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Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs

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Title:
Annual report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs
Series Title:
Annual reports, War Department
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United States -- Bureau of Insular Affairs
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publisher:
G.P.O.
Frequency:
Annual
regular
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English
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v. : ; 22 cm.

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Insular possessions -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
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federal government publication ( marcgt )
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
1924-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Report year ends June 30.

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SOAS, University of London
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
557807 ( ALEPH )
OCM03883729 ( OCLC )
sn 84032311 ( LCCN )
Classification:
HB325.3 ( ddc )

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United States. Bureau of Insular Affairs.Report of the Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, War Department

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ANNUAL REPORTS

WAR DEPARTMENT

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS - 1930


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ANNUAL REPORTS, WAR DEPARTMENT

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1930

ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF
INSULAR AFFAIRS

1930

UNITED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1930




ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

CHIEF, BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

War Department,

Bureau of Insular Affairs,

October 15, 1930.

The Secretary of War.

Sir : I have the honor to submit the following report of the Bureau
of Insular Affairs for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1930.

While, in Porto Rico, the fiscal year corresponds to that of the
United States Government (July 1-June 30), the fiscal year in the
Philippine Islands is identical with the calendar year. The * latest
annual report of the Governor General and the statistical data per-
taining thereto reflects, therefore, in general, the operations of the
Philippine government for the year ending December 31, 1929. In
certain cases hereinafter indicated the bureau’s report regarding
Philippine affairs is, however, brought up to include June 30, 1930.

THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

Changes in official personnel.—The following changes occurred
during the year among officials of the government of the Philippine
Islands appointed by the President :

The Hon. Dwight F. Davis, whose appointment as Governor Gen-
eral was mentioned in the last annual report, arrived in Manila July

8.1929, and entered upon the duties of his office the same day, reliev-
ing the Hon. Eugene A. Gilmore, who, as vice governor, had been
Acting Governor General since the departure from Manila, on Feb-
ruary 23, 1929, of the former Governor General, the Hon. Henry L.
Stimson.

The resignation of the Hon. Eugene A. Gilmore as vice governor
was accepted by the President, effective as of June 21, 1930. His
successor had not been appointed on June 30, 1930.

Mr. Ben F. Wright resigned as auditor of the Philippine Islands,
effective November 1, 1929. Former Major General and Chief of
the Militia Bureau, Creed C. Hammond, was appointed to succeed
him and entered upon the duties of insular auditor on November

2.1929.

Policy of the Governor General.—The general policy announced
by the new Governor General in his inaugural address, as sum-
marized in his annual report, contemplated no radical changes in
the organization of the insular government, but the utilization, as
a rule, of existing governmental agencies, with special emphasis upon
economic development and the elimination of any dishonest or
incompetent public officials.

l


2

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Congressional consideration of Philippine questions.—Appendix A
to this report lists certain acts, specially affecting the Philippine
Islands, enacted during the period to which this report pertains.
The tariff act of 1930 is of particular importance in this connection.
As finally enacted, it makes no change in the previous general pro-
cedure in accordance with which products of the Philippine Islands
enter the United States, and products of the United States enter the
Philippine Islands, free of duty. Increases in tariff schedules in-
cluded in the act tend to give additional protection from foreign
competition to certain major Philippine products.

In Appendix B to the report are listed certain measures, of special
importance in connection with political and economic relations be-
tween the United States and the Philippine Islands, which were
presented for consideration during the first and second sessions of
the Seventy-first Congress but which were not enacted into law.
Among these were:

(1) Proposals so to modify existing trade relations between the
Philippine Islands and the United States as to restrict the free access
of Philippine products to American markets.

This proposed legislation threatened economic disaster to the
Philippine Islands and the ultimate market curtailment of Philippine
markets for United States products. Opposition to it was voiced by
the Secretary of State (formerly Governor General of the Philippine
Islands), by the Secretary of War, by representatives of the Gov-
ernor General and of the Philippine Legislature, and by various com-
mercial bodies and others interested. The general attitude of the
War Department in regard to the proposed restrictions is outlined
in the two letters of the then Secretary of War (the late James W.
Good) appearing, respectively, as Appendices C and D to this report.
The proposals in question were all rejected by Congress.

(2) The proposed extension of the United States coastwise ship-
ping laws to the Philippine Islands.

Certain discretionary powers in this connection are already vested
in the President by existing law. Hearings were held in October,
1929, before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Commerce of the
Senate, on Senate Resolution 130, which instructed that committee
to investigate and “ report to the Senate whether it is sound public
policy, consistent with economic justice for all concerned, to extend
the coastwise laws of the United States to the Philippine Islands
pending the ultimate independence of these islands.” The objections
of the War Department to any proposed legislation directed toward
the extension of the United States coastwise shipping laws to the
Philippine Islands at this time were presented in a letter dated
October 21, 1929, addressed by the Acting Secretary of War to the
chairman of the subcommittee (of the Senate Commerce Committee)
before which the hearings were conducted. That letter was pub-
lished in the printed record of the hearings on Senate Resolution
130, Seventy-first Congress, first session (pp. 45-74).

(3) Measures having in view the granting of independence to the
Philippine Islands within periods varying, in the several proposals
presented, from about two to about eleven years.

Action by Congress on these measures is still pending. A favor-
able report (S. Rept. No. 781, 71st Cong., 2d sess.) on one of these
measures (S. 3822, commonly known as the Hawes-Cutting bill) was


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

3

made by the Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs
and was accompanied by a minority report in opposition to the pro-
visions of the bill. The general attitude of the War Department
regarding measures directed toward the early withdrawal of Ameri-
can sovereignty from the Philippine Islands was presented in two
letters, similar in character, addressed bj^ the Secretary of War to
the chairman of the Senate Committee on Territories and Insular
Affairs and the chairman of the House Committee on Insular Af-
fairs, respectively. The letter to the chairman of the Senate Com-
mittee on Territories and Insular Affairs, dated May 15, 1930, ap-
pears in Senate Document No. 150, Seventy-first Congress, second
session.

(4) Proposals that, in connection with the administration of the
immigration act of 1924, citizens of the Philippine Islands, in gen-
eral, be treated as aliens.

Plearings before the House Committee on Immigration and Nat-
uralization on one of the proposals in question—that incorporated in
H. R. 8708 (commonly known as the Welch bill)—were initiated in
April, 1930. Should this measure be enacted and given effect, the
practical result of its provisions, taken in connection with existing
law on the subject, would apparently be to place Filipinos, as re-
gards entering the United States, on the basis of alien Asiatics.
The objections of the Secretary of War to the passage of this pro-
posed legislation were presented to the committee. (See record of
the hearings, pp. 88-100.) Action by Congress on the bill is still
pending. Other measures embodying less radical restrictions upon
Filipino immigration to the United States were also introduced and
action on some of these is still pending. It is believed that the total
net increase of Filipinos in the United States during the year 1929
was less than 8,000.

The Philippine Legislature.—The second session of the eighth
legislature began on July 16, 1929, and terminated on November 8.
Its proceedings were characterized by harmonious relations between
the executive and legislative departments of the insular government.
Of the total number of bills passed (187), 140 (78.6 per cent) were
approved .by the Governor General, of which number 133 became
law as a result of that approval and 7, which, under the organic act,
required the approval of the President or Congress, were forwarded
to the War Department. Of these last, 5 were subsequently ap-
proved by the President. The disapproval by the Governor Gen-
eral of 40 of the bills passed (21.4 per cent of the total number) was
partly due to defects incident to hurried legislation in the closing
days of the session. On the last day the house acted on 84 of the
bills (nearly 45 per cent of the total number) that finally passed,
and the senate on 114 (over 60 per cent of the total number). Appro-
priate timely cooperation between the legislative leaders and de-
partmental heads'will, it is hoped, prevent similar congestion during
the closing days of future sessions.

The more important legislative enactments are listed and reviewed
briefly in the annual report of the Governor General. The folio ty-
ing five acts received the approval of the President:

Act 3608, approved February 8, 1930, which endows the University
of the Philippines with portions of the public domain for the addi-
tional support and maintenance of that institution.


4

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Act 3671, approved February 8, 1930, which imposes a tariff duty
on livestock (cattle) imported into the islands. The purpose of this
measure is to promote and protect the livestock industry of the
islands.

Act 3672, approved February 7, 1930, which authorizes the filing
in the proper court, under certain conditions and within the period
of one year from the date of the promulgation of the act, of certain
claims of title to parcels of land that have heretofore been declared
public land.

Act 3673 (PI. 2216), approved June 27, 1930, which is intended to
expedite the survey, subdivision, and disposition of public lands with
a view to bringing those lands into more productive use.

Act 3674 (S. 184), approved June 30, 1930, which limits the grant-
ing of licenses for cutting timber or utilizing or taking other forest
products in the public forests to those who are citizens of the Philip-
pine Islands, of the United States, or of countries the laws of which
grant similar permission to Filipino citizens.

Philippine missions to the United States.—The members of the
Philippine mission mentioned in the previous annual report of the
bureau as having arrived in Washington in April, 1929, returned to
the Philippine Islands during the following summer. In October
of the same year the question of Philippine independence was in-
jected into the discussion, on the floor of the United States Senate,
of proposals to include, in the tariff bill then under consideration
by Congress, provisions restricting the duty-free entry of Philippine
products into the United States. On October 9, 1929, there was in-
troduced in the Senate an amendment to the tariff bill directed to the
early independence of the Philippine Islands. Following the rejec-
tion of that amendment by the Senate, the Philippine Legislature,
by Concurrent Resolution No. 29 (adopted October 29, 1929), created
a committee of the legislature, composed of six members, three from
each House. This committee was instructed, jointly with the Philip-
pine Resident Commissioners in Washington, to “ petition the Gov-
ernment and Congress of the United States for the early granting of
independence to the Philippines, and submit to them from time to
time the views of the legislature on any matter concerning the Philip-
pines under consideration by the Government at Washington.” The
speaker and minority floor leader of the house of representatives ar-
rived in Washington on January 3, 1930, and were followed later
by the majority floor leader of the house and minority floor leader of
the senate. These four members of the committee remained in Wash-
ington for some time and, with the two Resident Commissioners,
appeared before committees of both Houses of Congress in connection
with Philippine questions under consideration.

General conditions in the islands.—The Governor General, in his
annual report, summarizes as follows general conditions throughout
the }^ear 1929 (calendar and fiscal) :

For the people in general, as well as the government, the year was on the
whole a very satisfactory one. Peace and order were excellent, and with the
exception of two typhoons which swept through some of the southern islands,
the country was free of major disasters. Health conditions were very favor-
able. While prices of staple crops were low, their volume was larger than
ever before. This prosperous condition of the country was reflected all along
the line in increased revenues of the government. A typical example of this
is the fact that, internal-revenue collections increased over 2,500.000 pesos, or


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

5

tibout 4y2 per cent. There was unmistakable evidence, however, toward the
end of the year that continued low prices were slowing up the business situa-
tion and competent observers expect that the revenues of the government will
be diminished for the year 1930, and business in general will be somewhat
poorer during the first part of the year. This causes no undue alarm, how-
ever, as the government is in a very sound position financially, the budget having
been drawn in such a way for the past several years that a cash balance has
resulted.

The legislature and financial officers of the government are fully cognizant
of the situation and realize the necessity of cutting government expenditures
to the minimum and curtailing all unnecessary development.

In so far as the business community is concerned, most firms have been con-
servatively managed and are well able to withstand a temporary depression.

Anticipated conditions for 1930, mentioned by the Governor Gen-
eral in the above quotation from his 1929 report, were reflected in a
considerable decrease in the external trade of the islands during the
first six months of 1930.

Political uncertainty, partly incident to the discussions of inde-
pendence in Congress, and economic uncertainty, partly incident
to proposals to restrict the free access of Philippine products to
United States markets, were doubtless factors in the slowing up of
business in the islands in the latter part of 1929 and first half
of 1930.

Public revenues.—The total receipts and expenditures for the Phil-
ippine government for the fiscal and calendar year 1929 are shown in
Appendix F. The revenues from ordinary sources—customs, inter-
nal revenue, and miscellaneous receipts—as shown in the statement
of the general fund contained in the annual report of the insular
secretary of finance for the year 1929 amounted to $43,635,288.18,
an increase over the corresponding revenues for the preceding year
of $2,454,276.50. The ordinary expenditures of the government, on
the other hand, amounted to $39,416,919.42, being a decrease of about
$396,484 as compared with those of the previous year. The unap-
propriated cash surplus at the end of the year 1929 was $5,010,517.64.

Bonded indebtedness.—The Governor General in his report for the
fiscal and calendar year 1929 shows an increase in the bonded in-
debtedness of $700,000 during the year. In Appendix F of this
report the statement of the bonded indebtedness is carried forward
to June 30, 1930. The total amount of outstanding indebtedness is
well within the limits provided by law and sinking funds are fully
maintained to cover all outstanding bonds. In view of the sub-
stantial unappropriated cash surplus which had accumulated in the
treasury the Governor General recommended and the Philippine
Legislature approved the redemption of the outstanding bonds of
an original $6,000,000 issue, Manila port works and improvement
bonds, due 1950 but redeemable in 1930. These bonds, issued in
1920, carry an interest rate of 5% per cent per annum, the highest
rate paid on any Philippine government bonds. Instructions were
accordingly issued for the redemption on September 2, 1930, of all
outstanding bonds of the issue, totaling $5,580,000. The result will
be a large saving in interest to the Philippine government.

External trade.—The total trade with the United States and for-
eign countries for the calendar year 1929, amounting to $311,607,118,
was the largest ever recorded, being about 7 per cent greater than the
-corresponding total for the previous year. The imports amounted to
$147,160,275, an increase of 9 per cent over the previous year; and


6

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

the exports amounted to $164,446,843, an increase of about 6 per cent.
While the balance of trade continued in favor of the islands, it was
somewhat less than the corresponding* balance ($20,397,648) in 1928
and only about two-fifths of the favorable balance ($39,722,614) in
1927.

The total trade with the United States amounted to $217,058,432
(70 per cent of the total external trade). Of this amount, $92,592,-
959 (an increase*over the preceding year of over 10 per cent) repre-
sented shipments to the islands and $124,465,473 (an increase of about
7 per cent) represented shipments from the islands.

Examination of the statistics of external trade for the six years
1924 to 1929 shows a general increase in the total value of shipments
from the islands but a somewhat larger general increase in the total
value of shipments into the islands—the increases in both cases being
chiefly in trade with the United States. The figures reflect a trend
toward trade balances less favorable to the islands, both as regards
the actual amount of the successive balances and as regards the per-
centage which the successive balances bear to the total external trade
of their respective years. Examination of the nature of the articles
imported suggests an increasing demand for those that may be classed
as luxuries, such as automobiles, electrical appliances, and silk and
its manufactures. Other large increases were in imports of iron and
steel products, mineral oils, and food products. In this connection
the Governor General states in his annual report :

* * * The per capita consumption of steel, most of which has always
come from the United States, has increased more than 400 per cent since 1903
and 67 per cent since 1924. The per capita consumption of cotton goods has
increased by over 200 per cent since 1903, meat and dairy products 300' per cent,
wheat flour 276 per cent, silk 421 per cent, paper 450 per cent, and other articles
imported from the United States in similar manner. These figures are cited to
illustrate the constant and growing importance of the Philippines as a market
for American goods. Taking into consideration the vast undeveloped resources
the future possibilities suggested are enormous.

Reports showing the external trade for the period January 1 to
June 30, 1930 (a period subsequent to that covered by the Governor
General’s annual report), indicate that, during the first six months
of 1930, there was a noticeable decrease, both in the total value of
external trade and in the favorable trade balance, as compared with
figures for the corresponding period of 1929.

Education.—The bureau of education has in recent years given
special attention to educational research, vocational education, and
health education.

Educational research was given added impetus in 1929 as the
result of a gift of $160,000 made by the International Board of
Education for use in that connection. Recent careful surveys in
the fields of vocational education and health education have been
conducted by specialists from the United States who visited the
islands in order to make the respective studies on the ground.
Enrollment in the vocational courses offered in the public schools
increased, from 7,442 in 1926 to 14,130 in 1929—an increase of nearly
100 per cent within three years.

In the public schools the total enrollment of pupils in 1929 was
1,161,367, a number greater, by approximately 50,000, than the
enrollment of the preceding year. This progress was made possible


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 7

by an increase of $350,000 in the appropriations available for appli-
cation to school extension. Due, however, to the increasing popula-
tion the schools were still able to provide accommodations for only
a little over one-third of the children of school age.

Private schools provide for a considerable number of pupils who
can not be accommodated in the government schools. Through in-
spections conducted under the bureau of education, the standards
maintained in these schools compare favorably, in general, with those
in the public schools.

The expenditures for education from insular appropriations for
1929 amounted to about 21 per cent of the total income.

Health.—-There were no serious outbreaks of communicable dis-
eases during the year 1929. There was a slight rise in the general
death rate (22.18 per 1,000) as compared with the 1928 figures.
The mortality rate from typhoid was the lowest on record for the
islands and but one case of cholera was reported. The only cases
of smallpox that occurred were confined to the islands of Sarangani
and Balut, Province of Davao. Tuberculosis still occupied the first
place in mortality records, over 30,000 deaths being attributed to
that disease during the year. There was a slight increase in dysen-
tery in the islands as a whole and a noticeable increase in deaths
due to beri-beri. Deaths from malaria have decreased 50 per cent
since 1926.

During the early part of the year 1930 cholera made its appear-
ance in the Provinces of Cebu, Iloilo, and Oriental Negros. While
it did not reach the proportions of an epidemic, vigorous efforts on
the part of the department of health were necessary to prevent its
spread.

About one-third of the total appropriation for public health is
utilized in the segregation and treatment of lepers; 1,321 were de-
tected and segregated during the year and 553 were released on
parole, making a total of 2,013 released as negative since 1922. New
facilities for combating this disease include a large station in Cebu,
provided by the Leonard Wood Memorial Foundation at a cost of
$180,000. The foundation also released $142 500 for use at the leprosy
station in Culion and $15,000 for the erection of a skin clinic in Cebu.

A number of health demonstration and health rehabilitation units
were established in 1929, largely through the cooperation and assist-
ance of the American Red Cross and the International Health
Board. Three new hospitals (totaling 225 beds), one laboratory and
three public health dispensaries were opened during the year.

Typhoons.—Destructive typhoons occurred in September, 1929,
and April, 1930. The first caused severe property losses and about
150 deaths in parts of Luzon and adjacent small islands; the second,
the serious effects of which were more local in character, visited
parts of the Visayan Islands. The American Red Cross gave gener-
ous aid to the sufferers and the United States military and naval
authorities rendered valuable assistance in meeting these emergencies.

Quarantine service.—The annual report of the Governor General
includes the following:

Although cholera, plague, and smallpox were present in epidemic form in
oriental ports adjacent to the Philippines, their transmission was prevented
hy effective quarantine measures and vaccination.

18189—30----2


8

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Early in the year reports were received of a considerable number of cases
of cerebrospinal meningitis among* Filipino steerage passengers on vessels which
bad left the Philippines eii route to the United States. The number of these
cases increased as colder weather was encountered on the voyage. Due to the
spread of the disease in the Pacific States, the President of the United States
issued an Executive order which included this disease in quarantinable dis-
eases. All steerage passengers leaving the islands were required to undergo
a two weeks’ quarantine and a bacteriological examination in all cases before
embarkation and regulations were drawn up lessening the number of steerage
passengers vessels might carry.

Meningitis is not a common disease in the islands and there appears to be
little doubt that the cases mentioned were picked up in oriental ports by
Filipinos en route to the United States who on account of the unaccustomed
cold and, frequently, their insufficient clothing, were peculiarly susceptible.

Government-owned companies.—The Cebu Portland Cement Co.r
the Manila Railroad Co., the Philippine National B#nk, arid the
Manila Hotel, in all of which the Philippine government holds vir-
tually all of the stock, are all reported as having made encouraging
net profits in 1929.

Provincial and municipal governments.—The Governor General re-
ports conditions in these governmental entities as generally satisfac-
tory. In both the regularly organized provinces and the specially
organized provinces under the bureau of non-Christian tribes, assess-
ments of real property and revenues from taxation increased. Peace
and order in the specially organized provinces are reported as-
generally on a par with conditions in the regularly organized
provinces.

Justice.—During the year 1929, 10 auxiliary judges were appointed
with a view to expediting the disposition of cadastral cases. Con-
gestion in the courts of first instance continues and constitutes one
of the most serious problems confronting the insular government.

Public works and communications.—The extension of the public
roads continues, some $8,000,000 having been expended during the*
year on roads and bridges. Three hundred and eighty kilometers of
new first-class roads, 289 kilometers of second-class roads were con-
structed, and some 21 important bridges were completed. This
brings the total of the insular road net of improved roads to 10,389.7
kilometers.

Through the cooperation of the United States Signal Corps, the
bureau Avas able to arrange for the transportation to the Philippine
Islands and laying there of about 280 miles of gutta-percha cable.
This work was accomplished quickly, efficiently, and with a large
saving to the insular government.

The unsatisfactory conditions of interisland transportation are
being gradually improved.

Agriculture and natural resources.—One of the most difficult prob-
lems confronting the government is that of the satisfactory disposi-
tion of public lands and the utilization of these properties for produc-
tive purposes. The increase in the number of homesteads approved
is still regrettably slow. An interesting experiment in this connec-
tion is the setting aside of a large agricultural area in Mindanao and
permitting a corporation organized for the cultivation of pineapples
to take up part of the reservation and finance homesteaders who will
settle in the colony and raise pineapples.


REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAE AFFAIRS

9

There is a well-recognized need for additional credit facilities avail-
able to the small farmer. Under a recent joint resolution of the leg-
islature a rural bank commission is now making a thorough survey
of the situation and is to report the results of its study during the
present year.

Administrative investigations— Rumors of serious irregularities in
certain bureaus of the department of commerce and communications
resulted in a number of administrative investigations as to actual
conditions. Instances of serious dishonesty and incompetency, ex-
tending to some of the ranking officials of the bureaus concerned, were
developed and resulted in a series of resignations and dismissals.
Prosecutions of certain officials were being conducted at the close of
the period to which the Governor General’s annual report pertains.

PORTO RICO

The governor.—The Hon. Theodore Roosevelt was appointed Gov-
ernor of Porto Rico on September 11, 1929. He arrived in San Juan
on October 7, 1929, and assumed the duties of his office the same day.

GENERAL POLICIES ANNOUNCED BY THE GOVERNOR

In his inaugural address to the people of Porto Rico. Governor
Roosevelt stated:

* * * During tlie last decade the questions that have been engaging the

attention of Porto Rico may be roughly grouped under two main heads. The
first concerns her future political status, the second, her economic and related
social condition.

It is perfectly proper that you, as citizens of the United States, should be
concerned over the form of government under which you and your children
may be living in time to come.

At this moment, however, our first, consideration, one that overshadows all
others in importance, is economic rehabilitation. All other matters are sec-
ondary at this time. Indeed, satisfactory progress along every other line is
primarily contingent upon the successful solution of the economic problem.

There are three prime requisites for a happy, progressive people—good edu-
cation, good health, and a sufficient prosperity to provide proper food, proper
clothes, and proper homes. All three are intimately connected. Each of the
three is a necessary complement to the other two; good educational and health
conditions are obviously dependent upon the material prosperity necessary for
their support. In all three respects at present conditions among our people
of Porto Rico are far below what we would have them.

* * * * * *

* * * While we should attack all three of these problems—health, education,
and economics—it is upon the last that we must first center our efforts.

In so doing we must not be deceived by temporary palliatives. We must strive
for permanent solutions. An artificial stimulant which gives momentary relief
is often followed by a severe relapse. The goal we must hold before our eyes
is the creation of conditions whereby the average man can obtain for himself
by his own labor, not by gifts or charity, governmental or private, a comfort-
able living for himself and his family. * * *

Having thus emphasized the general policy of economic rehabilita-
tion as the immediate aim, the governor indicated, in the same ad-
dress, certain specific phases as requiring prompt attention. Among
those mentioned were:

(a) To promote appropriate relief measures for the sufferers
from the great hurricane of September, 1928.


10

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

(i) To foster and extend the markets for Porto Bican products.
(c) To develop such industries as may be suitable to the genius
of the Porto Rican people.

(cl) To aid those Porto Ricans who may wish to take advantage
of opportunities offered by the various fields of endeavor
open in continental United States.

(e) To improve agricultural methods.

(/) To encourage tourists to visit the island.

Referring to the financial situation of the island and its people,
the governor stated:

* * * We must realize the financial difficulties in which circumstances

have placed us and face them squarely. In apportioning our revenues we must
see that health, education, agriculture, and labor receive the most generous
support of which the means at our command are capable. In economizing, we
should make our cuts in other less essential activities. * * *

In messages communicated to the legislature at its first session
subsequent to his arrival the governor further elaborated his initial
program, stressing both administrative economy and constructive
measures of rehabilitation. Reference is hereinafter made to some
of the specific measures adopted or recommended with a view to
giving effect to -the program in question.

Congressional consideration of Porto Rican affairs.—In Appendix
A of this report is listed certain legislation of special interest to
Porto Rico enacted by Congress in the period to which the report
pertains. In addition to the general tariff provisions made effective
in Porto Rico by the tariff act of 1930, that act contains a provision
(sec. 319), specially applicable to Porto Rico, whereby the insular
government is authorized to impose tariff duties on coffee imported
into the island, including that grown in a foreign country coming
through the United States. Since March 1, 1929, special appropria-
tions bv Congress for the benefit of Porto Rico in connection with
hurricane relief and rehabilitation work have totaled $9,150,000, of
which all but $1,000,000, to become available on January 1, 1931,
lias already been made available. By the act of July 3, 1930, Con-
gress further provided for a reduction, from $1,200,000 to $150,000,
in the amount to be reimbursed the United States Government by
Porto Rico on account of the San Juan Harbor and reclamation
project. The period of payment of the reduced amount was also
extended for five years.

In Appendix B are listed certain measures, of special interest to
Porto Rico, considered by Congress but not enacted into law.

The Porto Rican Legislature.—The twelfth session of the insular
legislature began on Februar}^ 10, 1930, and ended on April 15, 1930.
Certain of the legislative measures enacted or considered during the
session are referred to hereinafter under the headings to which
they pertain.

General conditions.—In the last annual report of this bureau the
effect of the hurricane of September 13-14, 1928, and the measures
taken up to that time to relieve the situation were discussed at some
length. The following statement was then made: “ The conse-
quences of such a catastrophe will, naturally, be reflected in gov-
ernmental revenues and individual incomes, in agriculture, in com-
merce—in fact, in all activities of the island’s economic and social
life—for some time to come.”


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

11

Governor Roosevelt, in his annual report, speaking of the time of
his arrival in Porto Rico in October, 1929, states:

At that time I found conditions in the islands exceedingly had. We were
struggling with three great problems—disease, poverty, and an island revenue
that was insufficient to meet the budget then in force.

The governor’s report also states:

* * * We were and are a prey to disease of many kinds. In the fiscal

year ending June 30, 1929, 4,442 of our people died from tuberculosis. Our
death rate in this disease was higher than that of any other place in the
Western Hemisphere, and four and one-half times the death rate in the
continental United States. Our death rate from malaria was two and one-half
times the rate in the continental United States. * * *

*******

Economically, our condition wTas equally bad. More than 60 per cent of our
people are out of employment either all or a part of each year. The average
yearly income of the working man or woman ranges between $150 and
$200. * * * We have too few .small farmers. This condition is not new.

It has always existed to a large extent, though now it is worse. * * *

*******

Even if we practice intensive agriculture fully and develop our small farms,
we can not by agriculture alone support our population. We must in addition
have industries. * *' *

Due largely to the economic conditions outlined above, the financial situation
of the government last autumn was desperate. During the. year ending June
30, 1929, we had overspent our revenues by $1,191,301.19.1 This sum, plus the
deficits incurred in the immediately preceding years, was being carried in the
form of floating indebtedness through loans at the banks. The condition of the
banks was bad. They had suffered heavily as a result of the hurricane. Many
of their loans were frozen. The money borrowed by the government had added
to this burden, cramping them still further. As a result, they were in no
position to extend the credit sorely needed by our people if we were to build
our businesses.

* * * * * * *

Furthermore, our budget for the year 1929-30 had been based upon an
erroneous estimate of receipts, and the government was running behind at the
rate of $200,000 a month, piling up a deficit which it was estimated by the
treasury would be in the neighborhood of $2,000,000 additional at the end of
the year. * * *

Porto Rico is a small tropical island, with a population density
over ten times that of the continental United States. At the time
when the island first came under United States sovereignty in 1898
it had been for approximately 400 years a Spanish colonial posses-
sion. The masses of the people were almost wholly dependent for a
scant livelihood upon small-scale agricultural operations. The dif-
ficulties of the struggle for existence of so dense a population upon
an agricultural basis were increased by certain physical and climatic
features. The coastal plain extending inward from the sea is rela-
tively narrow, and the interior of the island is extremely mountain-
ous and broken. The annual rainfall is heavy and seasonal, and
the island is subject to occasional very severe hurricanes. During
the period of Spanish control no important mineral resources were
located and industrial development was practically nil. The condi-
tion of the population in general was one of extreme poverty, amelio-
rated to some extent by the fact that the tropical climate rendered in-
adequate shelter and clothing much less a cause of actual suffering

1 The annual report of the insular auditor of Porto Rico for the year ending June 30,
1929, states the actual deficit for that year at $G03,67S.92. An advance estimate of the
probable deficit was $1,191,301.19.


12

lit POET OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

than would have been the case in latitudes farther removed from the
Equator and by the further fact that a certain amount of food, in
the form of fruits and other tropical products, was available to the
population with little or no cultivation. Wages of such portion of
the population as were on a wage basis were low even for tropical
countries at that time. Local capital for large-scale development of
an}?" kind was practically nonexistent. There was but one good road
of any length in the island. As regards public health, smallpox was
a scourge, the recorded deaths from that disease for the 9-year period
prior to 1898 averaging over 600 annually. In addition to the preva-
lence of diseases (such as tuberculosis) common in temperate lati-
tudes, so-called tropical anemia (the cause of which was later located
as due to intestinal parasites) was almost universal, and yellow fever
was a constant menace. The annual insular revenues were approxi-
mately from one-third to one-fifth those of recent years, and little of
those scant revenues was devoted to public education, public health,
or other activities for the improvement of the condition of the masses.

When the United States military government took over the island
the insular treasury was empty and there were numerous outstand -
ing obligations. About a year thereafter the island was visited by
one of the most destructive hurricanes in its history.

In the single generation that elapsed between the hurricane of 1899
and the next disaster of similar character in September, 1928, con-
ditions in Porto Rico were, in general, greatly improved. Partly as
the result of congressional legislation and of the subsequent entry of
capital from the continental United States there was brought about a
considerable development of large-scale agricultural operations (not-
ably in sugar production) and a marked increase in the general trade
and business of the island. This, in turn, made possible the collec-
tion of greatly increased public revenues. Those revenues have been
devoted in increasing amounts, under laws passed by the local legis-
lature and approved by the successive governors, to activities for the
promotion of public education, public health, improved communica-
tions, and other purposes tending to advance the welfare of the
people of Porto Rico; and the conditions which existed in Porto Rico
at the time when the hurricane of September, 1928, occurred re-
flected great advances within 30 years in the condition of the people
as regards public health, public education, public works, and general
social, political, and economic status. The improvement in the con-
dition of the masses brought about was relative rather than absolute,
if American living conditions be taken as the standard. Poverty and
disease were still the lot of many and public-school facilities were
accessible to only part of the population of school age. Conditions,
in general, were still far below those to be found in more prosperous
and advanced communities of the continental United States. The
contrast was, however, largely the result of differences in natural
resources, in climate, in density of population, and in racial, political,
and economic history. The elimination of those differences in a
single generation would, under the circumstances, hardly have been
possible. Much remained to be accomplished but much had also been
done. That the progress was not more rapid, and that the results
achieved were not nearer the ultimate goal desired, was due to many
factors, some of which have been mentioned. Limits imposed by the
amount of available revenues constituted an important factor.


REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 13

Both the fiscal year 1929-30 and the preceding one (1928-29) were
distinctly abnormal years as regards public health, public education,
public finances, and general economic conditions. That fact is ap-
parent from an examination of the detailed reports and statistical
data relating to those activities. For example, the annual death rate
in Porto Rico for 1927-28 was 20.4 per 1,000 of population; for
1928-29 it rose abruptly (incident to 10^ months under posthurri-
cane conditions) to 27.7 per 1,000, the highest since the influenza
epidemic of 1917-18. The average annual death rate for the 5-year
period immediately preceding the year in which the hurricane oc-
curred was 21.9 per 1,000 and the rate for months immediately pre-
ceding the hurricane was on an even lower basis. The rate rose
rapidly following the hurricane and by December, 1929 (three
months after the hurricane), the monthly death rate had reached a
figure corresponding to an annual death rate of 35 per 1,000. The
influence of the hurricane upon the mortality rate and public health
in general, of course, continued for some time after the peak of
December, 1929.

Among the more direct effects of the hurricane, as regards public
education, may be mentioned extensive destruction of school build-
ings and school equipment. Among indirect effects were those inci-
dent to the general decrease in public revenues.

As regards public finances the average total of insular revenue
receipts for the three fiscal years (1925-26, 1926-27, 1927-28) imme-
diately preceding the year in which the hurricane occurred was
$11,859,665.83; for the year 1928-29 in which the hurricane oc-
curred, the receipts were $11,004,138.52, $855,527.31 less than the
3-year average stated; and for the year following the hurricane'
(1929-30) they were only $9,614,246.64, $2,245,419.19 less than the
3-year average.

By no means all of the difficulties which have confronted the gov-
ernment and people of Porto Rico during the last two years were due
to the hurricane, but that disaster brought with it new problems of
an emergency character to accentuate previously existing problems
•of long standing. With the passing of the more acute phases of the
difficulties directly incident to the hurricane the older problems reas-
sert themselves with renewed prominence.

There remains to be solved the difficult problem of extending to all
the people the improved conditions heretofore effected as regards a
large part of the population and of raising further the improved, but
still deficient, standards of health, education, and living conditions.
The problem is far from simple. Since 1899 the population of the
already overcrowded island has increased more than 60 per cent,
an average annual increase of approximately 2 per cent. The in-
crease in the last 10 years has been at the average annual rate of 1.88
per cent and the present population is close to 450 per square mile.
If continued improvement in the conditions affecting this dense and
growing population is to be steady and progressive, and even at a
rate of progress comparable to that which has marked the last 30
years, there will be required steadily increasing public revenues. Any
acceleration of the rate of progress will, of course, involve corre-
sponding further increase in annual appropriations. It remains to
be seen to what extent the practicable development of existing sources


14

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

of local revenue and the possible opening up of new sources can be
made to meet the needs incident to further progress.

Governor Roosevelt has devoted himself with energjr and initiative
to seeking solutions of the different problems presented by existing,
conditions in Porto Rico. The outline of his program for meeting
those problems will be found in his annual report for the year.

Financial conditions.—The general fund, commonly termed insular
revenues, represents the collection of taxes and other receivables
which, according to law, are available for the current operations of
the insular government.

Cash receipts and disbursements, under the general fund, for the
fiscal year 1929-30 are summarized as follows in the annual report
of the auditor of Porto Rico:

Balance on hand July 1, 1929_________________________________ $816, 555. 38-

Revenue receipts_______________________________$9, 614, 246. 64

Repayment to appropriations____________________ 2,183, 661. 68

Received from municipalities for bond redemp-
tion _________________________________________ 34, 500. 00

Transfer from various trust funds______________ 451, 382. 34

Loan to partially cover deficit________________ 1, 000, 000. 00

-------------- 13, 283, 790. 66-

Total general fund resources for the year.

Disbursements against api)ropriation (net)_____ 11,048,635.61

Repayments.____________________________________ 2,183, 661. 68

Redemption of municipal bonds__________________ 34,'500. 00

Transfers to various trust funds_______________ 431, 670. 84

14,100, 346. 04

Total disbursements and transfers

13, 69S, 468.13-

Balance on hand June 30, 1930______________________ 401, 877. 91

Further data regarding the revenues and financial condition of the
insular government will be found in Appendix H to this report.

For the year 1929-30, the original budget requirements were fixed
at $10,499,000. The actual total requirements to meet appropria-
tions, as stated in the auditor’s report were, however, $11,557,731.19,.
resulting in an indicated cash deficit, as of June 30, 1930, of $1,126,-
929.17. This indicated deficit was largely provided for by a loan of
$1,000,000 effected by the insular government during the year 1929-30.
The remainder of the deficit was to be covered from part of the
proceeds of the $4,000,000 bond issue of July 1, 1930. (See Appendix
H, this report.)

Indicated cash deficits in the years 1923-24 and 1924-25, partly
incident to litigation then pending regarding payments of certain
large tax assessments, led to the creation of an unfunded insular debt
which at one time reached a maximum of over $5,000,000. This debt
was being steadily reduced up to the time of the hurricane and over
$3,000,000 had been repaid by July 1, 1928. New obligations con-
tracted during the hurricane }^ear (1928-29) resulted in a total of
notes payable, as of June 30, 1929, of over $3,000,000; and there was
a further net increase of $101,850 in these liabilities during the year
1929-30. Provision was made for the issuance as of July 1, 1930,
of an issue of $4,000,000 of 4% per cent bonds of the government of
Porto Rico, so much of the proceeds as might be required to be
applicable to the payment of all outstanding notes payable.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

15

Bonded indebtedness.—The bonded indebtedness of the government
of Porto Rico for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1930, amounted to
$25,353,000, an increase of $68,000 for the year. (See Appendix H.)

The total amount of bonds outstanding is within the limits author-
ized by the organic act of 10 per cent of the assessed valuation of
the real and personal property. This adjusted valuation as of June
30, 1930, was $330,274,020.

Municipalities.—Governor Roosevelt in his annual report states
in regard to municipalities:

* * * At this time many of the municipalities of the island are in

desperate case. Due to a variety of causes, such as bad economic conditions,
extravagance in government, the reckless use of bond issues, etc., many are
faced with a real crisis and have great difficulty in balancing their budgets.
Their debt has increased by leaps and bounds. Their present organization is
in some respects faulty. Before we can feel we are on a sound basis, this con-
dition must be rectified. I took the matter up with the last legislature, but
due to a number of reasons the measure did not pass. It is our plan in the
coming year to bring up the question again with our legislature, which we can do
with the added knowledge of more than a year’s further investigation. * * *

The financial condition of many of the municipalities was un-
satisfactory prior to the hurricane. That disaster added to their
difficulties. Of the 77 municipalities, only 41 now have a further
margin within the authorized limits for incurring indebtedness.
The aggregate bonded indebtedness of the 77 municipalities is
$17,846,200, a decrease of $540,100 during the year. There is an
additional total of unfunded municipal debts, amounting to nearly
two and one-half million dollars.

External trade.—The total trade with the United States and
foreign countries for the year ending June 30, 1930, amounted to
$183,568,487, as compared with $178,810,510 for the previous year—
an increase of about 2.6 per cent. These figures mark a return to a
trade balance favorable to the island—a condition that has existed
in every year since 1901 but two—in 1923-24 and in the hurricane
year of 1928-29.

The trade with the continental United States represented about 92
per cent of the total external trade.

Shipments to the United States comprise 95.4 per cent of the total
exports and shipments from the United States are 87 per cent of the
total from all outside sources.

Further detailed data will be found in Appendix G.

During the year a bureau of commerce and industry was estab-
lished under the office of the governor. The bureau has offices in
San Juan and in New York City. Its general mission, as stated by
the governor in his report, is “ to draw to the attention of business
people in the continental United States the opportunities offered by
Porto Rico and to aid them in taking advantage of them.” The
bureau will also seek to develop new markets for Porto Rican
products.

Public works.—Due to the condition of the insular treasury, gov-
ernmental building activities during the year were largely confined
to the completion of buildings already under, construction. The new
insane asylum at Rio Piedras was completed and occupied and work
was continued on the new penitentiary. The department of the

18189—30----3


16 -REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

interior handled a large amount of work connected with the construc-
tion and repair of schoolhouses and roads incident to the program
of the Porto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission. The total expendi-
ture for road work from Federal funds administered by the commis-
sion amounted to about $322,765 during the year 1929-30. The legis-
lature authorized progressive issues of bonds for a total amount of
$1,000,000 for the development of the Toro Negro water and power
project. The issue of part of the bonds in the year 1930-31 is
planned.

Justice.—A law enacted by the Porto Rican Legislature during the
year, and which should have important effects in improving the
administration of justice, increased the term of office of district
judges from 4 to 10 years.

Agriculture.—The governor’s annual report outlines an agricul-
tural program which shall emphasize the development of small
farms, assistance to small farmers through increased effectiveness of
the agricultural extension service and special attention to crops—
such as fruits, vegetables, and tobacco—which are wTell adapted to
cultivation by small farmers. Other features of the program are
described in the governor’s annual report.

The development, largely through capital from the continental
United States, of large-scale agricultural enterprises, although the
means of furnishing considerable employment to labor, an impor-
tant source of much-needed public revenues and a factor in increased
business activities of various kinds, has frequently been criticized in
recent years on the ground that it had resulted in a reduction in the
number of small farms. Of interest in that connection are advance
figures of the 1930 United States census which indicate that the
number of such properties increased between 1920 and 1930 from
about 41,000 to about 52,000. There was continued throughout the
year important aid in agricultural rehabilitation, begun in 1929 and
incident to the administration, by the Porto Rican Hurricane Relief
Commission, of the Federal funds appropriated for that purpose.
Up to June 30, 1930, loans from these funds for purposes of agri-
cultural rehabilitation has been approved to the amount of $5,891,228
out of a total of $6,000,000 available for this purpose. An additional
$71,000 had been applied to the distribution of seeds and seedlings.

Homestead commission.—This is an agency provided by law, the
purpose of which is to encourage, and assist in, the acquisition of
homes in urban zones, and tracts of land for agricultural purposes
in rural zones. Heretofore the small farms established under this
system have been created by the subdivision of public lands. Gov-
ernor Roosevelt, in his report, states that public lands available for
that purpose, and suited for agriculture, having been exhausted, it
was decided to extend the scope of the commission’s functions by
the buying of cheap lands from large holders and using it for home-
steading purposes. With that object in view, there was authorized
during the past year an issue of bonds of the insular government
in the amount of $500,000. The bonds have not yet been issued.

Liquidating board of former workmen?s relief commission.—The
.governor states, in his annual report:

* * * Due to certain difficulties in the inauguration of a state insurance

fund, the insular government had been saddled with debts of about $850,000
to injured workmen or their widows. These, of course, were the most


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

17

necessitous people in the community. By a rigorous collection of past-due pre-
miums and by the flotation of $500,000 of bonds, we expect to practically
discharge this obligation. * * *

The $500,000 bond issue mentioned in the above quotation from
Governor Roosevelt’s report has been authorized by law but has not
yet been issued.

Education.—The annual report of the Commissioner of Education
of Porto Rico gives the total enrollment for the year 1929-30, in all
schools supported with funds of the people of Porto Rico, as 221,248.
The same report states the total number of children of school agk
as approximately 500,000. These figures indicate that about 44 per
cent of the children of school age are enrolled in governmentally
supported schools.

Progress in public education in Porto Rico during the last 30
years is shown by the following self-explanatory tables, the figures
in which are taken, except where otherwise noted, from official
reports:

Table I

Year Enrollment in public schools Average daily at- tendance in public schools Total number of teachers in public schools Percentage of illiteracy, persons 10 years of age and over
1899 2 29,182 121,453 184,991 220,634 221,248 221,873 84,258 148,041 186, 551 193,396 2 3 850 1,548 3, 286 4,498 4,451 4 79.6 « 66. 5 5 55
1910
1919-20
1928-29
1929-30 (6)


1 First year under American sovereignty.

2 Figures from report of Survey of the Educational System of Porto Rico, 1926.

3 Approximate figures.

4 Census of Porto Rico.
a United States census.

• Figures of 1930 United States census are not yet available, but estimate in report of survey mentioned
ibove was about 45 per cent at that time (1926).

Table II

Year Total insular revenues Total expendi- tures from insular reve- nues for education Percentage of insular revenues expended for educa- tion Total expendi- tures by municipalities for education Aggregate expenditures for education (insular and municipal)
1898 1 2 $185,866.00 952,329.00 2, 363,285.11 4,101,818. 48 4,121, 217. 54
1910 $3, 457,252.92 7, 473,070.17 12, 446, 219.13 11,004,138.52 9,614,246.64 27.5 $419,161.00 686, 443.15 1,505, 576. 00 1,625,785.16 1,296,885. 26 $1,371,490.00 3,049,728.26 5,607,394. 48 5,747,002.70 5, 309,049.81
1919-20--- 31.6
1927-28 3 32.9
1928-29 37.4
1929-30 4,012,164.65 41.8


1 Under Spanish sovereignty.

2 From report of survey, 1926.

3 Fiscal year next preceding that of the hurricane.

In 1925 a survey of the public educational system of Porto Rico
was made under direction of the International Institute of Teachers
College, of Columbia University, by an educational survey commis-
sion headed by Dr. Paul Monroe, director of the institute. The com-
mission which was composed of 10 Americans with experience in


18

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

educational fields made the survey in Porto Rico where it had full
facilities for its work, including access to official records. Its report
contained numerous criticisms and recommendations directed to the
further development and improvement of the educational system.
The following extracts are quoted from the Foreword to the report
made in January, 1926:

Twenty-five years ago Porto Rico bad but the bare rudiments of a system of
public education. Even the prosperous minority of the population had access
only to school facilities of the most meager sort. Eighty-five per cent of the
people were totally illiterate. To-day the island possesses an organized estab-
lishment for public instruction comprehending the principal types of institu-
tions from the elementary school to the professional schools of the univer-
sity. * ♦ *

* * * * * * *

* * * The accomplishment has been possible only because the people of

Porto Rico have been willing to spend an unprecedented proportion of their
annual revenues for this purpose. * * *

The history of education in continental United States shows no parallel
achievement. * * *

Inevitably there is much that is imperfect in a system that has been so
rapidly projected. * * * Impressive as the achievement is, therefore, much

still remains to be done before the educational system of Porto Rico fulfills
the expectations and the hopes of the people. * * *

Most of the school buildings which suffered from the hurricane
have now been repaired or rebuilt, but there is still lack of adequate
equipment in the schools in many parts of the island. The amount
expended from Federal funds administered by the Porto Rican
Hurricane Relief Commission for the construction and repair of
school houses, will, when the work, begun in 1929, is completed in
the latter part of 1930, total about $1,400,000.

Prominent in the education program outlined in the governor’s
report is the proposed extension of a special type of “ consolidated
vocational rural school.” The scholastic curriculum is to include
only reading, writing, arithmetic, and English, the remainder of
the work to be practical. Each school is to be surrounded by a small
farm, cultivated by the boys under the direction of a practical
farmer. Supervised home truck gardens are to be encouraged. Girls
are to be instructed in home economics, including cooking, sewing,,
and embroidery. In addition to agriculture, boys are to be taught
trades, such as barbering, carpentry, and cobbling. It is planned
that each school should have a social worker to visit the families
and explain to them the basic principles of sanitation and health.
Other features mentioned as under contemplation, in so far as may
be practicable, include: Lectures by agricultural agents and sani-
tary inspectors; moving-picture films; reading room and radio facili-
ties ; and the making of the school a general community social center
for fairs, dances, dissemination of information as to market con-
ditions, etc.

The annual cost of one of these school units is given as about
$10,000. The governor states in his report :

* * * We have some 2,200 rural schools now in existence. We can not

establish all of them on the basis of this new type, but we are going to try to
arrange their curriculum and activities on approximately the same lines.
❖ * * ^ve hope in the future to have our entire rural system based in

general on this plan. * * *


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 19

Health.—Regarding the problem of disease the governor, in his
annual report, says:

* * * Our island funds are far too limited to grapple in any adequate

fashion with this great evil. We can make no frontal attack. Our plan with
the resources we have at hand is to extend gradually through the island a
system of health units based on that now in existence in certain parts of the
continental United States.

We plan to cover the entire island with a system of 20 of these units. Each
unit will be responsible not only for the urban population wherein is situated
the headquarters but, in addition, for all of the country population out to the
farthest farms on the hillside.

Each unit will be under the control of a full-time doctor who will be, in addi-
tion, the executive officer. * * * This medical officer will have a thorough

up-to-date but simple building, wherein will be kept records dealing with all
activities in the district. There will also be a clinic and operating room,
laboratories, etc. The main objective of these units is to check and suppress
endemic or epidemic diseases. Their mission is to prevent and control by edu-
cation and sanitation.

The personnel under the director will be composed of visiting nurses, sani-
tary inspectors, and social workers. The first of these, the nurses, will have
as their special mission the care of those who are sick already, particularly out-
patients. * * * The second, the sanitary inspectors, will cover the district

in regular rotation. * * * The last of the category, the social workers, like

the sanitary inspectors, cover the entire district in prescribed cycles. * * *

At the moment our funds are suffiicent with the aid we expect to get from
outside sources to expand and maintain 10 of these units, so as to cover half
of the island. * * *

The respective functions of the personnel mentioned above are
described in the governor’s annual report.

As regards the sources of funds for health activities, the governor
states:

* * * The insular funds would have been totally inadequate to accom-

plish the above work, for, due to the hurricane, economic depression, and a num-
ber of other evils, our revenues during the past fiscal year had shrunk some
15 per cent over what they had been a few years previous. Had we been
forced to work with them alone we would not only have been unable to extend
the work outlined above but would have had to curtail seriously the services
we then had.

* * * * * * *

At the suggestion of President Hoover, the Congress of the United States
very generously provided us with a million dollars for the repairing and as-
phalting of the insular roads. This money fulfills a double purpose. It enables
us, by lifting the weight of road rehabilitation from our shoulders, to devote
the money we should otherwise have been unable to use to the construc-
tive program in health, education, and agricultural and industrial development.
* * * * * * *

Certain national organizations of standing and repute, * * * met to-

gether in New York and formed a joint committee which, under the name of
the Porto Rico Child Health Committee, has for its mission a 5-year program
specifically directed against disease and its mainspring, malnutrition. This
committee has announced its intention of endeavoring to raise $7,300,000, the
money to be spent in certain well-coordinated endeavors over this period of
years, at the end of which time it is expected that the program they are under-
taking, plus the work of the insular government, will have placed Porto Rico
in such position that she can combat the evils herself. * * *

Reference is made elsewhere in the governor’s report to contribu-
tions from associations in the United States, totaling about $150,000,
which amount was used for milk stations and school lunch rooms.

Contributions from the National Headquarters of the American
Red Cross amounted to about $82,000.


20 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

The general mortality rate for the year 1929-30 was 21.3 per 1,000.
The corresponding rates for the six years immediately preceding
were as follows: 1923-24, 18.7; 1921-25, 24.4; 1925-26, 22.8; 1926-27,
23.3; 1927-28, 20.4; and 1928-29, 27.7 (hurricane year). The infant
mortality rate for the year 1929-30 was 133 per 1,000—an excellent
showing, as will appear from comparison with the following cor-
responding rates for the six years immediately preceding: 1923-24,
128; 1924-25, 148; 1925-26, 150; 1920-27, 167; 1927-28, 146; and
1928-29, 179 (hurricane year).

Operations of the Porto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission.—
These will be covered, in general, in the annual report of the commis-
sion to Congress. Certain phases of the operations are mentioned
elsewhere in the present report.

Personnel.—The following changes among presidential appointees
in the government of Porto Rico occurred during the fiscal year:

Hon. Horace M. Towner resigned as Governor of Porto Rico,
effective September 29, 1929.

Hon. Theodore Roosevelt was appointed Governor of Porto Rico
September 11, 1929, and assumed the duties of governor October 7,
1929.

Dr. Juan B. Huyke, commissioner of education, resigned, effective
January 16, 1930.’

Dr. Jose Padin was appointed commissioner of education, effective
January 16, 1930.

Mr. Leslie A. MacLeod was appointed auditor of Porto Rico July
25, 1929, and he arrived in Porto Rico to* assume the duties of his
office on August 19, 1929.

DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RECEIVERSHIP

The annual inspection of the receivership was made in November,
1929, by the chief of the bureau. He was accompanied by Capt.
Frank J. Keelty, of the Finance Department, United States Army,
who audited the accounts of the receivership and made a report con-
taining valuable comments and suggestions. The operation of the
receivership has been efficient and the audit showed a generally
satisfactory condition of the accounts.

The customs receipts for the calendar year 1929 amounted to
$4,989,527.06 as against $5,290,308.31 for the calendar year 1928.
This falling off in customs is attributed by the general receiver, in
his annual report for the year 1929, to the low prices obtained for the
principal products of the. country and the natural reaction upon
importation incident to the curtailment of purchasing power. While
there was a decrease of about $300,000 in the customs receipts for
1929 as compared with 1928, the operating expenses of the receiver-
ship were still well within the limit of 5 per cent of the customs
receipts as provided in article 1 of the convention of 1924. After
deducting the expenses of the receivership and the cost of the service
of the bonds outstanding, there remained $3,461,814.92 to be trans-
ferred to the Dominican Government. (Appendix I.)

F. LeJ. Parker,

Brigadier General, United States Army,

Chief of Bioreau


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

21

Appendix A

LAWS OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS AND

PORTO RICO, ENACTED DURING- THE FIRST AND SECOND SES-
SIONS OF THE SEVENTY-FIRST CONGRESS AND NOT COVERED

IN THE PREVIOUS ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF THE

BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS2

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS AND PORTO RICO

Public, No. 361, Seventy-first Congress (H. R. 2667), United States
tariff act of 1930, approved June 17, 1930.

Continues in effect previously existing general trade relations be-
tween the United States and the Philippine Islands. Increases the
rates of duty on certain items of trade in which the Philippine
Islands and Porto Rico are interested—sugar, tobacco, cordage, etc.,
in the Philippine Islands; sugar, tobacco, fruits, embroidered hand-
kerchiefs, etc., in Porto Rico.

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

Public, No. 504, Seventy-first Congress (H. R. 6127), approved
July 3, 1930: An act to authorize the payment of checking charges
and arrastre charges on consignments of goods shipped to the Phil-
ippine Islands.

Legalizes the payment of certain past and future accounts for
arrastre charges and checking charges incident to the handling or
checking, in the port of Manila, of cargoes unloaded from commer-
cial vessels (otherwise than upon piers operated by the United States
Government) and consigned to agencies of departments or bureaus
of the United States Government in the Philippine Islands.

PORTO RICO

Public Resolution No. 33, Seventy-first Congress (S. J. Res. 118),
approved January 22, 1930: Joint resolution to authorize additional
appropriations for the relief of Porto Rico.

Authorizes appropriation of $3,000,000 for the purpose of making
loans to agriculturists in Porto Rico, rebuilding and repairing
schoolhouses damaged or destroyed by the hurricane in the small
towns and rural districts of Porto Rico, and for the employment of
labor, purchase of supplies, material, and equipment for repairing
and constructing insular and rural municipal roads.

Public, No. 158, Seventy-first Congress (H. R. 9546), independent
offices'act, 1931, approved April 19, 1930: An act making appropria-
tions for the Executive Office and sundry independent executive bu-
reaus, boards, commissions, and offices for the fiscal year ending June
30,1931, and for other purposes.

Appropriates $1,000,000 for the purpose of making loans to indi-
vidual coffee planters, coconut planters, fruit growers, or other agri-
culturists in the island of Porto Rico, to become available January
1, 1931, thus completing the appropriation of amounts totaling
$8,150,000 authorized in Public Resolution No. 74, Seventieth Con-
gress, approved December 21, 1928.

2 The list includes certain measures approved subsequent to June 30, 1930.


22 REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Public No. 519, Seventy-first Congress (H. R. 12902), second
deficiency act, fiscal .year 1930, approved July 3, 1930.

Appropriates $1,000,000 to be disbursed by the Porto Rican Hurri-
cane Relief Commission, with the approval of the Governor of Porto
Rico, for the employment of labor and the purchase of supplies,
materials, and equipment for repairing and constructing insular
roads, this being part of the $3,000,000 authorized in Public Resolu-
tion No. 33 listed above.

Public No. 520, Seventy-first Congress (H. R. 11781), rivers and
harbors bill, approved July 3, 1930.

Modifies the contribution of Porto Rico toward the cost of dredging
San Juan Harbor, Porto Rico, so as to fix the total amount of cash
cooperation required from the people of Porto Rico at $150,000, which
amount shall become payable five years from the date of the approval
of the act, conditional upon the acceptance, within one year, by the
government of Porto Rico of the arrangement outlined.

Appendix B

LIST OF PRINCIPAL MEASURES AFFECTING THE PHILIPPINE
ISLANDS AND PORTO RICO CONSIDERED DURING THE FIRST
OR SECOND SESSION OF THE SEVENTY-FIRST CONGRESS, BUT
WHICH WERE NOT ENACTED 3

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS AND PORTO RICO

S. 4249; H. R. 11851 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To extend the duties
and powers of the bureau of efficiency to include the govermnents of
the insular possessions of the United States.

(S. 4249 was referred to the Senate Committee on Territories and
Insular Affairs April 22, 1930. H. R. 11851 was referred to the
House Committee on the Territories April 22,1930, and favorably re-
ported June 12. Rept. No. 1883.)

Public Resolution No. 25, Seventy-first Congress, extended, to Jan-
uary 16, 1930, the time during which the Joint Commission on In-
sular Reorganization should submit its report to Congress.

The Joint Commission, on January 15, rendered a report (S. Doc.
No. 68) which recommended the enactment of legislation delegating
to the President of the United States the authority to effect a coor-
dination of activities and agencies having charge of the administra-
tion of affairs in the insular possessions, and submitted:

S. J. Res. 120 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : Authorizing the President
to reorganize the administration of the insular possessions. (Re-
ferred to the Senate Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs
January 15, 1930.)

H. J. Res. 215 (same as S. J. Res. 120). (Referred to House Com-
mittee on Insular Affairs January 16, 1930.)

S. 2605 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To amend section 9 of the Federal
reserve act to permit State member banks of the Federal reserve
system to establish or retain branches in foreign countries or in de-

3 Tlie list does not cover the period covered by the previous annual report of the Chief
of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, hut does cover the period from June 30, 1930, to the date
of the adjournment of the Seventy-first Congress, July 3, 1930.


REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 23

pendencies or insular possessions of the United States. (Referred
to the Senate Committee on Banking and Currency on December 11,
1929, and favorably reported by that committee. Report No. 66,
Passed Senate April 14, 1930. Referred to House Committee on
Banking and Currency.)

H. R. 11431 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To promote travel to and in
the United States and its possessions, thereby promoting American
business, etc., to be known as the tourist promotion act.

Authorizes the Secretary of Commerce to create a travel division,
among other things, to “ investigate, encourage, promote, and develop
the travel of foreigners to and in the United States and its posses-
sions and of citizens and residents of the United States and its
possessions and to and from the United States and its possessions.”
(Referred to Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce
April 7, 1930.)

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

S. 204; S. 3108; S. J. Res. 113; S. Res. 199; S. 3379; S. 3822; H. R.
5182; H. R. 5652; H. R. 7267; H. R. 7760; H. R. 10170; H. Con. Res.
14; S. J. Res. 174, 71st Cong., all relating to the independence of the
Philippine Islands.

Extended hearings were held on the Senate bills before the Senate
Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs. S. 3822, introduced
by Senators Hawes and Cutting, “ To provide for the withdrawal of
the sovereignty of the United States over the Philippine Islands and
for the recognition of their independence,” etc., was favorably re-
ported to the Senate on June 2, 1930 (Rept. No. 781, pts. 1 and 2.)

In May, 1930, hearings were held on H. R. 5182 before the House
Committee on Insular Affairs.

H. R. 8817 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To amend section 29 of the act
of August 29, 1916 . . .

Provides for increase of salaries of certain officials of the Philip-
pine government appointed by the President—the Governor Gen-
eral, vice governor, auditor, and deputy auditor. (Introduced Janu-
ary 18, 1930, and referred to the House Committee on Insular
Affairs.)

H. R. 8708 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To exclude certain citizens of
the Philippine Islands from the United States.

Classifies Filipino citizens as “ aliens ” and excludes them from
the United States as such.

During April and May, 1930, hearings were held before the House
Committee on Immigration and Naturalization.

S. 4183 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To regulate the migration of citi-
zens of the Philippine Islands to the continental United States,
etc.

Limits migration of citizens of the Philippine Islands to conti-
nental United States to students, visitors for business or pleasure,
merchants, government officials, their families, attendants, servants,
and employees. (Referred to Senate Committee on Immigration
April 16, 1930.)

(A similar bill was, at the same time, introduced by Senator Short-
ridge, author of S. 4183, as an amendment to S. 51 (71st Cong., 1st


24 REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

sess.) : To subject certain immigrants, born in countries of the West-
ern Hemisphere, to the quota under the immigration laws, which
amendment was rejected in April. On May 7, 1930, Senator Hawes
introduced a somewhat similar, though more liberal, provision as an
amendment to S. 3822.)

H. J. Res. 330 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : Authorizing the restoration
of a limitation on the importation, free of duty, of Philippine sugar.

Limited the amount of sugar admitted free of duty from the
Philippine Islands to 500,000 long tons in any one fiscal year; copra,
to 300,000,000 pounds; and coconut oil to 400,000,000 pounds. (Re-
ferred to House Committee on Ways and Means, May 3, 1930. H. J.
Res. 214, 70th Cong., limited sugar only.)

S. Res. 130 (71st Cong., 1st sess.) : Instructing the Commerce Com-
mittee to investigate and report to the Senate whether it is sound
public policy, consistent with economic justice for all concerned, to
extend the coastwise laws of the United States to the Philippine
Islands pending the ultimate independence of these islands.

In October, 1929, hearings were held before a subcommittee of the
Senate Committee of Commerce.

S. 1603 (71st Cong.,. 2d sess.). (Same as H. R. 4197 introduced
during the first session.) : To provide for the exchange of lands of
the United States in the Philippine Islands for lands of the Philip-
pine Islands government.

S. 1603 passed Senate June 25. (Referred to the House Committee
on Military Affairs June 27, 1930.)

S. J. Res. 177 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To provide for the erection
of a monument to William Howard Taft at Manila, P. I.

Authorizes appropriation of $35,000 to carry out the provisions of
the resolution. (Reported out of Committee on the Library and
passed Senate June 17, 1930. Reported to the House July 1.
H. Rept. No. 2049.)

S. 168 (71st Cong., 1st sess.) : Providing for the biennial appoint-
ment of visitors to inspect and report upon the government and con-
ditions in the Philippine Islands. (Passed Senate June 2, 1930, but,
on request of Senator George, was reconsidered and the bill restored
to calendar.)

H. R. 10061 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : For the relief of the heirs of
Fermin Tobera, a citizen of the Philippine Islands, who was killed
without provocation in the anti-Filipino race riots in California on
January 22,1930. Authorizes appropriation of $5,000. (Introduced
February 18, 1930, and referred to the House Committee on Claims.)

S. 2317; S. 4403; and other similar bills (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : For
the relief of volunteer officers and soldiers in the volunteer service of
the United States who served in the Philippine Islands beyond the
period of their enlistment, and for other purposes.

Granting travel pay and commutation of subsistence to certain
soldiers serving in the Philippine Islands on April 11,1899, who were
entitled to muster out of service and who continued to serve in the
islands after the termination of the war with Spain. (Referred to
the Senate Committee on Military Affairs.)


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

25

PORTO RICO

H. J. Ees. 376; S. J. Res. 193 (71st Cong., 2d sess.): To change the
name of the island of Porto Rico to “ Puerto Rico.” (S. J. Res.
193 favorably reported by Senate Committee on Territories and
Insular Affairs June 27,1930, Rept. No. 1116; passed Senate June 30.
Referred to House Committee on Insular Affairs July 1.)

H. J. Res. 192; S. J. Res. 116 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : Extending
the provisions of sections 1, 2, 6, and 7 of the act of Congress entitled
“An act to provide for the protection of forest lands, for the reforest-
ation of denuded areas, for the extension of national forests, and for
other purposes, in order to promote the continuous production of
timber on lands chiefly suitable therefor,” to the Territory of Porto
Rico. (Referred to the Senate Committee on Agriculture and For-
estry January 14, 1930.)

S. 4213 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To amend section 25 of the organic
act approved March 2, 1917, so that the right to vote shall not be
denied or abridged on account of sex. (Referred to the Senate
Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs April 21, 1930.)

H. R. 8640; H. R. 12664; S. 4592 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : All pro-
viding for the filling of certain vacancies in the Senate and House of
Representatives of Porto Rico.

Hearings were held in June, 1930, on S. 4592 before the Senate
Committee on Territories and Insular Affairs.

H. R. 5650 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To amend the act to provide a
civil government for Porto Rico, and for other purposes, and to
provide additional measures in case of the absence or disqualification
of the judge of the district court of the United States for Porto
Rico.

Provides that in case of absence, disability, etc., of the judge of
the district court of the United States for Porto Rico, the President
of the United States may designate one or more judges of the Su-
preme Court of Porto Rico or any attorney in active practice before
the said court to discharge the duties of the judge. (Introduced
December 2, 1929, and referred to the House Committee on the
Judiciary.)

H. R. 5651 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To provide an additional section
to the Judicial Code of the United States regulating appeals from
the Supreme Court of Porto Rico.

Provides that in any case in the Supreme Court of Porto Rico
wherein the Constitution or any statute or treaty of the United
States is involved, or wherein the value in controversy exceeds
$25,000, the case may be referred, by certiorari, to the Supreme Court
of the United States for determination. (Introduced December 2,
1929, and referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary.)

H. R. 7767 (7lst Cong., 2d sess.) : To authorize the purchase of
motor-propelled passenger-carrying vehicles from the appropriations
for the Porto Rican Hurricane Relief Commission.

Provides for purchase of four cars, at a cost not to exceed $600
each, from appropriations for the Porto Rican Hurricane Relief Com-


26

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

mission in the first and second deficiency appropriation acts, approved
March 4, 1929. (Introduced December 18, 1929, and referred to
House Committee on Insular Affairs.)

H. R. 12479 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To coordinate the agricultural
experiment-station work and to extend the benefits of certain acts of
Congress to the Territory of Porto Rico.

Extends certain designated United States acts of Congress relating
to agricultural work in colleges, to Porto Rico, under the college of
agriculture of the University of Porto Rico, and authorizes appro-
priations, beginning in 1933 and increased annually until the total
to which Porto Rico is entitled under the provisions of the act is
reached. (Introduced May 20, 1930, and referred to the House
Committee on Agriculture.)

H. R. 12841 (71st Cong., 2d sess.) : To extend to Porto Rico the
benefits of the act entitled “An act to provide that the United States
shall aid the States in the construction of rural post roads, and for
other purposes,” approved July 11, 1916. (Introduced June 9, 1930,
and referred to the House Committee on Roads.)

H. R. 12901 (71st Cong., 2d sess.): To extend the provisions of
certain laws relating to vocational education and civilian rehabilita-
tion to Porto Rico.

Extends to Porto Rico the United States vocational education act
of February 23, 1917, with an annual appropriation of $105,000, and
the vocational rehabilitation act of June 2, 1920, with an annual
appropriation of $15,000. (Introduced June 11, 1930, and referred
to the House Committee on Education.)

Appendix C

War Department,
Washington, March 22, 1929.

Hod. Willis C. Hawley,

Chairman Ways and Means Committee,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C.

Dear Mr. Chairman : With a view to its consideration by your committee, I
desire to quote the following cablegram from the American Chamber of Com-
merce of the Philippine Islands, dated at Manila, March 7, 1929:

“The American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippine Islands is opposed
to any legislation affecting in any way the principle of free trade between the
Philippine Islands and the United States, such legislation being contrary to
the moral obligations of the people and the Government of the United States to
the people of these islands. In addition to which, such legislation would
seriously hamper and impede the economic development of these islands and
greatly curtail exports from the United States to the Philippines.”

In connection with this message it might be mentioned that successive Secre-
taries of War and Governors General have from time to time expressed them-
selves in substance as vigorously opposed to the restriction of trade between
the United States and the Philippine Islands in the belief that such action
would be unjust to the people of the Philippine Islands, a violation of the prin-
ciple of free trade for all people under the American flag, and unwise from the
standpoint of American policy.

With those views I am in entire accord, being fully satisfied of the justice
and expediency of continuing in effect the present laws relative to trade rela-
tions between the United States and the Philippine Islands, and also fully aware
of the vital importance to the islands of the continuance of these relations.

Sincerely yours,

James W. Good,
Secretary of War.

(Signed)


REPORT OE CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS 27

Appendix D

War Department,
Washington, April 16, 1929.

Hon. Reed Smoot,

Chairman Committee on Finance,

United States Senate.

Dear Senator Smoot : I beg to acknowledge receipt of your letter of April 6,
containing your comment relative to the matter of the possible limitation on the
amount of Philippine sugar that may be permitted to enter the United States
free of duty.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Some increase in the production of Philippine sugar, under a continuance of
present trade relations, appears probable. It also appears probable, however,
that any such increase will be slow and gradual, as the sugar industry of the
Philippine Islands is now being conducted under conditions similar to those
which have, since free entry of Philippine sugar into the United States was
authorized by Congress in 1913, operated effectively, in practice, to prevent any
such rapid development as has taken place elsewhere during the same period in
the more important sugar-producing areas—for example, in Cuba and in the
Hawaiian Islands.

Fixing a specific limitation upon the amount of Philippine sugar that may be
introduced free of duty into the United States would, in my opinion, be prej-
udicial to the best interests of both the Philippine and the American people.
It would mark a retrograde step in the generally wise and equitable use that
Congress has heretofore made of its unquestioned power to regulate trade re-
lations between the United States and its largest and most populous dependency;
it would tend to obstruct, instead of to encourage, the normal development of
an agricultural product which constitutes the largest item in the export trade
of the Philippine Islands; it would constitute a departure from a fundamental
principle in connection with the trade relations between the United States and
the Philippine Islands—a relation that has been consistently maintained by
Congress for nearly 16 years; it would suggest an entering wedge for similar
future legislation tending to deprive the Philippine Islands of the principal
market for their other products; and it would, incidentally, in my opinion,
operate primarily in the interests of the producers, not of American-grown, but
of Cuban-grown sugar.

*******

Sincerely yours,

(Signed) James W. Good.

Secretary of War.

Appendix E
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

Total foreign trade

12 months ending Dec. 31— Consignments Shipments
From United States From other countries Total To United States To other countries Total
1920 $92,289,778 74,130,015 47, 738,326 50, 352, 535 60, 398, 603 69, 297, 583 71, 575, 618 $57,148, 505 $149,438,283 $105, 216, 263 $45,907, 593 $151,123.856
1921 41, 708, 559 115, 838, 574 50, 356, 793 37,758, 530 88,115,323
1922 32, 459, 319 80,197, 645 64,111,601 31,47JL, 697 95, 583, 298
1923 i 37,147, 212 87,499, 747 85,047,023 35,705, 967 120,752,990
1924 i 47, 612, 292 108, 010,895 97, 313,903 38, 030,760 39,832,263 135,344, 663
1925 50,435, 251 119,732, 834 119, 298, 992 109,044,942 148,877,205
1926 47, 723, 374 100,003, 215 36, 881,105 136,884,320
1927 71, 478, 297 83, 858, 068 44, 373,175 115, 851,472 116,038, 250 39,535,835 1 155,574,085
1928 50, 798, 830 134, 656, 898 115,585,876 39,468, 670 ; 155, 054, 546
1929 92, 592, 959 54, 567, 316 147,160, 275 124,465,473 39, 981, 370 164, 446, 843


1 Corrected figures under consignments.


28

REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Manila-hemp shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per ton Quantity Value Value per ton
1920 - Long tons 139,250 $35,862,000 $258 Long tons 65,983 $20,614,026 $312
1921 98,815 12,984, 693 131 34,012 5,457,059 10,331,776 160
1922 169,309 19,540,915 115 82,225 126
1923 187,433 24,951, 575 133 81,167 12,635,311 156
1924 174, 510 29,950,458 172 75,999 15, 267, 238 18,200,649 201
1925 148, 638 35, 521,646 239 58,976 309
1926 151, 609 32,142, 038 212 60,881 16,301,101 268
1927 146,474 29, 687,129 203 47, 779 12,261,975 257
1928 172,140 26, 593, 606 154 50,304 9, 527,045 189
1929.... 186,431 28,420, 550 152 66,830 12,276,363 184

Coconut-oil shipments

Total Shipments to United States •
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1920 Long tons 76,346 $23,268,887 Cents 13. 60 Long tons 70,809 $2i, 683,043 Cents 13.67
1921 88,866 16,051,518 8.06 79,233 104,960 13,953,690 - 7.86
1922. 105, 514 15, 734,486 6.66 15, 644,253 6.65
1923 87,774 14,066, 582 7.15 83,409 13,375,397 7.16
1924.. 109,865 18,811,031 7.64 108,810 18, 628,406 7.64
1925 102,482 19,820,189 8.63 94,851 18,428,482 8. 67
1926 115,438 22,345, 217 8. 64 113,116 21,926,024 8.65
1927. 142, 515 139,996 24, 840,683 7.78 139,352 24,284,361 7.78
1928 23,489,173 7.49 138,608 23, 239,521 7.49
1929 187, 509 29,184, 942 6.95 185,707 28,900, 587 6.95

Copra shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per ton Quantity Value Value per ton
1920 Long tons 25,395 $3,716,871 $143 Long tons 1,411 $191,204 $136
1921... 147,960 13,073,457 88 52,093 4,332,777 83
1922 170,318 14,103,073 83 87,946 7,247,507 82
1923 203,859 19,246,999 94 127,217 11,989,932 94
1924 154,285 15,351,882 99 105,828 10,498,165 99
1925 144,391 15,868,703 110 114,323 12,581,560 110
1926 171,272 18,586,733 109 127,042 13,816,396 109
1927 196,170 19,155,741 98 154,350 15,238,157 98
1928 23U,713 22,542,341 98 179,701 17,603,832 98
1929 170,830 15,565,821 91 127,570 11,440,898 90


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

29

Desiccated-coconut shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Pounds Cents Pounds Cents
1922 L 2,117,273 $209,674 9.90 2,115,697 $209,521 9.90
1923 9,588,140 903,123 9.42 9,583,262 902,576 9.42
1924 17,932,108 1,598,559 8.92 17,916,418 1,597,413 8.92
1925 27,608,670 2, 608,873 9.45 27,574,475 2,605,611 9.45
1926 31,587,047 2, 757,657 8.73 31,526,986 2,751,964 8.73
1927 33,472,877 2,850,060 8. 51 33,370,655 2,840,286 8.51
1928 2 44,895,711 3, 723, 586 8.29 44,838,722 3,718,269 8.29
1929 49,142,492 3, 540,124 7.20 49,106,605 3,537,004 7.20

1 Not separately reported prior to Jan. i, 1922.

2 Includes revision o'! preliminary figures.

Sugar shipments 1

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total Shipments to United States
Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons Cents Long tons Cents
1920 177,488 $49,617,884 12.48 121,989 $39,348,934 14.40
1921 285,280 25,515,242 3.99 148,101 16,870,179 5.08
1922 351,552 25,013,310 3.18 236,184 19,441,013 3.67
1923 266,847 34,380,570 5. 75 226,088 30,241,487 5.97
1924 347,718 41,170,813 5.29 291,657 36,793,856' 5.63
1925 534,132 44,973,685 3. 76 452,618 40,879,461 4.03
1926 402,955 32,003,561 3. 54 334,137 28,936, 777 3.87
1927 542,773 50,076,777 4.12 498,496 47,670, 564 4.27
1928_ 553,015 46,587,205 3. 76 517,928 44,743,288 3.86
1929 677,973 52,419,826 3.45 653, 518 51,336,983 3. 51

1 Refined sugar, annual average 1925-1929 less than 5,000 long tons, not included.

Leaf-tobacco shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1920 - Pounds - 43,959,257' $6,740,483 Cents 15.33 Pounds 852,215 $296,202 Cents 34.76
1921 48,351,062 4,761,406 9.84 81,166 26,943 33.19
1922 33,354,915 2,273,117 6.81 21,746 6,152 28.29
1923 53, 528,374 3,636,710 6,79 286,064 52,852 10,572 18.48
1924 47,803,706 4,034,466 8.44 66,369 6,332 15. 93
1925 —_ 36, 559, 164 3,065,007 8.38 912 14.40
1926 31,576,755 52,004,303 2,679,630 8.49 9,370 3,820 40.76
1927 : 3,918,749 7. 54 157,175 124,617 28,898 18. 39
1928 44,571,470 3,029,633 6.80 15,896 12. 76
1929 60,800,643 4,392,435 7.22 104,009 12,604 12.12


30

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Cigar shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending Dec. 31— Quantity Value Value per thousand Quantity Value Value per thousand
1920 Thousands 421,545 $12,721,138 $30.18 Thousands 316,863 $10,546,304 $33.28
1921 154,400 3,213,226 20.81 67,737 1,966,035 29.02
1922 300,485 5,801,110 19.31 173,317 4,259,788 24. 58
1923 280,755 6,169,944 21.98 219,898 5,149,115 23.42
1924 218,599 5,404,662 24. 72 175,762 4, 419,782 25.15
1925 252,553 6,043,976 23.93 207,080 5,025, 596 24.25.
1926 247, 726 5,603, 420 22.86 195,327 4, 569,218 23.39
1927 207,578 4.652, 258 22. 41 167,300 3,768,916 22. 5a
1928 220,884 4,765,140 21.57 179, 570 3,855,672 21.47
1929 188, 333 3,824,649 20.31 150,945 3,013,355 19.96-

Embroidery shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1920 $7,811,784 5, 348,104 3,261,572 .6,375,645 4,698,001 $7,784,735 1 5,338,666 3,253,693 6. 365, 585 4,68(5,680 1925 $4,571,675 5,992,389 4,003, 476 4,523,968 6,011,532 $4,550,154 5,976, 464 3,976,126 4,483,5ia 5,962,093
1921 1926
1922.. 1927
1923 1928
1924 1929


All other shipments

12 months ending Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States ] 12 months ending i Dec. 31— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1920 $11,384,809 7,167, 677 9,646.041 11,021,842 14, 324, 791 $4,751,815 2,405, 444 3,717,898 4, 334,768 5,411,791 1925... $16, 403,451 14,713,675 16,389,212 19,799,894 21,086,904 $6,772,527 5,721,451 5,968,967 8,398,840 7,985,586
1921 1926
1922 1927
1923 1928 1
1924
1929 i

1 Includes revision of preliminary figures.

Appendix F

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS

Under an act of Congress approved August 29, 1916, as amended
by an act approved May 31, 1922, it is provided that the entire in-
debtedness of the Philippine government, exclusive of those obliga-
tions known as friar-land bonds and of bonds not to exceed
$10,000,000 in amount, issued by that government and secured by
an equivalent amount of bonds issued by the Provinces or munici-
palities thereof, shall not exceed at any one time 10 per cent of the
aggregate tax valuation of its. property.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR. AFFAIRS

31

It is further provided that the entire indebtedness of the city of
Manila shall not exceed 10 per cent of the aggregate tax valuation
of its property, nor that of any Province or municipality a sum in
excess of 7 per cent of the aggregate tax valuation of its property at
any one time.

The assessed value of taxable real property of the Philippine
Islands as at December 31, 1929, was $919,392,414; that of the city of
Manila as at December 31, 1929, was $130,678,498.

During the year additional bonds with a par value of $1,500,000
for metropolitan water district purposes, of $1,250,000 for Cebu port
works, and of $1,425,000 for Iloilo port works were issued.

The following statements show the bonded indebtedness of the
Philippine Islands and of its Provinces and municipalities, respec-
tively, on June 30, 1930:

Insular government

i

Amount

Title of loan

Rate

Issued

Outstand-
ing June
30, 1930

Included in 10 per cent limitation:

Public improvements_________________j

Do--------------------------------

Do________________________________

Do_________________________________I

Gold bonds of 1916_________________ j

Manila port works and improvements__|

General bonds______________________

Do_________________________________|

Irrigation and permanent public works_I

Metropolitan water district_________I

Do_____________________________ _|

Cebu port works______________________

Do________________________________

Do_______________________________!

Iloilo port works.______________

Do___________________________

Do___________________________

Per cent
4
4
4

5H

4

5 X
5

4 H
4H

5

4 H
4H
4 H
4 M
4 M
4M
4M

500.000
000, 000

500.000
000, 000
000,000
000, 000
000,000
000, 000
800, 000
000, 000

500.000

750.000
750, 000
500, 000

750.000
500, 000

925.000

$1, 627, 000
424, 000
736, 000

9.473.000
2, 861,000
5, 580, 000
4,492, 000

19,788,000
10, 083,000
2, 978, 000

1.500.000

736.000

750.000
500, 000
736, 000

500.000

925.000

Total________________________

Not included in 10 per cent limitation:

Friar-land purchase________________

Collateral bonds—

73,475,000

7,000,000

63, 689,000

4, 644, 000

Of 1922 (Manila)..........

Of 1926 (Iloilo)___________

Of 1926 (Pangasman)........

Of 1926 (Occidental Negros)

Of 1926 (Marinduque)______

Of 1926 (Hocos Norte)_____

Of 1927 (Laguna)..........

Of 1927 (Provincial)______

Of 1927 (Camarines Sur)._.

Of 1928 (La Union)________

Of 1928 (Manila)..........

4 H
4H
4H
4H
4 X
4 M
4H
4K
4 K
4H
4^

2, 750,000
976, 500
428, 500
400, 0G0
55, 500

274.000
98, 000

1,405,000
111, 000
110, 000

500.000

2,430, 000
976, 500
423, 500

400.000
55, 500

274, 000
98,000
1, 383,000
110, 000

110.000

500, 000

Total.....

Grand total

14,108, 500 11,409, 500

87, 583, 500 75, 098, 500

Dated Re- deem- able Due
1905 1915 1935
1906 1916 1936
1909 1919 1939
1921 1941
1916 1926 1946
1920 1930 1950
1922 1952
1922 1952
1922 1952
1925 1935 1955
1929 1959
1928 1958
1929 1959
1930 1960
1928 1958
1929 1959
1930 1960
1904 1914 1934
1922 1950
1926 1936 1956
1926 1956
1926 1956
1926 1956
1926 1956
1927 1957
1927 1957
1927 1937 1957
1928 1958
1928 1958




32

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

PROVINCES AND MUNICIPALITIES

Title of loan Rate Amount Dated Re- deem- able Due
Issued Outstand- ing June 30, 1930
City of Manila: Per cent
Sewer and waterworks 4 $1,000,000 $496, 000 1905 1915 1935
Do 4 2, 000,000 937, 000 1907 1917 1937
Do 4 1, 000,000 667,000 1908 191S 1938
Public improvements 5H 2, 750,000 2,430,000 1920 1930 1950
Do 4 Vi 500, 000 500, 000 1928 1958
Do_ 4H 500, 000 500,000 1929 1959
City of Cebu: Sewer and waterworks.- 4 125, 000 95,000 1911 1921 1941
Bangued, Abra Province: Water supply 5 20, 000 20,000 1919 1929 1949
Mayjayjay, Laguna Province: Public im-
provements 5 20,000 20,000 1919 1929 1949
Santa Cruz, Laguna Province: Public im- |
provements 5 45,000 45, 000 1919 1929 1949
Province of Iloilo and 9 municipalities (Ca-
batuan, Dingle, Iloilo, Jaro, LaPaz, Maasin,
Pavia, Pototan, and Santa Barbara): Public
'improvements.- 4 H\ 976, 500 976, 500 1926 1936 . 1956
Province of Occidental Negros: Public im- , l
provements. 4^1 400, 000 400,000 1926 1956
Province of Pangasinan: Public improve-
ments 4J>i 428, 500 428,500 1926 1956
Province of Marinduque: Public improve-
ments m 55, 500 55, 500 1926 1956
Province of Ilocos Norte and 3 municipalities
(Bacarra, Laoag, and Pasuquin): Public
improvements 4 ¥> 274, 000 274, 000 1926 1956
Province of Laguna: Public improvements 4 X 98,000 98, 000 1927 1957
Province of Ilocos Sur and municipality of Vi-
gan: Public improvements. 4 Vi 175, 000 173,000 1927 1957
Province of Tarlac: Public improvements 4 y2 171,000 169, 000 1927 1957
Province of Pampanga: Publicimprovements. m 477, 000 469, 000 1927 1957
Province of Nueva Ecija: Public improve-
ments 4 Yi 345,000 339, 000 1927 1957
Province of Bulacan: Public improvements — 4 ft 237,000 233, 000 1927 1957
Province of Camarines Sur and 4 municipali-
ties (Naga, Magarao, Canaman, and Cama-
ligan): Public improvements m 111, 000 110, 000 1927 1937 1957
Province of La Union: Public improvements.. 41/2 110, 000 110, 000 1928 1958
Total.. 11,818, 500 9, 545, 500


Bonds issued through Bureau of Insular Affairs, during year ending June

so, mo

Title of loan Authority for for issue Rate Amount Price received Dated Due
Cebu port works, second series. Metropolitan water district.. Iloilo port works, second series. Cebu port works, third series. Iloilo port works, third series. Total P. I. Act 3413. P. I. Act 3255. P. I. Act 3417. P. I. Act 3413. P. I. Act 3417. Per cent 4M 4 H 4H 4H 43^ $750,000 1, 500,000 500.000 500.000 925, 000 103. 779 100.512+ 103.779 104.205 104. 205 Sept. 15,1929 Oct. 1,1929 Oct. 15,1929 Mar. 15,1930 Apr. 15,1930 Sept. 15,1959 Oct. 1,1959 Oct. 15,1959 Mar. 15,1960 Apr. 15,1960
4,175,000


SINKING AND TRUST FUND

Under the provisions of Act No. 3014 of the Philippine Legislature,
approved March 8, 1922, sinking funds for the retirement of bonds
issued by the Philippine government are to be invested only in se-
curities of the government of the Philippine Islands or the Govern-
ment of the United States after the approval of this act.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

33

Since the passage of this act the treasurer of the Philippine Islands
transferred the following amounts to this bureau for investment:

Year ending June 30-
Prior years -----------------------—

Total

1929

1930

â– Sinking funds.
Trust funds.-.

Total...

$14, 275,241.40
1,400,179.89

$2,797,900. 00

$2,489,600.00
86,689.00

$19, 562,741.40
1,486,868.89

15,675,421.29

2, 797,900. 00

2, 576, 289.00

21,049,610. 29

At a cost of $20,351,423.97 bonds of the face value of $20,274,000
were purchased from the above funds and are included in the follow-
ing statement of securities, either purchased by this bureau for ac-
count of the government of the Philippine Islands or deposited with
the bureau by the insular treasurer, to be held for his account in the
United States, pending cancellation or other disposition.

Sinking and trust fund investments

Year ending June 30-

Bonds

Prior years

Total

1929

1930

Philippine government:

Collateral bonds—

43^’s due 1950 (Manila)----------------------

4H’s, due 1956 (Iloilo)______________________

4H’s, due 1956 (Occidental Negros)___________

4^’s, due 1956 (Pangasinan)__________________

4H’s, due 1957 (Provincial)------------------

4H’s, due 1957 (Camarines Sur)_______________

4^’s, due 1958 (Manila)______________________

General—

4^’s, due 1952_______________________________

5’s, due 1952________________________________

5’s, due 1955________________________________

Land purchase—

4’s, due 1934________________________________

Manila Railroad Co. purchase—

4’s, due 1946___________________-------------

Public improvement—

4’s, due 1935..------------------------------

4’s, due 1936________________________________

4’s, due 1939________________________________

5Ws, due 1941________________________________

4J^’s, due 1950 Manila port works and improve-
ments________________________________________

4H’s, due 1952 irrigation and permanent public

works--------------------------------------

4^’s, due 1958 Cebu port works_______________

4M’s, due 1958 Iloilo port works-------------

Municipal:

City of Cebu 4’s, due 1941______________________

City of Manila 4’s, due 1935--------------------

City of Manila 4’s, due 1937--------------------

City of Manila 4’s, due 1938------------------

City of Manila 5}i*s, due 1950------------------

Railroad:

Manila R. R. Co. 7’s, due 1937_--------------—

Philippine Ry. Co. 4’s, due 1937----------------

United States Government:

Fourth Liberty Loan-----------------------------

$332, 000
976, 500
400, 000
428, 500
5, 000

500.000

3, 236, 000
340, 000
504, 000

2, 293,000

1, 214, 000

855.000

637.000
818, 000
281, 000

559.000

4, 786,000

500.000

75.000

30, 000
540, 000
1,127, 000
472, 000
2,750,000

547, 000
1, 273, 000

75.000

$146, 000

$52, 000

4.59, 000
63, 000

555,000 185, 000 48,000 318, 000 120,000 65, 000
101,000 176, 000
77,000 104, 000
32,000 7, 000 2,000 358, 000 49, 000 6, 000 14,000 356, 000
59,000 302, 000
388, 000 15, 000 126, 000 10,000 1,000 11,000 31,000 186, 000

5, 000 35.000 4, 000 19.000 i

78,000

$530,000
976, 500
400, ^00
428, 500

464.000
03, 000

500, 000

4,109, 000
645, 000

617.000

2, 570,000
1,395, 000

936, 000

650.000

834.000

995.000

920, 000

5, 360, 000
515, 000

201.000

45.000
576,000

1.142.000
522, 000

2.750.000

625, 000

1.273.000

75.000

Total.

25, 554,000

2, 674,000

1,889,000 | 30,117,000


34

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Under the provisions of section 2 of Act No. 3014, the following
bonds, included in the preceding list of bonds purchased, have been
canceled:

Collateral bonds:

due 1950 (Manila)________________________________________ $320,000

4^’s, due 1957 (Provincial)_______________________________________ 22,000

4J/£’s, due 1957 (Camarines Sur)_____________________________________ 1,000

General bonds:

41/2’s, due 1952_________________________________________________ 3,212,000

5's, due 1952__________________________________________________ 508, 000

5's. due 1955__________________________________________________ • 22, 000

Land purchase: 4’s, due 1934________________________________________ 2, 356, 000

Manila Railroad Co. purchase: 4’s, due 1946_________________________ 1,139, 000

Public improvement:

4’s, due 1935__________________________________________________ 873,000

4’s, due 1936__________________________________________________ 576, 000

4’s, due 1939__________________________________________________ 764, 000

51/2’s, due 1941___________________________________________________ 527,000

5 Mj’s, due 1950. Manila port works and improvement_______________ 420,000’

4J/~>’s, due 1952, irrigation and permanent public works_________ 1,717,000

4%’s, due 1958, Cebu port works___________________________________ 14,000

4%‘s due 1958, Iloilo port works_______________________________ 14, 000

Municipal:

City of Cebu 4’s, due 1941_____________________________________ 30, OOO

City of Manila 4’s, due 1935___________________________________ 504, 000

City of Manila 4’s, due 1937___________________________________ 1, 063, OOO

City of Manila 4’s, due 1938___________________________________ 333,000

Total___________________________________________________14,415,000

All canceled bonds have been shipped to the auditor of the Philip-
pine Islands. This leaves $15,702,000 in securities actually held in
this bureau for account of the Philippine government on June 30,.
1930.

RAILWAY BONDS

The bonds of railroads, guaranteed as to interest by the Philippine
government, outstanding are:

Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4 per cent bonds, due 1939_______$12,538,000

Manila R. R. Co. (southern lines) 4 per cent bonds, due 1959_______ 1,122,000

Manila R. R. Co. 7 per cent sinking fund bonds, due 19374__________ 1, 500, OOO

Philippine Ry. Co. first-mortgage 4 per cent bonds, due 1937_______ 8, 549, OOO

Total______________________________________________________ 23, 709, 000

During the past year bonds of the Manila Eailroad Co., due in
1939, with a par value of $229,000, have been purchased from moneys
in the sinking funds and are being held by the trustee under the
mortgage pending cancellation. The par value of bonds thus held
by the trustee on June 30, 1930, amounted to $1,205,000.

4 The payment of the principal of this issue of bonds is also guaranteed by the Philippine-
government.


REPORT OP CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

35

COINAGE

The new coin received during the year 1929, including recoinage,
consisted of 1*394,000 of the 20-centav6 denomination, #100,000 of
the 10-centavo denomination, and 1*56,571.61 of the 1-centavo de-
nomination. On December 31, 1929, the total amount in circulation
and available therefor Avas 1*40,058,977.47, consisting of the following:

Pesos 0----------------------------------------------------- f*21, 889, 679. 00

50 centavos_________________________________________________ 6, 272, 494. 50

20 centavos------------------------------------------------- 5, 322,153. 00

10 centavos------------------------------------------------- 3, 844, 371. 00

5 centavos__________________________________________________ 1, 216, 504. 80

1 centavo___________________________________________________ 1,462,115.53

44 centavo (no longer coined)_______________________________ 51,659.64

40, 058, 977. 47

INSULAR RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

The following is a statement of insular receipts and disbursements
•of the Philippine Islands, exclusive of all items of a refundable char-
acter, expressed in United States currency, for fiscal (calendar)
.years 1926, 1927, 1928, and 1929:

Year ending Dec. 31—

192C 1927 1928 1929
CREDITS Balance from prior years 'Revenues: Customs Internal Repayment of Philippine National Bank losses, act 3174 $39,163, 589. 56 10,216,053. 85 20,007, 777. 31 $32,247,695. 49 9,907,266. 67 20,004,348. 03 $31,904,140. 64 11, 561, 648. 74 20,835,745. 77 1,426, 742, 34 10,232,475.03 3, 868,663. 59 $34, 673, 756. 00 12,829,104. 78 21,902,415.98 1,086, 515.15 10, 513, 550. 94 679,000. 00
Miscellaneous Proceeds from sale of bonds Total revenues Total credits DEBITS Expenditures: Bureaus and offices Revenue service Fixed charges. Public works and equipment Miscellaneous Aid to Provinces, cities, and municipalities Purchase of investments and securities Contingent losses for the rehabili- tation of the Philippine National Bank 9,584, 632. 31 2,092,463. 35. 9,931,368.13 1,908,611.25
41, 900, 926. 82 41,751, 594.08 47, 925,275. 47 47,070, 586. 85
81,064, 516.38 73,999,289. 57 79, 829,416.11 81, 744,342. 85
16, 710,696. 72 4,397,711. 84 4,998,684.87 3, 995,426. 84 160,620. 25 7,177, 798. 33 5,470,191.99 5, 905,690. 05 32,. 247,695. 49 17, 237,832. 26 4, 540, 888. 68 5,042,808. 03 2,963,453. 92 128,373. 24 8,326, 728. 65 3,825,074.15 29,990. 00 31, 904,140. 64 17, 693,928. 45 4,814,456. 92 5,087,157.11 4,210, 655. 38 103,080. 65 8,522,573. 73 4,723,807.87 18, 470, 937. 99 4, 916, 536. 01 5,040, 792. 47 2,119, 502.16 114,404. 29 9,809,466. 85 1,354,621. 68
Surplus Total debits 34,673,756.00 39,918,081. 40
81,064, 516.38 73,999,289. 57 79,829,416.11 81, 744, 342. 85

The Philippine peso equals 50 cents United States currency.


36

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

Appendix G
PORTO RICO

Total foreign trade

12 months ending
June 30—

1921.

1922.

1923.

1924.

1925.

1926.

1927.

1928.

1929.

1930.

Consignments Shipments
From United States From foreign countries Total To United States To foreign countries Total
$97, 074, 399 57, 400, 028 64,419,462 80, 586, 699 79,198, 565 83,056, 553 87,049. 962 79, 701,911 85,078,596 73,078,779 $8, 405, 304 6, 775,121 7, 525,043 8, 782,925 11, 306, 036 12, 201, 711 11, 760, 788 12, 640,418 12, 782,164 10, 843,050 $105,479,703 64,175, 149 71, 944, 505 89, 369, 624 90, 504, 601 95, 258, 264 98, 810, 750 92,342,329 97,860,760 83,921,829 $103,388,227 66,229,771 77,007,257 80, 754, 975 84,411,792 88,106, 570 99, 223,154 96, 662,619 76,471,829 95,097,640 1 $8,890,348 5,942,800 5, 285, 793 7, 525, 565 10,407,152 10,618, 281 8, 844, 280 i 6, 872,120 ! 5,251,041 4,549,018 $112,278, 575 72,172, 571 82, 293,0501 88, 280, 540 94,818,944 98,724,851 108, 067,434 103, 534, 739 81, 722, 870 99,646, 658

Sugar shipments

12 months ending June 30— j Total Shipments to United States
i Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons Cents Long tons Cents
1921 i 365, 547 $72, 440,924 8.85 365,198 $72,367, 290 8. 85
1922 i 419, 544 40, 820,333 â–  j 4.34 419, 203 40,784,886 4. 34
1923 317, 342 46,207,276 6.50 317,134 46,176, 202 6. 50
1924 332,180 47,838, 687 6.43 331, 921 47,792, 602 6.43
1925 510, 321 53, 261,895 4.66 510,166 53,240,480 4.66.
1926 516,795 48, 223,258 4.17 516, 612 48, 201,883 4.17
1927 513, 276 54, 756, 984 4. 76 513,169 54, 743,032 4.76
1928 540, 732 54, 579, 020 1 4.51 540, 586 54, 569, 764 4,51
1929. 421, 814 35, 224, 038 | 3.73 421, 792 35,222,144 3.73
1930 643, 944 53, 670, 038 3.72 643,901 53,667,063 3.72-

Note.—Includes refined sugar, separately shown in 1929 and 1930, as follows:

Total Shipments to United States
Quantity | Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
Long tons 38,073 53, 741 $3,892, 522 6,142, 744 Cents 4. 56 5.10 Long tons 38,051 52,698 $3,890,628 6,139,769 Cents 4. 56" 5.10'

„ Coffee shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending June 30— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1921 Pounds 26, 731,648 $5,352,924 Cents 20.02 Pounds 211,966 $39,037 Cents 18.42
1922 23, 402,127 4,316,859 18.44 65,622 12,793 19.64
1923 , — - 16,821, 939 3,188,002 18.96 70,915 14,181 20.00
1924 21, 859, 215 4, 595, 811 21.03 318, 086 71,158 22.37
1925 23, 782, 996 6, 575,635 27. 65 261,155 66, 862 170, 201 25.60
1926 - 26, 332,766 7, 071,407 26. 85 624, 045 27. 27
1927 i 19, 356. 904 5,748,877 29. 70 178,082 52, 059 29. 23
1928 7,837,800 2, 596,872 33.13 52, 221 13, 276 25. 42
1929 1, 278, 615 456,831 35. 73 579, 732 208, 954 36. 04
1930 433,809 151, 503 34. 92 » 262, 849 95, 250 36. 24

1 Includes coffee for transshipment to foreign countries amounting to 259,683 pounds, valued at $94,150,
leaving only 3,166 pounds, valued at $1,100, to be consumed in United States.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

37

Lcaf-totacco shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending June 30— Quantity Value Value per pound Quantity Value Value per pound
1921. Pounds 12,157,698 17,489,105 14, 937, 530 19, 944, 653 18,002, 340 20, 513, 594 $12,893, 701 8,154, 504 8,489, 984 12, 578,448 9,156,480 13,124, 643 19,496, 508 15,479, 820 11, 220, 264 10, 602,170 Cents 106.05 Pounds 12,100, 586 17, 438, 679 14, 904, 723 19,834,151 17, 766, 033 20, 513, 594 25, 975, 321 26, 654,458 19, 314,160 18,928,381 $12, 881, 289 8,148, 636 8, 487, 349 12, 557, 349 9,123, 995 13,124, 643 19, 489,311 15, 466, 781 11,216, 640 10, 599, 552 Cents 106.45
1922 46. 62 46. 71
1923 56. 85 56. 94
1924 , 63. 07 63.31
1925_ 50. 86 51. 36
1926 63. 98 63. 98
1927 26, 027, 239 26, 782, 084 19, 342, 009 18,966, 285 74.91 75.03
1928 57. 80 58. 03
1929 i 58. 01 58. 07
1930 55. 90 56. 00


Cigar shipments

Total Shipments to United States
12 months ending June 30— Quantity Value Value per thousand Quantity Value Value per thousand
1921 Thousands 152,098 $8.103, 601 $53. 27 Thousands 152,066 $8,101, 628 $53.28
1922 140, 504 6, 279. 054 44. 68 140,457 6, 277, 832 44.69
1923. 192,105 6, 911, 510 35.98 192, 069 6, 910, 735 35.98
1924 175, 289 5,460,119 31.15 175, 251 5, 458,880 31.15
1925 196, 560 7,105, 508 36.15 196, 553 7,105, 313 36.15
1926 • 214, 546 7,196,365 33. 54 214,546 160, 804 7,196, 365 33.54
1927 160, 804 4, 227, 576 26. 29 4, 227, 576 26.29
1928 144, 378 3, 625, 561 25.11 144, 378 3, 625, 561 25.11
1929 158, 656 3, 847, 797 24. 26 158, 656 3, 847, 797 24.26
1930 145, 566 3,408, 721 23.42 145, 566 3,408,721 23.42

Fruit shipments

12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States 12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1921 _ . $3,145,259 2,857, 086 4, 570, 359 3, 807, 567 4, 202, 840 $3,143,058 2, 853,431 4, 565. 324 3, 79i; 735 4,187,788 1926 $6,009,840 5, 823, 751 6, 824, 802 2,850, 722 7, 671, 525 $5,994,464 5, 792,433 6, 811,908 2, 843, 213 7,480, 222
1922 1927
1923 1928
1924 ... 1929
1925 1930


Coconut shipments

12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments ; to United i States ! | 12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1921 $690,895 489, 657 583,931 616,484 720,189 $685, 537 478, 095 567,061 605,129 709, 853 1926 $625, 989 628,196 713, 992 264, 778 218, 787 $611, 977 612,684 697, 972 249, 665 218, 787
1922 1927
1923 1928
1924 1929
-1925 1930



38

BEPOBT OP CHIEF OF BUBEAU OF INSULAE AFFAIBS

All other shipment*

12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1921 $9, 651, 271 9, 255, 078 12, 341, 988 13, 383,424 13, 796, 397 $6,170,388 7, 674, 098 10, 286,405 10, 478,122 9, 977, 501
1922
1923
1924
1925


12 months ending June 30— Total value Value of shipments to United States
1926 $16, 473,349 17, 385, 542 19, 714, 672. 27,858,440 23,923,914 $12,807,037 14,306,069 15,477,357 22,883,416 19,628, 045
1927.
1928. .
1929
1930.


Appendix H
PORTO RICO

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS

Under an act of Congress approved March 4, 1927, the insular
government of Porto Rico and the municipalities of San Juan and
Ponce are authorized to incur public indebtedness up to 10 per cent
of the aggregate tax valuation of their respective properties; other
municipalities are limited to a public indebtedness not in excess of 5
per cent of their respective taxable properties. Bonds of Porto Rico,
which are secured by an equivalent amount of bonds of municipal
corporations or school boards of Porto Rico, are not to be counted
within the 10 per cent limitation, but bonds issued by municipalities
or any subdivision thereof after March 4, 1927, to the payment of
which the good faith of the people of Porto Rico is pledged, are to
be counted therein.

During the year additional bonds of the insular government of
Porto Rico were issued with a par value of $750,000, the proceeds
from which are to be used in connection with the Isabela irrigation
project.

On June 30, 1930, the aggregate assessed* valuation of the real and
personal property in the island of Porto Rico amounted to $330,-
274,020.6 The following is a statement of the bonded indebtedness
of the insular government of Porto Rico as of June 30, 1930:

Amount

Title of loan

Rate

Issued

Included in 10 per cent limi-
tation:

Irrigation-

1909.. ...............

1913__________________

1913 _________________

1914 ______________

1915 _________________

1916 _________________

1918_________________

1922_________________

1923., ______________

Per

cent

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4 U

$3, 000, 000
1, 000, 000
700, 000

400.000

400.000

200, 000

200.000

250.000

975.000

1924.

600,000

1925___________________

1925___________________

4M 125,000

4 M 750, 000

Outstand-
ing June
30, 1930

Maturing

I

$450, 000
1, 000, 000
700, 000

400.000

400.000

200.000
200, 000
250, 000
825, 000

600, 000

125, 000
750,000

$150,000 on Jan. 1 of each year.

Jan. 1,1943; redeemable after Jan. 1,1933.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1944.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1951.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1955.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1959.
$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1. 1958.
$150,000 Jan. 1, 1961; $100,000 Jan 1. 1962.
$75,000 on Jan. 1 of each year beginning
Jan. 1,1929; outstanding series redeem-
able Jan. 1, 1939.

$75,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1942;

redeemable Jan. 1, 1939.

Jan. 1, 1963.

$75,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1950;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1939.

6 Corrected figure in accord with latest reassessed values. (See Report of Treasurer of
Porto Rico 1929-30, p. 47.)


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

39

Amount

Title of loan

Rate

Included in 10 per cent limi-
tation:

Irrigation—

Per

cent

1927.

4^

Issued

52.% 000

1927.

4 M

475, 000

1927________________

1929________________

San Juan Harbor im-
provement-

1917________________

1929________________

Public improvements—
1914____________________

1919 _______________

1920 _______________

1922.. _____________

1923________________

1923________________

1926.. .............

4^ 500,000

414 750,000

4 100,000

4Y2 320,000

4 1, 000, 000

4}4 b 000, 000

4H 1. 000, 000

5 1, 000, 000

5 1,000,000

5 6,000, 000

4M 2, 000,000

1927.

4H

2,000,000

High school (1920)........

House construction (1920)-
Workingmen's house con-
struction (1920).

Munoz Rivera Park
(1924).

4H

4M

43^2

300,000
250, 000
500, 000

200, 000

Outstand-
ing June
30, 1930

Maturing

525, 000
475, 0C0

5C0,000
750, 000

$75,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1900;

redeemable Jan. 1, 1939.

$75,000 annually Jan. 1, 1967, to Jan. 1,
1972; $25,000 Jan. 1, 1973; redeemable
Jan. 1, 1939.

$100,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1959.
Serially July 1, 1952, to July 1, 1970. Bud

30.000
320, 000

Jan. 1, 1942; redeemable after Jan. 1,1927.
Jan. 1, 1954; redeemable Jan. .1, 1939.

98% 000

1, 000, 000

1, 000, 000

1, 000, 000
1, 000, 000

6,000, 000

2, 000,000

2,000,000

300, 000
250, 000
500, 000

160,000

Jan. I, 1939; redeemable after Jan. 1,1925.

$200,000 Jan. 1, 1931-32; $300,000 Jan. 1,
1933-34.

$250,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1937;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1936.

$250,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1941.

$250,000 annually beginning Jan. 1, 1945;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1944.

$500,000 annually beginning July 1, 1944;
redeemable July 1, 1943.

$500,000 annually beginning July 1, 1956;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1956.

$500,000 annually beginning July 1, 1960;
redeemable Jan. 1, 1960.

Jan. 1, 1945; redeemable Jan. 1, 1930.

Do.

$250,000 Jan. 1, 1941-42; redeemable Jan.
1, 1940.

$20,000 annually on Jan. 1 of each year;
outstanding series redeemable Jan. 1,

Target range and avia-
tion field (1925).

4M

200, 000

200,000

Total______________

Contingent liability—

Ponce (1927).....

Do__________

Villalba (1927)__

Guaynabo (1928)..

27, 720, 000 24, 898,000
4H 650,000 635,000
4H 600,000 600,000
6 35,000 35, 000
5 76, 500 76,500

Total______________

Not included in 10 per cent
limitation:

Refunding (collateral)—

1,361, 500

1,346,500

1914.

1915.

4 655,000 390,000

4 300,000 65,000

Total_____

Grand total

955,000

455,000

30,036,500

26, 699, 500

1934.

$50,000 annually beginning July 1, 1945;
redeemable July 1, 1935.

Serially July 1, 1930, to July 1, 1959.
Serially July 1, 1932, to July 1, 1961.
Serially July 1, 1931, to July 1, 1956.
Serially July 1, 1933, to July 1, 1965.

Serially July 1, 1923, to July 1, 1953.
Serially July 1, 1919, to July 1, 1935.

Bonds issued through Bureau of Insular Affairs, durmg year ending June 80,

1930

Tile of loan Authority for issue Rate Amount Price received Dated Due
Isabela irrigation, series A to S. Funding, series A to J.i J. R. No. 12, July 3, 1929. P. R. Act No. 5, Apr. 9,1930. Per cent 4V2 4V2 $750,000 4, 000, 000 102.139 101. 34999 Oct. 1,1929 July 1,1930 Serially July 1, 1952, to July 1, 1970. $400,000 annually, Julv 1, 1931, to July 1, 1940.

'1 Were issued under date of July 1,1930, but have not been included as a part of the outstanding debt of
Porto Rico as of June 30, 1930.


40

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

MUNIC IPAL BONDED INDEBTEDNESS

At the close of the fiscal year 1929-30 the outstanding municipal
bonded indebtedness, distributed among 70 municipalities of Porto
Kico, was $17,846,200, against the payment of which there had been
accumulated in their respective sinking funds the sum of $2,271,-
159.31. No municipal bonds were issued during the year, but munici-
pal bonds aggregating $540,100 wTere redeemed, thus reducing the
municipal bonded indebtedness of the island by this amount.

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

Comparative statement of receipts and disbursements of Porto Rico, fiscal years

1928, 1929, and 1930

Fiscal year ending June 30—

Balance from prior years
Revenues:

1928

$128, 257. 36

1929

$758, 797. 88

1930

$816, 555. 38

Customs______________________________

Internal_____________________________

United States internal revenues______

Miscellaneous________________________

Total revenues_____________________

Other receipts:

Repayment of loans___________________

Repayment, bureau of supplies________

Other repayments_____________________

Transfers from trust funds___________

Temporary loans, account of hurricane.

Total other receipts...............

Total______________________________

Expenditures:

Legislative..........................

Executive-

Governor_________________________

Secretary________________________

Attorney general_________________

Treasurer________________________

Interior-

Roads and bridges____________

Public buildings_____________

Insular telegraph____________

Other expenses______________

Education-

Public schools_______________

Other expenses______________

Agriculture and labor____________

Health___________________________

Auditor__________________________

Insular police___________________

Public service commission_______

Civil service commission________

Other expenses__________________

Judicial________________________________

Total expenses....................

Other payments:

Transfers to trust funds____________

Municipal and school-board bonds____

Total other payments______________

Cash balance________________________

Total...._________________________

1,932, 313.43
9, 534, 568. 97
392,143. 93
587,192. 80

12,446,219.13

i 59, 885. 00
2,457,460. 94
224,240. 52
226, 748. 62

2,968, 335. 08

15,542,811. 57

183,055.15

41, 774. 39
2, 708, 870. 39
441,185. 86
763, 824. 94

756, 666. 68
67,913. 96
211,960.78
284,787. 61

3,952,134. 57
149, 683.91
393,923. 23
1, 308, 316. 57
132, 362. 43
861, 700. 73
41,496. 76
15,948. 00
474,137. 73
661,165.40

13,450,909. 09

1,279, 604. 60
53, 500. 00

1, 333, 104. 60
758,797. 88

15, 542,811. 57 1

1,459,797. 60
8, 679, 822.79
400, 250. 76
464,267. 37

11, 004,138. 52

i 36,195. 00
2, 352,180.17
408, 645. 59
87,778. 00
1, 002,950.00

3, 887, 748. 76

15, 650, 685.16

263, 087.96

39,498.18
2,454,074.45
397,985. 68
685,213. 75

1,151, 082. 22
143, 260.21
218, 755. 32
330,267.29

3, 996,763. 09
124, 454.45
488,133.79
1, 355,986. 75
133, 352.14
880,095. 35
40, 584. 33
15,498. 73
679,107.21
687,983. 64

14, 085,184. 54

716,445.24
32, 500. 00

748,945.24
816, 555. 38

15, 650, 685.16

1, 520,000. 00
7,324, 315. 59
366, 579.13
403,351.92

9, 614,246. 64

i 34, 500. 00
2,020,181. 69
163,479. 99
451, 382. 34
1, 000,000. 00

3, 669, 544.02

14,100, 346. 04

171, 607. 55

51, 873.17
2,032, 061. 07

463.443. 23
619, 372. 60

791, 693.72
144, 697.90
205, 213. 89
411, 552. 66

3, 901,720. 92

110.443. 73
453, 386.98

1, 371, 612. 32
132, 650. 63

885,340.24
40, 640. 23
16,121. 72
712, 740. 31
716,124.42

13,232, 297. 29

431, 670. 84
34,500.00

466,170.84
401, 877.91

14,100, 346. 04

1 Includes earthquake-mortgage loans to municipalities and school boards.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

41

REVENUE RECEIPTS

LData taken from Animal Report of the Auditor of Porto Rico, 1929-30]

The following tabulation shows the revenue receipts for the year
•classified according to the sources from which they were derived:

Customs___________________________

United States internal revenue____

Property taxes, insular proportion

Excise taxes______________________

Inheritance taxes_________________

Telephone and telegraph receipts__

Court fees and fines______________

Harbor and dock fees______________

Interest on loans to municipalities.

Interest on bank deposits_________

Income tax________________________

Sale of government property_______

University tax excess, previous year.
Miscellaneous_____________________

$1, 520, OOO. 00
366, 570.13
401, 714. 81
5. 320, 269. 41
41,134. 41
115, 262. 84
28, 670. 39
38, 536. 2S
14, 538. 24
128, 710. 20
1, 544, 672. 19
2,197. 91
16, 524. 77
75, 436. 06

Total_____________________________________________________ 9, 614, 246. 64

•Cash on hand July 1, 1929_______________________________________ S16, 555. 38

Total cash resources______________________________________ 10, 430, 802. 02

•CASH REQUIREMENTS AND RESOURCES FOR SAID REQUIREMENTS, FISCAL

TEAR 1929-30

LData. taken from Annual Report of the Auditor of Porto Rico]

Cash requirements:

Appropriation liabilities at July 1, 1929________________ 811, 767, 754. 00

Less surplus fund warrants (lapses) at June 30, 1930_____ 210,022.81

Total cash required for appropriations____________________ 11, 557,731.19

Total cash resources______________________________________ 10, 430, 802. 02

Deficiency in cash requirements at June 30, 1930_______ 1,126, 929.17

STATEMENT OF INSULAR REVENUE RECEIPTS FOR CERTAIN YEARS

[Data taken from Annual Report of Treasurer of Porto Rico, 1929-30]

For purposes of comparison, there are set forth below the amounts
of insular revenue received for the first full year of American occu-
pancy, 1900-1901 and for each of the last nine years:

Fiscal year: Receipts

1900-1901________$2,357,232.36

1921- 22_________ 9, 577, 759. 03

1922- 23_________ 8, 071, 202. 78

1923- 24_________ 9, 198, 385. 83

1924- 25_________ 8, 532, 741. 27

Fiscal year—Contd. Receipts

1925- 26_______$11,773,953.87

1926- 27_______ il, 358, 824. 50

1927- 28_______ 12, 446, 219. 13

1928- 29_______ 11, 004, 138. 52

1929- 30_______ 9, 614, 246. 64

It will be noted that the receipts for the past fiscal year showed a
marked decrease, due in great measure to the disastrous effects of the
hurricane of September 13, 1928.


42

REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAE AFFAIRS

THE BUDGET

The homes shown bv the annual budgets for each of the last 12

years are as follows:

1919- 20________________$7, 174, 000

1920- 21_______________ 8,247,000

1921- 22_______________ 9,971,000

1922- 23________________ 9, 053, 000

1923- 24_______________ 11, 841, 000

1924- 25_______________ 11, 735, 000

1925- 26_______________$10, 417, 000

1926- 27_______________ 10,450,000

1927- 28_______________ 10, 440, 000

1928- 29_______________ 10, 968, 000

1929- 30_______________ 10, 499, 000

1930- 31________________ 10,174,154

Note.—Above figures, except for 1930-31 obtained from Governor's Report
for 1928-29, p. 35. Figure for tlie 1930-31 budget obtained from Laws of Porto
Rico, 1930, p. 554.

ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY

[Data taken from Annual Report of Treasurer of Porto Rico, 1929—30]

The following statement shows the total assessed valuation of real
and personal property in Porto Rico, for taxable purposes, for the
years stated:

1901—02 _ ____________ $96,428,306

1925- 26______________ 321,833,473

1926- 27______________ 338,089,889

1927- 28_____________$341,370,654

1928- 29_____________ 344, 865, 104

1929- 30_____________°330, 274, 020

Note.—The reduction in the assessed valuation for the past fiscal year re-
sulted largely from the reassessment of coffee plantations, for taxation pur-
poses—22.476 plantations were reassessed. The total valuation of these prop-
erties, consisting of 144,890 acres, was reduced by $6,151,115. (Treasurer’s
Report, p. 47.)

Schedules of assets and liabilities as of June 30, 1030

[Data taken from Exhibit 1, Annual Report of Auditor of Porto Rico, 1929-301

Current year (1929-30) Previous year (1928-29) Difference
ASSETS Land and equipment $48,351,087.05 10, 312,594.08 1,573,211.05 2, 591,597.54 5, 807,345.04 2,260.00 123,968.42 162,166.65 1,634,042.47 $45,843,349.60 10,587,302.13 1,805,290. 88 2,876,236.09 4,435,190.84 5,221.19 111,610.64 177,839.34 1,435,664.12 $2, 508, 337.45 -’274,707.45 2 232,079.83 2 284,638. 55 1,372,154. 20 2 2,961.19- 12,357.78 2 15,672.69 198,378.35
Cash
Sinking funds. Trust fund reserves
Accounts receivable
Loans to municipalities...- Other deferred assets
Deferred debits
University of Porto Rico.
Total
70, 558, 872. 90 67,277,704.83 3, 281,168.07
LIABILITIES Notes payable
i 3, 326,800.00 3, 739,000.63 11,465,557. 75 3, 224,950.00 3,417,260.35 10,333.811.10 70,744.07 1,787,146. 52 25,285,000.00 2 (3,030. 76) 1,043,275.01 1,435,664.12 2,050,702.47 18,632,181.95 101,850.00 321, 740.28 1,131,746. 65 2 70,744.07 21,611.57 68,000.00 2 307,752.43 438,831.67 198,378.35 429,945.13 970,784.06
Accounts payable'.
Trust, fund liabilities
Deferred liabilities
Deferred credits _ 1, 785, 534. 95 25, 353,000.00 2 (310,783.19) 1,482,106. 68 1,634,042.47 2,480,647.60 19,602, 966.01
Bonded indebtedness
Surplus, Isabela irrigation service
Surplus, hydroelectric projects
Trustees, University of Porto Rico ...
Surplus, Guavama irrigation service
The people of Porto Rico
Total.
70, 558, 872.90 67,277,704.83 3,281,168.07


0 Corrected figure.

F 1 The Annual Report of the Treasurer of Porto Rico for 1929-30 states (p. 5), the total of the “floating
debt” of Porto Rico as of June 30, 1930, as $3,394,001.54.

2 Decrease in fiscal year 1929-30.


REPORT OF CHIEF OF BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS

43

Appendix I

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Dominican Customs Receivership

The following table shows the financial transactions of the re-
ceivership during the fiscal (calendar) year ended December 31, 1929:

Statement of the customs service, Dominican Republic, year ended December

81, 1929

Balance__________________________________________________________ $243, 363. 51

•Gross collections----------------------------------------------- 4, 989, 527. 06

Miscellaneous receipts------------------------------------------- 6, 051. 78

Total___________________________________________________ 5,238,942.35

Customs expense-----------------------------.------------------ 236, 036.13

Sinking fund___________________________________________________ 119,148.12

Interest on bonds______________________________________________ 1, 099, 999. 92

Dominican Government-------------------------------------------3, 461, 814. 92

Payments account Dominican Government-------------------------- 25,112.11

Personal fees refunded_________________________________________ 16, 466. 20

Accrued liability fund----------------------------------------- 6, 388. 37

Balance:

Sinking-fund account___________________________$80, 000. 00

Accrued liability fund--------------------------- 3, 611. 63

Due Dominican Government------------------------- 5, 212.19

Deputy receivers-------------------------------- 28, 739. 76

Provisional receipts____________________________156, 413. 00

----------- 273, 976. 58

Total.

5, 238, 942. 35








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