department of Agricul-
ture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1933, and for other purposes."
Makes appropriations for carrying into effect the provisions of cer-
tain acts of Congress, including those relating to agricultural experi-
ment station work, forest roads and trails, highways, etc., in Puerto
Rico.
Public, No. 304, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 12280), approved
July 22, 1932: "Federal Home Loan Bank act."
Includes Puerto Rico within its provisions.
Public, No. 305, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 12768), approved
July 22, 1932: "Making an appropriation for the Federal Home Loan
Bank Board for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1933."
Appropriates $250,000 for expenses preliminary to the organization
and establishment of the banks created by Public, No. 304 (above).
Public, No. 154, Seventy-second Congress (H. R. 10236), approved,
June 6, 1932: '/Revenue act of 1932."
Imposes excise taxes on certain articles sold in the United States
by the manufacturer or producer, or imported into the United States.
For the purposes of these taxes Puerto Rico is included in the term
"United States." In the application of the act certain products of
the Philippine Islands are exempted from its provisions.
The provisions of the revenue act of 1928 relative to taxes of foreign
countries and possessions of the United States remain unchanged.
Appendix B
LIST OF PRINCIPAL MEASURES AFFECTING THE PHILIPPINE
ISLANDS AND PUERTO RICO INTRODUCED DURING THE FIRST
SESSION OF THE SEVENTY-SECOND CONGRESS BUT WHICH
WERE NOT ENACTED
philippine islands and puerto rico
S. 3349; H. R. 5612; II. R. 6744; H. R. 8017; II. R. 9308; H. R.
10743: All requiring preference for American goods in purchases by
executive departments.
H. R. 5612. Limiting the purchases of the Post Office Department,
so far as possible, to articles the growth, production, or manufacture
of the United States, was referred to the Committee on the Post
Office and Post Roads, reported with amendment (H. Rept. No. 549),
and debated.
H. R. 10743. Requiring the purchase of domestic supplies for
public use and the use of domestic materials in public buildings and


30
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
works, was referred to the Committee on Expenditures in the Execu-
tive Departments, reported (H. Rept. No. 882), but not passed.
The only bills affecting purchases from the Philippine Islands or
Puerto Rico by the executive departments which were enacted into
law were those relating to purchases by the War and Navy Depart-
ments (Public Nos. 53 and 216) and listed in Appendix A.
S. J. Res. 35: "Authorizing the President to reorganize the ad-
ministration of the insular possessions."
Provides that whenever the President finds it is in the public interest
he is authorized by Executive Order to transfer to the jurisdiction of
such executive department as he shall designate "the whole or any
part of the functions of the Secretary of War and the Bureau of Insular
Affairs of the War Department with respect to matters pertaining to
the administration and civil government of the Philippine Islands
and Puerto Rico," for the creation of an office of insular affairs under
a director to be appointed by the President, by and with the advice
and consent of the Senate.
(Introduced December 9, 1931; referred to the Senate Committee
on Territories and Insular Affairs.)
A number of bills were introduced, both in the Senate and House,
with a view to reorganizing the executive agencies of the Government
as a measure of economy. One measure (S. J. Res. 76) was reported
by the Senate Committee on Finance on February 2, 1932 (S. Rept.
No. 157), debated in the Senate, but indefinitely postponed. Others
were referred to the House Committee on Rules or on Expenditures in
the Executive departments. All failed of passage.
S. 4262: "Merchant airship act, 1932." Providing for the estab-
lishment and development of American air-transport services over-
seas; to encourage construction in the United States by American
capital of American airships and other aircraft for use in "foreign
commerce," meaning commerce between the United States or pos-
sessions or Territories of the United States and foreign countries, or
between the United States and possessions or Territories of the
United States, or between possessions or Territories of the United
States, or between foreign countries; and the term "mails of the
United States" to include mails of the Philippine Islands.
(Introduced March 30, 1932; referred to the Committee on Com-
merce; reported with amendments (S. Rept. No. 670), on May 9,
1932.)
S. 3596; H. R. 9204: "Fiscal year 1933 military reservation act."
Authorizes the Secretary of War to sell or dispose of certain surplus
real estate of the War Department. Contemplates transferring to
the Navy Department a portion of Mariveles Reservation, P. I. and
to the people of Puerto Rico the Escambron tract.
(Introduced February 10 and 11, 1932; referred to Committees on
Military Affairs.)
S. J? Res. 80: Authorizing the Secretary of War to employ military
forces and property for emergency relief.
Includes relief from storms, floods, famine, earthquakes, or other
emergency in any State, Territory, or dependency of the United
States.
(Introduced January 15, 1932; referred to the Senate Committee on
Military Affairs; reported with amendments February 8 (S. Rept.


31 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

No. 194); recommitted to the Senate Committee on Military Affairs
February 10; committee discharged March 23; bill ordered to calen-
dar; debated, but not passed.)
H. R. 4676: "To promote travel to and in the United States and its
possessions, thereby promoting American business; and to encourage
foreign travel in the United States."
Authorizes the creation of a travel division in the Bureau of Foreign
and Domestic Commerce of the Department of Commerce.
(Introduced December 8, 1931; referred to House Committee on
Interstate and Foreign Commerce.)
H. R. 205: "To amend the act entitled 'An act to regulate the
immigration of aliens to, and the residence of aliens in, the United
States'."
Amends the act approved February 5, 1917, so as to secure full and
accurate information relative to travel by water of all aliens and
United States citizens between the United States, Hawaii, the Philip-
pine Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa,
or between such ports and foreign ports.
(Introduced December 8, 1931; referred to House Committee on
Immigration and Naturalization.)
the philippine islands
H. J. Res. 74; H. J. Res. 426: Authorizing the restoration of a
limitation, on the importation, free of duty, of Philippine sugar and
the placing of a limitation, free of duty, on Philippine coconut oil.
H. J. Res. 74 proposes to limit the amount of Philippine sugar
admitted free to 600,000 short tons in any fiscal year, and coconut
oil to 400,000,000 pounds.
H. J. Res. 426 proposes to limit the amount of Philippine sugar
admitted free to 500,000 short tons in any fiscal year.
Both bills referred to the House Committee on Ways and Means.
Other attempts to place limitations on certain Philippine products
were included in amendments proposed to the independence bills.
All failed of passage.
S. 23; S. 2743; S. 3080; S. 3377; H. R. 6; H. R. 4626; H. R. 5462;
H. R. 5509; H. R. 7233; II. R. 7610; H. R. 8758; H. J. Res. 100: All
providing for the independence of the Philippine Islands and some
including legislation affecting Filipino immigration into the United
States and trade relations.
In January and February, 1932, hearings were held before the
House Committee on Insular Affairs on H. R. 7233; on January 29
certain amendments were submitted by the Filipino Legislative
Mission, the most important being with reference to a plebiscite,
immigration, and trade relations; and in February hearings were held
before the Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs on
S. 3377.
S. 3377 was reported by the Senate Committee on Territories and
Insular Affairs on March 1 (S. Rept. 354); debated; several amend-
ments considered.
H. R. 7233 was reported with amendments by the House Committee
on Insular Affairs on March 15 (H. Rept. 806); passed House April 4;
referred to Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs.


32
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
H. R. 7233 reported by the Senate Committee on Territories and
Insular Affairs on April 26 with an amendment in the nature of a sub-
stitute, which amendment was S. 3377 as reported March 1,1932, in
S. Rept. 354. Debated in Senate; a number of amendments—some
relating to immigration of Filipinos into the United States, limitation
on certain Philippine products admitted duty free—were submitted
and discussed and several agreed to; on July 1 Senate postponed
further consideration of bill until 2 p. m., December 8, 1932.
H. R. 6391; H. R. 7922: Both affecting trade relations between the
Philippine Islands and the United States.
H. R. 6391 provides for the collection of customs duties on certain
articles coming from the Philippine Islands, now duty free, the duties
collected to be turned over to the Philippines.
H. R. 7922 amends the United States tariff act of 1930 by changing
the rates on certain articles in which the Philippines are interested.
Bills referred to House Committee on Ways and Means.
S. 2 and a number of House bills were introduced, all affecting the
immigration of Filipinos into the United States.
Provisions to restrict immigration were also embodied in certain of
the independence bills, including H. R. 7233 passed by the House and
S. 3377 under discussion at the close of the session, which, in effect,
placed Filipinos on a nonquota basis not exceeding 100 during any
calendar year.
All measures affecting Philippine immigration failed of passage.
S. 1332: To amend section 29 of the organic act of 1916 by increas-
ing the salaries of certain officials of the government appointed by the
President—the Governor General, Vice Governor, auditor, and dep-
uty auditor.
(Introduced December 10, 1931; referred to the Senate Committee
on Territories and Insular Affairs.)
H. R. 6597: "To permit the naturalization of certain Filipinos who
have served in the United States Army."
Extends the privilege of naturalization to Filipinos with service in
the United States Army, in addition to those who have served in the
United States Navy or Marine Corps or the Naval Auxiliary Service
having that privilege at present.
(Introduced December 22, 1931; referred to House Committee on
Immigration and Naturalization.)
H. J. Res. 339: To repeal that part of the United States naturaliza-
tion act of June 29, 1906, which provides for the naturalization of
Filipinos who have rendered service in the United States Navy or
Marine Corps or the Naval Auxiliary Service.
(Introduced March 18, 1932; referred to the House Committee on
Immigration and Naturalization.)
S. 3547; II. R. 8972: "Fiscal year 1933 Army real estate act."
Authorizing the Secretary of War to acquire, exchange, transfer,
and sell certain tracts of real estate, including Fort San Pedro and
Warwick Barracks, Cebu.
S. 3547 introduced February 8, 1932; reported with amendments
from Senate Committee on Military Affairs (S. Rept. 267); passed
Senate February 24; referred to House Committee on Military
Affairs,


33 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

H. R. 8972 introduced February 8, 1932; referred to House Com-
mittee on Military Affairs.
H. R. 10705: "Relating to retirement annuity for civil-service
employees who served under the government of the Philippine Islands
and of the chartered cities thereof."
Amends the United States civil service retirement act of May 29,
1930, so as to include the government of the Philippine Islands or
the government of any declared city thereof.
(Introduced March 21, 1932; referred to House Committee on the
Civil Service.)
H. R. 11862: "Authorizing the President of the United States to
grant reprieves and pardons for offenses committed in or against the
laws of any and all Territories and possessions of the United States
and places subject to the jurisdiction thereof, including the Philippine
Islands."
(Introduced May 4, 1932; referred to the House Committee on the
Judiciary.)
PUERTO RICO
H. R. 341: To provide for an elective governor of Puerto Rico.
Provides for the quadrennial election of the governor, who must be
a native of the island, not under 30 years of age, and 10 years a resi-
dent of Puerto Rico.
(Introduced December 8, 1931; referred to the House Committee
on Insular Affairs.)
S. 4691; H. R. 12100: To amend the organic act of Puerto Rico,
approved March 2, 1917, providing for equal protection to voters on
all election boards.
(Introduced in Senate May 18 and in House May 16, 1932; referred
to the two committees handling insular affairs.)
H. R. 6479: "To provide for the filling of certain vacancies in the
Senate and House of Representatives of Puerto Rico."
Authorizes special election to fill vacancies due to any cause other
than expiration of term of office; and, under certain other circum-
stances, provides for filling of vacancy through appointment by the
governor of a member of that political party to which the senator or
representative last elected to the office was accredited at the time of
such election.
(Introduced December 21, 1931; referred to the House Committee
on Insular Affairs.)
H. R. 6711: "Granting the Legislature of Puerto Rico the power to
enforce the prohibition of intoxicating liquors."
(Introduced January 4, 1932; referred to the House Committee on
the Judiciary.)
H. R. 10205: "To authorize the acquisition for military purposes
of certain lands in Puerto Rico."
Provides for the purchase of that portion of the San Juan Military
Reservation known as San Geronimo.
(Introduced March 5, 1932; referred to the House Committee on
Military Affairs.)
S. J. Res. 183; H. J. Res. 370: To amend the Puerto Rican hurri-
cane relief act by authorizing the Puerto Rican Hurricane Relief


34
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Commission to acquire in the name of the United States the title to
parcels of land and other property in Puerto Rico in satisfaction of
debts owing to the United States.
(House bill introduced April 19, 1932; referred to the House Com-
mittee on Insular Affairs; Senate bill introduced June 18, 1932;
referred to the Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs.)
H. R. 5093, II. R. 7436: Providing for the registration of aliens
and certificates of identification.
Includes aliens in Puerto Rico.
(Introduced December 9, 1931, and January 11, 1932; referred to
House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization.)
H. R. 6399: "To extend to Puerto Rico the benefits of the act
entitled ' An act to provide that the United States shall aid the States
in the construction of rural post roads, and for other purposes,'
approved July 11, 1916."
(Introduced December 19, 1931; referred to House Committee on
Roads.)
S. 136, S. 3800; H. R. 110, H. R. 5655, H. R. 10052: Providing
for cooperation with the several States in the care, education, voca-
tional guidance, physical rehabilitation of crippled children.
Puerto Rico to share in the benefits.
(Senate bills referred to the Senate Committee on Education and
Labor; House bills referred to the House Committee on Education.)
S. 572; H. R. 4739, H. R. 7525: "To provide that the United
States shall cooperate vTith the States in promoting the general health
of the rural population of the United States and the welfare and
hygiene of mothers and children."
Puerto Rico to share in the benefits.
(S. 572 introduced December 9, 1931; referred to Senate Committee
on Commerce; reported with amendments March 15 (S. RepL 428
in tvTo parts); passed over on calendar.)
(House bills referred to House Committee on Interstate and Foreign
Commerce. H. R. 7525 reported January 18, 1932 (H. Rept, 101).)
H. R. 4743: To amend "An act to provide for the promotion of
vocational rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry or otherwise
and their return to civil employment" (which act was extended to
Puerto Rico) by extending annual appropriations to June 30, 1937,
etc.
(Introduced December 8, 1931; referred to House Committee on
Education; reported with amendments March 25 (H. Rept. 898);
passed House May 18; referred to Senate Committee on Education
and Labor; reported June 13 (S. Rept. 821).)


35 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Appendix C
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
Total foreign trade

12 months ending
Dec. 31—
Consignments
From United
States
From other
countries
Total
Shipments
To United
States
To other
countries
Total
1922..
1923 i
1924 i.
1925_.
1926..
1927_.
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931..
$47,738,326
50,352, 535
60,398,603
69,297, 583
71, 575, 618
71,478,297
83,858,068
92, 592,959
78,183,029
62,139,683
$32,459,319
37,147, 212
47, 612, 292
50,435, 251
47, 723,374
44, 373,175
50,798,830
54, 567, 316
44,909,925
37,039, 036
$80,
87,
108,
119,
119,
115,
134,
147,
123,
99,
197,645
499,747
010, 895
732,834
298,992
851,472
656,898
160,275
092,954
178,719
$64, 111, 601
85,047,023
97,313,903
109,044,942
100,003, 215
116,038,250
115, 585,876
124,465,473
105,342,061
83,422,397
$31,471,697
35,705,967
38, 030,760
39,832,263
36,881,105
39,535,835
39,468,670
39,981,370
27,825,067
20, 549,677
$95, 583, 298
120,752,990
135,344, 663
148,877,205
136,884,320
155, 574,085
155, 054, 546
164, 446, 843
133,167,128
103, 972,074
1 Corrected figures under consignments.
Manila-hemp shipments
Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31—
Quantity Value Value per ton Quantity Value Value per ton
Long tons Long tons
1922-....................... 169,309 $19,540,915 $115 82, 225 $10,331,776 $126
1923__________________________ 187,433 24, 951, 575 133 81,167 12,635,311 156
1924__________________________ 174, 510 29,950,458 172 75,999 15,267, 238 201
1925.......................... 148,638 35, 521, 646 239 58,976 18, 200, 649 309
1926—....................... 151, 609 32,142,038 212 60,881 16,301,101 268
1927__________________________ 146, 474 29, 687,129 203 47,779 12, 261,975 257
1928_____________________ 172,140 26, 593, 606 154 50, 304 9, 527,045 189
1929__________________________ 186,431 28,420, 550 152 66, 830 12, 276.363 184
1930„________________________ 166, 616 18,426, 676 111 57,782 7, 638,029 133
1931......................... 130,026 8,942,907 69 27, 461 2, 511,734 91
Coconut-oil shipments
Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Value per pound
Quantity Value Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons Cents Long tons Cents
1922__________________________ 105,514 $15, 734, 486 6.66 104,960 $15. 644, 253 6. 65
1923__________________________ 87,774 14, 066, 582 7.15 83,409 13, 375, 397 7.16
1924__________________________ 109,865 18,811,031 7. 64 108,810 18, 628,406 7.64
1925—_______________________ 102,482 19,820,189 8. 63 94, 851 18,428, 482 8. 67
1926__________________________ 115,438 22, 345, 217 8. 64 113,116 21, 926,024 8. 65
1927-________________________ 142, 515 : 24, 840, 683 7.78 139,352 24, 284, 361 7. 78
1928........—_______________ 139, 996 23,489,173 7. 49 138, 608 23, 239, 521 7.49
1929__________________________ 187, 509 29,184,942 6.95 185,707 28, 900, 587 6.95
1930.......................... 145,036 19,155, 382 5.89 143,796 18,961,827 5. 89
1931__________________________ 162, 364 15, 035, 322 4.13 146, 383 13, 585, 684 4.14


36 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Copra shipments
12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per ton Quantity Value Value per ton
Long tons Long tons
1922.......................... 170,318 $14,103,073 $83 87,946 $7,247,507 $82
1923......................... 203,859 19, 246, 999 94 127,217 11,989,932 94
1924__________________________ 154,285 15,351, 882 99 105,828 10,498,165 99
1925__________________________ 144,391 15,868,703 110 114,323 12, 581, 550 110
1926.......................... 171, 272 18. 586,733 109 127,042 13,816, 396 109
1927.......................... 196,170 19,155,741 98 154,350 15,238,157 98
1928__________________________ 230,713 22,542,341 98 179,701 17,603,832 98
1929__________________________ 170,830 15,565,821 91 127, 570 11,440,898 90
1930.......................... 171, 546 13,433,438 78 138,931 10, 654,348 77
1931.......................... 171,486 9,150,404 53 118,975 6,052,329 51
Desiccated-coconut shipments
2 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1922 i......................... Pounds 2,117,273 9,588,140 17,932,108 27,608, 670 31, 587,047 33,472,877 44,895,711 49,130,664 43,943,820 37,084,972 $209,674 903,123 1, 598, 559 2,608,873 2,757, 657 2,850,060 3, 723, 586 3, 540,124 2,962,845 1, 822,129 Cents 9.90 9.42 8.92 9.45 8.73 8.51 8.29 7.20 6.74 4.91 Pounds 2,115,697 9,583,262 17,916,418 27,574,475 31, 526,986 33,370,655 44,838,722 49,094, 777 43,886.901 37,044,928 $209,521 902,576 1,597,413 2,605,611 2,751,964 2,840, 286 3,718,269 3,537,004 2,958,710 1, 819, 691 Cents 9.90 9.42 8.92. 9.45 8.73 8.51 8.29 7.20 6.74 4.91
1923 .......................
1924-_______________________
1925. .............—.........
1926.........................-
1927 .__......................
1928 ______________________
1929__________________________
1930__________________________
1931__________________________

i Not separately reported prior to Jan. 1, 1922.
Includes revision of preliminary figures.
Sugar shipments 1
Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Value per pound Value per pound
Quantity Value Quantity Value
Long tons Cents Long tons Cents
1922______________________ 351,552 $25,013,310 3.18 236,184 $19,441,013 3.67
1923__________________________ 266,847 34, 380, 570 5. 75 226,088 30,241,487 5.97
1924__________________________ 347,718 41,170,813 5.29 291,657 36,793,856 5.63
1925__________________________ 534,132 44,973,685 3.76 452,618 40,879,461 4.03.
1926__________________________ 402,955 32,003,561 3.54 334,137 28,936,777 3. 87
1927__________________—..... 542,773 50,076,777 4.12 498,496 47,670,564 4.27
1928__________________________ 553,015 46, 587,205 3.76 517, 928 44,743,288 3. 86
1929........................- 677,973 52,419,826 3.45 653, 518 51,336,983 3. 51
1930__________________________ 705,286 49,517,407 3.14 698,620 49,317,037 3.15
1931__________________________ 701,201 46,633,239 2. 97 700,611 46,619,584 2.97"
i Refined sugar, annual average 1926-1931 approximately 14,000 long tons, not included.


37 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Leaf-tobacco shipments
Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31—
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds Cents Pounds Cents
1922.—....................... 33,354,915 $2,273,117 6.81 21,746 $6,152 28.29
1923__________________________ 53, 528,374 3, 636,710 6.79 286,064 52,852 18.48
1924__________________________ 47, 803,706 4, 034,466 8.44 66,369 10,572 15. 93
1925__________________________ 36, 559,164 3,065,007 8.38 6,332 912 14. 40
1926..____________________ 31, 576,755 2, 679, 630 8.49 9, 370 3,820 40.76
1927..._______________________ 52,004, 303 3,918,749 7. 54 157,175 28,898 18. 39
1928__________________________ 44, 571,470 3,029,633 6.80 124,617 15,896 12. 76
1929__________________________ 60,800, 643 4, 392,435 7.22 104,009 12,604 12.12
1930-________________________ 45,790, 900 3,725,879 8.13 422, 525 48,695 11. 52
1931__________________________ 49,941,022 3, 501,496 7. 01 236,106 41,268 17. 48
Cigar shipments
12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per thousand Quantity Value Value per thousand
1922__________________________ Thousands 300,485 280, 755 218, 599 252, 553 247, 726 207, 578 220, 884 188, 333 178, 561 183, 874 $5, 801,110 6,169, 944 5,404,662 6, 043, 976 5,663,420 4,652, 258 4,765,140 3, 824, 649 3, 545,223 3,395, 337 $19.31 21.98 24.72 23.93 22. 86 22.41 21. 57 20.31 19. 85 18. 47 Thousands 173,317 219,898 175, 762 207,080 195,327 167, 300 179, 570 150,945 144,767 158, 520 $4,259,788 5,149,115 4,419, 782 5,025, 596 4, 569, 218 3, 768,916 3, 855, 672 3,013,355 2, 810,279 2, 885, 366 $24. 58 23. 42 25.15 24. 25 23. 39 22. 53 21. 47 19. 96 19.41 18.20
1923__________________________
1924 _____________________
1925 ________________________
1926__________________________
1927..........................
1928__________________________
1929_________________________
1930__________________________
1931__________________________

Embroidery shipments
12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1922 $3,261, 572 6,375, 645 4,698,001 4, 571, 675 5,992,389 $3,253,693 6, 365, 585 4, 686,680 4, 550,154 5, 976,464 1927_____________________ $4,003,476 4, 523, 968 6,011,532 3,591,737 2, 657,130 $3, 976,126 4,483, 513 5,962,093 3, 544,036 2,625,323
1923 1928_____________________
1924 1929_____________________
1925 1930-___________________
1926 1931.....................

All other shipments
12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1922 $9,646,041 11,021,842 14,324, 791 16,403,451 14, 713,675 $3,717,898 4,334, 768 5,411,791 6,772,527 5,721,451 1927-................... $16,389,212 19, 799,894 21,086,964 18,808,541 12,834,110 $5,968,967 8,398,840 7,985, 586 9,409,100 7, 281, 418
1923 1928 i____________________
1924 1929_____________________
1925 _ ........ 1930.....................
1926 1931____________________

i Includes revision of preliminary figures.


38
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Appendix D
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
bonded indebtedness
Under an act of Congress approved August 29, 1916, as amended
by an act approved May 31, 1922, it is provided that the entire
indebtedness of the Philippine government, exclusive of those obli-
gations known as friar-land bonds and of bonds not to exceed
$10,000,000 in amount, issued by that government and secured by
an equivalent amount of bonds issued by the Provinces and munici-
palities thereof, shall not exceed at any one time 10 per cent of the
aggregate tax valuation of its property.
It is further provided that the entire indebtedness of the city of
Manila shall not exceed 10 per cent of the aggregate tax valuation
of its property, nor that of any Province or municipality a sum in
excess of 7 per cent of the aggregate tax valuation of its property at
any one time.
The assessed value of taxable real property of the Philippine
Islands as at December 31, 1931, was $960,948,534; that of the city
of Manila as at December 31, 1931, was $138,364,690.50.
The following statements show the bonded indebtedness of the
Philippine Islands and of its Provinces and municipalities, respec-
tively, on June 30, 1932:
Insular government
Title of loan
Rate
Amount
Issued
Outstand-
ing June
30,1932
Dated
Re-
deem-
able
Due
Included in 10 per cent limitation:
Public improvements...................
Do----------------------------------
Do.....—--------------------------
Do..................................
Gold bonds of 1916----------------------
General bonds..........................
Do----------------------------------
Irrigation and permanent public works..
Metropolitan water district_____________
Do__________________________________
Do__________________________________
Cebu port works----------------------
Do..................................
Do..................................
noilo port works........................
Do.....................—......
Do__________________________________
Total.
Not included in 10 per cent limitation:
Friar-land purchase................
Collateral bonds—
Of 1922 (Manila)_______________
Of 1926 (Iloilo)_________________
Of 1926 (Pangasinan)-----------
Of 1926 (Occidental Negros)...
Of 1926 (Marinduque)__________
Of 1926 (Ilocos Norte)__________
Of 1927 (Laguna)_______________
Of 1927 (Provincial)____________
Of 1927 (Camarines Sur)......
Of 1928 (La Union)_____________
Of 1928 (Manila)______________
Total.......
Grand total.
Per cent
5
4V2
4y2
4V2
4 y2
4V2
4 y2
$2, 500,000
1,000,000
1,600,000
10,000,000
4,000,000
5,000,000
23,000,000
11,800,000
3,000,000
1, 500,000
250,000
750,000
750,000
500,000
750,000
500,000
925,000
$1,549,000
409,000
653,000
8, 547,000
2,700,000
4, 379,000
19,194,000
9,478,000
2,889,000
1,500,000
250,000
734,000
750,000
500,000
716,000
600,000
925,000
1905
1906
1909
1921
1916
1922
1922
1922
1925
1929
1931
1928
1929
1930
1928
1929
1930
1916
1916
1919
1926
1935
"l94l"
1935
1936
1939
1941
1946
1952
1952
1952
1955
195.9
1961
1968
1959
1960
1958
1959
1960
67,725,000
55, 673,000
4 y2
4 y2
4 y2
4H
4 M
4 H
4 M
4M
7,000,000
2,750,000
976, 500
428, 500
400,000
55, 500
274,000
98, 000
1,405,000
111,000
110,000
500,000
4,367,000
2, 368,000
976,500
428, 500
400,000
55, 500
274,000
98,000
1,375,000
110,000
110,000
484,000
1904
1922
1926
1926
1926
1927
1927
1927
1928
1928
1914
1936
1937
1934
1950
1956
1956
1956
1956
1956
1957
1957
1957
1958
1958
14,108,500
11,046, 500
81,833, 500
66,719, 500


39 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Provinces and municipalities

Title of loan
-City of Manila:
Sewer and waterworks-------------------
Do___________________________________
Do___________________________________
Public improvements____________________
Do...................................
do_______________________;___________
City of Cebu: Sewer and waterworks........
Bangued, Abra Province: Water supply________
Mayjayjay, Laguna Province: Public improve-
ments________________________________________
Santa Cruz, Laguna Province: Public improve-
ments_________________________________________
Province of Iloilo, and 9 municipalities (Oaba-
tuan, Dingle, Iloilo, Jaro, La Paz, Maasin,
Pavia, Pototan, and Santa Barbara): Public
improvements_________________________________
Province of Occidental Negros: Public improve-
ments_________________________________________
Province of Pangasinan: Public improvements._
Province of Marmduque: Public improvements.
Province of Ilocos Norte and 3 municipalities
(Bacarra, Laoag, and Pasuquin): Public im-
provements___________________________________
Province of Laguna: Public improvements______
Province of Ilocos Sur and municipality of Vigan:
Public improvements_________________________
Province of Tarlac: Public improvements.......
Province of Pampanga: Public improvements...
Province of Nueva Ecija: Public improvements
Province of Bulacan: Public improvements_____
Province of Camarines Sur and 4 municipalities
(Naga, Magarao, Canaman, and Camaligan):
Public improvements_________________________
Province of La Union: Public improvements...
Total.......—...........................
Rate
Per cent
4
4
4
5lA
4 X
4V2
4
5
5
5
4K
4 -H
4 H
4^2
4 H
4 H
4H
±y2
4M
4 H
4M
Amount
Issued
$1,000,000
2,000,000
1,000,000
2,750,000
500,000
500,000
125, 000
20,000
20,000
45, 000
976,500
400,000
428,500
55,500
274,000
98,000
175,000
171,000
477,000
345,000
237,000
111,000
110,000
11,818,500
Outstand-
ing June
30, 1932
$453,000
916,000
644,000
2,368,000
484,000
498,000
91,000
20,000
20,000
45,000
976, 500
400,000
428,500
55,500
274,000
98,000
170,000
165,000
467,000
339,000
232,000
110,000
110,000
9,366,500
Dated
1905
1907
1908
1920
1928
1929
1911
1919
1919
1919
1926
1926
1926
1926
1926
1927
1927
1927
1927
1927
1927
1927
1928
Re-
deem-
able
Due
1915
1917
1918
1921
1929
1929
1929
1936
1937
1935
1937
1938
1950
1958
1959
1941
1949
1949
1949
1956
1956
1956
1956
1956
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1958
SINKING AND OTHER FUNDS
Under the provisions of Act No. 3014 of the Philippine Legislature,
approved March 8, 1922, sinking funds for the retirement of bonds
issued by the Philippine government are to be invested only in secu-
rities of the government of the Philippine Islands or the Government
of the United States after the approval of this act.
Under the provisions of Act No. 3723 of the Philippine Legislature,
approved November 21, 1930, as amended by Act No. 3828, approved
October 28, 1931, funds derived from the sale of financial interest
protection bonds, issued under Act No. 2999, may be invested (a) in
bonds or other evidences of indebtedness of the government of the
Philippine Islands; (b) in bonds or other evidences of indebtedness of
the Government of the United States; (c) in bonds or other evidences
of indebtedness of a chartered city, Province, or municipality of the
Philippine Islands; (d) in securities the principal and interest whereof
are guaranteed by the Government of the United States or of the
Philippine Islands; (e) in Manila Railroad Co. southern lines bonds
Issued under Act No. 1905.


40
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Since the passage of these acts the treasurer of the Philippine
Islands has transferred the following amounts to this bureau for
investment:
Prior years Year ending June 30— Total
1931 1932
Sinking funds_____________________________ $19, 562, 741. 40 1, 486, 868. 89 $3, 805, 732. 68 198, 000. 00 $2,988, 039. 83 483, 786.14 2,035, 000. 00 $26, 356, 513. 91 2,168, 655. 08 2, 035,000. 00
Trust funds_______________________________ Financial interest protection bond fund. Total_______________________________
21, 049, 610. 29 4, 003, 732..68 5, 508, 825. 97 30, 560,168. 94
At a cost of $30,321,425.36, bonds of the face value of $30,117,000
have been purchased from the above funds. Included in these pur-
chases were $920,000 par value of Manila port works and improve-
ments 5K per cent bonds bought at a cost of $944,438.35, the entire
issue of which was canceled on September 2, 1930. All other bonds
purchased are included in the following statement of securities, either
purchased by this bureau for account of the government of the Philip-
pine Islands or deposited with this bureau by the insular treasurer, to
be held for his account in the United States pending cancellation or
other disposition.
Sinking and other fund investments
Philippine government:
Collateral bonds—
4H's, due 1950 (Manila)........................
4^'s, due 1956 (Iloilo)__________________________
4H's, due 1956 (Occidental Negros)..-----------
4H's, due 1956 (Pangasinan)____________________
4H's, due 1956 (Ilocos Norte)...................
due 1957 (Provincial)_____________________
AA's, due 1957 (Camarines Sur)________________
due 1957 (Laguna)________________________
4>6's, due 1958 (Manila)........................
General—
4H's, due 1952__________________________________
5's, due 1952_________________________________
5's, due 1955, metropolitan water district-------
4A's, due 1959, metropolitan water district-----
Land purchase—4's, due 1934_______________________
Manila R. R. Co. purchase—4's, due 1946_____________
Public improvement—
4's, due 1935....................................
4's, due 1936____________________________________
4's, due 1939....................................
53^'s, due 1941__________________________________
4H's, due 1952, irrigation and permanent public
works
4^'s, due 1958, Cebu port works. ______________
43^'s, due 1959, Cebu port works...............
ilA's, due 1958, Iloilo port works................
4^'s, due 1959, Iloilo port works._______________
Municipal:
City of Cebu 4's, due 1941______________________
City of Manila 4's, due 1935__________________
City of Manila 4's, due 1937.___________________
City of Manila 4's, due 1938____________________
City of Manila 5M's, due 1950------------------
City of Manila 4^'s, due 1959..................
Railroad:.
Manila R. R. Co. 7's, due 1937.................
Manila R. R. Co. 4's, due 1939.................
Philippine Ry. Co. 4's, due 1937................
United States Government: Fourth Liberty loan______
Total.
Prior years
$530,000
976, 500
400, 000
428, 500
464,000
63, 000
500, 000
4,109,000
645,000
617,000
2, 570, 000
1, 395, 000
936,000
650, 000
834,000
995,000
5, 360. 000
515,000
201,000
45,000
576,000
1,142, 000
522, 000
2, 750, 000
625, 000
1, 273, 000
75,000
29,197, 000
Year ending June 30—
$38, 000
274,000
21, 000
417, 000
348, 000
69, 000
100, 000
94, 000
101, 000
29,000
9,000
22, 000
614, 000
133,000
10,000
17, 000
8, 000
15,000
2,000
299, 000
62, 000
2, 682, 000
1932
$172, 000
60, 000
25,000
2,000
1,814, 000
912,000
322, 000
25,000
1,007,000
38,000
98,000
4, 000
55,000
1,448, 000
641,000
25,000
39, 000
102,000
10,000
5,000
73,000
27,000
1,000
55,000
201,000
7,161,000


41 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Under the provisions of section 2 of Act No. 3014, the following
bonds, included in the preceding list of bonds purchased, have been
canceled:
-Collateral bonds:
4/2's, due 1950 (Manila)_______________________________________________________$382, 000
4^'s, due 1957 (Provincial)______________________________________________________________30, 000
4j/2's, due 1957 (Camarines Sur)______________________________________________________1, 000
4}^s, due 1958 (Manila)__________________________________________________________________16, 000
^General bonds:
4^'s, due 1952____________________________________________________________________________________3, 806, 000
5's, due 1952______________________________________________________________________________________621, 000
5's, due 1955, metropolitan water district____________________________________111, 000
Land purchase: 4's, due 1934__________________________________________________________________2, 633, 000
Manila R. R. Co. purchase: 4's, due 1946______________________________________________1, 300, 000
Public improvement:
4's, due 1935______________________________________________________________________________________951, 000
4's, due 1936______________________________________________________________________________________591, 000
4's, due 1939______________________________________________________________________________________847, 000
5^'s, due 1941____________________________________________________________________________________1, 453, 000
4}^s, due 1952, irrigation and permanent public works______________2, 322, 000
4^'s, due 1958, Cebu port works____________________________________________________16, 000
4#s, due 1958, Iloilo port works______________________________________________________34, 000
.Municipal:
City of Cebu 4's, due 1941______________________________________________________________34, 000
City of Manila 4's, due 1935____________________________________________________________547, 000
City of Manila 4's, due 1937______________________________________________________________1, 084, 000
City of Manila 4's, due 1938____________________________________________________________356, 000
Citv of Manila 4V2's, due 1959________________________________2, 000
Total________________________________________________ 17, 137, 000
All canceled bonds have been shipped to the auditor of the Philip-
pine Islands. This leaves $21,903,000 in securities actually held in
tthis bureau for account of the Philippine government on June 30, 1932.
RAILWAY BONDS
The bonds of railroads, guaranteed as to interest by the Philippine
-government, outstanding are:
Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4 per cent bonds, due 1939______$10, 586, 000
Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4 per cent bonds, due 1959__________1, 069, 000
Manila R. R. Co. 7 per cent sinking fund bonds, due 1937 1______________1, 500, 000
Philippine Ry. Co. first-mortgage 4 per cent bonds, due 1937__________8, 549, 000
Total_________________________________________________ 21, 704, 000
During the past year bonds of the Manila Railroad Co., due in
1939, with a par value of $465,000, were purchased from moneys in
the sinking funds and were delivered to the trustee under the
mortgage.
Pursuant to instructions received from the Manila Railroad Co.,
there were canceled by the trustee during September, 1931, bonds
The par value of the bonds held in safekeeping by the trustee on
•June 30, 1932, amounted to $390,000; of these, $355,000 bonds were
due in 1939 and $35,000 bonds were due in 1959.
The.payment of the principal of this issue of bonds is also guaranteed by the Philippine government.


42
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
COINAGE
The new coin received during the year 1931, including recoinagef
consisted of 5*173,839.50 of the 5-centavo denomination and
1^56,593.55 of the 1-centavo denomination. On December 31, 1931,
the total amount in circulation and available therefor was 1^40,440,-
066.18, consisting of the following:
Pesos 1_________________________________________________P21, 882, 207. 00
50 centavos__________________________________________________________________________________________6, 271, 660. 50'
20 centavos__________________________________________________________________________________________5, 533, 105. 20=
10 centavos__________________________________________________________________________________________3, 891, 902. 80'
5 centavos____________________________________________________________________________________________1, 247, 613. 90
1 centavos______________________________________________ 1, 561, 917. 14
){ centavo (no longer coined)____________________________________________________________51, 659. 64
Total_____________________________________________ 40, 440, 066. 18-
INSULAR RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
The following is a statement of insular receipts and disbursements
of the Philippine Islands, exclusive of all items of a refundable char-
acter, expressed in United States currency, for fiscal (calendar) years
1928, 1929, 1930, and 1931:
Year ending Dec. 31—
1928 1929 1930 1931
credits Balance from prior years.................... Revenues: Customs................................ Internal_________________________—_____ Repayment of Philippine National Bank losses, Act 3174._________________ M iscellaneous- _......................... $31, 904,140. 64 $34,673, 756. 00 $39,918,081. 40 $36, 528,286.03:
11,561, 648. 74 20, 835, 745. 77 1,426,742.34 10,332,475. 03 3,868,663. 59 12,829,104. 78 21,962,415. 98 1,086, 515.15 10,513,550. 94 679,000. 00 11, 243, 783. 50 19,855, 614. 53 1,318, 560.09 11, 463,416. 82 3,610,840. 02 10, 243,860.06 20,159,670. 67 11,094,297." 52 258,383.00
Proceeds from sale of bonds............. Total revenues._______________________ Total credits..________________________ debits Expenditures: Bureaus and offices......................
47,925, 275. 47 47,070,586.85 47,492,214.96 41,756,211.24
79,829,416.11 81, 744,342.85 87,410,296.36 78,284,497.27
17,693,928. 45 4,814,456. 92 5,087,157.11 4,210,655. 38 103,080. 65 8,522,573.73 4,723,807.87 18,470,937. 99 4,916, 536. 01 5,040, 792.47 2,119,502.16 114,404. 29 9,809,466 85 1,354,621.68 19,083,146. 61 4,863,625. 25 9,747,870. 63 4,133,415. 28 131,985. 55 9,562,536. 32 3,053,200.80 306,229.89 15,866,265. 52" 5,380,944.48 4,904, 420.63 4,065,216. 51 75,749.10 13,418,439. 24 1,889,455. 67 ""722,"687." 65. 31,961,288. 47
Revenue service......................... Fixed charges______________ _________
Public works and equipment............ M iscellaneous___________________________
Aid to Provinces, cities and municipali- ties.................................... Purchase of investment and securities- Deferred credits to income of prior years. Pensions and gratuities B________________
Surplus..................................... 34,673,756. 00 39,918,081.40 36, 528,286.03
Total debits___________________________
79,829,416.11 81, 744,342.85 87,410,298. 36 78,284,497.27
Prior to 1931, included in item of bureaus and offices.
1 The Philippine peso equals 50 cents United States currency.


43 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Appendix E
PUERTO RICO
Total foreign trade
12 months ending June 30— Consignments Shipments
From United States From foreign countries Total To United States To foreign countries Total
1923_______________ $64, 419,462 80, 586, 699 79,198, 565 83,056, 553 87,049, 962 79, 701, 911 85,078, 596 73,078, 779 68,018,167 52, 826, 794 $7,525,043 8,782,925 11, 306, 036 12, 201, 711 11, 760, 788 12, 640, 418 12, 782,164 10, 844, 050 8, 419, 243 8, 454,307 $71,944, 505 89, 369, 624 90, 504, 601 95, 258, 264 98,810, 750 92, 342,329 97, 860. 760 83, 922, 829 76, 437, 410 61, 281,101 $77,007, 257 80, 754,975 84,411,792 88,106,570 99, 223,154 96, 662, 619 76, 471,829 95,097, 640 94, 876,997 83, 645, 863 $5,285, 793 7,525,565 10,407,152 10, 618, 281 8,844, 280 6,872,120 5, 251,041 4,468, 565 3, 523, 930 2,771,075 $82, 293,050 88,280, 540 94,818,944 98,724,851 108,067,434 103, 534,739 81,722,870' 99,566, 205 98,400,927 86, 416, 938
1924_______________
1925_______________
1926_______________
1927_______________
1928_______________
1929-_____________
1930_______________
1931_______________
1932_______________

Sugar shipments
Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending June 30—
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons Cents Long tons Cents
1923-________________________ 317,342 $46, 207, 276 6.50 317,134 $46,176, 202 6. 50
1924.......................... 332,180 47, 838, 687 6.43 331, 921 47, 792, 002 6. 43
1925__________________________ 510, 321 53, 261, 895 4.66 510,166 53, 240,480 4. 66
1926__________________________ 516,795 48, 223, 258 4.17 516,612 48, 201,883 4.17
1927__________________________ 513, 276 54, 756, 984 4.76 513,169 54, 743,032 4. 76
1928__________________________ 540,732 54, 579,020 4.51 540,586 54, 569, 764 4.51
1929__________________________ 421, 814 35, 224, 038 3.73 421, 792 35, 222,144 3.73
1930.......................... 643,944 53,670,038 3. 72 643, 901 53, 667,063 3.72
1931__________________________ 720, 380 54,367,401 3.37 720, 369 54, 366,133 3.37
1932__________________________ 814, 660 55,118, 211 3.02 814, 642 55,116, 975 3.02
Note—Includes refined sugar, separately shown 1929-1932, as follows:
12 months ending June 30— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
192 9__________________________ 193 0__________________________ 1931 —______________________ 1932 —______________________ Long tons 38,073 53, 741 75,033 85, 549 $3, 892,522 6,142, 744 7,427,887 7,838,650 Cents 4.56 5.10 4.42 4.09 Long tons 38,051 53,698 75,021 85, 531 $3,890,628 6,139, 769 7, 427, 068 7, 837,414 Cents 4.56 5.10 4. 42': 4.09
Coffee shipments
12 months ending June 30—
Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds 16,821,939 21.859, 215 23,782, 996 26, 332, 766 19, 356, 904 7, 837,800 1, 278, 615 433,901 1,977, 659 589, 602 $3,188, 002 4, 595,811 6,575, 635 7,071,407 5, 748,877 2,596,872 456, 831 151,550 546,438 154,903 Cents 18.96 21.03 27. 65 26.85 29. 70 33.13 35. 73 34.92 27. 63 26. 27 Pounds 70,915 318,086 261,155 624,045 178, 082 52, 221 579, 732 i 202, 849 1 1, 751,013 i 544, 737 $14,181 71,158 66, 862 170,201 52,059 13, 276 208,954 95, 250 488, 711 145, 806 Cents 20.00 22.37 25.60 27. 27 29.23 25.42 36.04 36.24 27.91 26.77'
1923
1924.
1925.
1926
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
i Includes coffee for transshipment to foreign countries amounting to 259,683 pounds, valued at $94,150:
in 1930, 1,535,284 pounds valued at $428,613 in 1931, and 543,370 pounds valued at $145,452 in 1932.


44 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Leaf-tobacco shipments
12 months ending June 30— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1923.________________________ Pounds 14,937,530 19, 944, 653 18, 002,340 20, 513, 594 26.027, 239 26,782,084 19,342,009 18,952, 270 19, 928,796 12.028, 566 $8,489,984 12, 578, 448 9,156,480 13,124, 643 19,496, 508 15,479,820 11,220, 264 10, 602, 458 12,053, 863 5, 782,151 Cents 56.85 63.07 50.86 63. 98 74.91 57.80 58.01 55. 90 60.48 48.07 Pounds 14,904,723 19,834,151 17, 766,033 20, 513, 594 25, 975,321 26, 654, 458 19, 314,160 18, 928,381 19, 918,034 11, 962, 866 $8,487,349 12, 557,349 9,123,995 13,124,643 19,489,311 15, 466,781 11, 216,640 10, 599, 552 12,052,331 5,781,037 Cents 56.94 63.31 51.36 63.98 75.03 58.03 58.07 56.00 60.51 48.32
1924__________________________
1925-________________________
1926-________________________
1927__________________________
1928__________________________
1929_________________________
1930__________________________
1931--._______________________
1932__________________________

Cigar shipments
12 months ending June 30— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per thousand Quantity Value Value per thousand
1923_______________________ Thousands 192,105 175, 289 196, 560 214, 546 160,804 144,378 158,656 145, 566 166, 986 122, 455 $6,911,510 5,460,119 7, 105, 508 7, 196, 365 4, 227, 576 3, 625, 561 3,847, 797 3, 408,721 3, 899, 556 2,403, 532 $35. 98 31. 15 36. 15 33. 54 26. 29 25. 11 24. 26 23. <.2 23. 35 19. 63 Thousands 192,069 175, 251 196, 553 214, 546 160,804 144,378 158, 656 145, 566 166,986 122,455 $6,910, 735 5,458,880 7,105,313 7,196,365 4, 227, 576 3,625, 561 3, 847, 797 3, 408,721 3,899, 556 2,403, 532 $35. 98 31. 15 36.15 33. 54 26.29 25.11 24.26 23. 42 23.35 19. 63
1924______________________
1925_______________________
1926_________________________
1927.-.-_____________________
1928__________________________
1929_________________________
1930_________________________
1931_________________________
1932,_________________________

Fruit shipments
12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1923_________________ $4, 570, 359 3,807, 567 4, 202,840 6, 009,840 5, 823, 751 $4, 565, 324 3, 791, 735 4, 187, 78S 5, 994, 464 5, 792, 433 1928 ________________ $6,824,802 2,850, 722 7,671, 617 4,884, 799 4,321,135 $6,811,908 2,843,213 7, 480, 222 4, 573, 789 4,101, 617
1924................... 1929 ............ .
1925____________________ 1930_____________________
1926.___________________ 1931..............
1927____________________ 1932_____________________

Coconut shipments
12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending June 30— Total vaiue Value of shipments to United States
1923.................... $583,931 616, 484 720, 189 625, 989 628, 196 $567, 061 605, 129 709,853 611, 977 612, 684 1928................. $713,992 264, 778 233,084 232, 388 268, 708 $697,972 249,665 218, 787 232,388 268, 708
1924____________________ 1929...........
1925.................... 1930 .................
1926--.-:............... 1931........... .......
1927____________________ 1932__________ . . ..



45 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Embroidery shipments
12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1923.................... $6, 564, 498 7, 253, 556 5, 833, 918 8, 336, 398 9, 225, 507 $6, 261,557 7,130,891 5, 705, 472 8,153, 506 9, 024, 775 1928 $9,285,790 15,151,040 13, 004, 725 13,665, 492 10, 322, 785 $8,907,801 14, 732, 260 12,522, 359 13, 202, 423 10, 261, 273
1924.................... 1929
1925____________________ 1930____________________
1926____________________ 1931____________________
1927.................... 1932____________ _______

All other shipments
12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1923-................... $5, 777, 490 6, 129, 868 7, 962,479 8, 136, 951 8,160, 035 $4, 024,848 3, 347, 231 4, 272, 029 4, 653, 531 5, 281, 284 1928 ____________ ____ $10, 428, 882 12, 707, 400 10, 824, 012 8, 837, 346 8, 045, 513 $6, 569, 556 8,151, 156 7,105, 686 6, 061, 666 5, 567, 005
1924.................... 1929 __________ ________
1925.__________________ 1930 ____ ____________
1926____________________ 1931_____________________
1927.................... 1932_____________________

Appendix F
PUERTO RICO
bonded indebtedness
Under an act of Congress approved March 4, 1927, the insular
government of Puerto Rico and the municipalities of San Juan and
Ponce are authorized to incur public indebtedness up to 10 per cent
of the aggregate tax valuation of their respective properties; other
municipalities are limited to a public indebtedness not in excess of
5 per cent of their respective taxable properties. Bonds of Puerto
Rico, which are secured by an equivalent par value of bonds of
municipal corporations or school boards of Puerto Rico, are not to be
counted within the 10 per cent limitation, but bonds issued by munici-
palities or any subdivision thereof after March 4, 1927, to the pay-
ment of which the good faith of the people of Puerto Rico is pledged,
are to be counted therein.
During the year additional bonds of the insular government of
Puerto Rico were issued with a par value of $500,000, the proceeds
from which are to be devoted to the continuance of the construction
of the works for development and use of the waters of the Toro Negro
and Matrullas Rivers, Toro Negro hydroelectric project. These
bonds were dated January 1, 1931, but were not delivered to the
purchaser until September 10, 1931.
On June 30,1932, the aggregate assessed valuation of the real and per-
sonal property in the island of Puerto Rico amounted to $324,309,117.


46
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
The following is a statement of the bonded indebtedness of the
insular government of Puerto Rico as of June 30, 1932:
Title of loan
Rate
Amount
Issued
Outstand-
ing June
30, 1932
Maturing
Included in 10 per cent limita-
tion:
Irrigation—
1909_________________-
1913___________________
1913...................
1914—................
1915...................
1916__________________-
1918___________________
1922-..._______________
1923...................
1924..
1925..
1925..
1927..
1927-
1927.........—........
1929-..................
1931....................
San Juan Harbor improve-
ment—
1917.................—
1929____________________
Public improvements—
1914____________________
191 9.................—
192 0____________________
1922..
1923..
1923-
1926..
1927..
High school (1920)....._._.....
House construction (1920).....
Workingmen's house construc-
tion (1920).
Munoz Rivera Park (1924)____
Target range and aviation field
(1925).
Funding (1930)................
Workmen's relief (1930)________
Hydroelectric system (1931)____
•Homestead (1932)..............
Total.
Contingent liability-
Ponce (1927)_____
Do...........
Villalba (1927)_______
â– Guaynabo (1928)_____
Total .
Not included in 10 per cent
limitation:
Refunding (collateral)—
1914____________________
1915--..................
Total _
P. ct.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
4 H
4K
4V£
4M
4 K
4^2
4 M
4^
Grand total.
5
5
5
*X
4 H
4M
4 M
±V2
4H
4 K
4 K
4M
4 H
4 ^
4H
4H
6
5
$3,000,000
1,000,000
700,000
400,000
400,000
200,000
200,000
250,000
975,000
600,000
125,000
750,000
525,000
475,000
500,000
750,000
150,000
100,000
320,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000, 000
1,000,000
1, 000,000
6, 000, 000
2,000,000
2,000,000
300,000
250,000
500,000
200,000
200,000
4,000,000
500,000
500,000
70,000
32,940,000
650,000
600,000
35,000
76, 500
1,361, 500
655,000
300,000
955,000
35,256, 500
$150,000
1,000,000
700,000
400,000
400,000
200,000
200,000
250,000
675,000
.600,000
125,000
750,000
525,000
475,000
500,000
750,000
150,000
30,000
320,000
988,000
600,000
1,000,000
1, 000,000
1,000,000
6,000,000
2,000,000
2,000,000
300,000
250,000
500,000
120,000
200,000
3,200,000
450,000
500,000
70,000
28,378,000
610,000
580,000
33,000
76,500
1,299,500
350,000
33,000
383,000
30,060, 500
$150,000 on Jan. 1 of each year.
Jan. 1,1943; redeemable after Jan. 1, 1933.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1,1944.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1,1951.
$100,000 aniiually beginning Jan. 1, 1955.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1,1959.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1,1958.
$150,000 Jan. 1,1961; $100,000 Jan. 1, 1962.
$75,000 on Jan. 1 of each year beginning
Jan. 1,1929; outstanding series redeem-
able Jan. 1, 1939.
$75,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1942;
redeemable Jan. 1,1939.
Jan. 1, 1963.
$75,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1950;
redeemable Jan. 1,1939.
$75,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1960;
redeemable Jan. 1,1939.
$75,000 annually Jan. 1, 1967, to Jan. 1,
1972; $25,000 Jan. .1, 1973; redeemable
Jan. 1, 1939.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1,1959.
Serially July 1, 1952, to July 1, 1970.
$90,000 July 1, 1970; $60,000 July 1, 1971.
Jan. 1,1942; redeemable after Jan. 1,1927.
Jan. 1, 1954; redeemable Jan. 1, 1939.
Jan. 1,1939; redeemable after Jan. 1,1925.
$300,000 Jan, 1, 1933-34.
$250,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1937;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1936.
$250,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1941.
$250,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1945;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1944.
$500,000 annually beginning July 1, 1944;
redeemable July 1, 1943.
$500,000 annually beginning July 1, 1966;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1956.
$500,000 annually beginning July 1, 1960;
redeemable Jan. 1,1960.
Jan. 1, 1945; redeemable Jan. 1, 1930.
Do.
$250,000 Jan. l; 1941-42; redeemable Jan.
1, 1940.
$20,000 annually on Jan. 1 of each year;
outstanding series redeemable Jan. 1,
1934.
$50,000 annually beginning July 1, 1945;
redeemable July 1,1935.
$400,000 annually beginning July 1, 1931.
$25,000 annually beginning July 1,1931.
Jan. 1, 1951; redeemable on or after Jan.
1, 1941.
Jan. 1, 1952; redeemable Jan. 1,1942.
Serially July 1, 1930, to July 1,1959.
Serially July 1, 1932, to July 1, 1961.
Serially July 1, 1931, to July 1, 1956.
Serially July 1, 1933, to July 1, 1965.
Serially July 1, 1923, to July 1, 1953.
Serially July 1,1919, to July 1,1935.


47 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

In preparing the above statement, bonds to the face value of $492,-
000, which were due and payable on July 1, 1932, have been deducted,
funds therefor having been transferred to the fiscal agents during
June, 1932.
The homestead bonds, face value $70,000, dated January 1, 1932,
were issued by the treasurer of Puerto Rico with the approval of the
governor, under provisions contained in Act No. 4 of the Legislature
of Puerto Rico, approved December 14, 1931, and sold locally in the
island at par.
Bonds issued through Bureau of Insular Affairs during vear ending
June 30, 1932:
Title of loan Authority for issue Rate Amount Prioe re- ceived Dated Due
Hydroelectric sys- tem. P. R. Act No. 7, Apr. 6, 1931; 4 Mi $500,000 101.183 Jan. 1,1931 Jan. 1,1951; redeemable on or after Jan. 1, 1941.
MUNICIPAL BONDED INDEBTEDNESS
At the close of the fiscal year 1931-32 the outstanding municipal
bonded indebtedness, distributed among 69 municipalities of Puerto
Rico, was $16,892,500, against the payment of which there had been
accumulated in their respective sinking funds the sum of $2,366,324.51.
The capital of Puerto Rico, which was created under Act No. 99
of the Legislature of Puerto Rico, approved May 15, 1931, and which
consists of the same territorial limits as the former municipality of
San Juan, issued bonds during the year in the amount of $376,000.
The bonds are dated October 1, 1931, are in coupon form only in the
denomination of $1,000 each, bear interest beginning January 1, 1932,
at the rate of 41%e per cent per annum, payable semiannually on the
1st day of January and July of each year, at the office of the treas-
urer of Puerto Rico, San Juan. The bonds mature in 20 series of
varying amounts on July 1, 1932, to January 1, 1942, inclusive.
These bonds do not carry the good-faith pledge of the insular govern-
ment of Puerto Rico and were disposed of locally without the inter-
vention or assistance of the Bureau of Insular Affairs. Municipal
bonds aggregating $781,100 were redeemed duriflg the year, thus
reducing the municipal bonded indebtedness of the island by the sum
of $405,100.


48 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
Comparative statement of receipts and disbursements of Puerto Rico, fiscal years
1930, 1931, and 1932
Fiscal year ending June 30—
1930 1931 1932
Balance from prior years................................ $816, 555.38 $401,877. 91 $553,026. 85
Revenues: Customs......................... .. ..... 1,520,000.00 7,324,315. 59 366,579.13 403,351. 92 1,110,000.00 9, 070,829. 79 421,404.87 451, 962. 90 2, 250,000. 00 9,813,914. 43 248,139. 23 350,306.10
Internal............................................
United States internal revenues..................... Miscellaneous....................................
Total revenues.................................... 9,614, 246. 64 11, 054,197. 56 12, 662,359. 76
Other receipts: Repayment of loans................................. Repayment, bureau of supplies...................... Other repayments. __________________________ . ._ Transfers from trust funds___________________________ i 34, 500. 00 2, 020,181. 69 163,479. 99 451,382.34 1, 000,000. 00 i 33,000. 00 1,748,695. 21 151, 206. 42 118,818. 61 23,000. 00 1,860,166. 92 151, 585. 77 446,536. 57
Bond issue................ 3,405,381. 54
Miscellaneous____________________________ 91,039.35
Total other receipts________________________________
3, 669, 544.02 5,457,101.78 2, 572,328. 61
Total______________________________________________ 14,100,346.04 16,913,177. 25 15, 787, 715. 22
Expenditures: Legislative............................... 171, 607. 55 51,873.17 2,032,061.07 206,472. 59 1,909, 579.60 304,070.60
Executive- Governor.....................
Secretary
Governor and secretary............ 118,971.78 500,881.15 1,070,987.18 478,493. 70 159,292.04 214, OIL 84 256,855. 70 4,117,110. 77 128,843.36 .....521,849.30 152,622.49 1,511,303. 93 166,360.48 976,025. 80 48,974. 87" 17,473.43 2,097, 581.17 707,706. 52 767,933.67
Attorney general_______________________________ Treasurer_________________________ ... . 463,443. 23 619,372. 60 791, 693. 72 144,697. 90 205, 213. 89 411, 552. 66 3,901, 720.92 110,443. 73 453,386. 98 450,694. 48 624,741.02 490,121.87 77,679.96 214,380. 63 257,032.61 4, 045,517. 09 111, 930. 06 502,362. 70
Interior- Roads and bridges........................... Public buildings____________________________ Insular telegraph___________________________ Other expenses___________________________ Education- Public schools.............................. Other expenses______________________________ Agriculture and labor... ....................... Agriculture and commerce___
Labor. ............
Health..________________________________________ 1, 371, 612. 32 132,650. 63 885,340. 24 40,640. 23 16,121. 72 0) 712, 740. 31 716,124.42 1,271,750. 54 167,909. 22 919,145. 09 42,401. 95 15,773. 00 (2) 3,653, 710.84 743,993.80
Auditor________________________________________
Insular police____________________________________ Public-service commission_______ _______________ Civil-service commission______ ________________ Bureau of supplies, printing, and transportation. 0 ther expenses.................................. Judicial..................................................
Total expenses....................................
13,232, 297. 29 15,705,197.05 14,317,349. 78
Other payments: Transfers to trust funds............................. Municipal and school-board bonds__________________ Total other payments............................. Cash balance_________________________________________
431,670. 84 34, 500. 00 621,953.35 33,000.00 572,943.38 23,000. 00
466,170. 84 401,877. 91 654,953.35 553,026.85 595,943.38 874,422. 06
Total ..... ..................................
14,100,346. 04 16,913,177. 25 15,787,715. 22:

1 Includes earthquake-mortgage loans to municipalities and school boards.
2 Included in expenditures of secretary for 1930 and governor for 1931.


49 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

REVENUE AND OTHER RECEIPTS
[Data taken from Annual Report of the Auditor of Puerto Rico, 1931-32]
The following tabulation shows the revenue and other receipts for
the year classified according to the sources from which they were
derived:
Customs__________________________________________________ $2, 250, 000. 00
United States internal revenue______________________________ 248, 139. 23
Property taxes, insular proportion___________________________ 354, 935. 50
Property taxes, proportion of the university tax______________________________6, 555. 41
Excise taxes______________________________________________ 7, 958, 191. 37
Inheritance taxes_________________________________________ 86, 901. 81
Telephone and telegraph receipts____________________________ 120, 565. 09
Court fees and fines_______________________________________ 21, 939. 20
Harbor and dock fees______________________________________ 44, 501. 38
Interest__________________________________________________ 82, 104. 52
Income tax___-___________________________________________ 1, 407, 330. 34
Miscellaneous_____________________________________________ 81, 195. 91
Total______________________________________________ 12, 662, 359. 76
Cash on hand July 1, 1931_________________________________ 553, 026. 85
Total______________________________________________ 13, 215, 386. 61
STATEMENT OF INSULAR REVENUE RECEIPTS FOR CERTAIN YEARS
[Data taken from Annual Reporte of Treasurer of Puerto Rico]
For purposes of comparison, there are set forth below, the amounts
of insular revenue received for the first full year of American occu-
pancy, 1900-1901, and for each of the last 10 years:
Fiscal year: Receipts
1900-1901____________$2, 357, 232. 36
1922-23 -______________8,071,202.78
1923-2 4________________9, 198, 385. 83
1924-25--- -________8,532,741. 27
1925-2 6________________11,773,953. 87
1926-2 7________________11, 358, 824. 50
Fiscal year—Contd. Receipts
1927-2 8________$12, 446, 219. 13
1928-2 9________________11, 004, 138. 52
1929-3 0________________9, 614, 246. 64
1930-3 1________________11,054, 197. 56
1931-3 2________________12, 662, 359. 76
It will be noted that the receipts for past fiscal year showed a marked
increase over the previous fiscal year which had been small owing to
the disastrous effects of the hurricane of September 13, 1928.
THE BUDGET
The following sums for the current expenses of the government of
Puerto Rico were appropriated in the annual appropriation acts for
each of the last 14 years:
1919-2 0______________________________$7, 174, 000
1920-2 1______________________________8,247,000
1921-2 2______________________________9,971,000
1922-2 3______________________________9,053,000
1923-2 4______________________________11,841,000
1924-2 5______________________________11,735,000
1925-2 6______________________________10,417,000
1926-2 7________________________________$10,450,000
1927-2 8______________________________10, 440, 000
1928-2 9______________________________10, 968, 000
1929-3 0______________________________10, 499, 000
1930-3 1______________________________10, 174, 154
1931-3 2______________________________11, 285, 245
1932-3 3______________________________10, 287, 835
Note.-—Figures for 1919-20 to 1929-30 were obtained from governor's report
for 1928-29, page 35. Figures for 1930-31, 1931-32, and 1932-33 were obtained
from Laws of Puerto Rico, 1930, page 554; 1931, page 880; 1932, page 514.


50
REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY
[Data taken from Annual Reports of Treasurer of Puerto Rico]
The following statement shows the total assessed valuation of real
and personal property in Puerto Rico, for taxable purposes, for the
years stated:
1901-02____________________________$96,428,306
1925-2 6____________________________321,833,473
1926-2 7______________ 338, 089, 889
1927-2 8____________________________341,370,654
1928-2 9______________$344, 865, 104
1929-3 0____________________________330, 274, 020
1930-3 1____________________________331,205,535
1931-3 2____________________________324, 309, 117
Schedules of assets and liabilities as of June 30, 1932
[Data taken from Exhibit 2, Annual Report of Auditor of Puerto Rico, 1931-32]
Current year
(1931-32)
Previous year
(1930-31)
Difference
assets
Land and equipment................
Cash................................
Sinking funds.......................
Trust fund reserves------------------
Notes receivable_____________________
Accounts receivable.................
Loans to municipalities.............
O ther deferred assets.............
Deferred debits......................
University of Puerto Rico.__________
Total.........................
liabilities
Notes payable----------------------
Accounts payable-------------------
Trust fund liabilities...............
Deferred liabilities-------------------
Deferred credits.....................
Bonded indebtedness---------------
Surplus, Isabela irrigation service...
Surplus, hydroelectric projects......
Trustees, University of Puerto Rico
Surplus, Quayama irrigation service
The people of Puerto Rico..........
Total.........................
$50, 975, 798. 35
9, 589, 506. 81
1,370, 527.80
1,135,899.52
2,498.00
8,835,205. 27
5,375.00
152,123.17
130, 796. 74
2,145, 749. 62
$49, 691,
10,495,
1,458,
2,041,
1,
7, 396,
139,
146,
1,669,
062. 59
263. 62
677.14
286.80
576. 88
143.50
600. 00
124.42
481.46
132.54
284,735.76
905,756.81
i 88,049.34
905,387. 28
921.12
439,061. 77
4,775. Off
12,998. 75
i 15,684. 72
476,617. 08
74,343,480. 28
73,039,248.95
1, 304, 231.33
379,
4,193,
11,662,
1,804,
28,761,
(580,
1,930,
2,145,
2,816,
21,229,
494. 54
348. 38
172. 27
796.86
301. 02
000. 00
262. 68)
629.92
749. 62
776.20
474.15
730,
3,733,
12,127,
1,
1,832,
29,097,
(368,
1,768,
1,669,
2,617,
19,829,
494.54
851.94
188. 01
593. 75
073.08
000.00
484 45)
924.39
132.54
657.27
817.88
1351,
459,
1 465,
t
127,
l
1211,
161,
476,
199,
1,399,
000.00-
496.44
015. 74
796.89-
772.06
000.00
778.23
705.6$
617.00
118.9$
656.27
74,343,480.28
78,039,248.96
1,304,231.3$
i Decrease in fiscal year, 1931-32.


51 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS
Appendix G
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
dominican customs receivership
The following table shows the financial transactions of the receiver-
ship during the fiscal (calendar) year ended December 31, 1931:
Statement of the customs service, Dominican Republic, year ended December
31t 19S1
receipts
Balance from December 31, 1930_____________________________ $171, 425. 14
Gross collections___________________________________________ 2, 883, 476. 92
Miscellaneous receipts______________________________________ 21, 562. 91
Provisional receipts, pending cancellation as of Dec. 31, 1931---- 58, 858. 00
Total j.______________________________________________ 3, 135, 322. 97
expenditures
Customs expense______________________________________________________________________________________131, 961. 53
Sinking fund payments_____________________________________ 1, 386, 578. 95
Interest on bonds____________________________________________________________________________________914, 361. 55
Paid to the Dominican Government, accrued revenue from Janu-
ary to July, 1931___________________________________________105, 000. 00
Paid for account of the Dominican Government, as per special
authority______________________________________________________________________________________________9, 637. 91
Taken by special emergency agent of the Dominican Government
from Oct. 26 to Dec. 31, 1931__________________________________________________________440, 430. 34
Exchange on funds transmitted------------------------------------------------------------8, 788. 55
Accrued liability fund disbursements--------------------------------------------------607. 50
5 per cent building fund disbursements----------------------------------------------3, 267. 73
Refunds of duties collected____________________________________________________________________2, 018. 62
Personal fees refunded----------------------------------------------------------------------------9, 635. 75
Provisional receipts, pending cancellation on Dec. 31, 1930, and
canceled during 1931____________________________________________________________________________64, 675. 00
Balances on hand Dec. 31, 1931:
5 per cent building fund. -------------------------------------------------------------1, 260. 70
$6,700,000 loan, 1922, interest account________________________________________22, 150. 51
Accrued liability fund____________________________________________________________________6, 392. 50
In transit from deputy receivers--------------------------------------------------28, 555. 83
Total_______________________________________________ 3, 135, 322. 97
O








Full Text

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ANNUA L REPORT S WA R DEPARTMEN T ANNUA L REPOR T O F TH E CHIE F O F TH E BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S 193 2 H B 325. 3 849,85 0

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ANNUA L REPORTS , WA R DEPARTMEN T FISCA L YEA R ENDE D JUN E 30 . 193 2 ANNUA L REPOR T O F TH E CHIE F O F TH E BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S 193 2 UNITE D STATE S GOVERNMEN T PRINTIN G OFFIC E WASHINGTON : 193 2

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CONTENT S Pag e Period s t o whic h th e severa l section s o f th e repor t respectivel y pertai n 1 TH E PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S 1 Visi t o f th e Secretar y o f Wa r 1 Visi t o f th e Chie f o f Burea u o f Insula r Affair s 1 Change s i n officia l personne l 2 Polic y o f th e Governo r Genera l 2 Congressiona l consideratio n o f Philippin e question s 3 Th e Philippin e Legislatur e 4 Philippin e missio n t o th e Unite d State s 5 Genera l condition s i n th e islands 5 Publi c finances fr Bonde d indebtednes s 8 Externa l trad e 8 Educatio n 9 Healt h 10 ; Government-owne d companie s 1 1 Provincia l an d municipa l government s 1 1 Justic e 1 2 Publi c work s an d communication s 1 2 Agricultur e an d natura l resource s 1 2 Filipin o emigratio n t o th e Unite d State s an d Hawai i 1 3 Election s 1 3 PUERT O RIC O 1 3 Change s i n officia l personne l 1 3 Polic y o f th e governo r 1 4 Congressiona l consideratio n o f Puert o Rica n affair s 1 4 Th e Puert o Rica n Legislatur e 1 4 Genera l condition s 1 5 Genera l financial condition s 15 M unicipalitie s 1 8 Externa l trad e 1 9 Publi c work s 2 0 Agricultur e 2 0 Educatio n 2 1 Healt h 22 Electio n law s 2 3 Workmen' s compensatio n act._ _ 2 4 Puert o Rica n Hurrican e Relie f Commissio n 24 Hurrican e o f Septembe r 27 , 1932 . 24 DOMINICA N CUSTOM S RECEIVERSHI P 2 5 Change s i n personnel , Burea u o f Insula r Affair s 2 7 APPENDIXES : A—Law s o f specia l interes t t o th e Philippin e Island s an d Puert o Ric o enacte d durin g th e first sessio n o f th e Seventy-secon d Congress . 2 8 B—Lis t o f principa l measure s affectin g th e Philippin e Island s an d Puert o Ric o introduce d durin g th e first sessio n o f th e Seventy secon d Congres s bu t whic h wer e no t enacte d 2 9 C—Philippin e externa l trad e table s 3 5 D—Philippin e financial statement s 3 8 E—Puert o Rica n externa l trad e table s 43 ; F—Puert o Rica n financial statement s 45 G—Financia l transactions , Dominica n custom s receivershi p 5 1 H I

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ANNUA L REPOR T O F TH E CHIEF , BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S WA R DEPARTMENT , BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIRS , October 5, 1932. Th e SECRETAR Y O F WAR . SIR : I hav e th e hono r t o submi t th e followin g repor t o f th e Burea u o f Insula r Affair s fo r th e fiscal yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1932 . Periods to which the several sections oj the report respectively pertain.— I n th e Philippin e Island s th e fiscal yea r i s identica l wit h th e calenda r year . Th e Philippin e sectio n o f thi s report , bein g base d largel y upo n th e lates t annua l repor t o f th e Governo r Genera l an d th e sta tistica l dat a pertainin g thereto , reflects , therefore , i n general , th e operation s o f th e Philippin e governmen t fo r th e calenda r an d fiscal yea r endin g Decembe r 31 , 1931 . I n certai n cases , howeve r (specifi call y indicate d i n th e text) , th e bureau' s repor t regardin g Philippin e affair s als o include s dat a pertainin g t o th e perio d Januar y 1 t o Jun e 30 , 1932 . I n Puert o Ric o th e fiscal yea r correspond s t o tha t o f th e Unite d State s Governmen t (Jul y 1-Jun e 30) , an d th e perio d covered , i n general , b y thi s repor t i s fro m Jul y 1 , 1931 , t o Jun e 30 , 1932 . Th e account s an d statistic s pertainin g t o th e Dominica n Custom s Receivershi p ar e base d upo n th e calenda r year , an d th e perio d t o whic h th e presen t repor t speciall y pertain s i s Januar y 1 t o Decembe r 31 , 1931 . TH E PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S Visit oj the Secretary oj War. —An even t o f primar y interes t an d importanc e t o th e peopl e o f th e Philippin e Island s wa s th e visi t pai d th e island s b y th e Hon . Patric k J . Hurley , Secretar y o f War , wh o arrive d i n Manil a Septembe r 1 , 1931 , an d embarke d fo r th e retur n voyag e t o th e Unite d State s o n Septembe r 26 . Thi s wa s th e first visi t o f a Secretar y o f Wa r t o th e island s sinc e 1910 , whe n th e Hon. . J . M . Dickinso n spen t abou t si x week s i n th e Philippines . Visit oj the Chiej oj Bureau oj Insular Affairs .—With a vie w t o gainin g a mor e intimat e knowledg e o f curren t loca l conditions , t o havin g th e benefi t o f renewe d persona l contac t wit h th e peopl e o f th e Philippin e Islands , an d t o promotin g effectiv e cooperatio n betwee n th e burea u an d th e insula r government , th e Chie f o f th e Burea u o f Insula r Affair s als o visite d th e Philippin e Island s i n 1931 . Leavin g Washingto n o n Ma y 20 , h e arrive d i n Manil a o n Jun e 18 , remainin g i n th e island s throughou t th e perio d o f th e visi t o f th e Secretar y o f l

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2 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S War , wit h who m th e chie f o f burea u returne d t o th e Unite d States , arrivin g i n Washingto n o n Octobe r 26 . Advantag e wa s take n o f th e sta y o f ove r 1 4 week s i n th e archipelag o t o trave l extensivel y i n mos t o f th e large r island s an d th e severa l province s thereo f an d t o confe r wit h official s an d other s o f th e localitie s visited . Governo r Genera l Davis , official s o f al l branche s o f th e insula r government—executive , legislative , an d judicial—an d o f th e variou s province s an d citie s visited , extende d ever y courtes y an d facilit y and , togethe r wit h citizen s engage d i n man y line s o f nongovernmenta l activities , gener ousl y contribute d o f thei r tim e an d experienc e i n th e effor t t o promot e th e purpos e fo r whic h th e tri p wa s undertaken . Changes in official personnel. —The followin g change s amon g thos e official s o f th e Governmen t o f th e Philippin e Island s wh o ar e appointe d b y th e Presiden t occurre d durin g th e yea r 193 1 o r shortl y thereafter : Governo r Genera l Dwigh t F . Davi s lef t th e Philippin e Island s o n leav e o f absenc e o n Novembe r 21,1931 , an d afte r arrivin g i n th e Unite d State s fel t compelled , du e t o th e continue d seriou s illnes s o f a mem be r o f hi s immediat e family , t o submi t hi s resignation , whic h th e Presiden t accepte d effectiv e Januar y 9 , 1932 . T o succee d hi m th e Presiden t appointe d Hon . Theodor e Roosevelt , wh o ha d bee n Gover no r o f Puert o Ric o sinc e Octobe r 7 , 1929 . Governo r Genera l Roose vel t arrive d i n Manil a o n Februar y 29 , 1932 , an d assume d offic e th e sam e day . Th e Vic e Governor , Hon . Georg e C . Butte , wa s Actin g Governo r Genera l durin g th e interi m betwee n th e departur e o f Governo r Genera l Davi s an d th e arriva l o f Governo r Genera l Roosevelt . Fiv e appointment s a s associat e justice s o f th e suprem e cour t wer e mad e durin g th e firs t hal f o f th e yea r 1932 . Tw o o f thes e appoint ments—thos e o f Hon . Jos e Aba d Santos , secretar y o f justic e o f th e Philippin e Islands , an d o f Maj . Gen . Joh n A . Hull , Unite d State s Arm y (retired) , lega l advise r o n th e staf f o f th e Governo r General — wer e t o fil l origina l vacancie s create d b y Ac t No . 3816 , mentione d late r i n thi s repor t unde r th e headin g "Justice. 7 7 Thre e vacancie s i n th e suprem e cour t wer e create d durin g th e earl y par t o f 193 2 b y th e deat h o f Associat e Justic e Charle s A . John s an d th e resignatio n an d retire men t o f Associat e Justice s E . Finle y Johnso n an d Norbert o Romualdez . T o fil l thes e vacancie s th e Presiden t appointe d Judg e Jame s C . Vicker s an d Judg e Carlo s Imperial , bot h o f th e cour t o f firs t instance , an d Hon . Georg e C . Butte , wh o resigne d a s Vic e Governo r i n orde r t o accep t th e appointment . Justice s Vicker s an d Hul l too k th e oat h o f offic e o n Jun e 1 , 1932 ; Justic e Santo s o n Jun e 10 ; Justic e Imperia l o n Jun e 22 ; an d Justic e Butt e o n Jul y 1 . Th e President , o n Augus t 13 , 1932 , conferre d a n a d interi m appoint men t a s Vic e Governo r o f th e Philippin e Island s o n Hon . Joh n H . Hollidav , o f Missouri . Vic e Governo r Holliday , wh o ha d bee n serv in g fo r som e month s a s on e o f th e lega l adviser s o n th e staf f o f th e Governo r General , entere d upo n th e dutie s o f hi s ne w offic e o n Au gus t 20 , 1932 . Policy oj the Governor General. —Governor Genera l Davi s continue d durin g th e las t yea r o f hi s administratio n hi s previou s emphasi s upo n economi c development , econom y an d honest y i n publi c administra tion , an d cooperatio n betwee n th e variou s agencie s o f government . Th e genera l policie s whic h h e earnestl y endeavore d t o promot e throughou t th e tw o an d one-hal f year s o f hi s ter m o f offic e ar e wel l

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3 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S indicate d i n th e followin g quotation s fro m hi s final repor t coverin g th e yea r 1931 : I n government , an d particularl y i n a governmen t suc h a s exist s i n th e islands , constructiv e cooperatio n withi n th e executiv e branc h an d betwee n th e executiv e an d th e legislatur e i s o f th e utmos t importance . I n administration , efficien t econom y wa s strongl y stressed . Th e ai m wa s t o giv e th e peopl e a pes o o f servic e fo r ever y pes o o f taxe s pai d b y them . Muc h progres s wa s mad e an d th e foundation s lai d fo r greate r progres s i n th e future . I hav e s o ofte n inveighe d agains t graf t tha t I wil l no t ad d anythin g here . Suffic e i t t o sa y tha t th e campaig n agains t graftin g brough t abou t th e eliminatio n o f a larg e numbe r o f dishones t publi c servant s o f hig h an d lo w position . Graf t ha s certainl y no t bee n entirel y eliminate d fro m th e government , bu t i t ha s bee n greatl y reduce d an d i s n o longe r a conventiona l offense . A s a resul t o f constan t reiteratio n th e peopl e hav e begu n t o lear n tha t th e grafte r steal s school s fro m thei r children , hospital s fro m thei r sick , an d necessitie s an d improvement s fro m the m all . * * * Economi c developmen t i s th e foundatio n upo n whic h th e economi c an d politica l futur e o f th e island s wil l depend . Economic s rathe r tha n politic s wa s therefor e constantl y an d continuall y emphasized , particularl y a s th e peopl e ar e b y natur e fa r mor e incline d t o politica l tha n t o economi c line s o f thought . I t wa s repeatedl y brough t ou t tha t th e existin g governmenta l revenue s wer e inadequat e an d stationary ; tha t th e essen tia l need s wer e constant ^ increasing ; tha t a scientifi c syste m o f taxatio n bearin g fairl y o n al l th e peopl e di d no t exist ; an d tha t th e onl y sure , sound , an d soli d advanc e towar d permanen t financial stabilit y woul d b e t o increas e th e taxabl e wealt h o f th e country . Closel y relate d t o economi c development , an d a n essentia l facto r i n socia l stabilit y a s well , i s th e importan t proble m o f lan d titles , vali d agains t th e machina tion s o f unscrupulou s lan d seeker s an d fre e fro m th e rapacit y o f usurers , whic h woul d promot e socia l stability , prosperity , an d goo d order . * * * Th e set tlemen t o f th e publi c domai n wa s expedited . Th e importanc e o f th e proble m wa s constantl y emphasize d b y th e administration . A n independen t middl e clas s i s th e greates t safeguar d o f a country ; a n oppresse d peasantr y i s th e greates t danger . Diversificatio n o f commoditie s produced ; developmen t o f tropica l crop s neede d b y th e world , togethe r wit h th e limitatio n o f crop s o f whic h ther e i s alread y worl d overproduction ; th e encouragemen t o f so-calle d "cottag e industries " fo r part tim e labor ; developmen t o f ou r minera l resources ; raisin g locall y certai n com moditie s suc h a s foodstuffs ; thes e an d man y othe r thing s wer e constantl y urged . Th e prohibitio n o f cattl e importatio n greatl y stimulate d th e livestoc k industry . I n m y opinion , measure s shoul d b e adopte d a s soo n a s possibl e t o brin g abou t th e progressiv e developmen t o f a firm economi c base , no t dependen t upo n outsid e aid , upo n whic h th e island s coul d develo p thei r ow n economi c future . If , then , thei r futur e politica l statu s wa s t o b e independence , the y woul d hav e a n inde penden t economi c foundatio n upo n whic h t o build . I f i t wa s t o b e som e for m o f partnershi p freel y entere d int o betwee n th e island s an d th e Unite d States—the y woul d b e partner s o n a n equa l an d independen t basis . Followin g th e election s i n Jun e th e ne w legislatur e me t fo r it s openin g sessio n o n Jul y 16 . I n m y messag e delivere d o n tha t occasio n I particularl y stresse d th e nee d fo r economi c developmen t t o provid e source s o f ne w revenue , pointin g ou t tha t th e expenditure s wer e constantl y increasin g ye t ne w source s o f taxatio n wer e no t becomin g available . Th e nee d o f furthe r diversificatio n o f crops , legis latio n t o increas e cro p yields , t o encourag e cattl e raisin g an d mining , wa s particu larl y stressed . Mentio n wil l b e found , unde r appropriat e heading s elsewher e i n thi s report , o f phase s o f executiv e polic y applicabl e t o th e respectiv e specia l subject s ther e discussed . Congressional consideration of Philippine questions. —Appendix A t o thi s repor t list s certai n act s o f Congress , enacte d durin g th e perio d t o whic h thi s repor t pertains , th e provision s o f whic h exten d t o th e Philippin e Islands . I n Appendi x B t o th e repor t wil l b e found a lis t o f principa l measure s affectin g th e Philippin e Island s introduce d

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4 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S durin g th e first sessio n o f th e Seventy-secon d Congres s bu t whic h wer e no t enacted . Earl y i n th e first sessio n o f th e Seventy-secon d Congres s a numbe r o f bill s providin g fo r th e independenc e o f th e Philippin e Islands , o r directe d t o tha t end , wer e introduce d i n on e o r bot h House s o f Congress . A lis t o f thes e measure s wil l b e foun d i n Appendi x B . I n Januar y an d February , 1932 , hearing s wer e hel d befor e th e Hous e Committe e o n Insula r Affair s o n on e o f thes e bills—H . R . 7233 — know n a s th e Har e bill ; an d i n February , 1932 , hearing s wer e hel d befor e th e Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affair s o n anothe r o f th e bills—S . 3377—know n a s th e Hawes-Cuttin g bill . Th e Har e bil l passe d th e Hous e b y a vot e o f 30 6 t o 4 7 o n Apri l 4 , 1932 , an d o n Apri l 2 6 i t wa s introduce d i n th e Senat e wit h amend ment s directe d t o makin g i t substantiall y identica l wit h th e Hawes Cuttin g bil l a s the n pendin g befor e th e Senate . Th e Har e bill , a s thu s introduce d i n th e Senate , wa s discusse d an d furthe r amende d b y tha t bod y durin g th e latte r par t o f June . Prior , however , t o th e completio n o f th e discussion , th e Senate , b y resolutio n adopte d o n Jul y 1 , postpone d furthe r consideratio n o f th e bil l unti l afte r th e openin g o f th e secon d sessio n o f th e Seventy-secon d Congres s i n Decembe r next . The Philipjnne Legislature .—The first sessio n o f th e Nint h Philip pin e Legislatur e convene d o n Jul y 16 , 1931 , an d adjourne d Novembe r 9 , 1931 . Report s o f th e variou s Governor s Genera l fo r previou s year s hav e commente d unfavorabl y upo n th e commo n practic e o f th e legislatur e o f leavin g th e grea t bul k o f legislatio n t o b e acte d upo n hurriedl y durin g th e las t fe w day s o f th e session . I n hi s annua l repor t fo r 193 1 th e Governo r Genera l note s a marke d improvemen t i n thi s respec t "du e largel y t o th e abilit y an d initiativ e o f th e presidin g officer s o f th e tw o houses. " On e hundre d an d twenty-fou r bill s wer e passed , o f whic h th e Governo r Genera l vetoe d 28 , o r somewha t ove r 2 2 pe r cent , a s compare d wit h abou t 3 0 pe r cen t vetoe d a t th e las t previou s session . Amon g th e mor e importan t measure s enacte d an d approve d wer e acts : Authorizin g th e secretar y o f commerc e an d communication s t o commenc e negotiation s fo r coordinatin g th e system s o f electrica l communication s throughou t th e island s an d t o repor t a pla n t o th e nex t sessio n o f th e legislature ; t o promot e credi t facilitie s fo r smal l farmer s (thre e acts) ; clarifyin g th e provision s o f th e tarif f la w directe d t o th e protectio n o f America n manufacturer s sellin g t o th e Philippin e government ; creatin g a nationa l economi c plannin g board ; regulatin g aviatio n an d radi o communications ; amendin g th e cooperativ e marketin g law . A n appropriatio n fo r a specia l committe e fo r th e consideratio n o f taxatio n an d tarif f law s wa s revived . Th e followin g five measures , whic h unde r th e provision s o f th e organi c ac t require d th e approva l o f th e Presiden t befor e the y coul d becom e law , wer e submitte d t o th e Presiden t an d approve d b y hi m a s follows : Ac t No . 3914 , approve d Januar y 20 , 1932 , clarifyin g th e meanin g o f th e tarif f ac t wit h regar d t o th e paymen t o f dut y o n Philippin e governmen t supplies . Ac t No . 3915 , approve d Februar y 1 , 1932 , providin g fo r th e estab lishmen t o f nationa l parks , declarin g suc h park s gam e refuges , an d fo r othe r purposes .

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5 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Ac t No . 3916 , approve d Marc h 11 , 1932 , amendin g th e tarif f ac t a s t o rate s o f duty whe n dutiabl e an d fre e merchandis e o r merchandis e dutiabl e a t differen t rate s ar e packe d together . Ac t No . 3917 , approve d Marc h 16 , 1932 , exemptin g fores t product s exporte d fro m paymen t o f th e wharfag e tax . Ac t No . 3918 , approve d Apri l 8 , 1932 , increasin g th e custom s dutie s o n ric e an d corn . Philippine mission to the United States. —The Philippin e Legislature , b y concurren t resolutio n No . 12 , adopte d Novembe r 9 , 1931 , create d a committe e o f th e legislatur e compose d o f thre e member s fro m eac h hous e (th e presiden t o f th e senate , th e Hon . Manue l L . Quezon ; th e speake r o f th e hous e o f representatives , th e Hon . Manue l Roxas ; th e presiden t pr o tempor e o f th e senate , th e Hon . Sergi o Osmena ; th e majorit y floo r leade r o f th e house , th e Hon . Pedr o Sabido ; th e minorit y floo r leade r o f th e senate , th e Hon . Rupert o Montinola ; an d th e minorit y floo r leade r o f th e house , th e Hon . Emilian o Tirona) , whic h committe e wa s instructed , jointl y wit h th e tw o Residen t Com missioner s i n Washington , t o petitio n "th e Governmen t an d Congres s o f th e Unite d State s fo r th e earl y concessio n o f independenc e t o th e Philippin e Islands , an d t o submi t t o the m fro m tim e t o tim e th e view s o f th e legislatur e o n an y matte r concernin g th e Philippine s unde r consideratio n b y th e Washingto n Government/ ' Th e committe e thu s constituted , wit h th e exceptio n o f th e Hon . Manue l L . Quezon , th e presiden t o f th e senate , arrive d i n Washingto n o n Januar y 2 , 1932 , an d wer e i n th e cours e o f th e followin g severa l day s receive d b y th e Presiden t an d th e Secretar y o f War . Th e fiv e member s o f th e missio n an d th e tw o Residen t Commissioner s appeare d befor e committee s o f bot h th e Senat e an d Hous e o f Representative s a t hearing s hel d o n independenc e bills . Th e member s o f th e missio n remaine d i n Washingto n throughou t th e firs t sessio n o f th e Seventy secon d Congres s an d wer e stil l i n th e Unite d State s a t th e dat e o f th e writin g o f thi s report . General conditions in the islands. —The unfavorabl e economi c con dition s generall y prevalen t throughou t th e worl d wer e mor e noticeabl y reflecte d i n th e Philippin e Island s tha n durin g th e precedin g year , bein g manifeste d i n a genera l declin e o f business , wit h consequen t unemploymen t an d decreas e i n privat e income s an d governmen t revenues . Th e secretar y o f commerc e an d communication s report s tha t sale s o f commoditie s decline d 2 3 pe r cen t i n value , tha t th e genera l pric e leve l wa s 2 7 pe r cen t lower , an d tha t th e registratio n o f ne w corporat e investment s decrease d b y 6 3 pe r cen t fro m th e precedin g year . Du e t o th e tropica l climat e an d th e generall y simpl e socia l organiza tion , th e peopl e o f th e island s wer e relativel y fortunat e i n tha t ther e wa s little , i f any , actua l sufferin g fro m lac k o f th e necessitie s o f life Genera l healt h condition s wer e improve d ove r th e precedin g year . Peac e an d orde r wer e i n genera l maintained . Ther e wer e som e disturbance s o f publi c order , usuall y mino r i n characte r an d confine d t o th e scattere d localitie s i n whic h the y originated . Varie d cause s wer e assigne d fo r thes e incidents , suc h a s labo r strike s i n th e vicinit y o f Iloilo ; dispute s betwee n landlord s an d tenant s i n Batan g s an d Pangasinan ; activitie s o f secre t societie s wit h communisti c affiliation s i n centra l Luzon ; an d lawles s activitie s o f certai n unrul y element s amon g th e Moro s an d Negrito s resultin g i n encounter s wit h th e con 143558—3 2 2

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6 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S stabulary . Th e mos t seriou s o f th e disturbance s occurre d a t Tayug , Pangasinan , wher e a mo b numberin g abou t 7 0 me n an d wome n arme d wit h bolo s attacke d th e loca l constabular y detachment , wit h th e resultin g death s o f 2 officer s an d 3 enliste d me n o f th e constabular y an d 4 o f th e attackers , an d th e damag e b y fir e o f severa l governmen t an d privat e buildings . Commentin g o n thi s incident , th e Governo r General , i n hi s annua l report , says : Th e cause s o f suc h uprising s ar e difficul t t o determine . Thos e wh o participat e ar e usuall y ignoran t people , who , le d o n b y unscrupulou s leaders , ma y hav e widel y varyin g reasons . Probabl y man y wh o too k par t i n thi s affai r di d no t realize , unti l i t wa s to o lat e t o withdraw , jus t ho w seriou s a ventur e the y ha d bee n le d into . Ther e i s alway s a combinatio n o f religiou s fanaticism , genuin e o r fancie d grievance s agains t governmen t officials , couple d wit h th e hop e o f spoils . Th e leadin g spirit s ar e usuall y me n o f som e intelligenc e wh o d o no t scrupl e t o tak e advantag e o f laten t agraria n unres t an d mislea d thei r follower s fo r thei r ow n purpose s whic h ar e frequentl y wholl y financial. I n th e bureau' s las t annua l repor t mentio n wa s mad e o f a tri p whic h th e Governo r General , i n compan y wit h member s o f hi s officia l family , mad e t o th e neighborin g countrie s o f Frenc h Indo-China , S i am , Britis h Malayia , an d Netherlan d India . I n hi s annua l repor t fo r 193 1 th e Governo r Genera l set s fort h i n som e detai l deduction s resultin g fro m th e informatio n obtaine d durin g th e trip . Summariz in g briefl y th e report s o f th e observation s o f th e severa l official s wh o accompanie d him , h e says : Th e report s brough t ou t forcibl y th e fac t tha t th e island s hav e falle n fa r behin d man y o f ou r neighbor s i n economi c development , an d tha t i f w e ar e t o compet e successfull y wit h thes e countrie s radica l step s mus t b e take n t o overcom e existin g deficiencies . Th e report s als o showe d tha t labo r i s bette r pai d an d care d fo r i n th e Philippine s tha n i n th e countrie s visite d an d th e standar d o f livin g i s muc h higher . Als o a muc h large r portio n o f th e revenue s ar e disburse d fo r th e benefi t o f th e people . Th e cos t o f publi c defens e i s eliminate d an d a large r contro l ove r th e governmen t i s exercise d b y th e peopl e themselves . Th e benefit s no t onl y materiall y bu t sociall y accruin g t o th e peopl e throug h thei r associatio n wit h th e Unite d State s wer e obvious . Th e Governo r Genera l mentioned , a s amon g th e activitie s whic h appea r t o b e i n a mor e advance d stag e o f developmen t i n on e o r mor e o f th e countrie s tha n i n th e Philippin e Islands , scientifi c research , experimentation , an d rura l credit s a s factor s i n promotin g agriculture ; electrica l communications ; an d aviation . Losse s fro m typhoons , floods, an d fire s durin g th e yea r i n th e Philippine s ar e estimate d t o amoun t t o approximatel y $7,500,000 . Th e Visaya n grou p o f island s wa s th e scen e o f th e heavies t sufferin g fro m typhoon s an d floods; an d th e Province s o f Occidenta l Negros , Pampanga , an d Alba y experience d destructiv e fires . I n April , 1932 , a destructiv e stor m visite d th e islan d o f Jol o i n th e Sul u Province . Public finances. —The tota l receipt s an d expenditure s fo r th e fisca l (an d calendar ) yea r 193 1 ar e show n i n Appendi x D . Th e revenue s fro m ordinar y sources—customs , interna l revenue , an d miscellaneou s receipts—a s show n i n th e annua l repor t o f th e secretar y o f financ e fo r th e yea r 193 1 amoun t t o $32,881,587 , a decreas e o f $5,345,90 5 fro m 1930. 1 Th e tota l ordinar y expenditure s amounte d t o $38,207, 978 , a decreas e fro m th e precedin g yea r o f $1,728,419 . Thi s decrease , th e Governo r Genera l state s i n hi s annua l report , "represent s th e 1 I n hi s repor t fo r 193 0 th e secretar y o f finance reporte d th e ordinar y revenue s t o amoun t t o $40,819,405 , whic h amoun t include d revenue s fro m certai n source s not include d i n th e correspondin g figures o f th e 193 1 report .

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7 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S /jg&JZt, effort s b y al l concerne d t o reduc e expenses,'/bu t stil l lef t a n exces s o f expenditure s ove r revenue s o f $ 5,05d, 8IQ c Fortunately , a surplu s accumulate d fro m prio r year s wa s sufficien t t o mak e u p thi s defici t an d leav e a n unappropriate d balanc e amountin g t o $2,925,338 . Th e greates t decreas e i n revenue s wa s i n th e sales-ta x receipts , whic h for m on e o f th e mos t importan t source s o f revenu e t o th e governmen t an d whic h decline d 2 3 pe r cen t fro m th e 193 0 figures . Thi s decreas e wa s du e no t onl y t o th e smalle r volum e o f busines s bu t als o t o th e lo w price s o f commodities . Income-ta x receipt s decline d 1 0 pe r cen t an d custom s dutie s 9 pe r cent . I n hi s messag e t o th e legislatur e o f Jul y 16 , 1931 , th e Governo r Genera l calle d attentio n t o th e fac t tha t th e revenue s wer e fallin g behin d th e estimate s upo n whic h th e budge t fo r th e yea r ha d bee n base d an d admonishe d tha t expenditure s fo r th e remainde r o f th e yea r woul d hav e t o b e kep t "dow n t o th e absolut e minimum. " O n Jul y 27 , 1931 , b y authorit y o f a provisio n incorporate d i n th e 193 1 appropriatio n act , th e Governo r Genera l issue d a n executiv e orde r specifyin g th e amount s tha t woul d hav e t o b e save d fro m curren t appropriation s b y eac h o f th e governmen t entities , totalin g almos t a millio n dollars . Informatio n tha t ha s bee n receive d t o includ e May , 1932 , relativ e t o th e curren t yea r (fisca l an d calenda r 1932 ) indicate s tha t th e reve nue s fo r 193 2 wil l approximat e th e revenue s fo r 1931 . I n orde r t o adjus t budgetar y requirement s t o th e anticipate d revenue s availabl e t o mee t them , Governo r Genera l Roosevel t has , sinc e hi s arriva l i n th e island s earl y i n 1932 , take n vigorou s measure s alon g severa l lines . I n Marc h o f thi s yea r th e secretar y o f financ e advise d th e Governo r Genera l tha t th e estimate s o f receipt s upo n whic h th e 193 2 budge t ha d bee n base d wer e no t bein g realize d an d presente d a n estimat e o f receipt s fo r 193 2 amountin g t o $26,000,000 , whil e appropriation s fo r th e yea r tota l abou t $35,000,000 . Th e Governo r Genera l addresse d himsel f wit h energ y t o th e difficul t proble m o f adjustin g govern menta l expenditure s t o th e indicate d revenues . Salarie s o f govern men t official s an d employee s hav e bee n reduce d an d othe r step s hav e bee n taken , o r ar e unde r consideration , wit h a vie w t o effectin g econ omie s i n administration . A s thes e measure s pertai n t o th e yea r 1932 , the y wil l b e mor e appropriatel y covere d i n a subsequen t annua l report . I n hi s messag e t o th e legislatur e o f Jul y 16 , 1932 , th e Governo r Genera l enumerate s a s follow s th e administrativ e economie s whic h ha d the n bee n inaugurated" : (a) Reductio n o f salarie s an d leavin g unfille d al l possibl e vacancies ; (b) reductio n o f pe r diem s o f emplo}^ee s travelin g o n officia l business ; (c) chea p transportatio n fo r employee s travelin g o n officia l busines s ha s bee n prescribe d an d inspectio n trip s tha t wer e no t vita l hav e bee n eliminated ; (d ) telephone s hav e bee n reduced ; (e) econom y i n th e purchas e o f equipmen t an d supplie s an d o f thei r us e ha s bee n instituted ; (/ ) th e constructio n o f al l non essentia l publi c work s ha s bee n halted ; (g) specia l appropriation s fo r nonessentia l projects , suc h a s participatio n i n th e Chicag o Fair , hav e bee n suspended ; (h ) unnecessar y units , suc h a s variou s vessel s o f th e government , hav e bee n eliminated . Th e Governo r Genera l indicate s tha t th e applicatio n o f thes e econ omie s i s expecte d t o resul t i n a savin g t o th e governmen t durin g th e curren t yea r o f approximatel y $3,250,000 , o r abou t 9 pe r cen t o f th e

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8 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S tota l o f th e origina l 193 2 budge t authorizations . A s thes e economie s wil l b e operativ e durin g onl y par t o f th e presen t year , the y should , i f continue d i n forc e throughou t th e ful l yea r 1933 , resul t i n large r tota l savings . Bonded indebtedness. —The Governo r Genera l i n hi s repor t fo r th e fiscal an d calenda r yea r 193 1 show s a n increas e i n th e bonde d indebted nes s o f $250,00 0 durin g th e year . I n Appendi x D o f thi s repor t th e statemen t o f th e bonde d indebtednes s i s carrie d forwar d t o Jun e 30 , 1932 . Th e amoun t o f outstandin g indebtednes s i s wel l withi n th e limi t provide d b y la w an d sinkin g fund s ar e full y maintaine d t o cove r al l outstandin g bonds . Tota l addition s t o th e sinkin g fund s durin g th e yea r greatl y exceede d th e amoun t o f ne w bond s issued . External trade. —The worl d depressio n continue d t o b e reflecte d i n th e furthe r reductio n o f th e externa l trad e o f th e islands . Th e highes t poin t i n Philippin e externa l trad e wa s reache d i n 1929 , i n whic h 3^ea r th e tota l trad e wit h th e Unite d State s an d foreig n countrie s amounte d t o $311,607,118 , whic h wa s 7. 5 pe r cen t greate r tha n th e correspondin g tota l fo r th e previou s year . I n 193 0 thi s trad e droppe d t o $256,260, 08 1 ( a decreas e o f 17. 8 pe r cent ) an d i n 193 1 t o $203,150,79 3 ( a decreas e o f 20. 7 pe r cen t fro m 1930) , representin g th e lowes t leve l reache d sinc e 1922 , an d a tota l decreas e fro m 192 9 (th e highes t year ) o f 34. 8 pe r cent . A favorabl e balanc e o f commodit y trad e wa s maintained , althoug h thi s shran k fro m $10,074,17 4 i n 193 0 t o $4,793, 35 5 i n 1931 . Export s (includin g shipment s t o th e Unite d States ) decrease d fro m $133,167,12 8 t o $103,972,074 , o r 21. 9 pe r cent . Wit h th e exceptio n o f abac a (manil a hemp), thi s decreas e i s accounte d fo r chiefl y b y th e dro p i n prices , a s th e volum e o f commoditie s shippe d abroa d remaine d generall y abou t th e same . I n th e case s o f bot h suga r an d coconu t oil , ther e wa s a n increas e i n th e quantitie s exporte d bu t a decreas e i n valu e thereof . Import s fel l fro m $123,092,95 4 i n 193 0 t o $99,178,71 9 i n 1931 , o r 19. 4 pe r cent . (Appendi x C. ) Th e Unite d State s continue d t o predominat e i n Philippin e externa l trade , receivin g 8 0 pe r cen t o f th e tota l Philippin e export s (a n increas e o f ove r 1 pe r cen t ove r th e precedin g year ) an d supplyin g 6 3 pe r cen t o f th e import s ( a decreas e o f almos t 1 pe r cen t fro m th e precedin g year) . Th e tota l trad e wit h th e Unite d State s amounte d t o $145,562,080 , representin g 7 1 pe r cen t o f th e tota l externa l trad e o f th e islands , compare d wit h 7 2 pe r cen t i n 193 0 an d 7 0 pe r cen t i n 1929 . Th e shipment s fro m th e Unite d State s amounte d t o $62,139,683 , whil e th e shipment s t o th e Unite d State s amounte d t o $83,422,79 3 (i n bot h case s a decreas e o f abou t 2 0 pe r cent) . Wit h th e exceptio n o f sil k an d it s manufactures , 5 7 pe r cen t o f whic h cam e fro m Japan , th e Unite d State s wa s th e mai n sourc e o f th e prin cipa l import s o f th e islands . Thus , o f cotto n good s imports , value d a t $16,401,04 8 an d constitutin g 1 7 pe r cen t o f th e tota l Philippin e import s an d th e larges t singl e impor t item , almos t one-hal f cam e fro m th e Unite d States . O f iro n an d stee l import s amountin g t o $13,364, 883 , mor e tha n three-fourth s cam e fro m th e Unite d States . O f minera l oil s importe d t o th e amoun t o f $9,457,89 5 abou t four-fifth s cam e fro m th e Unite d States . Les s tha n 2 pe r cen t o f th e import s o f automobiles , parts , an d accessories , value d a t $4,515,436 , cam e fro m countrie s othe r tha n th e Unite d States . Th e Unite d State s wa s als o th e principa l sourc e fo r import s consistin g o f mea t an d dair y products , electrica l machinery , pape r an d it s manufactures , whea t

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9 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S flour, an d tobacc o products . I t i s note d tha t th e onl y principa l import s whic h showe d increase s i n thi s yea r o f lowere d purchasin g powe r wer e minera l oil s an d mea t an d dair y products , fo r whic h th e Unite d State s i s th e mai n source . O f th e principa l Philippin e exports , th e Unite d State s receive s prac ticall y th e entir e quantit y o f sugar , coconu t oil , embroideries , an d desiccate d coconut ; mor e tha n 5 0 pe r cen t o f th e copra , lumber , an d cordage ; an d substantia l percentage s o f tobacc o product s an d manil a hemp . Th e onl y principa l expor t o f whic h th e Unite d State s wa s no t i n 193 1 th e larges t purchase r wa s copr a meal , o r cake , two-third s o f whic h wen t t o Germany . Speakin g o f thi s mutuall y advantageou s trad e relationship , th e Governo r Genera l i n hi s annua l repor t fo r th e yea r 193 1 says : Wha t th e los s o f th e free-trad e privileg e wit h th e Unite d State s woul d mea n i n th e economi c situatio n an d livin g condition s i n th e island s ma y b e readil y see n fro m thes e figures . Unabl e wit h presen t livin g standard s t o compet e i n th e ope n marke t wit h thei r neighbor s an d deprive d o f th e tremendou s unsee n subsid y whic h the y no w enjoy , th e peopl e littl e realiz e wha t a drasti c chang e i n thei r mod e o f livin g an y interruptio n o f th e presen t trad e relation s wit h th e Unite d State s woul d mean . And , o n th e othe r hand , h e continues : Wit h th e abolitio n o f fre e entr y o f Philippin e product s i n th e America n marke t th e natura l resul t wil l b e simila r treatmen t fo r America n product s i n th e Philip pines . I t i s doubtfu l i f thes e America n product s coul d the n hol d thei r ow n i n th e Philippines , an d a n exchang e o f product s whic h seem s t o hav e bee n mutuall y profitabl e woul d b e almos t i f no t wholl y wipe d out . Althoug h th e Philippin e Island s maintaine d a favorabl e balanc e o f commodit y trad e wit h th e worl d an d wit h th e Unite d States , i t con tinue d t o hav e a n unfavorabl e balanc e wit h countrie s othe r tha n th e Unite d States , amountin g i n 193 1 t o $16,489,75 9 ( a decreas e o f 3 pe r cen t fro m 1930) . Thi s unfavorabl e balanc e i s largel y accounte d fo r b y th e unfavorabl e balanc e wit h Japa n o f $7,388,43 0 (13. 9 pe r cen t les s tha n 1930 ) an d a n unfavorabl e balanc e wit h Chin a o f $4,551,94 4 (28. 9 pe r cen t greate r tha n 1930) . A larg e portio n o f th e import s fro m Japa n i s mad e u p o f cotto n goods an d silks . I n th e Philippin e carryin g trad e America n vessel s continue d t o lea d thos e o f othe r countries , bu t th e percentag e o f th e tota l carg o carrie d decline d fro m 4 4 pe r cen t i n 193 0 t o 3 9 pe r cen t i n 1931 , whil e th e correspondin g Britis h percentag e increase d fro m 2 4 t o 2 6 an d th e Japanes e fro m 1 2 t o 15 . Education. —The public-schoo l enrollmen t fo r th e schoo l yea r 1930 3 1 o f 1,224,54 8 wa s th e highes t o n record . Th e economi c situatio n cause d th e enrollmen t fo r th e schoo l yea r 1931-3 2 t o dro p t o 1,175,38 0 (approximatel y th e sam e a s th e 193 0 enrollment) , o f whic h al l bu t 75,00 0 wer e i n th e primar y an d intermediat e grades . O f th e secondar y enrollment , 16,81 1 wer e i n vocationa l schools . Th e secretar y o f publi c instructio n i n hi s annua l repor t fo r th e yea r 193 1 give s th e followin g brie f historica l summar y o f th e extensio n o f educationa l opportunitie s i n th e Philippines : Durin g th e schoo l yea r 1899-190 0 th e publi c school s wer e starte d wit h a n enrollmen t o f 6,900 . Thi s figure constantl y increased , s o tha t i n th e schoo l yea r 1909-1 0 i t ros e t o 587,317 . Durin g th e 1 0 year s tha t followe d th e enrollmen t wa s no t quit e consistentl y o n th e increase , althoug h i n th e schoo l yea r 1919-2 0 i t wa s alread y a s larg e a s 791,626 . A s earl y a s th e schoo l yea r 1921-2 2 thi s figure bega n t o excee d a million .

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1 0 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Th e repor t indicate s tha t th e percentag e o f enrollmen t i n th e genera l academi c secondar y cours e ha s droppe d sinc e 1925 , excep t tha t th e secondar y commercia l cours e showe d a n increas e i n 193 1 ove r 1930 . Th e secondar y agricultura l course s have , however , show n a n increase d attendance , althoug h inconsistently . I n th e nautical , trade , an d home-economic s course s th e increas e ha s bee n rapi d an d continuous . Th e placemen t servic e conducte d i n connectio n wit h th e vocationa l wor k wa s abl e t o plac e graduate s traine d i n farming , mechanics , mining , an d carpentry . I n Manil a an d fiv e othe r division s nigh t school s wer e conducte d fo r adult s an d fo r childre n wh o coul d no t atten d schoo l i n th e daytime . Th e enrollmen t i n thes e school s durin g th e las t schoo l yea r attaine d 7,492 . Th e Filipin o peopl e ar e intensel y eage r fo r educatio n fo r thei r childre n an d hav e bee n accustome d t o allo t a larg e proportio n o f thei r revenue s fo r schoo l purposes . Wit h it s reduce d revenues , th e govern men t i s confronte d wit h th e necessit y fo r stric t econom y i n expendi ture s fo r school s a s fo r othe r activities . A t th e tim e o f writin g hi s repor t fo r th e yea r 1931 , th e Governo r General' s indicate d vie w wa s that , i n orde r t o kee p appropriation s withi n necessar y limit s withou t lowerin g educationa l standards , i t woul d b e necessar y t o effec t a genera l reductio n o f salarie s an d t o giv e greate r governmenta l suppor t t o elementar y educatio n an d les s t o advance d education . I n thi s connectio n h e states : I n educatio n mor e empliasi s shoul d b e give n t o primar y rathe r tha n t o advance d education . Fro m m y observatio n o f th e conditio n o f th e mas s o f th e Filipin o peopl e I a m convince d tha t thei r educationa l need s wil l bes t b e serve d b y a mor e widesprea d elementary ' educatio n i n th e primar y schools . Th e exten sio n o f elementar y educatio n woul d brin g fa r mor e practica l an d beneficia l result s an d accomplis h muc h mor e wit h th e limite d fund s availabl e tha n woul d b e brough t abou t b y increasin g th e opportunitie s fo r th e fe w t o secur e advance d education . Agricultura l an d vocationa l trainin g shoul d als o b e give n greate r emphasis . Healt h educatio n an d th e developmen t o f th e bodie s a s wel l a s th e mind s o f th e childre n shoul d no t b e neglected . Th e Philippin e Island s ar e wel l supplie d wit h excellen t privat e school s wher e advance d educatio n ma y b e obtained . Th e numbe r o f privat e school s operatin g wit h governmen t approva l increase d fro m 35 5 i n December , 1930 , t o 36 3 i n December , 1931 . Th e tota l enroll men t fo r 1930-3 1 wa s 100,399 , a n increas e o f 1,755 , principall y i n th e collegiat e courses . Health .—An improvemen t i n genera l healt h condition s i s evidence d i n th e estimate d genera l mortalit y rat e o f 22.0 7 pe r 1,00 0 i n com pariso n wit h th e revise d rat e o f 22.7 8 fo r 1930 . I n th e cit y o f Manil a th e rat e decline d fro m 27.2 6 t o 25.61 ; th e infant-mortalit y rat e fel l fro m 160.2 4 t o 151.58 . Cholera , whic h ha d appeare d i n th e island s i n 193 0 afte r a n ab senc e o f severa l years , causin g 3,07 9 deaths , continue d int o 1931 , bu t wit h abate d force , th e death s fro m thi s diseas e fallin g t o 766 . Ther e wer e n o death s fro m smallpo x durin g th e year . Dysenter y an d in fluenza case s increased . Ther e wa s a declin e i n th e numbe r o f death s fro m typhoid , measles , an d beriberi . Healt h statistic s indicat e tha t ther e ha s bee n a stead y increas e i n death s fro m tuberculosi s durin g th e pas t decade . Th e numbe r o f death s fro m thi s diseas e attain s annuall y seriou s proportion s an d i n 193 1 i s estimate d t o hav e amounte d t o ove r 26,000 . Th e Governo r

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11 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S General , commentin g o n th e seriousnes s o f thi s i n hi s annua l report , says : I n healt h matter s I fee l tha t fa r mor e tim e an d mone y shoul d b e expende d o n tuberculosi s (fro m whic h I a m informe d ove r 1 0 pe r cen t o f th e populatio n i s suffering ) tha n ha s bee n spen t i n th e past . A goo d star t wa s mad e i n th e appointmen t o f a tuberculosi s commission . Emphasi s shoul d b e lai d upo n pre ventativ e measures , whic h ar e particularl y difficul t t o initiate , involving , a s the y do , change s i n th e fundamenta l socia l habit s an d custom s o f th e people . Th e Governo r Genera l note s th e gratifyin g increasin g tendenc y o n th e par t o f sufferer s fro m leprosy , thei r families , an d th e publi c t o repor t case s o f leprosy . I t i s bein g mor e an d mor e recognize d tha t th e earlie r th e diseas e i s reporte d th e bette r th e chanc e o f ultimat e cure . Durin g th e yea r 1931 , 32 5 leper s wer e declare d negativ e an d released . Government-owned companies. —The Philippin e Nationa l Bank , th e Manil a Railroa d Co. , th e Ceb u Portlan d Cemen t Co. , an d th e Manil a Hote l Co . ar e al l reporte d a s havin g ne t profit s fo r th e yea r 1931 , although , excep t i n th e cas e o f th e Manil a Hote l Co. , suc h profit s wer e les s tha n fo r th e precedin g year . O f th e Philippin e Nationa l Bank , th e Governo r General , i n hi s annua l report , states : Th e conservativ e policie s wer e continue d durin g th e year . * * * Instea d o f bein g a sourc e o f weaknes s i n thes e time s o f financia l stress , th e ban k wa s abl e t o ai d othe r institution s whic h deserve d assistanc e an d t o hel p tid e ove r period s o f strai n an d stress . Th e suga r central s i n Negros , whic h o n Octobe r 31 , 1926 , owe d th e ban k ove r $20,000,000 , reduce d thei r deb t durin g th e yea r b y $2,585,589 , leavin g a balanc e du e o n Decembe r 31,1931 , o f $10,009,440 . Th e ne t profi t o f th e Manil a Railroa d Co . decline d fro m $556,00 0 i n 193 0 t o $264,00 0 i n 1931 , o r mor e tha n 5 2 pe r cent . Th e declin e i s attribute d t o th e economi c depressio n an d increase d competitio n fro m moto r transportation . Whil e th e positio n o f th e Ceb u Portlan d Cemen t Co . a t th e clos e o f th e yea r wa s satisfactory , i t i s face d wit h a prospec t o f sever e competitio n o n tha t par t o f it s produc t whic h mus t b e sol d t o th e public . Provincial and municipal governments. —The genera l revisio n o f propert y assessmen t referre d t o i n th e bureau' s repor t o f las t yea r continued , bringin g th e tota l valu e o f taxabl e propert y i n th e 4 0 regularl y organize d Province s u p t o $766,706,81 5 ($1,359,85 5 mor e tha n th e precedin g year) , an d u p t o $33,154,29 8 i n th e 9 speciall y organize d Province s unde r th e burea u o f non-Christia n tribe s ($3,015,14 3 mor e tha n th e precedin g year) , o r a tota l o f $819,861,11 3 fo r th e Provinces . Includin g th e chartere d citie s o f Manil a an d Baguio , th e tota l assesse d valu e o f taxabl e rea l propert y become s $960,948,53 4 fo r th e archipelago . Loca l revenue s i n th e 4 0 regularl y organize d Province s decrease d fro m $20,621,69 5 i n 193 0 t o $18,552,30 2 i n 1931 . O f th e amoun t collecte d i n 1931 , $4,733,66 3 accrue d t o th e insula r government . Collection s i n eigh t speciall y organize d Province s (totalin g nin e i n number ) fro m whic h complet e report s wer e receive d amounte d t o $6,171,937 , o r abou t 12. 2 pe r cen t les s tha n fo r th e precedin g year . Th e Governo r Genera l report s that , wit h th e exceptio n o f a fe w case s o f a loca l nature , condition s o f peac e an d orde r wer e bette r tha n usua l i n th e non-Christia n Provinces .

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1 2 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Justice. —One o f th e mos t seriou s problem s wit h whic h th e Philip pin e governmen t ha s bee n confronte d i n recen t year s i s th e conges tio n i n th e docket s o f th e courts . Th e step s whic h hav e bee n take n t o reliev e th e situatio n i n th e lowe r court s hav e bee n touche d upo n i n previou s report s o f th e bureau . Wit h a vie w t o relievin g th e congestio n i n th e suprem e court , Ac t No . 381 6 o f th e Philippin e Legislature , approve d b y th e Governo r Genera l Decembe r 8 , 1930 , provide d fo r a n increas e i n th e tota l membershi p o f th e cour t fro m 9 t o 1 5 member s an d mad e importan t change s i n certai n o f th e rule s applicabl e t o th e transactio n o f th e court' s business . Ful l effec t ha s no t bee n give n t o s o muc h o f Ac t No . 381 6 a s contemplate d th e additio n t o th e cour t o f si x associat e justices . Tw o o f thes e vacancie s have , however , bee n filled. A s no w constituted , th e cour t i s compose d o f five Filipino s (on e o f who m i s th e chie f justice ) an d si x Americans . Th e presen t tota l membershi p o f 1 1 i s reasonabl y adapte d t o th e transactio n o f busines s unde r Ac t No . 381 6 an d n o furthe r increas e i n th e membershi p i s deeme d neces sar y no r i s contemplated . Th e court s o f first instanc e wer e abl e t o decreas e th e numbe r o f civi l an d crimina l case s pendin g fro m 22,67 5 a t th e beginnin g o f th e yea r t o 20,35 7 a t th e end . Th e situatio n wit h regar d t o cadastra l case s wa s no t s o satisfactory . Th e numbe r o f lot s decide d durin g th e yea r decrease d an d th e numbe r o f lot s pendin g a t th e en d o f th e yea r registere d a noticeabl e increase . A s a resul t o f th e administrativ e investigatio n o f th e burea u o f prisons , mentio n o f whic h wa s mad e i n th e bureau' s repor t o f las t year , tw o mor e high-rankin g official s wer e separate d fro m th e burea u fo r cause s durin g th e year . Public works and communications .—The ne w post-offic e buildin g i n Manila , whic h th e Governo r Genera l describe s a s "a n imposin g building , wel l locate d an d wel l equipped, " wa s occupie d i n March , 1931 . Reconstructio n o f th e residence s o f th e Governo r Genera l i n Manil a an d Bagui o i s expecte d t o sav e th e considerabl e sum s whic h i t ha s bee n necessar y t o expen d annuall y o n repair s i n recen t years . Durin g 193 1 ther e wer e constructe d 414. 2 kilometer s (25 7 miles ) o f ne w first-class roads , 260. 8 kilometer s (16 2 miles ) o f second-clas s roads , an d 251. 8 kilometer s (15 6 miles ) o f third-clas s roads , makin g a tota l o f 14,332. 5 kilometer s (8,88 6 miles ) o f road s o f al l classe s no w i n existenc e i n th e islands . Th e ne w constructio n i n 193 1 include d 3 2 reinforced-concret e bridges . Tw o ne w governmen t cutter s wer e pu t i n servic e durin g th e year , whic h wil l enabl e th e governmen t t o dispos e o f som e olde r vessel s whic h hav e becom e expensiv e t o maintain . Moto r vehicle s registere d durin g th e yea r numbe r 37,889 , a sligh t increas e ove r 1930 . Passenge r car s t o th e numbe r o f 2,57 4 an d truck s t o th e numbe r o f 1,65 2 wer e imported , al l bu t 3 comin g fro m th e Unite d States . A divisio n o f aviatio n wa s establishe d i n th e departmen t o f com merc e an d communications , negotiation s wer e institute d wit h th e Province s fo r th e acquisitio n o f landin g fields, an d provisio n wa s mad e fo r a n ai r mai l service . Agriculture and natural resources. —The tota l are a unde r cultivatio n an d th e volum e o f productio n o f crop s remaine d muc h th e sam e a s fo r th e previou s year , althoug h th e tota l valu e o f crop s underwen t

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13 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S a reductio n o f abou t 2 5 pe r cent . Th e losse s suffere d fro m typhoon s an d plan t pest s an d disease s wer e les s tha n i n recen t previou s years . Ther e wa s a sligh t decreas e i n th e productio n o f rice , wit h a resultin g increas e o f importation , bu t thi s commodit y n o longe r figures , a s for merl y i t did , amon g th e principa l imports ; th e Philippine s hav e i n recen t year s becom e practicall y self-sufficien t i n regar d t o rice . I n hi s messag e t o th e legislatur e o f Jul y 16 , 1931 , th e Governo r Genera l pointe d ou t tha t les s tha n one-fourt h o f th e arabl e lan d o f th e island s wa s unde r cultivation . On e o f th e mai n impediment s t o th e settlemen t an d cultivatio n o f th e lan d i s th e uncertaint y an d dela y inciden t t o obtainin g titles . A committe e t o stud y th e situa tio n wa s appointe d whic h mad e a comprehensiv e repor t an d man y o f it s recommendation s wer e adopted . Th e relate d questions , however , continu e amon g th e mos t seriou s problem s confrontin g th e Philippin e government . Ther e wa s a n increas e i n gol d minin g durin g th e year . Bullio n wa s shippe d ou t o f th e island s t o th e valu e o f approximatel y thre e an d a hal f millio n dollars . Ther e wa s a decreas e i n lumbe r exports , du e principall y t o th e destructio n b y fire o f fou r o f th e principa l sawmills . Al l o f thes e mill s ar e expecte d t o b e rebuilt . Th e investmen t i n sawmill s an d machine-loggin g operation s i s estimate d t o b e ove r $20,000,000 . Filipino emigration to the United States and Hawaii .—The annua l repor t o f th e Governo r Genera l fo r 193 1 include s th e following : A tota l o f 4,76 8 Filipino s o f al l classe s lef t th e Philippin e Island s fo r Hawai i durin g th e year , whil e 4,16 2 returne d fro m there . Durin g th e las t fiv e year s a tota l o f 40,34 8 Filipino s hav e gon e t o Hawai i an d 19,97 0 hav e returne d fro m ther e t o th e Philippin e Islands . A tota l o f 8,14 4 Filipino s lef t fo r th e Unite d State s an d insula r possession s durin g th e yea r an d 6,86 4 returne d t o th e islands . Thu s th e ne t increas e o f de parture s ove r arrival s wa s 1,280 , o f who m 60 6 wen t t o Hawaii , leavin g a ne t increas e o f 67 4 wh o wen t t o continenta l Unite d States . Thi s i s b y fa r th e smalles t i n recen t year s an d indicate s tha t th e questio n o f Filipin o immigratio n t o Americ a i s b y n o mean s a s seriou s a s i t ha s bee n pictured . Elections .—The regula r triennia l genera l electio n o f th e Philippin e Island s wa s hel d o n Jun e 2 , 1931 . Th e figure s availabl e a t th e dat e o f writin g thi s repor t revea l tha t 1,489,69 3 voter s registere d fo r thi s election , representin g abou t 5 4 pe r cen t o f th e votin g population , a percentag e abou t 1 0 pe r cen t highe r tha n tha t fo r th e electio n o f 1928 . Th e percentag e o f thos e registere d wh o actuall y cas t thei r vote s wa s slightl y ove r 80 , o r abou t th e sam e a s tha t fo r th e electio n o f 1928 . Th e electio n resulte d i n th e electio n o f 6 senators , 6 9 representa tives , 3 0 provincia l governors , an d 4 5 member s o f provincia l board s fro m th e Nacionalista-Consolidad o Part y an d 4 senators , 1 2 repre sentatives , 8 provincia l governors , an d 1 3 member s o f provincia l board s fro m th e Democrat a Party . PUERT O RIC O Changes in official personnel. —The Hon . Theodor e Roosevel t resigne d a s Governo r o f Puert o Ric o Januar y 18 , 1932 , t o accep t a n appointmen t a s Governo r Genera l o f th e Philippin e Islands . Th e Presiden t appointe d t o succee d hi m th e Hon . Jame s R . Beverley , wh o ha d serve d a s attorne y genera l o f Puert o Ric o sinc e Ma y 22 , 1928 , 143558—3 2 3

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1 4 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S an d wh o ha d bee n actin g governo r sinc e Decembe r 17 , 1931 . Gov erno r Beverle y assume d th e dutie s o f governo r o n Januar y 30 , 1932 . Th e Presiden t appointe d th e Hon . Charle s E . Winter , o f Wyoming , a s attorne y genera l o f Puert o Ric o t o succee d Governo r Beverley . Mr . Winte r too k th e oat h o f offic e o n Marc h 30 , 1932 . Th e Hon . Jacint o Texidor , associat e justic e o f th e Suprem e Cour t o f Puert o Rico , die d o n Octobe r 5 , 1931 . Th e Presiden t ap pointe d a s hi s successo r th e Hon . Feli x Cordov a Davila , wh o ha d fo r man y year s serve d a s Residen t Commissione r o f Puert o Ric o t o th e Unite d States . Justic e Cordov a assume d hi s ne w dutie s o n Apri l 11 , 1932 . T o complet e th e unexpire d ter m o f Hon . Feli x Cordov a Davil a a s Residen t Commissione r t o th e Unite d States , th e Governo r o f Puert o Ric o appointe d Hon . Jos e L . Pesquera . Mr . Pesquer a presente d hi s credential s an d too k hi s sea t i n th e Hous e o f Representative s o n Apri l 28 , 1932 . Policy of the governor. —In th e repor t whic h h e ha s submitte d fo r th e yea r ende d Jun e 30 , 1932 , Governo r Beverle y make s th e followin g statement : Th e presen t governo r wa s closel y associate d wit h Governo r Roosevelt' s ad ministratio n i n Puert o Ric o an d n o majo r change s i n polic y hav e bee n made . O n th e contrary , ever y effor t ha s bee n mad e t o continu e th e policie s previousl y undertake n s o fa r a s circumstance s hav e no t altere d an d t o attemp t t o brin g the m t o thei r prope r fruition . Thes e policies , directe d towar d th e economi c an d socia l improve men t o f th e island , hav e bee n outline d generall y i n th e las t tw o annua l report s o f thi s bureau . Certai n o f the m wil l b e mor e specificall y referre d t o hereafte r i n thi s repor t unde r th e appropriat e subjects . Congressional consideration of Puerto Rican affairs. —In Appendi x A o f thi s repor t i s liste d certai n legislatio n o f specia l interes t t o Puert o Ric o enacte d b y th e Congres s durin g th e perio d t o whic h thi s repor t pertains . Speciall y importan t amon g thes e measure s ar e Publi c No . 302 , whic h extend s t o Puert o Ric o th e benefit s o f th e Reconstructio n Financ e Corporatio n act , an d Publi c No . 304 , th e Federa l Hom e Loa n Ban k act . Publi c Resolutio n No . 2 0 restore s t o th e islan d th e officia l desig natio n o f "Puert o Rico. " Thi s i s th e nam e b y whic h th e islan d wa s know n durin g it s 30 0 year s unde r Spanis h sovereignty . I n th e Englis h tex t o f th e treat y o f Paris , b y whic h Spai n cede d th e islan d t o th e Unite d States , th e spellin g wa s "Port o Rico. " Late r th e Unite d State s Geographi c Boar d mad e th e decisio n tha t th e correc t spellin g wa s "Puert o Rico. " However , Congress , i n passin g th e ac t o f Apri l 12 , 1900 , whic h establishe d civi l governmen t i n th e island , followe d th e spellin g o f th e treaty , whic h ha d th e effec t o f makin g "Port o Rico " th e officia l designatio n o f th e island . I n Appendi x B ar e liste d certai n measure s o f specia l interes t t o Puert o Ric o whic h wer e introduce d i n th e first sessio n o f th e Seventy secon d Congres s bu t whic h wer e no t enacte d int o law . The Puerto Rican Legislature. —The Twelft h Puert o Rica n Legis latur e wa s i n sessio n fo r thre e period s durin g th e fiscal yea r 1931-32 . Governo r Roosevel t calle d th e secon d specia l sessio n fo r a 14-da y perio d fro m Novembe r 25 , 1931 , fo r th e specia l consideratio n o f electio n matters . (Se e "Elections " hereinafter. )

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15 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Th e fourt h an d las t regula r sessio n convene d Februar y 8 , 1932 , an d adjourne d Apri l 15 , a t th e expiratio n o f th e perio d prescribe d b y th e organi c act . Governo r Beverle y calle d a thir d specia l session , whic h convene d Jun e 21 , 1932 , t o conside r matter s whic h h e considere d urgen t an d whic h ha d no t bee n dispose d o f durin g th e regula r session . Thes e matter s were : Amendment s t o th e electio n la w i n th e interes t o f fai r elections , amendment s t o th e workmen' s compensatio n act , an d consideratio n o f much-neede d municipa l reform . Eac h o f thes e subject s wil l b e take n u p hereafte r unde r appropriat e headings , Amon g th e mor e importan t measure s whic h wer e passe d durin g thes e thre e session s an d whic h receive d th e approva l o f th e governo r were : A n ac t t o authoriz e th e treasure r o f Puert o Ric o t o purchas e i n th e ope n marke t insula r an d municipa l bonds , t o consolidat e issues , an d t o borro w mone y temporaril y i n anticipatio n o f ta x collections ; a n ac t creatin g a n emergenc y fund ; a n ac t cancelin g an d remittin g certai n taxe s owe d b y coffee an d coconu t plantations : a reenactmen t o f th e authorizatio n t o issu e bond s t o purchas e land s fo r farm s unde r th e homestea d la w s o a s t o eliminat e certai n lega l objection s tha t ha d bee n raised ; amendment s o f th e electio n law ; levyin g a specia l ta x o f 2 pe r cen t o n th e assesse d valuatio n o f ever y cuerd a (acre , approximately ) o f coffe e lan d fo r th e purpos e o f creatin g a coffee insuranc e an d rehabilitatio n fund . General conditions. —The governor , i n hi s annua l repor t fo r th e yea r ende d Jun e 30 , 1932 , referrin g t o condition s i n th e island , says : Th e economi c conditio n o f th e islan d durin g th e yea r ha s no t bee n good , althoug h th e world-wid e depressio n ha s probabl y bee n fel t les s her e tha n i n mor e highl y industralize d areas . Th e amoun t o f poverty , malnutrition , an d unemploymen t ha s bee n distressin g i n spit e o f th e fac t tha t thi s yea r sa w th e larges t cro p o f suga r eve r raise d i n th e island—ove r 992,00 0 tons . A grea t dea l o f unemploymen t i n Puert o Ric o i s seasonal , an d w e hav e ha d fo r man y year s a hig h percentag e o f worker s unemploye d i n whol e o r i n par t whos e conditio n lia s bee n aggravate d b y th e world-wid e depression . Wit h respec t t o th e ever-seriou s proble m o f overpopulation , Gover no r Beverle y state s i n hi s annua l report : Accordin g t o th e 193 0 censu s th e populatio n o f Puert o Ric o wa s 1,543,91 3 persons , o r a n averag e o f 449. 5 peopl e t o th e squar e mil e * * * . Th e esti mate d populatio n a s o f Jul y 1 , 1932 , wa s 1,599,14 2 persons , o r a densit y o f 465. 5 pe r squar e mile . Condition s demonstrat e tha t thi s popmatio n i s to o larg e fo r a n are a whic h i s an d mus t alway s remai n largel y agricultural . Organizatio n o f agriculture , encouragemen t o f industries , an d vocationa l trainin g ca n al l hel p t o alleviat e th e situation , bu t the y wil l neve r b e sufficien t t o rais e th e averag e standar d o f livin g o f th e peopl e t o a satisfactor y poin t wit h th e presen t densit y o f populatio n an a i n th e presen t stat e o f technica l an d agricultura l developmen t Fo r th e proble m o f overpopulatio n a numbe r o f partia l solution s hav e bee n advocated . U p t o th e presen t tim e th e governmen t ha s give n attentio n t o th e encouragemen t o f ne w industrie s an d th e expansio n o f establishe d ones , bu t i t seem s clea r tha t i t i s rapidl y becomin g necessar y t o attemp t otne r an d fur the r solutions . Withou t som e extraordinar y an d unexpecte d change s i n economi c conditions , furthe r ne t addition s t o populatio n i n th e islan d mus t inevitabl y resul t i n greate r distres s an d povert y an d ultimatel y i n a risin g deat h rate . Th e populatio n questio n i s fundamenta l an d i s intimatel y relate d t o th e standar d o f living , t o labo r conditions , an d especiall y t o healt h conditions . General financial conditions .-—The governo r report s tha t th e finan cia l conditio n o f th e insula r treasur y a t th e clos e o f th e fisca l yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1932 , wa s "satisfactor y beyon d al l expectations. " Th e revenu e o f $12,662,359.7 6 wa s th e larges t eve r collecte d i n on e

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1 6 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S yea r b y th e treasur y an d $1,608,162.2 0 mor e tha n wa s collecte d dur in g th e previou s year . Thi s increas e wa s largel y accounte d fo r b y a n increas e o f $1,140,00 0 i n th e custom s receipt s ove r thos e o f th e pre viou s yea r an d th e importatio n b y th e Sout h Port o Ric o Suga r Co . o f sugarcan e fro m th e Dominica n Republic , accounte d i n tur n fo r a larg e par t o f th e increase d custom s collections . Ther e wa s als o a n increas e i n excis e taxes , bu t receipt s fro m th e sale s ta x an d incom e ta x declined . Collection s o f propert y taxe s durin g th e yea r amounte d t o nearl y $1,000,00 0 mor e tha n fo r th e precedin g year , a fac t whic h th e governo r attribute s directl y t o th e efficien t an d energeti c wor k o f th e treasure r o f Puert o Rico . Th e propert y ta x i s th e chie f sourc e o f incom e o f th e municipalities . General fund of the insular treasury. —Cash receipt s an d disburse ments , unde r th e genera l fund , fo r th e fisca l yea r 1931-3 2 ar e sum marize d a s follow s i n th e annua l repor t o f th e audito r o f Puert o Rico : Balanc e o n han d Jul y 1 , 193 1 $553 , 026 . 8 5 Insula r revenu e receipt s $12 , 662 , 359 . 7 6 Proceeds , coffe e fun d 72 , 476 . 5 0 Surplus , insuranc e fun d 18 , 562 . 8 5 Tota l receipt s int o genera l fun d 12 , 753 , 399 . 1 1 Tota l general-fun d resource s fo r th e yea r 13 , 306 , 425 . 9 6 Tota l cas h disbursement s 12 , 305 , 597 . 0 9 Transfer s t o variou s trus t fund s 126 , 406 . 8 1 Tota l disbursement s an d transfer s 12 , 432 , 003 . 9 0 Balanc e o n han d Jun e 30 , 193 2 874 , 422 . 0 6 Curren t asset s payabl e t o genera l fund : Advanc e t o Isabel a irrigatio n fun d 257 , 500 . 0 0 Advanc e t o Guayam a irrigatio n service — 94 , 312 . 5 0 Advance s t o municipalitie s 1 91 , 255 . 9 8 Tota l 443 , 068 . 4 8 Tota l curren t asset s 1 , 317 , 490 . 5 4 Tota l o f carry-ove r appropriatio n liabilitie s t o fisca l yea r 1932-3 3 .. . 679,251 . 9 7 Exces s o f resource s ove r appropriatio n liabilitie s fisca l yea r 1931-3 2 638 , 238 . 5 7 A t th e en d o f th e previou s fisca l yea r a surplu s o f $203,969.2 1 i n th e genera l fun d wa s show n ove r appropriatio n liabilities . Fina l liquidatio n o f general-fun d operation s fo r th e fisca l yea r 1931-3 2 a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , shows : Exces s o f cas h resource s ove r appropriatio n liabilitie s $195 , 170 . 0 9 Othe r resource s reimbursabl e t o genera l fun d 443 , 068 . 4 8 Tota l exces s o f resource s ove r appropriatio n liabilitie s 638 , 238 . 5 7 Thi s indicate s a n improvemen t i n th e genera l fun d fo r th e fisca l yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1932 , i n th e amoun t o f $434,269.36 . Notes payable. —The balanc e o f note s payabl e a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , amount s t o $379,494.54 . Th e balanc e a s o f Jun e 30 , 1931 , wa s $730,494.54 . Th e ne t chang e represent s a considerabl e decreas e i n outstandin g indebtednes s unde r "Note s payable " i n th e amoun t o f $351,000 . i Include s $43,275.3 2 fo r advance s mad e durin g previou s fiscal years .

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17 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Bonded indebtedness. —The bonde d indebtednes s o f th e governmen t o f Puert o Ric o amounte d t o $28,761,00 0 o n Jun e 30 , 1932 , compare d wit h $29,097,00 0 o n Jun e 30 , 1931 . Bond s i n th e tota l amoun t o f $570,00 0 wer e issue d durin g th e year ; bond s i n th e tota l amoun t o f $906,00 0 wer e redeeme d durin g th e year . Th e ne t decreas e i n th e bonde d indebtednes s fo r th e yea r wa s $336,000 . I t mus t b e noted , however , tha t th e sinkin g fund s fo r th e redemptio n o f bond s wer e $1,458,577.1 4 o n Jun e 30 , 1931 , whil e o n Jun e 30 , 1932 , thes e fund s amounte d t o $1,370,527.80 , o r a decreas e o f $88,049.34 . Takin g int o consideratio n bot h bond s outstandin g an d sinkin g funds , th e ne t chang e i n th e bonde d indebtednes s wa s a decreas e o f $247,950.66 . Insular emergency fund. —One o f th e mos t importan t law s passe d durin g th e pas t regula r sessio n o f th e Puert o Ric o Legislatur e wa s Ac t No . 33 , approve d Apri l 28 , 1932 , whic h create d a permanen t emergenc y fund , designate d "Insula r emergenc y fund. " Pursuan t t o thi s act , a t th e clos e o f operation s o f eac h fiscal year , ther e shal l b e covere d int o thi s fun d an y par t o f th e cas h balanc e o f th e genera l fun d plu s advance s t o othe r fund s reimbursabl e t o th e genera l fun d exceedin g th e balance s o f th e appropriation s provide d fo r i n th e budge t an d o f al l othe r appropriation s i n force . Thi s i s th e firs t ste p take n sinc e th e establishmen t o f civi l governmen t i n Puert o Ric o towar d th e creatio n o f a treasur y reserv e fund . Th e "Insula r emergenc y fund " wa s constitute d initiall y b y th e transfe r o f th e unincumbere d balanc e o f th e " Reserv e fo r contin gencie s i n specia l fund " create d unde r th e provision s o f Ac t No . 5 o f 1930 . Th e statu s o f th e "Insula r emergenc y fund " a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , wa s a s follows : Cas h balanc e $234 , 071 . 0 6 Reimbursabl e loa n mad e t o sanitatio n fun d 49 , 197 . 0 9 Reimbursabl e loa n mad e t o cafetero s d e Puert o Ric o 100 , 000 . 0 0 Reimbursabl e loa n mad e t o burea u o f supplie s 200 , 000 . 0 0 Reimbursabl e loa n mad e t o wate r resource s fun d 100 , 000 . 0 0 Reimbursabl e advance s mad e t o Isabel a irrigatio n fun d 257 , 500 . 0 0 Reimbursabl e advance s mad e t o Guayam a irrigatio n fun d 94 , 312 . 5 0 Reimbursabl e advance s mad e t o variou s municipalitie s 91 , 255 . 9 8 Tota l 1,126,336.6 3 Th e statu s o f th e "Insula r emergenc y fund " a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , compare d wit h th e "Reserv e fo r contingencie s i n specia l fund " a s o f Jun e 30 , 1931 , i s a s follows : Tota l assets , "Insula r emergenc y fund " $1 , 126 , 336 . 6 3 Les s reimbursabl e advance s considere d i n genera l funds : Isabel a irrigatio n fun d $257 , 500 . 0 0 Guayam a irrigatio n fun d 94 , 312 . 5 0 Variou s municipalitie s 91 , 255 . 9 8 Cas h surplu s a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , considere d i n genera l fund s 195 , 170 . 0 9 638 , 238 . 5 7 Balanc e 488 , 098 . 0 6 Balanc e "Reserv e fo r contingencie s i n specia l fund " a s o f Jun e 30 , 193 1 551 , 098 . 0 6 Les s balanc e "Insula r emergenc y fund " a s o f Jun e 30 , 193 2 448 , 098 . 0 6 Retrogressio n fo r 193 2 o f "Insula r emergenc y fund " 63 , 000 . 0 0

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1 8 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Financial progress. —Considering th e genera l fund , note s payable , th e bonde d indebtedness , an d th e "Insula r emergenc y fund, " th e governmen t o f Puert o Ric o show s financial progres s fo r th e fiscal yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1932 , o f $970,220.02 , arrive d a t a s follows : Progress : Genera l fun d $434 , 269 . 3 6 Note s payabl e 351 , 000 . 0 0 Bonde d indebtednes s 336 , 000 . 0 0 Tota l progres s 1 , 121 , 269 . 3 6 Retrogression : Decreas e i n sinkin g fund s $88 , 049 . 3 4 Decreas e i n "Insula r emergenc y fund " 1 63 , 000 . 0 0 151 , 049 . 3 4 Ne t progres s 970 , 220 . 0 2 Th e abov e figures sho w a decidedl y favorabl e tren d i n th e finances o f Puert o Ric o durin g th e yea r ende d Jun e 30 , 1932 , i n spit e o f th e genera l economi c depression . Fo r furthe r dat a regardin g th e revenue s an d financial conditio n o f th e insula r governmen t se e Appendi x F . Municipalities. —The unsatisfactor y conditio n o f municipa l finances ha s bee n commente d upo n i n previou s report s o f thi s bureau . Th e car e exercise d durin g th e pas t yea r b y th e executiv e counci l an d th e audito r o f Puert o Ric o i n supervisin g municipa l loan s an d i n check in g estimate d receipt s o f th e municipalitie s i n orde r t o preven t infla tio n o f budget s ha s prevente d th e majorit y o f th e municipalitie s fro m incurrin g debt s durin g th e yea r i n exces s o f thei r budgetar y appro priations . Durin g th e fisca l yea r th e executiv e counci l approve d municipa l loan s t o th e exten t o f $850,595.47 . Th e tota l indebtednes s o f th e municipalitie s a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , wa s $18,882,541.25 , plu s interes t accrue d an d payabl e amountin g t o $40,007.66 . Thi s show s a n im provemen t whe n compare d wit h th e tota l indebtednes s o f $19,957, 352.15 , plu s accrue d interes t o f $27,603.47 , reporte d o n Jun e 30 , 1931 . Th e fac t remain s tha t i n spit e o f th e supervisio n give n th e munici pa l finance s ar e no t i n goo d condition . Durin g th e pas t yea r th e insula r treasur y wa s force d t o advanc e th e municipalitie s th e su m o f $47,980.6 6 fo r th e paymen t o f principa l an d interes t o n municipa l bond s t o preven t defaults ; thi s bring s th e tota l o f suc h advance s t o $91,255.98 . Th e tota l receipt s o f th e municipalitie s fo r th e fiscal yea r 1931-3 2 amounte d t o $7,123,121.05 , whil e th e disbursement s totale d $7,383, 452.85 . Th e tota l cas h balance s a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , amounte d t o $3,819,732.65 , a s compare d wit h $4,080,064.4 5 o n Jun e 30 , 1931 . Th e foregoin g figures indicat e a reductio n i n th e cas h balance s o f $260,331.8 0 a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 . O f th e tota l cas h balanc e a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , $109,092.6 2 pertain s t o th e genera l fund s o f th e sev era l municipalitie s an d $66,073.6 5 t o thei r schoo l funds , an d thes e items , aggregatin g $175,166.27 , represen t th e onl y cas h t o mee t budgetar y liabilities , th e remainin g balanc e consistin g o f cas h bond s an d deposits , loa n funds , an d othe r specia l funds . 1 Thi s i s th e ne t retrogressio n i n th e "Insula r emergenc y fund " compare d wit h th e amoun t reporte d i n th e "Reserv e fo r contingencie s i n specia l fund " a s o f Jun e 30 , 1931 , excludin g reimbursabl e item s an d cas h balance s i n th e amoun t o f $038,238.5 7 alread y considere d a s asset s i n th e genera l fund .

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19 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Th e ne t debt-incurrin g margi n o f municipalitie s a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 , amounte d t o $4,411,438.60 , a s compare d wit h $4,027,732.9 0 a t th e clos e o f th e previou s year . I n thi s connectio n i t shoul d b e note d tha t 3 5 municipalitie s hav e exceede d thei r combine d debt-incurrin g limi tation s b y $1,247,845.22 , whil e 4 1 municipalitie s stil l hav e a margi n o f $5,659,283.82 . Th e Governo r o f Puert o Ric o state s i n hi s repor t fo r 1932 : Th e municipa l financial problem s o f Puert o Ric o ca n no t b e solve d throug h additiona l borrowin g no r throug h direc t advance s fro m th e insula r government . I t i s th e opinio n o f th e administratio n tha t thi s polic y woul d onl y ten d t o retar d thei r financial an d economi c recovery . Fundamenta l correctives , no t palliatives , mus t b e applied , an d th e syste m o f loca l governmen t mus t b e mad e simple r an d mor e economical . Certai n change s i n th e organizatio n o f th e municipalitie s wer e effecte d i n 1931 , bu t th e legislatio n the n enacte d neithe r accomplishe d th e desire d simplificatio n o f th e municipa l governmenta l syste m no r followe d th e repeate d pas t recommendation s o f successiv e governor s tha t th e numbe r o f th e municipalitie s b e reduce d b y consolidation . Tha t th e presen t situatio n i n thi s respec t i s unsatisfactor y i s indicate d b y th e followin g quotatio n fro m th e governor' s lates t annua l report : * * * i t i s th e opinio n o f thi s administration , a s i t wa s o f th e precedin g admin istration , tha t th e governmenta l set-u p o f th e smalle r municipalitie s i s to o elaborat e an d expensiv e i n compariso n wit h th e service s actuall y rendere d t o th e people . Fo r severa l year s governor s hav e bee n recommendin g t o th e legis latur e tha t municipa l organizatio n b e simplified . I t i s als o believe d tha t th e existin g numbe r o f municipalitie s i s to o large , an d tha t i n man y instance s con solidatio n o f neighborin g municipalitie s coul d b e mad e i n th e interest s o f econom y an d goo d governmen t an d withou t sacrificin g services . Th e principa l objectio n t o consolidatio n eithe r o f municipalitie s o r o f municipa l service s come s fro m intereste d loca l politica l groups . * * * External trade .—The tota l trad e wit h th e Unite d State s an d foreig n countrie s fo r th e yea r ende d Jun e 30 , 1932 , amounte d t o $147,698,039 , a s compare d wit h $174,838,33 7 fo r th e precedin g year— a decreas e o f abou t $27,140,298 , o r abou t 1 6 pe r cent . Thi s declin e i s represente d b y a fallin g of f i n import s 1 o f $15,156,309 , an d i n export s 2 o f $11,983,989 . Th e favorabl e commodit y trad e balance , recovere d afte r th e advers e balanc e durin g th e hurrican e yea r 1928-29 , con tinue s t o b e maintained , th e exces s o f export s ove r import s bein g $25,135,837 , o r 1 7 pe r cen t o f th e tota l trade . Th e trad e wit h th e continenta l Unite d State s represente d abou t 92. 4 pe r cen t o f th e tota l externa l trade . Shipment s t o th e Unite d State s compris e 96. 8 pe r cen t o f th e tota l export s an d shipment s fro m th e Unite d State s amounte d t o 86. 2 pe r cen t o f th e tota l import s fro m al l outsid e sources . Coffe e shipments , value d a t $154,903 , droppe d t o th e 193 0 level ; suga r exports , value d a t $55,118,211 , registere d a sligh t increas e ove r 1931 . Durin g th e yea r ende d Jun e 30 , 1932 , Puert o Ric o ranke d firs t a s a.custome r o f th e Unite d State s i n th e Centra l an d Sout h America n area . Puert o Ric o bough t fro m th e continenta l Unite d State s good s value d a t $52,826,794 , thi s bein g 2 9 pe r cen t i n exces s o f Unite d State s sale s i n Cuba . Durin g th e yea r mentioned , th e Republi c o f Cuba , whic h ranke d first afte r Puert o Ric o a s th e larges t Lati n America n importe r fro m th e continenta l Unite d States , too k good s value d a t $37,340,151 . Th e purchase s o f Puert o Ric o fro m th e 1 Includin g shipment s fro m th e Unite d States . 2 Includin g shipment s t o th e Unite d States .

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2 0 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Unite d State s durin g th e yea r ende d Jun e 30 , 1932 , showe d a pe r capit a o f $34.20 , a s compare d wit h combine d pe r capit a purchase s o f al l Lati n America n countrie s fro m th e Unite d State s amountin g t o approximatel y $2.50 . (Appendi x E. ) Public works. —Public-works activitie s continue d t o b e confine d practicall y t o th e maintenanc e o f thos e alread y i n existenc e an d th e completio n o f thos e alread y commenced . Wor k o n th e topographi c ma p t o whic h referenc e wa s mad e i n th e bureau' s repor t o f las t yea r wa s stoppe d o n accoun t o f lac k o f funds . Ne w roa d constructio n consiste d o f th e completio n o f 12. 3 kilometer s o f macadamize d roads . Durin g th e year , 295. 5 kilometer s o f roa d wer e asphalte d wit h fund s o f th e Puert o Rica n Hurrican e Relie f Commission , makin g a tota l o f 549. 8 kilometer s o f roa d asphalte d b y th e commission . Th e asphalt in g o f thes e road s ha s performe d th e doubl e servic e o f reducin g road maintenanc e cost s fo r th e insula r governmen t an d furnishin g much neede d employment . O f th e $1,433,348.5 7 expende d fo r roa d maintenance , $463,248.6 5 cam e fro m insula r appropriations , an d $970,099.9 2 wa s spen t b y th e Puert o Rica n Hurrica n Relie f Commissio n fro m Federa l fund s appro priate d i n accordanc e wit h Publi c Resolutio n No . 3 3 o f th e Seventy first Congress , approve d Januar y 22 , 1930 . Agriculture. —The insula r governmen t ha s devote d it s specia l atten tio n durin g th e pas t severa l year s t o th e encouragemen t o f smal l farmin g unit s an d th e developmen t o f crop s suitabl e fo r thi s clas s o f farming , suc h a s coffe e an d vegetable s fo r hom e consumptio n an d fo r th e winte r marke t o f th e continenta l Unite d States . Coffe e i s especiall y wel l adapte d t o cultivatio n i n smal l unit s i n th e hill y interio r region s o f th e island . A t th e Internationa l Colonia l an d Oversea s Expositio n hel d i n Pari s i n 1931 , Puert o Rica n coffe e wa s awarde d th e gran d prix , th e highes t awar d possible . A coffe e cooperativ e marketin g association , know n a s "Cafetero s d e Puert o Rico , Inc., " wa s organize d i n 192 5 an d operate d successfull y unti l afte r th e hurrican e o f 1928 , whe n i t foun d itsel f i n financial difficulties . Th e governmen t ha s take n th e lea d i n havin g thi s cooperativ e reor ganize d an d place d o n a soun d basis . Th e legislatur e authorize d a loa n o f $100,00 0 durin g th e regula r sessio n o f 1932 . Coffe e seedling s t o th e numbe r o f 1,583,05 0 wer e distribute d i n additio n t o thos e dis tribute d b y th e Puert o Rica n Hurrican e Relie f Commission . A larg e quantit y o f vegetabl e seed s wer e distributed . Severa l vegetabl e crop s ne w t o Puert o Ric o wer e successfull y initiate d b y th e field forc e o f th e Departmen t o f Agricultur e an d Commerc e i n it s campaig n fo r cro p diversification . Th e suga r yea r wa s marke d b y th e lowes t pric e pai d fo r suga r sinc e 189 8 an d b y th e larges t cro p eve r produce d o n th e island . Suga r prices , dut y pai d Ne w York , wen t a s lo w a s $2.5 8 pe r hundre d pound s an d onl y th e ver y larg e cro p o f 992,432.8 4 shor t ton s an d favore d acces s t o Unite d State s market s fo r it s dispositio n save d th e islan d fro m seriou s economi c consequences . Th e fourt h congres s o f th e Internationa l Associatio n o f Suga r Can e Technologist s me t i n Sa n Jua n i n March , 1932 . Th e tobacc o cro p fo r th e yea r i s estimate d t o hav e droppe d t o 5,500,00 0 pounds , a s agains t ove r 37,000,00 0 pounds fo r th e precedin g year . Thi s dro p wa s mainl y du e t o a n antiplantin g campaig n pur sue d b y th e tobacc o planters , induce d b} r th e lo w price s an d lac k o f a profitabl e marke t fo r tobacc o alread y i n warehouses .

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21 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Thirtee n ne w far m bureaus , wit h a membershi p o f 1,625 , wer e organize d a s a par t o f th e campaig n fo r organizin g th e farmer s fo r productio n an d distribution . I n additio n t o coffe e plantings , 1,537, 03 7 tre e seedling s o f othe r kind s wer e distribute d durin g th e year . Agricultura l demonstration s an d lecture s wer e continued . Agents o f th e departmen t mad e ove r 32,00 0 visit s t o individua l farmer s an d th e eigh t demonstratio n farm s receive d ove r 7,00 0 visit s fro m farmers , Referenc e wa s mad e i n th e bureau' s repor t o f las t yea r t o th e ac t o f Congres s o f Marc h 4 , 1931 , whic h authorize d th e extensio n t o Puert o Ric o o f th e benefit s o f certai n Federa l agricultura l ai d legis lation , relatin g t o experimen t statio n an d extensio n work , o n th e sam e basi s a s t o th e States . On e o f th e condition s preceden t t o th e extensio n o f th e benefit s o f thes e law s wa s th e transfe r t o th e Colleg e o f Agricultur e o f th e Universit y o f Puert o Ric o o f th e agricultura l experimen t station s conducte d b y th e insula r government . Th e Legislatur e o f Puert o Ric o attempte d t o compl y wit h th e require ment , bu t wa s prevente d fro m doin g s o b y certai n condition s attache d t o th e propert y t o b e transferred , s o tha t th e islan d ha s no t a s ye t benefite d fro m th e legislation . Attempt s ar e bein g mad e t o adjus t th e matte r t o th e satisfactio n o f th e Federa l authorities . Education. —According t o th e annua l repor t o f th e governor , a t th e en d o f th e fiscal yea r 1931-3 2 ther e wer e i n operatio n i n Puert o Ric o 2 3 publi c hig h schools ; 2 0 incomplete , o r continuation , hig h schools ; 3 9 second-uni t rura l schools ; 1,81 3 elementar y urba n schools ; an d 1,89 9 elementar y rura l schools ; wit h a tota l teachin g staf f o f 4,60 1 (a n increas e o f 7 8 ove r th e precedin g year) , o f whic h 4,42 9 wer e pai d b y th e insula r governmen t an d 17 2 b y municipa l governments . Th e expenditure s fo r educationa l purpose s fro m insula r fund s amounte d t o $4,363,007.59 , i n additio n t o whic h th e municipalitie s expende d $1,166,692.73 . Th e school s o f Puert o Ric o wer e house d i n 1,99 7 schoo l buildings , comprisin g 4,47 7 classrooms . O f thes e building s 1,09 6 belonge d t o th e peopl e o f Puert o Ric o an d 90 1 wer e eithe r rente d o r free . O f th e public-schoo l buildings , 1,60 9 ar e situate d i n th e rura l "barrios " an d 38 8 ar e situate d i n th e urba n centers . Th e tota l enrollmen t durin g th e yea r i n al l publi c school s wa s 229,169 , a n increas e o f 2,95 4 ove r th e precedin g year . Organize d schoo l lunc h room s numbere d 779 , an d a n averag e o f 36,01 8 childre n wer e serve d dail y durin g th e year . Th e governor , i n hi s annua l report , says : Thes e schoo l lunc h room s ar e supporte d b y th e insula r governmen t an d th e municipa l government , b y privat e organization s suc h a s parent-teache r associa tion s an d b y donations . Th e Puert o Ric o Chil d Healt h Committe e contribute d approximatel y one-hal f o f th e mone y use d durin g th e yea r fo r thi s work . Grate fu l acknowledgmen t i s mad e t o thi s organizatio n fo r it s splendi d help . Th e Puert o Ric o Chil d Healt h Committe e wa s forme d i n 1930 , largel y throug h th e effort s o f Governo r Roosevelt , b y representative s o f severa l nationa l healt h an d child-welfar e organization s o f th e continenta l Unite d States . Th e outstandin g featur e o f Puert o Rica n educationa l wor k durin g th e pas t severa l year s ha s bee n th e successfu l developmen t o f a ne w typ e o f consolidate d vocationa l rura l school . Durin g th e schoo l yea r 1928-29 , a s a n experimen t i n advancin g th e polic y o f th e Puert o Ric o governmen t o f adaptin g th e course s i n th e rura l school s t o th e need s an d condition s o f th e countr y people , th e departmen t o f educatio n opene d i n five rura l communitie s wha t ar e calle d second-uni t rura l 143558—3 2 4

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2 2 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S schools . Th e succes s o f th e ne w school s wa s immediat e an d pro nounced , an d befor e th e completio n o f th e firs t experimenta l yea r plan s fo r expansio n wer e i n progress . Thirtee n school s wer e i n operatio n i n 1929-30 ; i n 1930-3 1 th e numbe r increase d t o 36 ; an d i n 1931-3 2 t o 39 . I n hi s annua l repor t th e governo r say s wit h respec t t o thes e schools : Durin g th e yea r th e polic y o f coordinatin g th e departmen t o f healt h an d agri cultur e wit h th e departmen t o f educatio n ha s continued . Th e insula r govern men t i s devotin g preferentia l attentio n t o th e establishmen t o f vocationa l an d agricultura l schools , th e latte r know n locall y a s second-uni t rura l schools . Thes e schools , i n additio n t o givin g elementar y instructio n i n th e basi c academi c sub jects , devot e hal f th e schoo l da y t o practica l instructio n i n agricultur e an d variou s industries . Attache d t o eac h o f thes e school s i s a socia l worker , wh o i n additio n t o teachin g classe s als o visit s th e familie s i n he r distric t an d instruct s the m i n th e element s o f sanitation , preventiv e medicine , an d hom e management . Fo r th e trainin g o f thes e socia l worker s specia l course s ar e give n durin g th e summer s a t th e Universit y o f Puert o Rico . Thes e school s cooperat e closel y wit h th e departmen t o f agricultur e an d commerc e an d for m a n effectiv e metho d o f disseminatin g valuabl e informatio n t o adult s a s wel l a s t o th e schoo l children . Thi s typ e o f schoo l i s intende d t o b e an d i s becomin g a socia l an d communit y center ; an d wher e th e deman d warrant s it , nigh t classe s fo r adult s ar e given . Th e importanc e t o th e islan d o f th e developmen t o f thes e rura l agricultura l an d vocationa l school s ca n no t b e overestimated . The y ar e vita l t o ou r futur e welfare , an d i t i s regretabl e tha t the y wer e no t develope d an d pushe d fro m th e tim e o f th e America n occupatio n o f th e island . Congres s o n Marc h 3 , 1931 , extende d t o Puert o Ric o Federa l ai d i n vocationa l trainin g an d civilia n rehabilitation , an d durin g th e yea r th e su m o f $13,876.4 8 o f Federa l fund s an d th e su m o f $26,066.8 4 o f insula r fund s wer e use d i n thi s wor k b y th e insula r boar d fo r vocationa l educatio n se t u p i n accordanc e wit h th e requirement s o f th e Federa l acts . * * * I n furthe r pursuanc e o f th e polic y o f directin g it s majo r effor t t o rura l an d vocationa l education , th e governo r recommende d t o th e legislatur e i n Februar y tha t th e commissione r o f educatio n b e per mitte d t o charg e tuitio n fee s i n al l hig h school s i n orde r t o releas e fund s fo r thi s work . Th e recommendation , however , wa s no t acte d upon . Th e commissione r o f educatio n report s 4 1 privat e school s accredite d b y th e departmen t o f education , wit h a tota l enrollmen t o f 7,73 4 an d 35 9 teachers , a n increas e o f 74 0 i n enrollmen t an d 5 6 teacher s ove r th e precedin g year . Satisfactor y progres s o f th e Universit y o f Puert o Ric o i s reported . Th e enrollmen t fo r th e yea r 1931-3 2 wa s 2,308 , a s compare d wit h 1,70 3 durin g th e precedin g year . Unde r th e persona l directio n o f th e chancellor , Dr . Carlo s E . Chardon , th e universit y initiate d a n exten siv e progra m o f researc h bearin g upo n th e physical , economic , an d socia l problem s o f Puert o Rico . Health. —The genera l deat h rat e fo r th e calenda r yea r 193 1 wa s 20. 4 pe r 1,00 0 population , whic h i s 1. 8 point s highe r tha n th e rat e fo r th e precedin g yea r o f 18. 6 pe r 1,00 0 population , bu t i s lowe r tha n th e rat e fo r an y othe r yea r sinc e 1924 . Th e increase d deat h rat e fo r 193 1 i s attribute d t o th e hig h incidenc e o f malari a fo r th e year . Th e governo r report s tha t th e effort s o f th e governmen t towar d malari a contro l hav e no t me t wit h grea t success , du e primaril y t o th e extensiv e area s o f swam p an d lo w land s o f th e coasta l plains , t o th e drainin g o f whic h th e governmen t ca n no t devot e sufficien t funds . Th e Rocke felle r Foundatio n wa s aidin g i n a malari a demonstration , whic h wa s i n progres s a t th e en d o f th e year .

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23 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S I n hi s repor t fo r th e yea r ende d Jun e 30 , 1932 , th e governo r make s th e followin g statemen t wit h referenc e t o healt h condition s i n Puert o Ric o : Al l o f th e majo r healt h problem s i n Puert o Ric o ar e closel y allie d wit h th e economi c conditio n o f th e islan d an d th e standar d o f livin g o f th e people . Th e lo w standar d o f livin g prevalen t throughou t th e masse s o f th e peopl e an d th e pressur e o f populatio n ar e reflecte d i n a hig h incidenc e o f hookworm , malaria , tuberculosis , an d diet-deficienc y diseases , an d thes e disease s i n tur n lowe r th e vitalit y o f th e laborin g classe s an d hav e a grea t influenc e i n keepin g th e standard s o f livin g low . Th e governo r report s th e numbe r o f case s o f tuberculosi s i n th e islan d t o b e variousl y estimate d a t fro m 30,00 0 t o 50,000 . I n additio n t o it s genera l polic y o f teachin g disease-preventio n method s i n th e school s an d throug h th e healt h unit s an d b y cooperatio n wit h th e municipalities , th e insula r governmen t specificall y attempt s t o cop e wit h th e proble m o f tuberculosi s b y hospitalizatio n i n governmen t institution s an d subsidie s t o privat e charitabl e sanitariums . Th e healt h unit s an d subunit s operate d 6 4 mil k station s fo r infan t feedin g an d gav e ai d i n 3,12 5 case s durin g th e year . Seriou s effort s ar e bein g mad e t o contro l hookworm ; th e burea u o f rura l sanitatio n conducte d campaign s i n 1 1 municipalities . Th e Puert o Rican Governmen t continue d th e progra m whic h i t ha s bee n pursuin g durin g th e pas t severa l year s fo r th e consolidatio n o f insula r an d municipa l publi c healt h activitie s throug h th e extensio n ove r th e islan d o f a syste m o f healt h units . Thi s program , whic h ha s bee n describe d i n detai l i n recen t previou s annua l report s o f thi s burea u an d o f th e governo r o f Puert o Rico , call s fo r th e divisio n o f th e islan d int o fro m 2 0 t o 2 5 districts , eac h serve d b y a healt h unit , an d i s designe d t o wide n th e scop e o f public-healt h wor k an d reduc e th e expens e o f suc h work . Durin g th e yea r covere d b y th e lates t repor t o f th e governo r 1 7 o f thes e unit s wer e i n operation , servin g 2 9 munic ipalities . Sinc e th e clos e o f th e yea r tw o additiona l unit s hav e bee n opene d whic h serv e five additiona l municipalities . Nurse s attache d t o th e unit s mad e a tota l o f 54,45 3 visit s durin g th e year . A featur e o f th e healt h wor k i s cooperatio n wit h th e departmen t o f education . Th e Rockefelle r Foundatio n contribute d a tota l o f $72,399.3 6 t o healt h wor k i n Puert o Ric o durin g th e yea r 1931-32 , an d th e Puert o Ric o Chil d Healt h Committe e contribute d a tota l o f $40,000 . " With ou t thi s aid, " state s th e governor , "th e departmen t o f healt h woul d hav e bee n seriousl y embarrasse d i n it s program. " Election laws .—Governor-Roosevelt calle d th e legislatur e i n specia l sessio n fro m Novembe r 2 5 t o Decembe r 9 , 1931 , fo r th e expres s purpos e o f considerin g legislatio n t o provid e fo r fai r an d adequat e representatio n i n th e insula r an d loca l board s o f election s durin g th e registration s whic h wer e schedule d t o begi n Novembe r 30 , 1931 . A n ac t wa s passe d t o postpon e th e registrations , bu t th e legislatur e adjourne d a t th e en d o f th e 14-da y perio d allowe d unde r th e organi c ac t withou t havin g take n th e remedia l actio n requeste d b y th e governor . I n hi s messag e t o th e legislatur e a t th e openin g o f it s regula r sessio n i n Februar y o f thi s year , Governo r Beverle y gav e prominenc e t o hi s recommendation s fo r certai n revision s o f th e electio n laws . A bil l wa s passe d embodyin g som e o f th e governor' s recom mendations , bu t th e governo r fel t compelle d t o vet o th e bil l becaus e o f certai n objectionabl e feature s whic h ha d bee n incorporate d int o it .

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2 4 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S A thir d specia l sessio n o f th e twelft h legislatur e wa s calle d b y th e governo r t o conven e Jun e 21 , 1932 , an d consider , amon g othe r things , amendment s t o th e electio n la w i n th e interes t o f fai r elections . I n hi s messag e t o th e legislatur e a t th e openin g o f thi s specia l session , th e governo r outline d th e followin g point s deeme d necessar y t o secur e jus t an d impartia l election s i n th e island : (a) Observer s i n th e insula r an d loca l electio n board s fo r partie s b y petitio n o f 1 0 pe r cen t o r mor e o f th e tota l vot e cas t a t th e las t precedin g genera l elections ; (6 ) ful l representatio n fo r suc h partie s o n th e insula r an d loca l electio n board s i n cas e th e principa l partie s combin e i n an y for m eithe r b y fusio n o r b y nominatin g th e sam e candidate s fo r Residen t Commissione r t o th e Unite d States , o r b y nominatin g th e sam e candidate s fo r a majorit y o f th e senatoria l an d representativ e positions ; (c ) permissio n fo r candidate s t o appea r o n mor e tha n on e ticket ; (d) safeguardin g th e secrec y o f th e ballot ; (e) eliminatin g th e declaratio n o f voi d ballot s b y th e pol l boards . Tw o law s wer e enacte d b y th e legislatur e an d approve d b y th e governo r designe d t o giv e al l importan t politica l group s fai r repre sentatio n i n th e insula r an d loca l electio n board s an d i n pollin g place s an d t o exten d fo r a fe w day s th e tim e give n b y la w t o th e insula r boar d o f election s t o exclud e ne w registrant s fro m th e electio n lists . Thes e law s correc t th e mor e obviou s o f th e previousl y existin g defects . Workmen's compensation act. —Governor Beverle y i n hi s annua l repor t state d i n regar d t o workmen' s compensation : Th e presen t la w cover s al l labo r o f ever y kind , fro m th e highes t officia l o f a grea t corporatio n dow n t o th e lowest-pai d da} ^ laborer . Th e onl y exception s mad e ar e domesti c servants , governmen t employee s doin g clerica l wor k only , an d casua l laborers . Fo r example , a smal l farme r employin g on e da y labore r mus t tak e ou t a polic y an d pa y th e minimu m premiu m rate . Th e administra tio n consider s tha t a la w wit h suc h a broa d coverag e i s entirel y to o ambitiou s fo r th e island , considerin g th e condition s prevalen t amon g th e workin g classe s an d smal l employers , an d considerin g th e financial resource s o f th e islan d an d o f it s people . Bot h i n th e regula r sessio n o f th e legislatur e o f 193 2 an d i n th e specia l sessio n whic h convene d Jun e 21 , 1932 , th e governo r mad e urgen t recom mendatio n tha t th e industria l acciden t ac t b e modifie d b y narrowin g th e cover age , excludin g al l agricultura l laborer s no t workin g wit h powe r machinery , an d excludin g fro m th e compulsor y operatio n o f th e ac t al l employer s employin g fewe r tha n five persons . Th e administratio n als o recommende d tha t th e indus tria l commissio n b e diveste d o f al l administrativ e powe r an d that-th e admin istratio n o f th e la w b e concentrate d i n th e hand s o f th e treasure r o f Puert o Ric o i n plac e o f bein g scattere d a s a t present . Thes e amendment s wer e no t enacte d int o law . Puerto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission. —During th e fisca l yea r 193 2 a n additiona l Federa l appropriatio n o f $1,000,00 0 (inde penden t office s appropriatio n act , 1932 ) wa s mad e availabl e fo r th e Puert o Rica n Hurrican e Relie f Commissio n fo r repairin g an d con structin g road s i n Puert o Rico . Th e roa d wor k carrie d ou t b y th e commissio n unde r thi s an d prio r appropriation s i s approachin g com pletion . Th e tota l expenditure s o f th e commissio n u p t o Jun e 30 , 1932 , i n connectio n wit h hurrican e relie f an d rehabilitatio n wor k i n Puert o Ric o amounte d t o $9,504,322 , o f whic h $2,183,03 0 pertaine d t o th e fisca l yea r 1931-32 . Hurricane of September 27, 1932. —As thi s repor t wa s bein g pre pare d fo r submission , wor d wa s receive d tha t o n Septembe r 2 7 Puert o Ric o agai n experience d th e misfortun e o f bein g visite d b y a hurrican e o f extraordinar y severity . Fro m hi s cable d repor t o f a surve y whic h Governo r Beverle y mad e b y airplan e a s soo n a s practicabl e afte r th e

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25 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S subsidenc e o f th e stor m an d fro m subsequen t reports , i t appear s tha t th e hurrican e entere d th e easter n en d o f th e islan d an d pursue d a northwesterl y course , th e mos t severel y stricke n are a bein g th e easter n en d an d norther n coast , roughl y comprise d i n th e sectio n betwee n Fajard o an d Arecib o o n th e nort h an d Naguab o an d Ciale s o n th e south . Considerabl e damag e wa s sustaine d a s fa r sout h a s Yabuca o an d Rincon . Whil e th e devastate d are a wa s no t s o grea t a s i n th e cas e o f th e 192 8 hurricane , i t appear s tha t th e destructio n withi n th e stor m are a i s greater . Th e lis t o f know n dea d exceed s 200 ; th e injure d numbe r almos t 3,000 ; thos e i n nee d o f shelte r ar e estimate d a t 246,000 . Propert y losse s ar e tentativel y estimate d a t betwee n thirt y an d fifty millio n dollars . Estimate d cro p losse s i n th e stor m are a ar e a s fol lows : Sugarcane , 4 0 t o 5 0 pe r cent ; fruit , 10 0 pe r cent ; tobacco , 5 0 pe r cent ; vegetable s an d simila r crops , 7 5 pe r cent . Coffee-cro p losse s ar e estimate d a t 50"pe r cent . Ther e seem s t o b e reaso n fo r hopin g a t presen t tha t mos t o f th e coffe e tree s escape d destruction . Relie f wor k wa s promptl y underake n b y th e America n Re d Cross . Th e Puert o Ric o chil d healt h an d chil d feedin g committee s hav e renewe d th e ver y valuabl e activitie s the y hav e bee n pursuin g i n th e interes t o f th e childre n o f th e island . DOMINICA N CUSTOM S RECEIVERSHI P Th e annua l inspectio n o f th e receivershi p wa s mad e b y Col . Cree d F . Cox , assistan t t o th e chie f o f bureau , i n December , 1931 . Th e receivershi p wa s foun d t o b e operatin g efficientl y an d th e account s t o b e i n generall y satisfactor y condition . Th e custom s receipt s fo r th e yea r 193 1 amounte d t o $2,883,476.92 , a declin e o f $711,091 , o r 19.7 8 pe r cent , compare d wit h 193 0 an d th e lowes t sinc e 1921 . Th e declin e becam e mor e pronounce d a s th e yea r progressed . Th e genera l receive r i n hi s annua l repor t fo r th e calenda r yea r 193 1 attribute s th e decrease d revenue s t o diminishin g market s an d fallin g price s fo r th e stapl e expor t product s o f th e Dominica n Republic , t o th e consequen t curtailmen t o f buyin g powe r withi n th e country , an d t o th e fac t tha t importation s ar e confine d t o th e pressin g need s o f actua l consumption . Th e cos t o f operatio n o f th e receivershi p wa s withi n th e limit s prescribe d i n th e conventio n o f 1924 . (Appendi x G. ) Unde r th e arrangement , inaugurate d i n September , 1930 , a t th e reques t o f th e Presiden t o f th e Dominica n Republi c an d referre d t o i n th e bureau' s repor t o f las t year , th e genera l receive r continue d t o collec t th e internal-revenu e taxe s o n good s passin g throug h th e custom s houses . Th e amoun t o f suc h revenu e collecte d durin g 193 1 wa s $1,652,669.58 , o f wdiic h amoun t 4 pe r cen t wa s retaine d fo r operatin g expense s an d th e remainde r transmitte d t o th e Dominica n Government . Unde r th e term s o f th e conventio n o f 192 4 betwee n th e Unite d State s an d th e Dominica n Republic , n o par t o f th e proceed s o f th e custom s collection s wer e t o b e pai d ove r b y th e genera l receive r t o th e Dominica n Governmen t an d thu s becom e availabl e fo r meetin g th e genera l operatin g expense s o f tha t governmen t unles s an d unti l ther e remaine d i n th e genera l receiver' s hand s a balanc e fo r th e yea r i n questio n ove r an d abov e th e tota l amoun t require d fo r th e ful l paymen t o f certai n preferre d charges . Th e charge s t o b e thu s give n

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2 6 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S priorit y included , i n additio n t o th e expense s o f operatin g th e receiv ership , th e amount s necessar y t o discharg e th e interes t an d sinking fun d payment s o f th e Dominica n publi c deb t service d throug h th e genera l receivership . Fo r a numbe r o f year s previou s t o 193 0 th e custom s collection s ba d bee n sufficien t bot h t o mee t al l preferre d charge s an d als o t o permi t th e genera l receive r t o tur n ove r t o th e Dominica n treasur y a n annua l balanc e equivalen t i n amoun t t o a ver y substantia l par t o f th e operatin g expense s o f th e Dominica n Governmen t fo r th e yea r i n question . Durin g th e yea r 193 0 th e effect s o f th e world-wid e depressio n wer e reflecte d i n diminishe d custom s receipts , an d thi s conditio n wa s markedl y accentuate d b y th e disastrou s hurrican e whic h visite d Sant o Doming o i n Septembe r o f tha t year . Th e 193 0 collection s wer e onl y abou t 7 2 pe r cen t o f th e tota l fo r 1929 . Thi s decreas e i n custom s collection s wa s coinciden t wit h th e inauguratio n o f larg e amortizatio n payment s o n th e bonds . Th e ne t resul t o f thi s situatio n wa s tha t th e tota l availabl e fo r th e Dominica n Governmen t fro m custom s collection s durin g th e yea r 193 0 amounte d t o les s tha n $849,000 , a s contraste d wit h ove r $3,461,00 0 i n 1929 . Th e declin e i n custom s receipt s continue d i n 1931 . Earl y i n tha t yea r i t becam e apparen t tha t i f th e preferre d charge s agains t custom s receipt s wer e dul y me t ther e woul d probabl y b e n o balanc e availabl e t o b e turne d ove r b y th e genera l receive r t o th e Dominica n Government , whic h ha d com e t o rel y upo n suc h annua l payment s a s a n importan t supplemen t t o th e publi c revenue s derive d fro m othe r sources . Interes t an d sinkin g fun d charge s o n al l loan s wer e me t i n ful l fro m th e custom s receipt s u p t o an d includin g th e mont h o f July . B y August , however , th e collection s ha d decline d t o a poin t wher e th e ne t proceeds , afte r deductio n o f th e operatin g expense s o f th e genera l receivership , wer e insufficien t t o mee t full y th e payment s inciden t t o th e servic e o f th e debt . Unde r thes e circumstance s th e Dominica n Governmen t advance d th e su m ($36,595.74 ) necessar y t o complet e th e Augus t payments , bu t thi s wa s th e las t mont h fo r whic h ful l paymen t wa s made . Th e Septembe r an d Octobe r payment s wer e me t onl y t o th e exten t mad e possibl e b y th e custom s collection s an d thes e continue d t o decline . Meantim e th e Dominica n Governmen t wa s facin g a financia l crisi s th e difficultie s o f whic h wer e increase d b y th e aftermat h o f th e hurrican e o f th e previou s Septembe r an d th e discontinuanc e o f th e importan t ite m o f revenu e formerl y receive d fro m th e custom s collection s a s th e balanc e remainin g afte r th e pay ment , b y th e genera l receiver , o f al l preferre d charges . Effort s t o reconcil e budgetar y requirement s wit h availabl e incom e havin g prove n ineffectual , th e Dominica n Governmen t ha d recours e t o a measur e i n th e natur e o f a n emergenc y law , whic h becam e effectiv e Octobe r 26 , 1931 . Thi s la w provided , i n effect , fo r th e dispositio n o f custom s revenue s i n th e followin g order : First , paymen t o f expense s o f th e genera l receivership ; second , paymen t o f interes t installment s o n Dominica n Governmen t bonds ; third , paymen t o f $125,00 0 monthl y t o th e Dominica n Government . Unde r th e emergenc y la w th e priorit y o f th e charge s agains t th e custom s collection s represente d b y bot h th e operatin g expense s o f th e genera l receivershi p an d interes t payment s o n th e bond s continue s undisturbed ; bu t ther e ar e mad e availabl e monthl y fo r th e genera l purpose s o f th e Dominica n Governmen t certai n proceed s o f th e cus tom s collection s which , i n accordanc e wut h th e provision s o f th e con

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27 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S ventio n betwee n th e Unite d State s an d Dominica n Governments , shoul d instea d b e applie d t o reducin g th e principa l o f th e bonde d debt . Th e attitud e o f th e Unite d State s Governmen t wit h respec t t o th e actio n take n b y th e Dominica n Governmen t wa s announce d i n a statemen t prepare d an d release d t o th e pres s b y th e Stat e Depart men t fo r publicatio n o n Novembe r 11 , 1931 . Tha t statement , afte r referrin g t o th e seriousnes s o f th e financial situatio n i n whic h th e Dominica n Governmen t foun d itself , continue d a s follows : Havin g i n min d th e provision s o f th e conventio n betwee n th e Unite d State s an d th e Dominica n Republic , an d i n vie w o f th e circumstance s se t fort h above , thi s Governmen t i s no t dispose d a t thi s tim e t o tak e an y actio n othe r tha n t o continu e t o follo w wit h attentio n an d car e th e development s i n th e Dominica n Republic . I t i s th e belie f o f th e departmen t tha t thi s polic y wil l b e th e bes t fo r al l concerned , includin g th e bondholder s upo n whos e bond s th e Dominica n Governmen t propose s t o continu e t o pa y interes t regularly . Th e genera l receive r o f Dominica n customs , i n hi s annua l repor t fo r th e yea r 1931 , states : Th e administratio n o f th e custom s servic e i s no t affecte d b y th e radica l depar tur e fro m th e requirement s o f th e convention , an d remain s wit h th e receivership , exactl y a s heretofore , excep t fo r th e provision s o f Decre e No . 251 , whic h direct s tha t al l collection s a t th e thre e principa l ports—Sant o Domingo , Sa n Pedr o d e Macoris , an d Puert o Plata—b e diverte d an d place d t o th e credi t o f th e specia l agen t fo r th e emergenc y appointe d b y th e Dominica n Government . Receipt s fo r dutie s collecte d a t thos e port s ar e no w give n b y " interventore s especiales, " representin g th e specia l agent . Bu t i n al l othe r respect s th e admin istratio n o f th e offic e routin e continue s wit h th e receivership . I n othe r words , ther e i s a minimu m o f chang e fro m th e ol d order . On e practica l effec t o f th e operatio n o f th e emergenc y la w ha s bee n th e suspensio n o f al l sinking-fun d payment s subsequen t t o th e mont h o f October , 1931 . Paymen t o f interes t o n th e bond s was , however , mad e fo r th e entir e yea r 193 1 an d i s bein g continue d durin g th e yea r 1932 . Accordin g t o it s provisions , th e la w wil l ceas e t o hav e effec t a t th e en d o f th e yea r 1933 , o r a t an y tim e durin g th e year s 193 2 an d 193 3 whe n fo r an y 6-mont h perio d th e genera l revenue s o f th e Dominica n Republi c shal l amoun t t o $2,250,00 0 Unite d State s currency . Th e custom s revenue s s o fa r hav e bee n mor e tha n sufficien t t o fulfil l th e requirement s o f th e emergenc y law . CHANGE S I N PERSONNEL , BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Maj . Donal d M . Ashbridge , Coas t Artiller y Corps , assistan t t o chie f o f bureau , wa s relieve d fro m dut y an d lef t th e burea u o n Jun e 17,1932 . H e wa s succeede d b y Maj . Kar l F . Baldwin , Coas t Artiller y Corps , wh o reporte d fo r dut y a t th e burea u o n Jun e 30 , 1932 . Th e tou r o f dut y o f Col . Cree d F . Cox , Fiel d Artillery , a s senio r assistan t t o th e chie f o f bureau , terminate d o n Augus t 23 , 1932—sub sequen t t o th e clos e o f th e fiscal yea r 1931-32 . H e wa s succeede d b y Lieut . Col . Walte r C . Short , Infantry , wh o ha s bee n attache d t o th e burea u fo r dut y sinc e Septembe r 20 , 1930 . Lieut . Col . Edwar d A . Stockton , jr. , Coas t Artiller y Corps , reporte d fo r dut y o n Augus t 24 , 1932 , t o succee d Colone l Shor t i n dutie s whic h includ e specia l super visio n o f th e purchasing , disbursing , an d account s division . F . LEJ . PARKER , Brigadier General, United States Array, Chief of Bureau. B y W. C. S.

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2 8 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S APPENDI X A LAW S O F SPECIA L INTERES T T O TH E PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S AN D PUERT O RIC O ENACTE D DURIN G TH E FIRS T SESSIO N O F TH E SEVENTY-SECON D CONGRES S PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S AN D PUERT O RIC O Publi c No . 53 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (S . 3514) , approve d March , 8 , 1932 : "Regulatin g th e us e o f appropriation s fo r th e militar y an d nonmilitar y activitie s o f th e Wa r Department. " Direct s tha t i n purchase s b y th e Wa r Departmen t i n th e Unite d State s preferenc e b e give n t o domesti c articles , thereb y largel y exclud in g fro m Wa r Departmen t purchase s article s grown , produced , o r man ufacture d i n th e Philippin e Island s o r Puert o Rico . Public , No . 216 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 11452) , approve d Jun e 30 , 1932 : "Makin g appropriation s fo r th e Nav y Departmen t an d th e nava l servic e fo r th e fiscal yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1933 , an d fo r othe r purposes. " Contain s restriction s simila r t o Public , No . 5 3 (above) , wit h referenc e t o purchase s b y th e Nav y Department . Public , No . 212 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 11267) , approve d Jun e 30 , 1932 : "Makin g appropriation s fo r th e legislativ e branc h o f th e Governmen t fo r th e fiscal yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1933 , an d fo r othe r purposes. " Authorize s th e Presiden t a t an y tim e t o disban d th e Philippin e Scout s o r reduc e th e personne l thereof ; an d reduce s th e amoun t authorize d t o b e appropriate d fo r vocationa l educatio n an d civilia n rehabilitatio n whic h ha d bee n allotte d t o Puert o Ric o b y previou s legislatio n enacte d Marc h 3 , 1931 . PUERT O RIC O Publi c Resolutio n No . 20 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (S . J . Res . 36) , approve d Ma y 17 , 1932 . Change s th e nam e o f th e islan d o f "Port o Rico " t o "Puert o Rico. " Public , No . 302 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 9642) : "Emer genc y relie f an d constructio n ac t o f 1932, " approve d Jul y 21 , 1932 : "T o reliev e destitution , t o broade n th e lendin g power s o f th e Recon structio n Financ e Corporation , an d t o creat e employmen t b y provid in g fo r an d expeditin g a public-work s program. " Amend s th e Reconstructio n Financ e Corporatio n ac t (Public , No . 2, . 72 d Cong. ) an d include s Puert o Ric o i n it s terms . Public , No . 5 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 6660) , approved . Februar y 2 , 1932 : "Firs t deficienc y act , fiscal yea r 1932 T Appropriate s $45,00 0 fo r vocationa l wor k i n Puert o Rico . Public , No . 227 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 10022) , approve d Jun e 30 , 1932 , "Independen t office s appropriatio n act , 1933. " Appropriate s $75,00 0 fo r vocationa l wor k i n Puert o Rico . Publi c Resolutio n No . 12 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (S . J . Res . 110) , approve d Marc h 7 , 1932 : "Authorizin g th e distributio n o f Govern ment-owne d whea t t o th e America n Nationa l Re d Cros s an d othe r organization s fo r relie f o f distress. " Applicabl e t o Puert o Rico .

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29 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Publi c Resolutio n No . 33 , Seventy.secon d Congres s (H . J . Res . 418) , approve d Jul y 5 , 1932 : "Authorizin g th e distributio n o f Government owne d whea t a,n d cotto n t o th e America n Nationa l Re d Cros s an d othe r organization s fo r relie f o f distress. " Applicabl e t o Puert o Rico . Publi c Resolutio n No . 43 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (II . J . Res . 461) , approve d Jul y 22 , 1932 , make s appropriation s t o enabl e th e Federa l Far m Boar d t o carr y int o effec t th e provision s o f Publi c Resolutio n No . 33 . Public , No . 269 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 7912) , approve d Jul y 7 , 1932 : "Makin g appropriation s fo r th e Departmen t o f Agricul tur e fo r th e fisca l yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1933 , an d fo r othe r purposes. " Make s appropriation s fo r carryin g int o effec t th e provision s o f cer tai n act s o f Congress , includin g thos e relatin g t o agricultura l experi men t statio n work , fores t road s an d trails , highways , etc. , i n Puert o Rico . Public , No . 304 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 12280) , approve d Jul y 22 , 1932 : "Federa l Hom e Loa n Ban k act. " Include s Puert o Ric o withi n it s provisions . Public , No . 305 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 12768) , approve d Jul y 22 , 1932 : "Makin g a n appropriatio n fo r th e Federa l Hom e Loa n Ban k Boar d fo r th e fisca l yea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1933. " Appropriate s $250,00 0 fo r expense s preliminar y t o th e organizatio n an d establishmen t o f th e bank s create d b y Public , No . 30 4 (above) . Public , No . 154 , Seventy-secon d Congres s (H . R . 10236) , approved , Jun e 6 , 1932 : '/Revenu e ac t o f 1932. " Impose s excis e taxe s o n certai n article s sol d i n th e Unite d State s b y th e manufacture r o r producer , o r importe d int o th e Unite d States . Fo r th e purpose s o f thes e taxe s Puert o Ric o i s include d i n th e ter m "Unite d States. " I n th e applicatio n o f th e ac t certai n product s o f th e Philippin e Island s ar e exempte d fro m it s provisions . Th e provision s o f th e revenu e ac t o f 192 8 relativ e t o taxe s o f foreig n countrie s an d possession s o f th e Unite d State s remai n unchanged . APPENDI X B LIS T O F PRINCIPA L MEASURE S AFFECTIN G TH E PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S AN D PUERT O RIC O INTRODUCE D DURIN G TH E FIRS T SESSIO N O F TH E SEVENTY-SECON D CONGRES S BU T WHIC H WER E NO T ENACTE D PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S AN D PUERT O RIC O S . 3349 ; H . R . 5612 ; II . R . 6744 ; H . R . 8017 ; II . R . 9308 ; H . R . 10743 : Al l requirin g preferenc e fo r America n good s i n purchase s b y executiv e departments . H . R . 5612 . Limitin g th e purchase s o f th e Pos t Offic e Department , s o far a s possible , t o article s th e growth , production , o r manufactur e o f th e Unite d States , wa s referre d t o th e Committe e o n th e Pos t Offic e an d Pos t Roads , reporte d wit h amendmen t (H . Rept . No . 549) , an d debated . H . R . 10743 . Requirin g th e purchas e o f domesti c supplie s fo r publi c us e an d th e us e o f domesti c material s i n publi c building s an d

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3 0 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S works , wa s referre d t o th e Committe e o n Expenditure s i n th e Execu tiv e Departments , reporte d (H . Rept . No . 882) , bu t no t passed . Th e onl y bill s affectin g purchase s fro m th e Philippin e Island s o r Puert o Ric o b y th e executiv e department s whic h wer e enacte d int o la w wer e thos e relatin g t o purchase s b y th e Wa r an d Nav y Depart ment s (Publi c Nos . 5 3 an d 216 ) an d liste d i n Appendi x A . S . J . Res . 35 : "Authorizin g th e Presiden t t o reorganiz e th e ad ministratio n o f th e insula r possessions. " Provide s tha t wheneve r th e Presiden t find s i t i s i n th e publi c interes t h e i s authorize d b y Executiv e Orde r t o transfe r t o th e jurisdictio n o f suc h executiv e departmen t a s h e shal l designat e "th e whol e o r an y par t o f th e function s o f th e Secretar y o f Wa r an d th e Burea u o f Insula r Affair s o f th e Wa r Departmen t wit h respec t t o matter s pertainin g t o th e administratio n an d civi l governmen t o f th e Philippin e Island s an d Puert o Rico, " fo r th e creatio n o f a n offic e o f insula r affair s unde r a directo r t o b e appointe d b y th e President , b y an d wit h th e advic e an d consen t o f th e Senate . (Introduce d Decembe r 9 , 1931 ; referre d t o th e Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affairs. ) A numbe r o f bill s wer e introduced , bot h i n th e Senat e an d House , wit h a vie w t o reorganizin g th e executiv e agencie s o f th e Governmen t a s a measur e o f economy . On e measur e (S . J . Res . 76 ) wa s reporte d b y th e Senat e Committe e o n Financ e o n Februar y 2 , 193 2 (S . Rept . No . 157) , debate d i n th e Senate , bu t indefinitel y postponed . Other s wer e referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n Rule s o r o n Expenditure s i n th e Executiv e departments . Al l faile d o f passage . S . 4262 : "Merchan t airshi p act , 1932. " Providin g fo r th e estab lishmen t an d developmen t o f America n air-transpor t service s over seas ; t o encourag e constructio n i n th e Unite d State s b y America n capita l o f America n airship s an d othe r aircraf t fo r us e i n "foreig n commerce, " meanin g commerc e betwee n th e Unite d State s o r pos session s o r Territorie s o f th e Unite d State s an d foreig n countries , o r betwee n th e Unite d State s an d possession s o r Territorie s o f th e Unite d States , o r betwee n possession s o r Territorie s o f th e Unite d States , o r betwee n foreig n countries ; an d th e ter m "mail s o f th e Unite d States " t o includ e mail s o f th e Philippin e Islands . (Introduce d Marc h 30 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Committe e o n Com merce ; reporte d wit h amendment s (S . Rept . No . 670) , o n Ma y 9 , 1932. ) S . 3596 ; H . R . 9204 : "Fisca l yea r 193 3 militar y reservatio n act. " Authorize s th e Secretar y o f Wa r t o sel l o r dispos e o f certai n surplu s rea l estat e o f th e Wa r Department . Contemplate s transferrin g t o th e Nav y Departmen t a portio n o f Marivele s Reservation , P . I . an d t o th e peopl e o f Puert o Ric o th e Escambro n tract . (Introduce d Februar y 1 0 an d 11 , 1932 ; referre d t o Committee s o n Militar y Affairs. ) S . J ? Res . 80 : Authorizin g th e Secretar y o f Wa r t o emplo y militar y force s an d propert y fo r emergenc y relief . Include s relie f fro m storms , floods, famine , earthquakes , o r othe r emergenc y i n an y State , Territory , o r dependenc y o f th e Unite d States . (Introduce d Januar y 15 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Senat e Committe e o n Militar y Affairs ; reporte d wit h amendment s Februar y 8 (S . Rept .

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31 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S No . 194) ; recommitte d t o th e Senat e Committe e o n Militar y Affair s Februar y 10 ; committe e discharge d Marc h 23 ; bil l ordere d t o calen dar ; debated , bu t no t passed. ) H . R . 4676 : "T o promot e trave l t o an d i n th e Unite d State s an d it s possessions , thereb y promotin g America n business ; an d t o encourag e foreig n trave l i n th e Unite d States. " Authorize s th e creatio n o f a trave l divisio n i n th e Burea u o f Foreig n an d Domesti c Commerc e o f th e Departmen t o f Commerce . (Introduce d Decembe r 8 , 1931 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Interstat e an d Foreig n Commerce. ) H . R . 205 : "T o amen d th e ac t entitle d 'A n ac t t o regulat e th e immigratio n o f alien s to , an d th e residenc e o f alien s in , th e Unite d States'. " Amend s th e ac t approve d Februar y 5 , 1917 , s o a s t o secur e ful l an d accurat e informatio n relativ e t o trave l b y wate r o f al l alien s an d Unite d State s citizen s betwee n th e Unite d States , Hawaii , th e Philip pin e Islands , Guam , Puert o Rico , th e Virgi n Islands , America n Samoa , o r betwee n suc h port s an d foreig n ports . (Introduce d Decembe r 8 , 1931 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Immigratio n an d Naturalization. ) TH E PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S H . J . Res . 74 ; H . J . Res . 426 : Authorizin g th e restoratio n o f a limitation , o n th e importation , fre e o f duty , o f Philippin e suga r an d th e placin g o f a limitation , fre e o f duty , o n Philippin e coconu t oil . H . J . Res . 7 4 propose s t o limi t th e amoun t o f Philippin e suga r admitte d fre e t o 600,00 0 shor t ton s i n an y fisca l year , an d coconu t oi l t o 400,000,00 0 pounds . H . J . Res . 42 6 propose s t o limi t th e amoun t o f Philippin e suga r admitte d fre e t o 500,00 0 shor t ton s i n an y fiscal year . Bot h bill s referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n Way s an d Means . Othe r attempt s t o plac e limitation s o n certai n Philippin e product s wer e include d i n amendment s propose d t o th e independenc e bills . Al l faile d o f passage . S . 23 ; S . 2743 ; S . 3080 ; S . 3377 ; H . R . 6 ; H . R . 4626 ; H . R . 5462 ; H . R . 5509 ; H . R . 7233 ; II . R . 7610 ; H . R . 8758 ; H . J . Res . 100 : Al l providin g fo r th e independenc e o f th e Philippin e Island s an d som e includin g legislatio n affectin g Filipin o immigratio n int o th e Unite d State s an d trad e relations . I n Januar y an d February , 1932 , hearing s wer e hel d befor e th e Hous e Committe e o n Insula r Affair s o n H . R . 7233 ; o n Januar y 2 9 certai n amendment s wer e submitte d b y th e Filipin o Legislativ e Mission , th e mos t importan t bein g wit h referenc e t o a plebiscite , immigration , an d trad e relations ; an d i n Februar y hearing s wer e hel d befor e th e Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affair s o n S . 3377 . S . 337 7 wa s reporte d b y th e Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affair s o n Marc h 1 (S . Rept . 354) ; debated ; severa l amend ment s considered . H . R . 723 3 wa s reporte d wit h amendment s b y th e Hous e Committe e o n Insula r Affair s o n Marc h 1 5 (H . Rept . 806) ; passe d Hous e Apri l 4 ; referre d t o Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affairs .

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3 2 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S H . R . 723 3 reporte d b y th e Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affair s o n Apri l 2 6 wit h a n amendmen t i n th e natur e o f a sub stitute , whic h amendmen t wa s S . 337 7 a s reporte d Marc h 1,1932 , i n S . Rept . 354 . Debate d i n Senate ; a numbe r o f amendments—som e relatin g t o immigratio n o f Filipino s int o th e Unite d States , limitatio n o n certai n Philippin e product s admitte d duty free—wer e submitte d an d discusse d an d severa l agree d to ; o n Jul y 1 Senat e postpone d furthe r consideratio n o f bil l unti l 2 p . m. , Decembe r 8 , 1932 . H . R . 6391 ; H . R . 7922 : Bot h affectin g trad e relation s betwee n th e Philippin e Island s an d th e Unite d States . H . R . 639 1 provide s fo r th e collectio n o f custom s dutie s o n certai n article s comin g fro m th e Philippin e Islands , no w dut y free , th e dutie s collecte d t o b e turne d ove r t o th e Philippines . H . R . 792 2 amend s th e Unite d State s tarif f ac t o f 193 0 b y changin g th e rate s o n certai n article s i n whic h th e Philippine s ar e interested . Bill s referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Way s an d Means . S . 2 an d a numbe r o f Hous e bill s wer e introduced , al l affectin g th e immigratio n o f Filipino s int o th e Unite d States . Provision s t o restric t immigratio n wer e als o embodie d i n certai n o f th e independenc e bills , includin g H . R . 723 3 passe d b y th e Hous e an d S . 337 7 unde r discussio n a t th e clos e o f th e session , which , i n effect , place d Filipino s o n a nonquot a basi s no t exceedin g 10 0 durin g an y calenda r year . Al l measure s affectin g Philippin e immigratio n faile d o f passage . S . 1332 : T o amen d sectio n 2 9 o f th e organi c ac t o f 191 6 b y increas in g th e salarie s o f certai n official s o f th e governmen t appointe d b y th e President—th e Governo r General , Vic e Governor , auditor , an d dep ut y auditor . (Introduce d Decembe r 10 , 1931 ; referre d t o th e Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affairs. ) H . R . 6597 : "T o permi t th e naturalizatio n o f certai n Filipino s wh o hav e serve d i n th e Unite d State s Army. " Extend s th e privileg e o f naturalizatio n t o Filipino s wit h servic e i n th e Unite d State s Army , i n additio n t o thos e wh o hav e serve d i n th e Unite d State s Nav y o r Marin e Corp s o r th e Nava l Auxiliar y Servic e havin g tha t privileg e a t present . (Introduce d Decembe r 22 , 1931 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Immigratio n an d Naturalization. ) H . J . Res . 339 : T o repea l tha t par t o f th e Unite d State s naturaliza tio n ac t o f Jun e 29 , 1906 , whic h provide s fo r th e naturalizatio n o f Filipino s wh o hav e rendere d servic e i n th e Unite d State s Nav y o r Marin e Corp s o r th e Nava l Auxiliar y Service . (Introduce d Marc h 18 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n Immigratio n an d Naturalization. ) S . 3547 ; II . R . 8972 : "Fisca l yea r 193 3 Arm y rea l estat e act. " Authorizin g th e Secretar y o f Wa r t o acquire , exchange , transfer , an d sel l certai n tract s o f rea l estate , includin g For t Sa n Pedr o an d Warwic k Barracks , Cebu . S . 354 7 introduce d Februar y 8 , 1932 ; reporte d wit h amendment s fro m Senat e Committe e o n Militar y Affair s (S . Rept . 267) ; passe d Senat e Februar y 24 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Militar y Affairs ,

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33 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S H . R . 897 2 introduce d Februar y 8 , 1932 ; referre d t o Hous e Com mitte e o n Militar y Affairs . H . R . 10705 : "Relatin g t o retiremen t annuit y fo r civil-servic e employee s wh o serve d unde r th e governmen t o f th e Philippin e Island s an d o f th e chartere d citie s thereof. " Amend s th e Unite d State s civi l servic e retiremen t ac t o f Ma y 29 , 1930 , s o a s t o includ e th e governmen t o f th e Philippin e Island s o r th e governmen t o f an y declare d cit y thereof . (Introduce d Marc h 21 , 1932 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n th e Civi l Service. ) H . R . 11862 : "Authorizin g th e Presiden t o f th e Unite d State s t o gran t reprieve s an d pardon s fo r offense s committe d i n o r agains t th e law s o f an y an d al l Territorie s an d possession s o f th e Unite d State s an d place s subjec t t o th e jurisdictio n thereof , includin g th e Philippin e Islands. " (Introduce d Ma y 4 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n th e Judiciary. ) PUERT O RIC O H . R . 341 : T o provid e fo r a n electiv e governo r o f Puert o Rico . Provide s fo r th e quadrennia l electio n o f th e governor , wh o mus t b e a nativ e o f th e island , no t unde r 3 0 year s o f age , an d 1 0 year s a resi den t o f Puert o Rico . (Introduce d Decembe r 8 , 1931 ; referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n Insula r Affairs. ) S . 4691 ; H . R . 12100 : T o amen d th e organi c ac t o f Puert o Rico , approve d Marc h 2 , 1917 , providin g fo r equa l protectio n t o voter s o n al l electio n boards . (Introduce d i n Senat e Ma y 1 8 an d i n Hous e Ma y 16 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e tw o committee s handlin g insula r affairs. ) H . R . 6479 : "T o provid e fo r th e fillin g o f certai n vacancie s i n th e Senat e an d Hous e o f Representative s o f Puert o Rico. " Authorize s specia l electio n t o fil l vacancie s du e t o an y caus e othe r tha n expiratio n o f ter m o f office ; and , unde r certai n othe r circum stances , provide s fo r fillin g o f vacanc y throug h appointmen t b y th e governo r o f a membe r o f tha t politica l part y t o whic h th e senato r o r representativ e las t electe d t o th e offic e wa s accredite d a t th e tim e o f suc h election . (Introduce d Decembe r 21 , 1931 ; referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n Insula r Affairs. ) H . R . 6711 : "Grantin g th e Legislatur e o f Puert o Ric o th e powe r t o enforc e th e prohibitio n o f intoxicatin g liquors. " (Introduce d Januar y 4 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n th e Judiciary. ) H . R . 10205 : "T o authoriz e th e acquisitio n fo r militar y purpose s o f certai n land s i n Puert o Rico. " Provide s fo r th e purchas e o f tha t portio n o f th e Sa n Jua n Military Reservatio n know n a s Sa n Geronimo . (Introduce d Marc h 5 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n Militar y Affairs. ) S . J . Res . 183 ; H . J . Res . 370 : T o amen d th e Puert o Rica n hurri can e relie f ac t b y authorizin g th e Puert o Rica n Hurrican e Relie f

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3 4 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Commissio n t o acquir e i n th e nam e o f th e Unite d State s th e titl e t o parcel s o f lan d an d othe r propert y i n Puert o Ric o i n satisfactio n o f debt s owin g t o th e Unite d States . (Hous e bil l introduce d Apri l 19 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Hous e Com mitte e o n Insula r Affairs ; Senat e bil l introduce d Jun e 18 , 1932 ; referre d t o th e Senat e Committe e o n Territorie s an d Insula r Affairs. ) H . R . 5093 , II . R . 7436 : Providin g fo r th e registratio n o f alien s an d certificate s o f identification . Include s alien s i n Puert o Rico . (Introduce d Decembe r 9 , 1931 , an d Januar y 11 , 1932 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Immigratio n an d Naturalization. ) H . R . 6399 : "T o exten d t o Puert o Ric o th e benefit s o f th e ac t entitle d ' A n ac t t o provid e tha t th e Unite d State s shal l ai d th e State s i n th e constructio n o f rura l pos t roads , an d fo r othe r purposes, ' approve d Jul y 11 , 1916. " (Introduce d Decembe r 19 , 1931 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Roads. ) S . 136 , S . 3800 ; H . R . 110 , H . R . 5655 , H . R . 10052 : Providin g fo r cooperatio n wit h th e severa l State s i n th e care , education , voca tiona l guidance , physica l rehabilitatio n o f cripple d children . Puert o Ric o t o shar e i n th e benefits . (Senat e bill s referre d t o th e Senat e Committe e o n Educatio n an d Labor ; Hous e bill s referre d t o th e Hous e Committe e o n Education. ) S . 572 ; H . R . 4739 , H . R . 7525 : "T o provid e tha t th e Unite d State s shal l cooperat e v T it h th e State s i n promotin g th e genera l healt h o f th e rura l populatio n o f th e Unite d State s an d th e welfar e an d hygien e o f mother s an d children. " Puert o Ric o t o shar e i n th e benefits . (S . 57 2 introduce d Decembe r 9 , 1931 ; referre d t o Senat e Committe e o n Commerce ; reporte d wit h amendment s Marc h 1 5 (S . Rep L 42 8 i n tv T o parts) ; passe d ove r o n calendar. ) (Hous e bill s referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Interstat e an d Foreig n Commerce . H . R . 752 5 reporte d Januar y 18 , 193 2 (H . Rept , 101). ) H . R . 4743 : T o amen d "A n ac t t o provid e fo r th e promotio n o f vocationa l rehabilitatio n o f person s disable d i n industr y o r otherwis e an d thei r retur n t o civi l employment " (whic h ac t wa s extende d t o Puert o Rico ) b y extendin g annua l appropriation s t o Jun e 30 , 1937 , etc . (Introduce d Decembe r 8 , 1931 ; referre d t o Hous e Committe e o n Education ; reporte d wit h amendment s Marc h 2 5 (H . Rept . 898) ; passe d Hous e Ma y 18 ; referre d t o Senat e Committe e o n Educatio n an d Labor ; reporte d Jun e 1 3 (S . Rept . 821). )

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35 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S APPENDI X C PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S Total foreign trade 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Consignment s Fro m Unite d State s Fro m othe r countrie s Tota l Shipment s T o Unite d State s T o othe r countrie s Tota l 1922. . 192 3 i 192 4 i . 1925_ . 1926. . 1927_ . 1928 1929 1930 1931. . $47,738,32 6 50,352 , 53 5 60,398,60 3 69,297 , 58 3 71 , 575 , 61 8 71,478,29 7 83,858,06 8 92 , 592,95 9 78,183,02 9 62,139,68 3 $32,459,31 9 37,147 , 21 2 47 , 612 , 29 2 50,435 , 25 1 47 , 723,37 4 44 , 373,17 5 50,798,83 0 54 , 567 , 31 6 44,909,92 5 37,039 , 03 6 $80 , 87 , 108 , 119 , 119 , 115 , 134 , 147 , 123 , 99 , 197,64 5 499,74 7 010 , 89 5 732,83 4 298,99 2 851,47 2 656,89 8 160,27 5 092,95 4 178,71 9 $64 , 111 , 60 1 85,047,02 3 97,313,90 3 109,044,94 2 100,003 , 21 5 116,038,25 0 115 , 585,87 6 124,465,47 3 105,342,06 1 83,422,39 7 $31,471,69 7 35,705,96 7 38 , 030,76 0 39,832,26 3 36,881,10 5 39,535,83 5 39,468,67 0 39,981,37 0 27,825,06 7 20 , 549,67 7 $95 , 583 , 29 8 120,752,99 0 135,344 , 66 3 148,877,20 5 136,884,32 0 155 , 574,08 5 155 , 054 , 54 6 164 , 446 , 84 3 133,167,12 8 103 , 972,07 4 1 Correcte d figures unde r consignments . Manila-hemp shipments Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r to n Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r to n Long tons Long tons 1922 169,30 9 $19,540,91 5 $11 5 82 , 22 5 $10,331,77 6 $12 6 192 3 187,43 3 24 , 951 , 57 5 13 3 81,16 7 12,635,31 1 15 6 192 4 174 , 51 0 29,950,45 8 17 2 75,99 9 15,267 , 23 8 20 1 1925. . 148,63 8 35 , 521 , 64 6 23 9 58,97 6 18 , 200 , 64 9 30 9 1926 — 151 , 60 9 32,142,03 8 21 2 60,88 1 16,301,10 1 26 8 192 7 146 , 47 4 29 , 687,12 9 20 3 47,77 9 12 , 261,97 5 25 7 192 8 172,14 0 26 , 593 , 60 6 15 4 50 , 30 4 9 , 527,04 5 18 9 192 9 186,43 1 28,420 , 55 0 15 2 66 , 83 0 12 , 276.36 3 18 4 1930 „ 166 , 61 6 18,426 , 67 6 11 1 57,78 2 7 , 638,02 9 13 3 193 1 130,02 6 8,942,90 7 6 9 27 , 46 1 2 , 511,73 4 9 1 Coconut-oil shipments Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Long tons Cents Long tons Cents 192 2 105,51 4 $15 , 734 , 48 6 6.6 6 104,96 0 $15 . 644 , 25 3 6 . 6 5 192 3 87,77 4 14 , 066 , 58 2 7.1 5 83,40 9 13 , 375 , 39 7 7.1 6 192 4 109,86 5 18,811,03 1 7 . 6 4 108,81 0 18 , 628,40 6 7.6 4 1925 — 102,48 2 19,820,18 9 8 . 6 3 94 , 85 1 18,428 , 48 2 8 . 6 7 192 6 115,43 8 22 , 345 , 21 7 8 . 6 4 113,11 6 21 , 926,02 4 8 . 6 5 1927 142 , 51 5 : 24 , 840 , 68 3 7.7 8 139,35 2 24 , 284 , 36 1 7 . 7 8 192 8 — 139 , 99 6 23,489,17 3 7 . 4 9 138 , 60 8 23 , 239 , 52 1 7.4 9 192 9 187 , 50 9 29,184,94 2 6.9 5 185,70 7 28 , 900 , 58 7 6.9 5 193 0 145,03 6 19,155 , 38 2 5.8 9 143,79 6 18,961,82 7 5 . 8 9 193 1 162 , 36 4 15 , 035 , 32 2 4.1 3 146 , 38 3 13 , 585 , 68 4 4.1 4

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3 6 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Copra shipments 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r to n Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r to n Long tons Long tons 192 2 170,31 8 $14,103,07 3 $8 3 87,94 6 $7,247,50 7 $8 2 1923 . 203,85 9 19 , 246 , 99 9 9 4 127,21 7 11,989,93 2 9 4 192 4 154,28 5 15,351 , 88 2 9 9 105,82 8 10,498,16 5 9 9 192 5 144,39 1 15,868,70 3 11 0 114,32 3 12 , 581 , 55 0 11 0 192 6 171 , 27 2 18 . 586,73 3 10 9 127,04 2 13,816 , 39 6 10 9 1927 . 196,17 0 19,155,74 1 9 8 154,35 0 15,238,15 7 9 8 192 8 230,71 3 22,542,34 1 9 8 179,70 1 17,603,83 2 9 8 192 9 170,83 0 15,565,82 1 9 1 127 , 57 0 11,440,89 8 9 0 193 0 171 , 54 6 13,433,43 8 7 8 138,93 1 10 , 654,34 8 7 7 193 1 171,48 6 9,150,40 4 5 3 118,97 5 6,052,32 9 5 1 Desiccated-coconut shipments 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d 192 2 i Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 192 3 Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 1924 Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 1925 . — Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 1926 . Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 192 7 ._ _ Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 192 8 Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 192 9 Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 193 0 Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 193 1 Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,117,27 3 9,588,14 0 17,932,10 8 27,608 , 67 0 31 , 587,04 7 33,472,87 7 44,895,71 1 49,130,66 4 43,943,82 0 37,084,97 2 $209,67 4 903,12 3 1 , 598 , 55 9 2,608,87 3 2,757 , 65 7 2,850,06 0 3 , 723 , 58 6 3 , 540,12 4 2,962,84 5 1 , 822,12 9 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.9 2 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 Pounds 2,115,69 7 9,583,26 2 17,916,41 8 27,574,47 5 31 , 526,98 6 33,370,65 5 44,838,72 2 49,094 , 77 7 43,886.90 1 37,044,92 8 $209,52 1 902,57 6 1,597,41 3 2,605,61 1 2,751,96 4 2,840 , 28 6 3,718,26 9 3,537,00 4 2,958,71 0 1 , 819 , 69 1 Cents 9.9 0 9.4 2 8.92 . 9.4 5 8.7 3 8.5 1 8.2 9 7.2 0 6.7 4 4.9 1 i No t separatel y reporte d prio r t o Jan . 1 , 1922 . Include s revisio n o f preliminar y figures. Sugar shipments 1 Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Valu e pe r poun d Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Long tons Cents Long tons Cents 192 2 351,55 2 $25,013,31 0 3.1 8 236,18 4 $19,441,01 3 3.6 7 192 3 266,84 7 34 , 380 , 57 0 5 . 7 5 226,08 8 30,241,48 7 5.9 7 192 4 347,71 8 41,170,81 3 5.2 9 291,65 7 36,793,85 6 5.6 3 192 5 534,13 2 44,973,68 5 3.7 6 452,61 8 40,879,46 1 4.03 . 192 6 402,95 5 32,003,56 1 3.5 4 334,13 7 28,936,77 7 3 . 8 7 192 7 — 542,77 3 50,076,77 7 4.1 2 498,49 6 47,670,56 4 4.2 7 192 8 553,01 5 46 , 587,20 5 3.7 6 517 , 92 8 44,743,28 8 3 . 8 6 192 9 677,97 3 52,419,82 6 3.4 5 653 , 51 8 51,336,98 3 3 . 5 1 193 0 705,28 6 49,517,40 7 3.1 4 698,62 0 49,317,03 7 3.1 5 193 1 701,20 1 46,633,23 9 2 . 9 7 700,61 1 46,619,58 4 2.97 " i Refine d sugar , annua l averag e 1926-193 1 approximatel y 14,00 0 lon g tons , no t included .

PAGE 43

37 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Leaf-tobacco shipments Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Pounds Cents Pounds Cents 1922. — 33,354,91 5 $2,273,11 7 6.8 1 21,74 6 $6,15 2 28.2 9 192 3 53 , 528,37 4 3 , 636,71 0 6.7 9 286,06 4 52,85 2 18.4 8 192 4 47 , 803,70 6 4 , 034,46 6 8.4 4 66,36 9 10,57 2 15 . 9 3 192 5 36 , 559,16 4 3,065,00 7 8.3 8 6,33 2 91 2 14 . 4 0 1926. . 31 , 576,75 5 2 , 679 , 63 0 8.4 9 9 , 37 0 3,82 0 40.7 6 1927.. . 52,004 , 30 3 3,918,74 9 7 . 5 4 157,17 5 28,89 8 18 . 3 9 192 8 44 , 571,47 0 3,029,63 3 6.8 0 124,61 7 15,89 6 12 . 7 6 192 9 60,800 , 64 3 4 , 392,43 5 7.2 2 104,00 9 12,60 4 12.1 2 1930 45,790 , 90 0 3,725,87 9 8.1 3 422 , 52 5 48,69 5 11 . 5 2 193 1 49,941,02 2 3 , 501,49 6 7 . 0 1 236,10 6 41,26 8 17 . 4 8 Cigar shipments 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r thousan d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r thousan d 192 2 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 192 3 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 192 4 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 192 5 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 192 6 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 192 7 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 192 8 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 192 9 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 193 0 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 193 1 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 Thousands 300,48 5 280 , 75 5 218 , 59 9 252 , 55 3 247 , 72 6 207 , 57 8 220 , 88 4 188 , 33 3 178 , 56 1 183 , 87 4 $5 , 801,11 0 6,169 , 94 4 5,404,66 2 6 , 043 , 97 6 5,663,42 0 4,652 , 25 8 4,765,14 0 3 , 824 , 64 9 3 , 545,22 3 3,395 , 33 7 $19.3 1 21.9 8 24.7 2 23.9 3 22 . 8 6 22.4 1 21 . 5 7 20.3 1 19 . 8 5 18 . 4 7 Thousands 173,31 7 219,89 8 175 , 76 2 207,08 0 195,32 7 167 , 30 0 179 , 57 0 150,94 5 144,76 7 158 , 52 0 $4,259,78 8 5,149,11 5 4,419 , 78 2 5,025 , 59 6 4 , 569 , 21 8 3 , 768,91 6 3 , 855 , 67 2 3,013,35 5 2 , 810,27 9 2 , 885 , 36 6 $24 . 5 8 23 . 4 2 25.1 5 24 . 2 5 23 . 3 9 22 . 5 3 21 . 4 7 19 . 9 6 19.4 1 18.2 0 Embroidery shipments 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 192 2 $3,261 , 57 2 6,375 , 64 5 4,698,00 1 4 , 571 , 67 5 5,992,38 9 $3,253,69 3 6 , 365 , 58 5 4 , 686,68 0 4 , 550,15 4 5 , 976,46 4 192 7 $4,003,47 6 4 , 523 , 96 8 6,011,53 2 3,591,73 7 2 , 657,13 0 $3 , 976,12 6 4,483 , 51 3 5,962,09 3 3 , 544,03 6 2,625,32 3 192 3 $3,261 , 57 2 6,375 , 64 5 4,698,00 1 4 , 571 , 67 5 5,992,38 9 $3,253,69 3 6 , 365 , 58 5 4 , 686,68 0 4 , 550,15 4 5 , 976,46 4 192 8 $4,003,47 6 4 , 523 , 96 8 6,011,53 2 3,591,73 7 2 , 657,13 0 $3 , 976,12 6 4,483 , 51 3 5,962,09 3 3 , 544,03 6 2,625,32 3 192 4 $3,261 , 57 2 6,375 , 64 5 4,698,00 1 4 , 571 , 67 5 5,992,38 9 $3,253,69 3 6 , 365 , 58 5 4 , 686,68 0 4 , 550,15 4 5 , 976,46 4 192 9 $4,003,47 6 4 , 523 , 96 8 6,011,53 2 3,591,73 7 2 , 657,13 0 $3 , 976,12 6 4,483 , 51 3 5,962,09 3 3 , 544,03 6 2,625,32 3 192 5 $3,261 , 57 2 6,375 , 64 5 4,698,00 1 4 , 571 , 67 5 5,992,38 9 $3,253,69 3 6 , 365 , 58 5 4 , 686,68 0 4 , 550,15 4 5 , 976,46 4 1930 $4,003,47 6 4 , 523 , 96 8 6,011,53 2 3,591,73 7 2 , 657,13 0 $3 , 976,12 6 4,483 , 51 3 5,962,09 3 3 , 544,03 6 2,625,32 3 192 6 $3,261 , 57 2 6,375 , 64 5 4,698,00 1 4 , 571 , 67 5 5,992,38 9 $3,253,69 3 6 , 365 , 58 5 4 , 686,68 0 4 , 550,15 4 5 , 976,46 4 193 1 $4,003,47 6 4 , 523 , 96 8 6,011,53 2 3,591,73 7 2 , 657,13 0 $3 , 976,12 6 4,483 , 51 3 5,962,09 3 3 , 544,03 6 2,625,32 3 $3,261 , 57 2 6,375 , 64 5 4,698,00 1 4 , 571 , 67 5 5,992,38 9 $3,253,69 3 6 , 365 , 58 5 4 , 686,68 0 4 , 550,15 4 5 , 976,46 4 $4,003,47 6 4 , 523 , 96 8 6,011,53 2 3,591,73 7 2 , 657,13 0 $3 , 976,12 6 4,483 , 51 3 5,962,09 3 3 , 544,03 6 2,625,32 3 All other shipments 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Dec . 31 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 192 2 $9,646,04 1 11,021,84 2 14,324 , 79 1 16,403,45 1 14 , 713,67 5 $3,717,89 8 4,334 , 76 8 5,411,79 1 6,772,52 7 5,721,45 1 1927 $16,389,21 2 19 , 799,89 4 21,086,96 4 18,808,54 1 12,834,11 0 $5,968,96 7 8,398,84 0 7,985 , 58 6 9,409,10 0 7 , 281 , 41 8 192 3 $9,646,04 1 11,021,84 2 14,324 , 79 1 16,403,45 1 14 , 713,67 5 $3,717,89 8 4,334 , 76 8 5,411,79 1 6,772,52 7 5,721,45 1 192 8 i $16,389,21 2 19 , 799,89 4 21,086,96 4 18,808,54 1 12,834,11 0 $5,968,96 7 8,398,84 0 7,985 , 58 6 9,409,10 0 7 , 281 , 41 8 192 4 $9,646,04 1 11,021,84 2 14,324 , 79 1 16,403,45 1 14 , 713,67 5 $3,717,89 8 4,334 , 76 8 5,411,79 1 6,772,52 7 5,721,45 1 192 9 $16,389,21 2 19 , 799,89 4 21,086,96 4 18,808,54 1 12,834,11 0 $5,968,96 7 8,398,84 0 7,985 , 58 6 9,409,10 0 7 , 281 , 41 8 192 5 _ $9,646,04 1 11,021,84 2 14,324 , 79 1 16,403,45 1 14 , 713,67 5 $3,717,89 8 4,334 , 76 8 5,411,79 1 6,772,52 7 5,721,45 1 193 0 $16,389,21 2 19 , 799,89 4 21,086,96 4 18,808,54 1 12,834,11 0 $5,968,96 7 8,398,84 0 7,985 , 58 6 9,409,10 0 7 , 281 , 41 8 192 6 $9,646,04 1 11,021,84 2 14,324 , 79 1 16,403,45 1 14 , 713,67 5 $3,717,89 8 4,334 , 76 8 5,411,79 1 6,772,52 7 5,721,45 1 193 1 $16,389,21 2 19 , 799,89 4 21,086,96 4 18,808,54 1 12,834,11 0 $5,968,96 7 8,398,84 0 7,985 , 58 6 9,409,10 0 7 , 281 , 41 8 $9,646,04 1 11,021,84 2 14,324 , 79 1 16,403,45 1 14 , 713,67 5 $3,717,89 8 4,334 , 76 8 5,411,79 1 6,772,52 7 5,721,45 1 $16,389,21 2 19 , 799,89 4 21,086,96 4 18,808,54 1 12,834,11 0 $5,968,96 7 8,398,84 0 7,985 , 58 6 9,409,10 0 7 , 281 , 41 8 i Include s revisio n o f preliminar y figures.

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3 8 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S APPENDI X D PHILIPPIN E ISLAND S BONDE D INDEBTEDNES S Unde r a n ac t o f Congres s approve d Augus t 29 , 1916 , a s amende d b y a n ac t approve d Ma y 31 , 1922 , i t i s provide d tha t th e entir e indebtednes s o f th e Philippin e government , exclusiv e o f thos e obli gation s know n a s friar-lan d bond s an d o f bond s no t t o excee d $10,000,00 0 i n amount , issue d b y tha t governmen t an d secure d b y a n equivalen t amoun t o f bond s issue d b y th e Province s an d munici palitie s thereof , shal l no t excee d a t an y on e tim e 1 0 pe r cen t o f th e aggregat e ta x valuatio n o f it s property . I t i s furthe r provide d tha t th e entir e indebtednes s o f th e cit y o f Manil a shal l no t excee d 1 0 pe r cen t o f th e aggregat e ta x valuatio n o f it s property , no r tha t o f an y Provinc e o r municipalit y a su m i n exces s o f 7 pe r cen t o f th e aggregat e ta x valuatio n o f it s propert y a t an y on e time . Th e assesse d valu e o f taxabl e rea l propert y o f th e Philippin e Island s a s a t Decembe r 31 , 1931 , wa s $960,948,534 ; tha t o f th e cit y o f Manil a a s a t Decembe r 31 , 1931 , wa s $138,364,690.50 . Th e followin g statement s sho w th e bonde d indebtednes s o f th e Philippin e Island s an d o f it s Province s an d municipalities , respec tively , o n Jun e 30 , 1932 : Insular government Titl e o f loa n Rat e Amoun t Issue d Outstand in g Jun e 30,193 2 Date d Re deem abl e Du e Include d i n 1 0 pe r cen t limitation : Publi c improvement s D o D o — D o Gol d bond s o f 191 6 Genera l bond s D o Irrigatio n an d permanen t publi c works. . Metropolita n wate r distric t D o D o Ceb u por t work s D o D o noil o por t work s D o — . D o Total . No t include d i n 1 0 pe r cen t limitation : Friar-lan d purchas e Collatera l bonds — O f 192 2 (Manila ) O f 192 6 (Iloilo ) O f 192 6 (Pangasinan ) O f 192 6 (Occidenta l Negros).. . O f 192 6 (Marinduque ) O f 192 6 (Iloco s Norte ) O f 192 7 (Laguna ) O f 192 7 (Provincial ) O f 192 7 (Camarine s Sur ) O f 192 8 (L a Union ) O f 192 8 (Manila ) Tota l Gran d total . Per cent 5 4V 2 4y 2 4V 2 4 y 2 4V 2 4 y 2 $2 , 500,00 0 1,000,00 0 1,600,00 0 10,000,00 0 4,000,00 0 5,000,00 0 23,000,00 0 11,800,00 0 3,000,00 0 1 , 500,00 0 250,00 0 750,00 0 750,00 0 500,00 0 750,00 0 500,00 0 925,00 0 $1,549,00 0 409,00 0 653,00 0 8 , 547,00 0 2,700,00 0 4 , 379,00 0 19,194,00 0 9,478,00 0 2,889,00 0 1,500,00 0 250,00 0 734,00 0 750,00 0 500,00 0 716,00 0 600,00 0 925,00 0 190 5 190 6 190 9 192 1 191 6 192 2 192 2 192 2 192 5 192 9 193 1 192 8 192 9 193 0 192 8 192 9 193 0 191 6 191 6 191 9 192 6 193 5 "l94l " 193 5 193 6 193 9 194 1 194 6 195 2 195 2 195 2 195 5 195. 9 196 1 196 8 195 9 196 0 195 8 195 9 196 0 67,725,00 0 55 , 673,00 0 4 y 2 4 y 2 4 y 2 4 H 4 M 4 H 4 M 4 M 7,000,00 0 2,750,00 0 976 , 50 0 428 , 50 0 400,00 0 55 , 50 0 274,00 0 98 , 00 0 1,405,00 0 111,00 0 110,00 0 500,00 0 4,367,00 0 2 , 368,00 0 976,50 0 428 , 50 0 400,00 0 55 , 50 0 274,00 0 98,00 0 1,375,00 0 110,00 0 110,00 0 484,00 0 190 4 192 2 192 6 192 6 192 6 192 7 192 7 192 7 192 8 192 8 191 4 193 6 193 7 193 4 195 0 195 6 195 6 195 6 195 6 195 6 195 7 195 7 195 7 195 8 195 8 14,108,50 0 11,046 , 50 0 81,833 , 50 0 66,719 , 50 0

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39 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Provinces and municipalities Titl e o f loa n -Cit y o f Manila : Sewe r an d waterwork s D o D o Publi c improvement s D o d o ; Cit y o f Cebu : Sewe r an d waterwork s Bangued , Abr a Province : Wate r suppl y Mayjayjay , Lagun a Province : Publi c improve ment s Sant a Cruz , Lagun a Province : Publi c improve ment s Provinc e o f Iloilo , an d 9 municipalitie s (Oaba tuan , Dingle , Iloilo , Jaro , L a Paz , Maasin , Pavia , Pototan , an d Sant a Barbara) : Publi c improvement s Provinc e o f Occidenta l Negros : Publi c improve ment s Provinc e o f Pangasinan : Publi c improvements. _ Provinc e o f Marmduque : Publi c improvements . Provinc e o f Iloco s Nort e an d 3 municipalitie s (Bacarra , Laoag , an d Pasuquin) : Publi c im provement s Provinc e o f Laguna : Publi c improvement s Provinc e o f Iloco s Su r an d municipalit y o f Vigan : Publi c improvement s Provinc e o f Tarlac : Publi c improvement s Provinc e o f Pampanga : Publi c improvements.. . Provinc e o f Nuev a Ecija : Publi c improvement s Provinc e o f Bulacan : Publi c improvement s Provinc e o f Camarine s Su r an d 4 municipalitie s (Naga , Magarao , Canaman , an d Camaligan) : Publi c improvement s Provinc e o f L a Union : Publi c improvements.. . Tota l — Rat e Per cent 4 4 4 5 l A 4 X 4V 2 4 5 5 5 4 K 4 H 4 H 4^ 2 4 H 4 H 4 H ±y 2 4 M 4 H 4 M Amoun t Issue d $1,000,00 0 2,000,00 0 1,000,00 0 2,750,00 0 500,00 0 500,00 0 125 , 00 0 20,00 0 20,00 0 45 , 00 0 976,50 0 400,00 0 428,50 0 55,50 0 274,00 0 98,00 0 175,00 0 171,00 0 477,00 0 345,00 0 237,00 0 111,00 0 110,00 0 11,818,50 0 Outstand in g Jun e 30 , 193 2 $453,00 0 916,00 0 644,00 0 2,368,00 0 484,00 0 498,00 0 91,00 0 20,00 0 20,00 0 45,00 0 976 , 50 0 400,00 0 428,50 0 55,50 0 274,00 0 98,00 0 170,00 0 165,00 0 467,00 0 339,00 0 232,00 0 110,00 0 110,00 0 9,366,50 0 Date d 190 5 190 7 190 8 192 0 192 8 192 9 191 1 191 9 191 9 191 9 192 6 192 6 192 6 192 6 192 6 192 7 192 7 192 7 192 7 192 7 192 7 192 7 192 8 Re deem abl e Du e 191 5 191 7 191 8 192 1 192 9 192 9 192 9 193 6 193 7 193 5 193 7 193 8 195 0 195 8 195 9 194 1 194 9 194 9 194 9 195 6 195 6 195 6 195 6 195 6 195 7 195 7 195 7 195 7 195 7 195 7 195 7 195 8 SINKIN G AN D OTHE R FUND S Unde r th e provision s o f Ac t No . 301 4 o f th e Philippin e Legislature , approve d Marc h 8 , 1922 , sinkin g fund s fo r th e retiremen t o f bond s issue d b y th e Philippin e governmen t ar e t o b e investe d onl y i n secu ritie s o f th e governmen t o f th e Philippin e Island s o r th e Governmen t o f th e Unite d State s afte r th e approva l o f thi s act . Unde r th e provision s o f Ac t No . 372 3 o f th e Philippin e Legislature , approve d Novembe r 21 , 1930 , a s amende d b y Ac t No . 3828 , approve d Octobe r 28 , 1931 , fund s derive d fro m th e sal e o f financial interes t protectio n bonds , issue d unde r Ac t No . 2999 , ma y b e investe d (a) i n bond s o r othe r evidence s o f indebtednes s o f th e governmen t o f th e Philippin e Islands ; (b ) i n bond s o r othe r evidence s o f indebtednes s o f th e Governmen t o f th e Unite d States ; (c ) i n bond s o r othe r evidence s o f indebtednes s o f a chartere d city , Province , o r municipalit y o f th e Philippin e Islands ; (d) i n securitie s th e principa l an d interes t whereo f ar e guarantee d b y th e Governmen t o f th e Unite d State s o r o f th e Philippin e Islands ; (e) i n Manil a Railroa d Co . souther n line s bond s Issue d unde r Ac t No . 1905 .

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4 0 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Sinc e th e passag e o f thes e act s th e treasure r o f th e Philippin e Island s ha s transferre d th e followin g amount s t o thi s burea u fo r investment : Prio r year s Yea r endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l Prio r year s 193 1 193 2 Tota l Sinkin g fund s $19 , 562 , 741 . 4 0 1 , 486 , 868 . 8 9 $3 , 805 , 732 . 6 8 198 , 000 . 0 0 $2,988 , 039 . 8 3 483 , 786.1 4 2,035 , 000 . 0 0 $26 , 356 , 513 . 9 1 2,168 , 655 . 0 8 2 , 035,000 . 0 0 Trus t fund s Financia l interes t protectio n bon d fund . Tota l $19 , 562 , 741 . 4 0 1 , 486 , 868 . 8 9 $3 , 805 , 732 . 6 8 198 , 000 . 0 0 $2,988 , 039 . 8 3 483 , 786.1 4 2,035 , 000 . 0 0 $26 , 356 , 513 . 9 1 2,168 , 655 . 0 8 2 , 035,000 . 0 0 Trus t fund s Financia l interes t protectio n bon d fund . Tota l 21 , 049 , 610 . 2 9 4 , 003 , 732..6 8 5 , 508 , 825 . 9 7 30 , 560,168 . 9 4 A t a cos t o f $30,321,425.36 , bond s o f th e fac e valu e o f $30,117,00 0 hav e bee n purchase d fro m th e abov e funds . Include d i n thes e pur chase s wer e $920,00 0 pa r valu e o f Manil a por t work s an d improve ment s 5 K pe r cen t bond s bough t a t a cos t o f $944,438.35 , th e entir e issu e o f whic h wa s cancele d o n Septembe r 2 , 1930 . Al l othe r bond s purchase d ar e include d i n th e followin g statemen t o f securities , eithe r purchase d b y thi s burea u fo r accoun t o f th e governmen t o f th e Philip pin e Island s o r deposite d wit h thi s burea u b y th e insula r treasurer , t o b e hel d fo r hi s accoun t i n th e Unite d State s pendin g cancellatio n o r othe r disposition . Sinking and other fund investments Philippin e government : Collatera l bonds — 4H's , du e 195 0 (Manila ) 4^'s , du e 195 6 (Iloilo ) 4H's , du e 195 6 (Occidenta l Negros). . 4H's , du e 195 6 (Pangasinan ) 4H's , du e 195 6 (Iloco s Norte ) du e 195 7 (Provincial ) AA's , du e 195 7 (Camarine s Sur ) du e 195 7 (Laguna ) 4>6's , du e 195 8 (Manila ) General — 4H's , du e 195 2 5's , du e 195 2 5's , du e 1955 , metropolita n wate r distric t 4A's , du e 1959 , metropolita n wate r distric t Lan d purchase—4's , du e 193 4 Manil a R . R . Co . purchase—4's , du e 194 6 Publi c improvement — 4's , du e 1935 . 4's , du e 193 6 4's , du e 193 9 53^'s , du e 194 1 4H's , du e 1952 , irrigatio n an d permanen t publi c work s 4^'s , du e 1958 , Ceb u por t works . 43^'s , du e 1959 , Ceb u por t work s i l A's, du e 1958 , Iloil o por t work s 4^'s , du e 1959 , Iloil o por t works . Municipal : Cit y o f Ceb u 4's , du e 194 1 Cit y o f Manil a 4's , du e 193 5 Cit y o f Manil a 4's , du e 1937 . Cit y o f Manil a 4's , du e 193 8 Cit y o f Manil a 5M's , du e 195 0 Cit y o f Manil a 4^'s , du e 195 9 Railroad: . Manil a R . R . Co . 7's , du e 193 7 Manil a R . R . Co . 4's , du e 1939 . Philippin e Ry . Co . 4's , du e 193 7 Unite d State s Government : Fourt h Libert y loa n Total . Prio r years $530,00 0 976 , 50 0 400 , 00 0 428 , 50 0 464,00 0 63 , 00 0 500 , 00 0 4,109,00 0 645,00 0 617,00 0 2 , 570 , 00 0 1 , 395 , 00 0 936,00 0 650 , 00 0 834,00 0 995,00 0 5 , 360 . 00 0 515,00 0 201,00 0 45,00 0 576,00 0 1,142 , 00 0 522 , 00 0 2 , 750 , 00 0 625 , 00 0 1 , 273 , 00 0 75,00 0 29,197 , 00 0 Yea r endin g Jun e 30 — $38 , 00 0 274,00 0 21 , 00 0 417 , 00 0 348 , 00 0 69 , 00 0 100 , 00 0 94 , 00 0 101 , 00 0 29,00 0 9,00 0 22 , 00 0 614 , 00 0 133,00 0 10,00 0 17 , 00 0 8 , 00 0 15,00 0 2,00 0 299 , 00 0 62 , 00 0 2 , 682 , 00 0 193 2 $172 , 00 0 60 , 00 0 25,00 0 2,00 0 1,814 , 00 0 912,00 0 322 , 00 0 25,00 0 1,007,00 0 38,00 0 98,00 0 4 , 00 0 55,00 0 1,448 , 00 0 641,00 0 25,00 0 39 , 00 0 102,00 0 10,00 0 5,00 0 73,00 0 27,00 0 1,00 0 55,00 0 201,00 0 7,161,00 0

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41 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Unde r th e provision s o f sectio n 2 o f Ac t No . 3014 , th e followin g bonds , include d i n th e precedin g lis t o f bond s purchased , hav e bee n canceled : -Collatera l bonds : 4/ 2 's , du e 195 0 (Manila ) $382 , 00 0 4^'s , du e 195 7 (Provincial ) 30 , 00 0 4j/ 2 's , du e 195 7 (Camarine s Sur ) 1 , 00 0 4}^s , du e 195 8 (Manila ) 16 , 00 0 ^Genera l bonds : 4^'s , du e 195 2 3 , 806 , 00 0 5's , du e 195 2 621 , 00 0 5's , du e 1955 , metropolita n wate r distric t 111 , 00 0 Lan d purchase : 4's , du e 193 4 2 , 633 , 00 0 Manil a R . R . Co . purchase : 4's , du e 194 6 1 , 300 , 00 0 Publi c improvement : 4's , du e 193 5 951 , 00 0 4's , du e 193 6 591 , 00 0 4's , du e 193 9 847 , 00 0 5^'s , du e 194 1 1 , 453 , 00 0 4}^s , du e 1952 , irrigatio n an d permanen t publi c work s 2 , 322 , 00 0 4^'s , du e 1958 , Ceb u por t work s 16 , 00 0 4#s , du e 1958 , Iloil o por t work s 34 , 00 0 .Municipal : Cit y o f Ceb u 4's , du e 194 1 34 , 00 0 Cit y o f Manil a 4's , du e 193 5 547 , 00 0 Cit y o f Manil a 4's , du e 193 7 1 , 084 , 00 0 Cit y o f Manil a 4's , du e 193 8 356 , 00 0 Cit v o f Manil a 4V 2 's , du e 195 9 2 , 00 0 Tota l 17 , 137 , 00 0 Al l cancele d bond s hav e bee n shippe d t o th e audito r o f th e Philip pin e Islands . Thi s leave s $21,903,00 0 i n securitie s actuall y hel d i n tthi s burea u fo r accoun t o f th e Philippin e governmen t o n Jun e 30 , 1932 . RAILWA Y BOND S Th e bond s o f railroads , guarantee d a s t o interes t by th e Philippin e -government , outstandin g are : Manil a R . R . Co . (souther n lines ) 4 pe r cen t bonds , du e 193 9 $10 , 586 , 00 0 Manil a R . R . Co . (souther n lines ) 4 pe r cen t bonds , du e 195 9 1 , 069 , 00 0 Manil a R . R . Co . 7 pe r cen t sinkin g fun d bonds , du e 193 7 1 1 , 500 , 00 0 Philippin e Ry . Co . first-mortgag e 4 pe r cen t bonds , du e 193 7 8 , 549 , 00 0 Tota l 21 , 704 , 00 0 Durin g th e pas t yea r bond s o f th e Manil a Railroa d Co. , du e i n 1939 , wit h a pa r valu e o f $465,000 , wer e purchase d fro m money s i n th e sinkin g fund s an d wer e delivere d t o th e truste e unde r th e mortgage . Pursuan t t o instruction s receive d fro m th e Manil a Railroa d Co. , ther e wer e cancele d b y th e truste e durin g September , 1931 , bond s
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4 2 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S COINAG E Th e ne w coi n receive d durin g th e yea r 1931 , includin g recoinage f consiste d o f 5*173,839.5 0 o f th e 5-centav o denominatio n an d 1^56,593.5 5 o f th e 1-centav o denomination . O n Decembe r 31 , 1931 , th e tota l amoun t i n circulatio n an d availabl e therefo r wa s 1^40,440, 066.18 , consistin g o f th e following : Peso s 1 P21 , 882 , 207 . 0 0 5 0 centavo s 6 , 271 , 660 . 50 ' 2 0 centavo s 5 , 533 , 105 . 20 = 1 0 centavo s 3 , 891 , 902 . 80 ' 5 centavo s 1 , 247 , 613 . 9 0 1 centavo s 1 , 561 , 917 . 1 4 ) { centav o (n o longe r coined ) 51 , 659 . 6 4 Tota l 40 , 440 , 066 . 18 INSULA R RECEIPT S AN D DISBURSEMENT S Th e followin g i s a statemen t o f insula r receipt s an d disbursement s o f th e Philippin e Islands , exclusiv e o f al l item s o f a refundabl e char acter , expresse d i n Unite d State s currency , fo r fisca l (calendar ) year s 1928 , 1929 , 1930 , an d 1931 : Yea r endin g Dec . 31 — 192 8 192 9 193 0 193 1 CREDIT S Balanc e fro m prio r year s Revenues : Custom s Interna l — Repaymen t o f Philippin e Nationa l Ban k losses , Ac t 3174 . M iscellaneous _ . $31 , 904,140 . 6 4 $34,673 , 756 . 0 0 $39,918,081 . 4 0 $36 , 528,286.03 : CREDIT S Balanc e fro m prio r year s Revenues : Custom s Interna l — Repaymen t o f Philippin e Nationa l Ban k losses , Ac t 3174 . M iscellaneous _ . 11,561 , 648 . 7 4 20 , 835 , 745 . 7 7 1,426,742.3 4 10,332,475 . 0 3 3,868,663 . 5 9 12,829,104 . 7 8 21,962,415 . 9 8 1,086 , 515.1 5 10,513,550 . 9 4 679,000 . 0 0 11 , 243 , 783 . 5 0 19,855 , 614 . 5 3 1,318 , 560.0 9 11 , 463,416 . 8 2 3,610,840 . 0 2 10 , 243,860.0 6 20,159,670 . 6 7 11,094,297. " 5 2 258,383.0 0 Proceed s fro m sal e o f bond s Tota l revenues . Tota l credits. . DEBIT S Expenditures : Bureau s an d office s 11,561 , 648 . 7 4 20 , 835 , 745 . 7 7 1,426,742.3 4 10,332,475 . 0 3 3,868,663 . 5 9 12,829,104 . 7 8 21,962,415 . 9 8 1,086 , 515.1 5 10,513,550 . 9 4 679,000 . 0 0 11 , 243 , 783 . 5 0 19,855 , 614 . 5 3 1,318 , 560.0 9 11 , 463,416 . 8 2 3,610,840 . 0 2 10 , 243,860.0 6 20,159,670 . 6 7 11,094,297. " 5 2 258,383.0 0 Proceed s fro m sal e o f bond s Tota l revenues . Tota l credits. . DEBIT S Expenditures : Bureau s an d office s 47,925 , 275 . 4 7 47,070,586.8 5 47,492,214.9 6 41,756,211.2 4 Proceed s fro m sal e o f bond s Tota l revenues . Tota l credits. . DEBIT S Expenditures : Bureau s an d office s 79,829,416.1 1 81 , 744,342.8 5 87,410,296.3 6 78,284,497.2 7 Proceed s fro m sal e o f bond s Tota l revenues . Tota l credits. . DEBIT S Expenditures : Bureau s an d office s 17,693,928 . 4 5 4,814,456 . 9 2 5,087,157.1 1 4,210,655 . 3 8 103,080 . 6 5 8,522,573.7 3 4,723,807.8 7 18,470,937 . 9 9 4,916 , 536 . 0 1 5,040 , 792.4 7 2,119,502.1 6 114,404 . 2 9 9,809,46 6 8 5 1,354,621.6 8 19,083,146 . 6 1 4,863,625 . 2 5 9,747,870 . 6 3 4,133,415 . 2 8 131,985 . 5 5 9,562,536 . 3 2 3,053,200.8 0 306,229.8 9 15,866,265 . 52 " 5,380,944.4 8 4,904 , 420.6 3 4,065,216 . 5 1 75,749.1 0 13,418,439 . 2 4 1,889,455 . 6 7 ""722,"687. " 65 . 31,961,288 . 4 7 Revenu e servic e Fixe d charge s 17,693,928 . 4 5 4,814,456 . 9 2 5,087,157.1 1 4,210,655 . 3 8 103,080 . 6 5 8,522,573.7 3 4,723,807.8 7 18,470,937 . 9 9 4,916 , 536 . 0 1 5,040 , 792.4 7 2,119,502.1 6 114,404 . 2 9 9,809,46 6 8 5 1,354,621.6 8 19,083,146 . 6 1 4,863,625 . 2 5 9,747,870 . 6 3 4,133,415 . 2 8 131,985 . 5 5 9,562,536 . 3 2 3,053,200.8 0 306,229.8 9 15,866,265 . 52 " 5,380,944.4 8 4,904 , 420.6 3 4,065,216 . 5 1 75,749.1 0 13,418,439 . 2 4 1,889,455 . 6 7 ""722,"687. " 65 . 31,961,288 . 4 7 Publi c work s an d equipmen t M iscellaneou s 17,693,928 . 4 5 4,814,456 . 9 2 5,087,157.1 1 4,210,655 . 3 8 103,080 . 6 5 8,522,573.7 3 4,723,807.8 7 18,470,937 . 9 9 4,916 , 536 . 0 1 5,040 , 792.4 7 2,119,502.1 6 114,404 . 2 9 9,809,46 6 8 5 1,354,621.6 8 19,083,146 . 6 1 4,863,625 . 2 5 9,747,870 . 6 3 4,133,415 . 2 8 131,985 . 5 5 9,562,536 . 3 2 3,053,200.8 0 306,229.8 9 15,866,265 . 52 " 5,380,944.4 8 4,904 , 420.6 3 4,065,216 . 5 1 75,749.1 0 13,418,439 . 2 4 1,889,455 . 6 7 ""722,"687. " 65 . 31,961,288 . 4 7 Aid t o Provinces , citie s an d municipali tie s Purchas e o f investmen t an d securities Deferre d credit s t o incom e o f prio r years . Pension s an d gratuitie s B 17,693,928 . 4 5 4,814,456 . 9 2 5,087,157.1 1 4,210,655 . 3 8 103,080 . 6 5 8,522,573.7 3 4,723,807.8 7 18,470,937 . 9 9 4,916 , 536 . 0 1 5,040 , 792.4 7 2,119,502.1 6 114,404 . 2 9 9,809,46 6 8 5 1,354,621.6 8 19,083,146 . 6 1 4,863,625 . 2 5 9,747,870 . 6 3 4,133,415 . 2 8 131,985 . 5 5 9,562,536 . 3 2 3,053,200.8 0 306,229.8 9 15,866,265 . 52 " 5,380,944.4 8 4,904 , 420.6 3 4,065,216 . 5 1 75,749.1 0 13,418,439 . 2 4 1,889,455 . 6 7 ""722,"687. " 65 . 31,961,288 . 4 7 Surplu s 34,673,756 . 0 0 39,918,081.4 0 36 , 528,286.0 3 15,866,265 . 52 " 5,380,944.4 8 4,904 , 420.6 3 4,065,216 . 5 1 75,749.1 0 13,418,439 . 2 4 1,889,455 . 6 7 ""722,"687. " 65 . 31,961,288 . 4 7 Tota l debit s 34,673,756 . 0 0 39,918,081.4 0 36 , 528,286.0 3 15,866,265 . 52 " 5,380,944.4 8 4,904 , 420.6 3 4,065,216 . 5 1 75,749.1 0 13,418,439 . 2 4 1,889,455 . 6 7 ""722,"687. " 65 . 31,961,288 . 4 7 Tota l debit s 79,829,416.1 1 81 , 744,342.8 5 87,410,298 . 3 6 78,284,497.2 7 Prio r t o 1931 , include d i n ite m o f bureau s an d offices . 1 Th e Philippin e pes o equal s 5 0 cent s Unite d State s currency .

PAGE 49

43 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S APPENDI X E PUERT O RIC O Total foreign trade 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Consignment s Shipment s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Fro m Unite d State s Fro m foreig n countrie s Tota l T o Unite d State s T o foreig n countrie s Tota l 192 3 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 192 4 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 192 5 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 192 6 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 192 7 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 192 8 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 1929 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 193 0 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 193 1 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 193 2 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 $64 , 419,46 2 80 , 586 , 69 9 79,198 , 56 5 83,056 , 55 3 87,049 , 96 2 79 , 701 , 91 1 85,078 , 59 6 73,078 , 77 9 68,018,16 7 52 , 826 , 79 4 $7,525,04 3 8,782,92 5 11 , 306 , 03 6 12 , 201 , 71 1 11 , 760 , 78 8 12 , 640 , 41 8 12 , 782,16 4 10 , 844 , 05 0 8 , 419 , 24 3 8 , 454,30 7 $71,944 , 50 5 89 , 369 , 62 4 90 , 504 , 60 1 95 , 258 , 26 4 98,810 , 75 0 92 , 342,32 9 97 , 860 . 76 0 83 , 922 , 82 9 76 , 437 , 41 0 61 , 281,10 1 $77,007 , 25 7 80 , 754,97 5 84,411,79 2 88,106,57 0 99 , 223,15 4 96 , 662 , 61 9 76 , 471,82 9 95,097 , 64 0 94 , 876,99 7 83 , 645 , 86 3 $5,285 , 79 3 7,525,56 5 10,407,15 2 10 , 618 , 28 1 8,844 , 28 0 6,872,12 0 5 , 251,04 1 4,468 , 56 5 3 , 523 , 93 0 2,771,07 5 $82 , 293,05 0 88,280 , 54 0 94,818,94 4 98,724,85 1 108,067,43 4 103 , 534,73 9 81,722,870 ' 99,566 , 20 5 98,400,92 7 86 , 416 , 93 8 Sugar shipments Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Long tons Cents Long tons Cents 1923 317,34 2 $46 , 207 , 27 6 6.5 0 317,13 4 $46,176 , 20 2 6 . 5 0 192 4 332,18 0 47 , 838 , 68 7 6.4 3 331 , 92 1 47 , 792 , 00 2 6 . 4 3 192 5 510 , 32 1 53 , 261 , 89 5 4.6 6 510,16 6 53 , 240,48 0 4 . 6 6 192 6 516,79 5 48 , 223 , 25 8 4.1 7 516,61 2 48 , 201,88 3 4.1 7 192 7 513 , 27 6 54 , 756 , 98 4 4.7 6 513,16 9 54 , 743,03 2 4 . 7 6 192 8 540,73 2 54 , 579,02 0 4.5 1 540,58 6 54 , 569 , 76 4 4.5 1 192 9 421 , 81 4 35 , 224 , 03 8 3.7 3 421 , 79 2 35 , 222,14 4 3.7 3 193 0 643,94 4 53,670,03 8 3 . 7 2 643 , 90 1 53 , 667,06 3 3.7 2 193 1 720 , 38 0 54,367,40 1 3.3 7 720 , 36 9 54 , 366,13 3 3.3 7 193 2 814 , 66 0 55,118 , 21 1 3.0 2 814 , 64 2 55,116 , 97 5 3.0 2 NOTE—Include s refine d sugar , separatel y show n 1929-1932 , a s follows : 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d 19 2 9 19 3 0 193 1 — 193 2 — Long tons 38,07 3 53 , 74 1 75,03 3 85 , 54 9 $3 , 892,52 2 6,142 , 74 4 7,427,88 7 7,838,65 0 Cents 4.5 6 5.1 0 4.4 2 4.0 9 Long tons 38,05 1 53,69 8 75,02 1 85 , 53 1 $3,890,62 8 6,139 , 76 9 7 , 427 , 06 8 7 , 837,41 4 Cents 4. 56 5.1 0 4 . 42' : 4.0 9 Coffee shipments 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Pounds 16,821,93 9 21.859 , 21 5 23,782 , 99 6 26 , 332 , 76 6 19 , 356 , 90 4 7 , 837,80 0 1 , 278 , 61 5 433,90 1 1,977 , 65 9 589 , 60 2 $3,188 , 00 2 4 , 595,81 1 6,575 , 63 5 7,071,40 7 5 , 748,87 7 2,596,87 2 456 , 83 1 151,55 0 546,43 8 154,90 3 Cents 18.9 6 21.0 3 27 . 6 5 26.8 5 29 . 7 0 33.1 3 35 . 7 3 34.9 2 27 . 6 3 26 . 2 7 Pounds 70,91 5 318,08 6 261,15 5 624,04 5 178 , 08 2 52 , 22 1 579 , 73 2 i 202 , 84 9 1 1 , 751,01 3 i 544 , 73 7 $14,18 1 71,15 8 66 , 86 2 170,20 1 52,05 9 13 , 27 6 208,95 4 95 , 25 0 488 , 71 1 145 , 80 6 Cents 20.0 0 22.3 7 25.6 0 27 . 2 7 29.2 3 25.4 2 36.0 4 36.2 4 27.9 1 26.77 ' 192 3 1924 . 1925 . 192 6 1927 . 1928 . 1929 . 1930 . 1931 . 1932 . i Include s coffe e fo r transshipmen t t o foreig n countrie s amountin g t o 259,68 3 pounds , value d a t $94,150 : i n 1930 , 1,535,28 4 pound s value d a t $428,61 3 i n 1931 , an d 543,37 0 pound s value d a t $145,45 2 i n 1932 .

PAGE 50

4 4 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Leaf-tobacco shipments 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r poun d 1923 . Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 192 4 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 1925 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 1926 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 192 7 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 192 8 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 192 9 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 193 0 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 1931-. Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 193 2 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 Pounds 14,937,53 0 19 , 944 , 65 3 18 , 002,34 0 20 , 513 , 59 4 26.027 , 23 9 26,782,08 4 19,342,00 9 18,952 , 27 0 19 , 928,79 6 12.028 , 56 6 $8,489,98 4 12 , 578 , 44 8 9,156,48 0 13,124 , 64 3 19,496 , 50 8 15,479,82 0 11,220 , 26 4 10 , 602 , 45 8 12,053 , 86 3 5 , 782,15 1 Cents 56.8 5 63.0 7 50.8 6 63 . 9 8 74.9 1 57.8 0 58.0 1 55 . 9 0 60.4 8 48.0 7 Pounds 14,904,72 3 19,834,15 1 17 , 766,03 3 20 , 513 , 59 4 25 , 975,32 1 26 , 654 , 45 8 19 , 314,16 0 18 , 928,38 1 19 , 918,03 4 11 , 962 , 86 6 $8,487,34 9 12 , 557,34 9 9,123,99 5 13,124,64 3 19,489,31 1 15 , 466,78 1 11 , 216,64 0 10 , 599 , 55 2 12,052,33 1 5,781,03 7 Cents 56.9 4 63.3 1 51.3 6 63.9 8 75.0 3 58.0 3 58.0 7 56.0 0 60.5 1 48.3 2 Cigar shipments 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l Shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r thousan d Quantit y Valu e Valu e pe r thousan d 192 3 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 192 4 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 192 5 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 192 6 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 1927.-. Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 192 8 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 192 9 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 193 0 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 193 1 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 1932 , Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,10 5 175 , 28 9 196 , 56 0 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158,65 6 145 , 56 6 166 , 98 6 122 , 45 5 $6,911,51 0 5,460,11 9 7 , 105 , 50 8 7 , 196 , 36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3 , 625 , 56 1 3,847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3 , 899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36 . 1 5 33 . 5 4 26 . 2 9 25 . 1 1 24 . 2 6 23 . <. 2 23 . 3 5 19 . 6 3 Thousands 192,06 9 175 , 25 1 196 , 55 3 214 , 54 6 160,80 4 144,37 8 158 , 65 6 145 , 56 6 166,98 6 122,45 5 $6,910 , 73 5 5,458,88 0 7,105,31 3 7,196,36 5 4 , 227 , 57 6 3,625 , 56 1 3 , 847 , 79 7 3 , 408,72 1 3,899 , 55 6 2,403 , 53 2 $35 . 9 8 31 . 1 5 36.1 5 33 . 5 4 26.2 9 25.1 1 24.2 6 23 . 4 2 23.3 5 19 . 6 3 Fruit shipments 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 192 3 $4 , 570 , 35 9 3,807 , 56 7 4 , 202,84 0 6 , 009,84 0 5 , 823 , 75 1 $4 , 565 , 32 4 3 , 791 , 73 5 4 , 187 , 78 S 5 , 994 , 46 4 5 , 792 , 43 3 192 8 $6,824,80 2 2,850 , 72 2 7,671 , 61 7 4,884 , 79 9 4,321,13 5 $6,811,90 8 2,843,21 3 7 , 480 , 22 2 4 , 573 , 78 9 4,101 , 61 7 192 4 $4 , 570 , 35 9 3,807 , 56 7 4 , 202,84 0 6 , 009,84 0 5 , 823 , 75 1 $4 , 565 , 32 4 3 , 791 , 73 5 4 , 187 , 78 S 5 , 994 , 46 4 5 , 792 , 43 3 192 9 . $6,824,80 2 2,850 , 72 2 7,671 , 61 7 4,884 , 79 9 4,321,13 5 $6,811,90 8 2,843,21 3 7 , 480 , 22 2 4 , 573 , 78 9 4,101 , 61 7 192 5 $4 , 570 , 35 9 3,807 , 56 7 4 , 202,84 0 6 , 009,84 0 5 , 823 , 75 1 $4 , 565 , 32 4 3 , 791 , 73 5 4 , 187 , 78 S 5 , 994 , 46 4 5 , 792 , 43 3 193 0 $6,824,80 2 2,850 , 72 2 7,671 , 61 7 4,884 , 79 9 4,321,13 5 $6,811,90 8 2,843,21 3 7 , 480 , 22 2 4 , 573 , 78 9 4,101 , 61 7 1926 . $4 , 570 , 35 9 3,807 , 56 7 4 , 202,84 0 6 , 009,84 0 5 , 823 , 75 1 $4 , 565 , 32 4 3 , 791 , 73 5 4 , 187 , 78 S 5 , 994 , 46 4 5 , 792 , 43 3 193 1 $6,824,80 2 2,850 , 72 2 7,671 , 61 7 4,884 , 79 9 4,321,13 5 $6,811,90 8 2,843,21 3 7 , 480 , 22 2 4 , 573 , 78 9 4,101 , 61 7 192 7 $4 , 570 , 35 9 3,807 , 56 7 4 , 202,84 0 6 , 009,84 0 5 , 823 , 75 1 $4 , 565 , 32 4 3 , 791 , 73 5 4 , 187 , 78 S 5 , 994 , 46 4 5 , 792 , 43 3 193 2 $6,824,80 2 2,850 , 72 2 7,671 , 61 7 4,884 , 79 9 4,321,13 5 $6,811,90 8 2,843,21 3 7 , 480 , 22 2 4 , 573 , 78 9 4,101 , 61 7 $4 , 570 , 35 9 3,807 , 56 7 4 , 202,84 0 6 , 009,84 0 5 , 823 , 75 1 $4 , 565 , 32 4 3 , 791 , 73 5 4 , 187 , 78 S 5 , 994 , 46 4 5 , 792 , 43 3 $6,824,80 2 2,850 , 72 2 7,671 , 61 7 4,884 , 79 9 4,321,13 5 $6,811,90 8 2,843,21 3 7 , 480 , 22 2 4 , 573 , 78 9 4,101 , 61 7 Coconut shipments 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l vaiu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 192 3 $583,93 1 616 , 48 4 720 , 18 9 625 , 98 9 628 , 19 6 $567 , 06 1 605 , 12 9 709,85 3 611 , 97 7 612 , 68 4 1928 . $713,99 2 264 , 77 8 233,08 4 232 , 38 8 268 , 70 8 $697,97 2 249,66 5 218 , 78 7 232,38 8 268 , 70 8 192 4 $583,93 1 616 , 48 4 720 , 18 9 625 , 98 9 628 , 19 6 $567 , 06 1 605 , 12 9 709,85 3 611 , 97 7 612 , 68 4 192 9 $713,99 2 264 , 77 8 233,08 4 232 , 38 8 268 , 70 8 $697,97 2 249,66 5 218 , 78 7 232,38 8 268 , 70 8 192 5 $583,93 1 616 , 48 4 720 , 18 9 625 , 98 9 628 , 19 6 $567 , 06 1 605 , 12 9 709,85 3 611 , 97 7 612 , 68 4 193 0 $713,99 2 264 , 77 8 233,08 4 232 , 38 8 268 , 70 8 $697,97 2 249,66 5 218 , 78 7 232,38 8 268 , 70 8 1926--.: $583,93 1 616 , 48 4 720 , 18 9 625 , 98 9 628 , 19 6 $567 , 06 1 605 , 12 9 709,85 3 611 , 97 7 612 , 68 4 193 1 $713,99 2 264 , 77 8 233,08 4 232 , 38 8 268 , 70 8 $697,97 2 249,66 5 218 , 78 7 232,38 8 268 , 70 8 192 7 $583,93 1 616 , 48 4 720 , 18 9 625 , 98 9 628 , 19 6 $567 , 06 1 605 , 12 9 709,85 3 611 , 97 7 612 , 68 4 193 2 . . . . $713,99 2 264 , 77 8 233,08 4 232 , 38 8 268 , 70 8 $697,97 2 249,66 5 218 , 78 7 232,38 8 268 , 70 8 $583,93 1 616 , 48 4 720 , 18 9 625 , 98 9 628 , 19 6 $567 , 06 1 605 , 12 9 709,85 3 611 , 97 7 612 , 68 4 $713,99 2 264 , 77 8 233,08 4 232 , 38 8 268 , 70 8 $697,97 2 249,66 5 218 , 78 7 232,38 8 268 , 70 8

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45 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Embroidery shipments 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 192 3 . . $6 , 564 , 49 8 7 , 253 , 55 6 5 , 833 , 91 8 8 , 336 , 39 8 9 , 225 , 50 7 $6 , 261,55 7 7,130,89 1 5 , 705 , 47 2 8,153 , 50 6 9 , 024 , 77 5 192 8 $9,285,79 0 15,151,04 0 13 , 004 , 72 5 13,665 , 49 2 10 , 322 , 78 5 $8,907,80 1 14 , 732 , 26 0 12,522 , 35 9 13 , 202 , 42 3 10 , 261 , 27 3 192 4 $6 , 564 , 49 8 7 , 253 , 55 6 5 , 833 , 91 8 8 , 336 , 39 8 9 , 225 , 50 7 $6 , 261,55 7 7,130,89 1 5 , 705 , 47 2 8,153 , 50 6 9 , 024 , 77 5 192 9 $9,285,79 0 15,151,04 0 13 , 004 , 72 5 13,665 , 49 2 10 , 322 , 78 5 $8,907,80 1 14 , 732 , 26 0 12,522 , 35 9 13 , 202 , 42 3 10 , 261 , 27 3 192 5 $6 , 564 , 49 8 7 , 253 , 55 6 5 , 833 , 91 8 8 , 336 , 39 8 9 , 225 , 50 7 $6 , 261,55 7 7,130,89 1 5 , 705 , 47 2 8,153 , 50 6 9 , 024 , 77 5 193 0 $9,285,79 0 15,151,04 0 13 , 004 , 72 5 13,665 , 49 2 10 , 322 , 78 5 $8,907,80 1 14 , 732 , 26 0 12,522 , 35 9 13 , 202 , 42 3 10 , 261 , 27 3 192 6 $6 , 564 , 49 8 7 , 253 , 55 6 5 , 833 , 91 8 8 , 336 , 39 8 9 , 225 , 50 7 $6 , 261,55 7 7,130,89 1 5 , 705 , 47 2 8,153 , 50 6 9 , 024 , 77 5 193 1 $9,285,79 0 15,151,04 0 13 , 004 , 72 5 13,665 , 49 2 10 , 322 , 78 5 $8,907,80 1 14 , 732 , 26 0 12,522 , 35 9 13 , 202 , 42 3 10 , 261 , 27 3 192 7 $6 , 564 , 49 8 7 , 253 , 55 6 5 , 833 , 91 8 8 , 336 , 39 8 9 , 225 , 50 7 $6 , 261,55 7 7,130,89 1 5 , 705 , 47 2 8,153 , 50 6 9 , 024 , 77 5 193 2 $9,285,79 0 15,151,04 0 13 , 004 , 72 5 13,665 , 49 2 10 , 322 , 78 5 $8,907,80 1 14 , 732 , 26 0 12,522 , 35 9 13 , 202 , 42 3 10 , 261 , 27 3 $6 , 564 , 49 8 7 , 253 , 55 6 5 , 833 , 91 8 8 , 336 , 39 8 9 , 225 , 50 7 $6 , 261,55 7 7,130,89 1 5 , 705 , 47 2 8,153 , 50 6 9 , 024 , 77 5 $9,285,79 0 15,151,04 0 13 , 004 , 72 5 13,665 , 49 2 10 , 322 , 78 5 $8,907,80 1 14 , 732 , 26 0 12,522 , 35 9 13 , 202 , 42 3 10 , 261 , 27 3 All other shipments 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 1 2 month s endin g Jun e 30 — Tota l valu e Valu e o f shipment s t o Unite d State s 1923-. . $5 , 777 , 49 0 6 , 129 , 86 8 7 , 962,47 9 8 , 136 , 95 1 8,160 , 03 5 $4 , 024,84 8 3 , 347 , 23 1 4 , 272 , 02 9 4 , 653 , 53 1 5 , 281 , 28 4 192 8 $10 , 428 , 88 2 12 , 707 , 40 0 10 , 824 , 01 2 8 , 837 , 34 6 8 , 045 , 51 3 $6 , 569 , 55 6 8,151 , 15 6 7,105 , 68 6 6 , 061 , 66 6 5 , 567 , 00 5 192 4 $5 , 777 , 49 0 6 , 129 , 86 8 7 , 962,47 9 8 , 136 , 95 1 8,160 , 03 5 $4 , 024,84 8 3 , 347 , 23 1 4 , 272 , 02 9 4 , 653 , 53 1 5 , 281 , 28 4 192 9 $10 , 428 , 88 2 12 , 707 , 40 0 10 , 824 , 01 2 8 , 837 , 34 6 8 , 045 , 51 3 $6 , 569 , 55 6 8,151 , 15 6 7,105 , 68 6 6 , 061 , 66 6 5 , 567 , 00 5 1925 . $5 , 777 , 49 0 6 , 129 , 86 8 7 , 962,47 9 8 , 136 , 95 1 8,160 , 03 5 $4 , 024,84 8 3 , 347 , 23 1 4 , 272 , 02 9 4 , 653 , 53 1 5 , 281 , 28 4 193 0 $10 , 428 , 88 2 12 , 707 , 40 0 10 , 824 , 01 2 8 , 837 , 34 6 8 , 045 , 51 3 $6 , 569 , 55 6 8,151 , 15 6 7,105 , 68 6 6 , 061 , 66 6 5 , 567 , 00 5 192 6 $5 , 777 , 49 0 6 , 129 , 86 8 7 , 962,47 9 8 , 136 , 95 1 8,160 , 03 5 $4 , 024,84 8 3 , 347 , 23 1 4 , 272 , 02 9 4 , 653 , 53 1 5 , 281 , 28 4 193 1 $10 , 428 , 88 2 12 , 707 , 40 0 10 , 824 , 01 2 8 , 837 , 34 6 8 , 045 , 51 3 $6 , 569 , 55 6 8,151 , 15 6 7,105 , 68 6 6 , 061 , 66 6 5 , 567 , 00 5 192 7 $5 , 777 , 49 0 6 , 129 , 86 8 7 , 962,47 9 8 , 136 , 95 1 8,160 , 03 5 $4 , 024,84 8 3 , 347 , 23 1 4 , 272 , 02 9 4 , 653 , 53 1 5 , 281 , 28 4 193 2 $10 , 428 , 88 2 12 , 707 , 40 0 10 , 824 , 01 2 8 , 837 , 34 6 8 , 045 , 51 3 $6 , 569 , 55 6 8,151 , 15 6 7,105 , 68 6 6 , 061 , 66 6 5 , 567 , 00 5 $5 , 777 , 49 0 6 , 129 , 86 8 7 , 962,47 9 8 , 136 , 95 1 8,160 , 03 5 $4 , 024,84 8 3 , 347 , 23 1 4 , 272 , 02 9 4 , 653 , 53 1 5 , 281 , 28 4 $10 , 428 , 88 2 12 , 707 , 40 0 10 , 824 , 01 2 8 , 837 , 34 6 8 , 045 , 51 3 $6 , 569 , 55 6 8,151 , 15 6 7,105 , 68 6 6 , 061 , 66 6 5 , 567 , 00 5 APPENDI X F PUERT O RIC O BONDE D INDEBTEDNES S Unde r a n ac t o f Congres s approve d Marc h 4 , 1927 , th e insula r governmen t o f Puert o Ric o an d th e municipalitie s o f Sa n Jua n an d Ponc e ar e authorize d t o incu r publi c indebtednes s u p t o 1 0 pe r cen t o f th e aggregat e ta x valuatio n o f thei r respectiv e properties ; othe r municipalitie s ar e limite d t o a publi c indebtednes s no t i n exces s o f 5 pe r cen t o f thei r respectiv e taxabl e properties . Bond s o f Puert o Rico , whic h ar e secure d b y a n equivalen t pa r valu e o f bond s o f municipa l corporation s o r schoo l board s o f Puert o Rico , ar e no t t o b e counte d withi n th e 1 0 pe r cen t limitation , bu t bond s issue d b y munici palitie s o r an y subdivisio n thereo f afte r Marc h 4 , 1927 , t o th e pay men t o f whic h th e goo d fait h o f th e peopl e o f Puert o Ric o i s pledged , ar e t o b e counte d therein . Durin g th e yea r additiona l bond s o f th e insula r governmen t o f Puert o Ric o wer e issue d wit h a pa r valu e o f $500,000 , th e proceed s fro m whic h ar e t o b e devote d t o th e continuanc e o f th e constructio n o f th e work s fo r developmen t an d us e o f th e water s o f th e Tor o Negr o an d Matrulla s Rivers , Tor o Negr o hydroelectri c project . Thes e bond s wer e date d Januar y 1 , 1931 , bu t wer e no t delivere d t o th e purchase r unti l Septembe r 10 , 1931 . O n Jun e 30,1932 , th e aggregat e assesse d valuatio n o f th e rea l an d per sona l propert y i n th e islan d o f Puert o Ric o amounte d t o $324,309,117 .

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4 6 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S Th e followin g i s a statemen t o f th e bonde d indebtednes s o f th e insula r governmen t o f Puert o Ric o a s o f Jun e 30 , 1932 : Titl e o f loa n Rat e Amoun t Issue d Outstand in g Jun e 30 , 193 2 Maturin g Include d i n 1 0 pe r cen t limita tion : Irrigation — 190 9 191 3 191 3 1914 — 1915 . 191 6 191 8 1922-.. . 192 3 1924. . 1925. . 1925. . 1927. . 1927 192 7 — 1929 1931 . Sa n Jua n Harbo r improve ment — 191 7 — 192 9 Publi c improvements — 191 4 19 1 9 — 19 2 0 1922. . 1923. . 1923 1926. . 1927. . Hig h schoo l (1920 ) _. _ Hous e constructio n (1920 ) Workingmen' s hous e construc tio n (1920) . Muno z River a Par k (1924 ) Targe t rang e an d aviatio n field (1925) . Fundin g (1930 ) Workmen' s relie f (1930 ) Hydroelectri c syste m (1931 ) •Homestea d (1932 ) Total . Contingen t liability Ponc e (1927 ) D o Villalb a (1927 ) •Guaynab o (1928 ) Tota l . No t include d i n 1 0 pe r cen t limitation : Refundin g (collateral) — 191 4 1915-. Tota l _ P . ct. 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 H 4 K 4V £ 4 M 4 K 4^ 2 4 M 4 ^ Gran d total . 5 5 5 *X 4 H 4 M 4 M ±V 2 4 H 4 K 4 K 4 M 4 H 4 ^ 4 H 4 H 6 5 $3,000,00 0 1,000,00 0 700,00 0 400,00 0 400,00 0 200,00 0 200,00 0 250,00 0 975,00 0 600,00 0 125,00 0 750,00 0 525,00 0 475,00 0 500,00 0 750,00 0 150,00 0 100,00 0 320,00 0 1,000,00 0 1,000,00 0 1,000 , 00 0 1,000,00 0 1 , 000,00 0 6 , 000 , 00 0 2,000,00 0 2,000,00 0 300,00 0 250,00 0 500,00 0 200,00 0 200,00 0 4,000,00 0 500,00 0 500,00 0 70,00 0 32,940,00 0 650,00 0 600,00 0 35,00 0 76 , 50 0 1,361 , 50 0 655,00 0 300,00 0 955,00 0 35,256 , 50 0 $150,00 0 1,000,00 0 700,00 0 400,00 0 400,00 0 200,00 0 200,00 0 250,00 0 675,00 0 .600,00 0 125,00 0 750,00 0 525,00 0 475,00 0 500,00 0 750,00 0 150,00 0 30,00 0 320,00 0 988,00 0 600,00 0 1,000,00 0 1 , 000,00 0 1,000,00 0 6,000,00 0 2,000,00 0 2,000,00 0 300,00 0 250,00 0 500,00 0 120,00 0 200,00 0 3,200,00 0 450,00 0 500,00 0 70,00 0 28,378,00 0 610,00 0 580,00 0 33,00 0 76,50 0 1,299,50 0 350,00 0 33,00 0 383,00 0 30,060 , 50 0 $150,00 0 o n Jan . 1 o f eac h year . Jan . 1,1943 ; redeemabl e afte r Jan . 1 , 1933 . $100,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1,1944 . $100,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1,1951 . $100,00 0 aniiuall y beginnin g Jan . 1 , 1955 . $100,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1,1959 . $100,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1,1958 . $150,00 0 Jan . 1,1961 ; $100,00 0 Jan . 1 , 1962 . $75,00 0 o n Jan . 1 o f eac h yea r beginnin g Jan . 1,1929 ; outstandin g serie s redeem abl e Jan . 1 , 1939 . $75,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1 , 1942 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1,1939 . Jan . 1 , 1963 . $75,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1 , 1950 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1,1939 . $75,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1 , 1960 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1,1939 . $75,00 0 annuall y Jan . 1 , 1967 , t o Jan . 1 , 1972 ; $25,00 0 Jan . .1 , 1973 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1939 . $100,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1,1959 . Seriall y Jul y 1 , 1952 , t o Jul y 1 , 1970 . $90,00 0 Jul y 1 , 1970 ; $60,00 0 Jul y 1 , 1971 . Jan . 1,1942 ; redeemabl e afte r Jan . 1,1927 . Jan . 1 , 1954 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1939 . Jan . 1,1939 ; redeemabl e afte r Jan . 1,1925 . $300,00 0 Jan , 1 , 1933-34 . $250,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1 , 1937 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1936 . $250,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1 , 1941 . $250,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jan . 1 , 1945 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1944 . $500,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jul y 1 , 1944 ; redeemabl e Jul y 1 , 1943 . $500,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jul y 1 , 1966 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1956 . $500,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jul y 1 , 1960 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1,1960 . Jan . 1 , 1945 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1930 . Do . $250,00 0 Jan . l ; 1941-42 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1940 . $20,00 0 annuall y o n Jan . 1 o f eac h year ; outstandin g serie s redeemabl e Jan . 1 , 1934 . $50,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jul y 1 , 1945 ; redeemabl e Jul y 1,1935 . $400,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jul y 1 , 1931 . $25,00 0 annuall y beginnin g Jul y 1,1931 . Jan . 1 , 1951 ; redeemabl e o n o r afte r Jan . 1 , 1941 . Jan . 1 , 1952 ; redeemabl e Jan . 1,1942 . Seriall y Jul y 1 , 1930 , t o Jul y 1,1959 . Seriall y Jul y 1 , 1932 , t o Jul y 1 , 1961 . Seriall y Jul y 1 , 1931 , t o Jul y 1 , 1956 . Seriall y Jul y 1 , 1933 , t o Jul y 1 , 1965 . Seriall y Jul y 1 , 1923 , t o Jul y 1 , 1953 . Seriall y Jul y 1,1919 , t o Jul y 1,1935 .

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47 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S I n preparin g th e abov e statement, bond s t o th e fac e valu e o f $492, 000 , whic h wer e du e an d payabl e o n Jul y 1 , 1932 , hav e bee n deducted , fund s therefo r havin g bee n transferre d t o th e fisca l agent s durin g June , 1932 . Th e homestea d bonds , fac e valu e $70,000 , date d Januar y 1 , 1932 , wer e issue d b y th e treasure r o f Puert o Ric o wit h th e approva l o f th e governor , unde r provision s containe d i n Ac t No . 4 o f th e Legislatur e o f Puert o Rico , approve d Decembe r 14 , 1931 , an d sol d locall y i n th e islan d a t par . Bond s issue d throug h Burea u o f Insula r Affair s durin g vea r endin g Jun e 30 , 1932 : Titl e o f loa n Authorit y fo r issu e Rat e Amoun t Prio e re ceive d Date d Du e Hydroelectri c sys tem . P . R . Ac t No . 7 , Apr . 6 , 1931 ; 4 M i $500,00 0 101.18 3 Jan . 1,193 1 Jan . 1,1951 ; redeemabl e o n o r afte r Jan . 1 , 1941 . MUNICIPA L BONDE D INDEBTEDNES S A t th e clos e o f th e fisca l yea r 1931-3 2 th e outstandin g municipa l bonde d indebtedness , distribute d amon g 6 9 municipalitie s o f Puert o Rico , wa s $16,892,500 , agains t th e paymen t o f whic h ther e ha d bee n accumulate d i n thei r respectiv e sinkin g fund s th e su m o f $2,366,324.51 . Th e capita l o f Puert o Rico , whic h wa s create d unde r Ac t No . 9 9 o f th e Legislatur e o f Puert o Rico , approve d Ma y 15 , 1931 , an d whic h consist s o f th e sam e territoria l limit s a s th e forme r municipalit y o f Sa n Juan , issue d bond s durin g th e yea r i n th e amoun t o f $376,000 . Th e bond s ar e date d Octobe r 1 , 1931 , ar e i n coupo n for m onl y i n th e denominatio n o f $1,00 0 each , bea r interes t beginnin g Januar y 1 , 1932 , a t th e rat e o f 4 1 % e pe r cen t pe r annum , payabl e semiannuall y o n th e 1s t da y o f Januar y an d Jul y o f eac h year , a t th e offic e o f th e treas ure r o f Puert o Rico , Sa n Juan . Th e bond s matur e i n 2 0 serie s o f varyin g amount s o n Jul y 1 , 1932 , t o Januar y 1 , 1942 , inclusive . Thes e bond s d o no t carr y th e good-fait h pledg e o f th e insula r govern men t o f Puert o Ric o an d wer e dispose d o f locall y withou t th e inter ventio n o r assistanc e o f th e Burea u o f Insula r Affairs . Municipa l bond s aggregatin g $781,10 0 wer e redeeme d durifl g th e year , thu s reducin g th e municipa l bonde d indebtednes s o f th e islan d b y th e su m o f $405,100 .

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4 8 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S RECEIPT S AN D DISBURSEMENT S Comparative statement of receipts and disbursements of Puerto Rico, fiscal years 1930, 1931, and 1932 Fisca l yea r endin g Jun e 30 — 193 0 193 1 193 2 Balanc e fro m prio r year s $816 , 555.3 8 $401,877 . 9 1 $553,026 . 8 5 Revenues : Custom s . . 1,520,000.0 0 7,324,315 . 5 9 366,579.1 3 403,351 . 9 2 1,110,000.0 0 9 , 070,829 . 7 9 421,404.8 7 451 , 962 . 9 0 2 , 250,000 . 0 0 9,813,914 . 4 3 248,139 . 2 3 350,306.1 0 Interna l 1,520,000.0 0 7,324,315 . 5 9 366,579.1 3 403,351 . 9 2 1,110,000.0 0 9 , 070,829 . 7 9 421,404.8 7 451 , 962 . 9 0 2 , 250,000 . 0 0 9,813,914 . 4 3 248,139 . 2 3 350,306.1 0 Unite d State s interna l revenue s Miscellaneou s 1,520,000.0 0 7,324,315 . 5 9 366,579.1 3 403,351 . 9 2 1,110,000.0 0 9 , 070,829 . 7 9 421,404.8 7 451 , 962 . 9 0 2 , 250,000 . 0 0 9,813,914 . 4 3 248,139 . 2 3 350,306.1 0 Tota l revenues . 9,614 , 246 . 6 4 11 , 054,197 . 5 6 12 , 662,359 . 7 6 Othe r receipts : Repaymen t o f loan s Repayment , burea u o f supplie s Othe r repayments . . . _ Transfer s fro m trus t fund s i 34 , 500 . 0 0 2 , 020,181 . 6 9 163,479 . 9 9 451,382.3 4 1 , 000,000 . 0 0 i 33,000 . 0 0 1,748,695 . 2 1 151 , 206 . 4 2 118,818 . 6 1 23,000 . 0 0 1,860,166 . 9 2 151 , 585 . 7 7 446,536 . 5 7 Bon d issu e i 34 , 500 . 0 0 2 , 020,181 . 6 9 163,479 . 9 9 451,382.3 4 1 , 000,000 . 0 0 3,405,381 . 5 4 Miscellaneou s 3,405,381 . 5 4 91,039.3 5 Tota l othe r receipt s 91,039.3 5 Tota l othe r receipt s 3 , 669 , 544.0 2 5,457,101.7 8 2 , 572,328 . 6 1 Tota l 14,100,346.0 4 16,913,177 . 2 5 15 , 787 , 715 . 2 2 Expenditures : Legislativ e 171 , 607 . 5 5 51,873.1 7 2,032,061.0 7 206,472 . 5 9 1,909 , 579.6 0 304,070.6 0 Executive Governo r 171 , 607 . 5 5 51,873.1 7 2,032,061.0 7 206,472 . 5 9 1,909 , 579.6 0 304,070.6 0 Secretar y 171 , 607 . 5 5 51,873.1 7 2,032,061.0 7 206,472 . 5 9 1,909 , 579.6 0 Governo r an d secretar y 171 , 607 . 5 5 51,873.1 7 2,032,061.0 7 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Attorne y genera l Treasure r .. . . 463,443 . 2 3 619,372 . 6 0 791 , 693 . 7 2 144,697 . 9 0 205 , 213 . 8 9 411 , 552 . 6 6 3,901 , 720.9 2 110,443 . 7 3 453,386 . 9 8 450,694 . 4 8 624,741.0 2 490,121.8 7 77,679.9 6 214,380 . 6 3 257,032.6 1 4 , 045,517 . 0 9 111 , 930 . 0 6 502,362 . 7 0 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Interior Road s an d bridge s Publi c building s Insula r telegrap h Othe r expense s Education Publi c school s Othe r expense s Agricultur e an d labor.. . Agricultur e an d commerc e 463,443 . 2 3 619,372 . 6 0 791 , 693 . 7 2 144,697 . 9 0 205 , 213 . 8 9 411 , 552 . 6 6 3,901 , 720.9 2 110,443 . 7 3 453,386 . 9 8 450,694 . 4 8 624,741.0 2 490,121.8 7 77,679.9 6 214,380 . 6 3 257,032.6 1 4 , 045,517 . 0 9 111 , 930 . 0 6 502,362 . 7 0 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Labor . 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Health. . 1 , 371 , 612 . 3 2 132,650 . 6 3 885,340 . 2 4 40,640 . 2 3 16,121 . 7 2 0 ) 712 , 740 . 3 1 716,124.4 2 1,271,750 . 5 4 167,909 . 2 2 919,145 . 0 9 42,401 . 9 5 15,773 . 0 0 ( 2 ) 3,653 , 710.8 4 743,993.8 0 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Audito r 1 , 371 , 612 . 3 2 132,650 . 6 3 885,340 . 2 4 40,640 . 2 3 16,121 . 7 2 0 ) 712 , 740 . 3 1 716,124.4 2 1,271,750 . 5 4 167,909 . 2 2 919,145 . 0 9 42,401 . 9 5 15,773 . 0 0 ( 2 ) 3,653 , 710.8 4 743,993.8 0 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Insula r polic e Public-servic e commissio n Civil-servic e commissio n Burea u o f supplies , printing , an d transportation . 0 the r expense s Judicia l 1 , 371 , 612 . 3 2 132,650 . 6 3 885,340 . 2 4 40,640 . 2 3 16,121 . 7 2 0 ) 712 , 740 . 3 1 716,124.4 2 1,271,750 . 5 4 167,909 . 2 2 919,145 . 0 9 42,401 . 9 5 15,773 . 0 0 ( 2 ) 3,653 , 710.8 4 743,993.8 0 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Tota l expense s 1 , 371 , 612 . 3 2 132,650 . 6 3 885,340 . 2 4 40,640 . 2 3 16,121 . 7 2 0 ) 712 , 740 . 3 1 716,124.4 2 1,271,750 . 5 4 167,909 . 2 2 919,145 . 0 9 42,401 . 9 5 15,773 . 0 0 ( 2 ) 3,653 , 710.8 4 743,993.8 0 118,971.7 8 500,881.1 5 1,070,987.1 8 478,493 . 7 0 159,292.0 4 214 , OI L 8 4 256,855 . 7 0 4,117,110 . 7 7 128,843.3 6 521,849.3 0 152,622.4 9 1,511,303 . 9 3 166,360.4 8 976,025 . 8 0 48,974 . 87 " 17,473.4 3 2,097 , 581.1 7 707,706 . 5 2 767,933.6 7 Tota l expense s 13,232 , 297 . 2 9 15,705,197.0 5 14,317,349 . 7 8 Othe r payments : Transfer s t o trus t fund s Municipa l an d school-boar d bond s Tota l othe r payment s Cas h balanc e 13,232 , 297 . 2 9 15,705,197.0 5 14,317,349 . 7 8 Othe r payments : Transfer s t o trus t fund s Municipa l an d school-boar d bond s Tota l othe r payment s Cas h balanc e 431,670 . 8 4 34 , 500 . 0 0 621,953.3 5 33,000.0 0 572,943.3 8 23,000 . 0 0 Othe r payments : Transfer s t o trus t fund s Municipa l an d school-boar d bond s Tota l othe r payment s Cas h balanc e 466,170 . 8 4 401,877 . 9 1 654,953.3 5 553,026.8 5 595,943.3 8 874,422 . 0 6 Tota l 466,170 . 8 4 401,877 . 9 1 654,953.3 5 553,026.8 5 595,943.3 8 874,422 . 0 6 Tota l 14,100,346 . 0 4 16,913,177 . 2 5 15,787,715 . 22 : 14,100,346 . 0 4 16,913,177 . 2 5 15,787,715 . 22 : 1 Include s earthquake-mortgag e loan s t o municipalitie s an d schoo l boards . 2 Include d i n expenditure s o f secretar y fo r 193 0 an d governo r fo r 1931 .

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49 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S REVENU E AN D OTHE R RECEIPT S [Dat a take n fro m Annua l Repor t o f th e Audito r o f Puert o Rico , 1931-32 ] Th e followin g tabulatio n show s th e revenu e an d othe r receipt s fo r th e yea r classifie d accordin g t o th e source s fro m whic h the y wer e derived : Custom s $2 , 250 , 000 . 0 0 Unite d State s interna l revenu e 248 , 139 . 2 3 Propert y taxes , insula r proportio n 354 , 935 . 5 0 Propert y taxes , proportio n o f th e universit y ta x 6 , 555 . 4 1 Excis e taxe s 7 , 958 , 191 . 3 7 Inheritanc e taxe s 86 , 901 . 8 1 Telephon e an d telegrap h receipt s 120 , 565 . 0 9 Cour t fee s an d fine s 21 , 939 . 2 0 Harbo r an d doc k fee s 44 , 501 . 3 8 Interes t 82 , 104 . 5 2 Incom e tax____ 1 , 407 , 330 . 3 4 Miscellaneou s 81 , 195 . 9 1 Tota l 12 , 662 , 359 . 7 6 Cas h o n han d Jul y 1 , 193 1 553 , 026 . 8 5 Tota l 13 , 215 , 386 . 6 1 STATEMEN T O F INSULA R REVENU E RECEIPT S FO R CERTAI N YEAR S [Dat a take n fro m Annua l Report e o f Treasure r o f Puert o Rico ] Fo r purpose s o f comparison , ther e ar e se t fort h below , th e amount s o f insula r revenu e receive d fo r th e first ful l yea r o f America n occu pancy , 1900-1901 , an d fo r eac h o f th e las t 1 0 years : Fisca l year : Receipt s 1900-190 1 $2 , 357 , 232 . 3 6 1922-2 3 8,071,202.7 8 19232 4 9 , 198 , 385 . 8 3 1924-25-8,532,741 . 2 7 19252 6 11,773,953 . 8 7 19262 7 11 , 358 , 824 . 5 0 Fisca l year—Contd . Receipt s 19272 8 $12 , 446 , 219 . 1 3 19282 9 11 , 004 , 138 . 5 2 19293 0 9 , 614 , 246 . 6 4 19303 1 11,054 , 197 . 5 6 19313 2 12 , 662 , 359 . 7 6 I t wil l b e note d tha t th e receipt s fo r pas t fiscal yea r showe d a marke d increas e ove r th e previou s fiscal yea r whic h ha d bee n smal l owin g t o th e disastrou s effect s o f th e hurrican e o f Septembe r 13 , 1928 . TH E BUDGE T Th e followin g sum s fo r th e curren t expense s o f th e governmen t o f Puert o Ric o wer e appropriate d i n th e annua l appropriatio n act s fo r eac h o f th e las t 1 4 years : 19192 0 $7 , 174 , 00 0 19202 1 8,247,00 0 19212 2 9,971,00 0 19222 3 9,053,00 0 19232 4 11,841,00 0 19242 5 11,735,00 0 19252 6 10,417,00 0 19262 7 $10,450,00 0 19272 8 10 , 440 , 00 0 19282 9 10 , 968 , 00 0 19293 0 10 , 499 , 00 0 19303 1 10 , 174 , 15 4 19313 2 11 , 285 , 24 5 19323 3 10 , 287 , 83 5 NOTE.-—Figure s fo r 1919-2 0 t o 1929-3 0 wer e obtaine d fro m governor' s repor t fo r 1928-29 , pag e 35 . Figure s fo r 1930-31 , 1931-32 , an d 1932-3 3 wer e obtaine d fro m Law s o f Puert o Rico , 1930 , pag e 554 ; 1931 , pag e 880 ; 1932 , pag e 514 .

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5 0 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S ASSESSE D VALUATIO N O F PROPERT Y [Dat a take n fro m Annua l Report s o f Treasure r o f Puert o Rico ] Th e followin g statemen t show s th e tota l assesse d valuatio n o f rea l an d persona l propert y i n Puert o Rico , fo r taxabl e purposes, fo r th e year s stated : 1901-0 2 $96,428,30 6 19252 6 321,833,47 3 19262 7 338 , 089 , 88 9 19272 8 341,370,65 4 19282 9 $344 , 865 , 10 4 19293 0 330 , 274 , 02 0 19303 1 331,205,53 5 19313 2 324 , 309 , 11 7 Schedules of assets and liabilities as of June 30, 1932 [Dat a take n fro m Exhibi t 2 , Annua l Repor t o f Audito r o f Puert o Rico , 1931-32 ] Curren t yea r (1931-32 ) Previou s yea r (1930-31 ) Differenc e ASSET S Lan d an d equipmen t Cas h Sinkin g fund s Trus t fun d reserve s Note s receivabl e Account s receivabl e Loan s t o municipalities. . O the r deferre d asset s Deferre d debit s Universit y o f Puert o Rico . Total. . LIABILITIE S Note s payabl e Account s payabl e Trus t fun d liabilitie s Deferre d liabilitie s Deferre d credit s Bonde d indebtednes s Surplus , Isabel a irrigatio n service.. . Surplus , hydroelectri c projects . Trustees , Universit y o f Puert o Ric o Surplus , Quayam a irrigatio n servic e Th e peopl e o f Puert o Ric o Total.. . $50 , 975 , 798 . 3 5 9 , 589 , 506 . 8 1 1,370 , 527.8 0 1,135,899.5 2 2,498.0 0 8,835,205 . 2 7 5,375.0 0 152,123.1 7 130 , 796 . 7 4 2,145 , 749 . 6 2 $49 , 691 , 10,495 , 1,458 , 2,041 , 1 , 7 , 396 , 139 , 146 , 1,669 , 062 . 5 9 263 . 6 2 677.1 4 286.8 0 576 . 8 8 143.5 0 600 . 0 0 124.4 2 481.4 6 132.5 4 284,735.7 6 905,756.8 1 i 88,049.3 4 905,387 . 2 8 921.1 2 439,061 . 7 7 4,775 . Of f 12,998 . 7 5 i 15,684 . 7 2 476,617 . 0 8 74,343,480 . 2 8 73,039,248.9 5 1 , 304 , 231.3 3 379 , 4,193 , 11,662 , 1,804 , 28,761 , (580 , 1,930 , 2,145 , 2,816 , 21,229 , 494 . 5 4 348 . 3 8 172 . 2 7 796.8 6 301 . 0 2 000 . 0 0 262 . 68 ) 629.9 2 749 . 6 2 776.2 0 474.1 5 730 , 3,733 , 12,127 , 1 , 1,832 , 29,097 , (368 , 1,768 , 1,669 , 2,617 , 19,829 , 494.5 4 851.9 4 188 . 0 1 593 . 7 5 073.0 8 000.0 0 48 4 45 ) 924.3 9 132.5 4 657.2 7 817.8 8 1351 , 459 , 1 465 , t 127 , l 1211 , 161 , 476 , 199 , 1,399 , 000.00 496.4 4 015 . 7 4 796.89 772.0 6 000.0 0 778.2 3 705.6 $ 617.0 0 118.9 $ 656.2 7 74,343,480.2 8 78,039,248.9 6 1,304,231.3 $ i Decreas e i n fiscal year , 1931-32 .

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51 REPOR T O F CHIE F O F BUREA U O F INSULA R AFFAIR S APPENDI X G DOMINICA N REPUBLI C DOMINICA N CUSTOM S RECEIVERSHI P Th e followin g tabl e show s th e financial transaction s o f th e receiver shi p durin g th e fiscal (calendar ) yea r ende d Decembe r 31 , 1931 : Statement of the customs service, Dominican Republic, year ended December 31 t 19S1 RECEIPT S Balanc e fro m Decembe r 31 , 193 0 $171 , 425 . 1 4 Gros s collection s 2 , 883 , 476 . 9 2 Miscellaneou s receipt s 21 , 562 . 9 1 Provisiona l receipts , pendin g cancellatio n a s o f Dec . 31 , 193 1 58 , 858 . 0 0 Tota l j . 3 , 135 , 322 . 9 7 EXPENDITURE S Custom s expens e 131 , 961 . 5 3 Sinkin g fun d payment s 1 , 386 , 578 . 9 5 Interes t o n bond s 914 , 361 . 5 5 Pai d t o th e Dominica n Government , accrue d revenu e fro m Janu ar y t o July , 193 1 105 , 000 . 0 0 Pai d fo r accoun t o f th e Dominica n Government , a s pe r specia l authorit y 9 , 637 . 9 1 Take n b y specia l emergenc y agen t o f th e Dominica n Governmen t fro m Oct . 2 6 t o Dec . 31 , 193 1 440 , 430 . 3 4 Exchang e o n fund s transmitte d 8 , 788 . 5 5 Accrue d liabilit y fun d disbursement s 607 . 5 0 5 pe r cen t buildin g fun d disbursement s 3 , 267 . 7 3 Refund s o f dutie s collecte d 2 , 018 . 6 2 Persona l fee s refunde d 9 , 635 . 7 5 Provisiona l receipts , pendin g cancellatio n o n Dec . 31 , 1930 , an d cancele d durin g 193 1 64 , 675 . 0 0 Balance s o n han d Dec . 31 , 1931 : 5 pe r cen t buildin g fund . 1 , 260 . 7 0 $6,700,00 0 loan , 1922 , interes t accoun t 22 , 150 . 5 1 Accrue d liabilit y fun d 6 , 392 . 5 0 I n transi t fro m deput y receiver s 28 , 555 . 8 3 Tota l 3 , 135 , 322 . 9 7 O