Citation
Ko nga mahinga a nga tupuna Maori

Material Information

Title:
Ko nga mahinga a nga tupuna Maori
Alternate title:
Mythology and traditions of the New Zealanders
Alternate title:
Poems, traditions, and chaunts of the Maories
Creator:
Grey, George, 1812-1898
Place of Publication:
Wellington
Publisher:
Robert Stokes
Publication Date:
Language:
Maori
Physical Description:
xiv, 432, cxii, 20 p; 23 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Maori language ( lcsh )
Folk songs, Maori ( lcsh )
Maori poetry ( lcsh )
Reo Māori
Spatial Coverage:
Oceania -- New Zealand
Ao-o-Kiwa -- Aotearoa
Coordinates:
-42 x 174

Notes

General Note:
VIAF (Name Authority) : Grey, George, 1812-1898 : URI http://viaf.org/viaf/34564597

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS University of London
Rights Management:
This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commerical License. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge the author and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.
Resource Identifier:
IE MAO 398 / 39701 ( soas classmark )

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POEMS, TRADITIONS, AND CHAUNTS
OF THE MAORIES.




KO
NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA HAKIRARA
0 NGA MAORI.
HE MEA KOHIKOHI MAI
NA
SIR GEORGE GREY, K.C.B.,
GOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE NEW ZEALAND ISLANDS,
PRINTED BY ROBERT STOKES, WELLINGTON.
1853.




PREFACE.
For eighteen centuries and a half a class of men have
existed in the world, fertile in labors, rich in love,
apostolic in character, who merging in a sense of duty
all thought of self, and making a great part of their
existence one continued series of self-sacrifices, have
occupied themselves in preaching the doctrines of
Christianity in barbarous and heathen lands, and have
been always far in advance of those countries in which
Christianity existed either in its full ripeness, or in that
state of failing decrepitude which too often follows the
warmth and intensity of the love with which first con-
verts receive it.
Before these champions of the Christian faith, idolatry,
human sacrifices, cannibalism, and the innumerable ter-
rible sins born of idol worship, have, in all the lands
which they converted, disappeared. Fierce and frightful
have been the giant systems of vice which these men
have fought against, and have overcome; yet how fierce
and how dreadful they were we cannot now tell: they
have generally vanished, leaving but few and faint traces
behind them. In the classic works of Greece and Rome


ii
PREFACE.
a memorial of the Pagan systems of those countries has
to a great extent been preserved; but there Paganism
meets us under its most polished and perhaps least re-
volting aspect. No full memorial yet exists of the system
and customs of any of the less polished forms of
idolatry.
But although so few traces remain in now Christian
lands of the terrible enemies which these meek Christian
heroes destroyed, nevertheless, plentiful foot-prints,
scattered throughout all those countries, attest that the
feet of swift messengers, shod with the preparation of
the Gospel, have been there. Whatever the race that
these Christian heroes belonged to, whatever the
tongue which they spoke, whatever were the language,
the customs, the superstitious rites of the race they con-
verted, they have every where left behind them certain
common signs, certain peculiar and unmistakeable marks
of mercy, which through all subsequent changes and
revolutions have remained ineffaceably impressed upon
the countries they have won to Christianity.
Throughout the lands in which these men taught, the
institution of the holy Sabbath has through long centu-
ries secured to countless millions of human beings rest
from their toils upon the Lord’s Day. The weak and
young, the worn and aged, the slave, the overtasked
poor, have in all those countries had their strength re-
cruited, their existence brightened, their spiritual part
improved, by one day’s rest and contemplation being
secured to them out of every seven.


PREFACE.
iii
Wherever these Christian teachers appeared, women
ceased to be slaves, men put away their multitude of
wives, marriage sanctified the union of the two sexes,
the wife became the husband’s equal and companion,
the marriage-ring, in addition to its symbolical meaning,
gave to all eyes a readily distinguishable proof that a
woman had undertaken the vows and duties of the
married state.
Wherever these saintly men passed, churches with
spires pointing heavenward arose, and bells were heard
either summoning congregations to morning and even-
ing prayer, or melodiously and merrily chiming as a
Christian youth and maiden were being holily united in
God’s house; or which else with solemn knell warned
all the members of the Christian congregation that a
soul had departed to its Maker, that one of the flock
had been removed, and that prayers and holy contem-
plation were the duty of its surviving members.
In all lands which those men traversed, infants were
by baptism received into Christ’s Church; children were
sedulously taught to lisp divine truths; youths and
maidens having attained to years of knowledge, con-
finned the promises which in their infancy had been
made in their names; adults of every age assembled to
celebrate the Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper; the dead
were decently buried with fitting prayers, and heathen
modes of sepulture were abandoned; alms were col-
lected for the sick and needy; the duties of charity and
mercy were inculcated; sponsors were provided for


iv
PREFACE.
children; a system of Church organisation established,
now it may be in many instances fallen into ruin and
neglect, yet never wholly effaced, and in every country
leaving such broad and easily ascertainable marks, as to
shew that it will at the appointed time spring again into
existence fresh and vigorous as ever.
The same Christian men established every where the
principle of the absolute and entire equality of the
Christian rights of men in the sight of their Maker, so
that the poorest of mankind and those of the most con-
temptible descent, might equally with the most wealthy
and most noble, if not inferior to them in spiritual gifts
and graces, look forward to possess the highest spiritual
position, the most lofty temporal powers which the
Church could bestow. Thus a new dignity was added
to the character of man, the most haughty noble could
no longer absolutely despise and spurn the churl who
was regarded by the Church with so much of compassion
and love, who it was so ready to instruct, to encourage,
and if deserving to exalt: hence in most converted
countries were broken down the barriers which shut out
hopelessly the poor and lowly born from the highest rank
and civil employment; and the State, won by the ex-
ample of the Church, laid open to all her citizens alike
the pathways which lead to preferments and honor.
Again, in such countries the natives often adopted a
standard which bore in some form, as in the Union Jack
of Great Britain, the sign of the Cross. In the institu-
tions of chivalry, the knights abandoning the heathen


PREFACE.
V
signs of distinction, bore upon their breast a cross of a
form peculiar to their order. The illiterate who could
not write, but who were yet anxious to shew their wor-
thiness of belief, placed a cross after their names written
for them by some learned clerk. The descendants of
those barbarous chiefs who had meekly submitted
themselves to Christian baptism, and had assumed a
Christian name, often abandoned their heathen and
barbaric appellations, and bore through successive gene-
rations as their family name, the Christian name which
their ancestor had originally assumed.
In other instances, these Christian teachers stamped
vividly their impress upon the entire institutions of a
nation, as in Great Britain, where the people who threw
off barbarism and its customs, having no form of govern-
ment suited to a Christian state, adopted in the Queen,
Lords, and Commons, the model of the form of govern-
ment of their primitive Church, and thus in addition to
the innumerable other blessings they derived from their
early Christian teachers, were indebted to them also for
a constitution surpassing all the forms of government
which man’s ingenuity had previously devised, which
has been the admiration of mankind, the source of
strength and constant increase to a mighty Empire,
and which has girdled the globe with her colonies and
offshoots.
Those who are well acquainted with the recently con-
verted islands of the Pacific Ocean will with pleasure
trace how through long succeeding centuries the same


vi
PREFACE.
causes produce the same effects, and how the people of
many of these islands have adopted as their form of
government the system of committees, which was that
form of institution introduced by the early Missionary
bodies into those islands, for regulating the affairs of
their own clergy and churches.
The men who accomplished, or are accomplishing
these mighty things, are generally unknown. Silently
and noiselessly they have moved along their Christian
course, a few alone of their names have come down to
us from our forefathers, or have been during our own
lifetime cherished in our memoryj but it is more than
probable that the most worthy of this band of Christian
heroes have fallen asleep, unheard of by the great mass
of their fellow men. Such men have however long ex-
isted, such men still exist, and must continue to do so,
for there are yet great triumphs for Christianity to
achieve.
Hitherto, with the exception of a few instances, such
as in the case of Greece and Rome, the works of whose
principal Pagan writers are still extant, nothing has
been done in any country which Christian teachers have
converted, to show the full extent of the work which
they accomplished. It is true that imperishable traces
of what they taught and established are always left be-
hind them; but it is rarely that any thing remains to
shew what they overthrew, and what consequently were
the real nature and greatness of the dangers and diffi-
culties against which they were forced to contend. It


PREFACE.
vii
may be said that whilst one part of the work they ac-
complished still remains visible, the greatest and most
difficult part is now lost to our knowledge and view.
Hence men are too apt to undervalue their labours,
and losing sight of what the world was without Chris-
tianity, altogether to misconceive the advantages that
Christianity has secured to the human race. It is to be
feared that there are too many who think that the world
without Christianity was very much like what the world
is with it.*
It therefore appeared desirable that in New Zealand
a monument should be raised to shew in some measure
what that country was before its natives were converted
to the Christian faith, and no more fitting means of
accomplishing such an object appeared attainable than
that of letting the people themselves testify of their
* On this point in relation to New Zealand, the following not»
is added
“ I cannot but think that the benevolent of future times would, with astonish-
ment and joy, search eagerly the records which will shew that even centuries of
idolatry and crime had not wholly obliterated, in the minds of such a race, a
knowledge of their Maker, and a desire for His divine laws, and had not left
them less prepared for the introduction of Christianity than the most polished
Pagans of antiquity were. That, on the contrary, so intolerable was the burden
imposed upon them, that we have seen whole races, in all these islands, in a
few years, throw off the yoke of idolatry, and eagerly embrace the Christian
faith:—that powerful chiefs, to gain the benefits of the truth, sacrificed worldly
rank and power;—without compensation of any kind, manumitted their slaves,
whose labour constituted their chief source of wealth,—and established in their
territory Christianity in its simplest and most primitive form,—although such a
proceeding was alike opposed to their power, their prejudices, passions, and
apparent worldly interests.”—Sir G. Grey to New Zealand Society, Sept. 16,
1851.


viii
PREFACE.
former state, by collecting their traditional poetry, and
their heathen prayers and incantations, composed and
sung for centuries before the light of Christianity had
broken upon their country. It was also clear that to
those persons who study the history of the human race
as developed in the history, customs, and languages of
different nations, such a work would possess a high de-
gree of interest, and it seemed probable that there
would be many persons who would study with pleasure
the poetry of a savage race, whose songs and chaunts,
whilst they contain so much that is wild and terrible,
yet at the same time present many passages of the
most singularly original poetic beauty.
At the present time it appeared possible to make such
a collection of the ancient poems of the New Zealanders,
because they still lingered in the memories of a large
portion of the population, although they were fast pass-
ing out of use, and so ancient and highly figurative was
the language in which they were composed, that already
large portions of them are nearly or quite unintelligible
to many of their best instructed young men.
Portions of more than seven years have been pass-
ed in collecting these poems, and in arranging them
in their proper metre. Sometimes long intervals of
time have elapsed between the period when one portion
of a poem was obtained, and the periods when natives
could be found who knew the other portions of it.
Nearly all parts of the islands of New Zealand have
been visited by the compiler of this work whilst he was


PREFACE.
ix
engaged in collecting and completing these poems and
traditions, although several of them are yet imperfect.
They have all been subjected to the criticism and review
of several good native judges of poetry, and in most
instances three or four natives in different parts of the
Islands, who had no communication upon the subject
with each other, have actually written out the whole or
such portions of the poem as they were acquainted
with.
The written copies which they furnished were very
unintelligible, for they could not arrange them in metre,
and the words were generally run into one another in
the way in which they chaunted the poems, so that the
task of deciphering these numerous copies, and of com-
piling the whole poem from the incomplete portions fur-
nished, was one of great difficulty, and which occupied
much time. The metre in which the poems were to be
arranged was always obtained by hearing it chaunted
by several natives at different times.
The most favorable times for collecting these poems,
and those at which most of them were in the first in-
stance obtained, was at the great meetings of the
people upon public affairs, when their chiefs and most
eloquent orators addressed them. On those occasions, ac-
cording to the custom of the nation, the most effective
speeches were invariably principally made up from reci-
tations of portions of ancient poems. In this case, the
art of the orator was shewn by his selecting a quotation
from an ancient poem which figuratively but dimly sha-


X
PREFACE.
dowed forth his intentions and opinions; as he spoke the
people were pleased at the beauty of the poetry, and at his
knowledge of their ancient poets, whilst their ingenuity
was excited to endeavour to detect from his figurative
language what were his intentions and designs, quotation
after quotation as they were rapidly and forcibly chaunt-
ed forth made his meaning clearer and clearer, curio-
sity and attention were by degrees riveted upon the
speaker, and if his sentiments were in unison with the
great mass of the assembly, and he was a man of influ-
ence, as each succeeding quotation gradually removed
the doubts which hung upon the minds of the attentive
group who were seated upon the ground around him,
murmur of applause rose after murmur of applause,
until at some closing quotation which left no doubt as
to his real meaning, the whole assembly gave way to
tumults of delight, and applauded equally the determi-
nation which he had formed, his poetic knowledge, and
his oratorical art, by which under images beautiful to
them, he had for so long a time veiled, and at last so
perfectly manifested his real intentions.
The religious poems and traditions were generally
furnished by their former priests ; probably to no other
person but the compiler of these poems would many
of them have been imparted. Amongst the moist
curious of this class of poems are those termed Mata,
or visions, in which the priest in a trance saw
moving round him busy groups of spirits, eagerly
engaged in pursuits which were figurative of events
which were afterwards to happen upon earth. As the


PREFACE.
xi
spirits moved to and fro immersed in their occupa-
tions, they chaunted wild choruses which prophetically
figured forth the coming event—one or more of these
were remembered by the priest, who on awaking from
his trance, taught them to the tribe, by whom they
were sung as prophecies, and who by means of these
revelations from the spirit world were often moved to
peace or war at the pleasure of the priest. Two striking
poems of this character, handed down by a seer of the
name of Kukurarangi, will be found at page 111.
Amongst the tribes of New Zealand many beautiful
romances relating to actions of their ancestors are tradi-
tionally preserved; a few of these have been embodied
in this volume; two striking ones will be found at pages
52 and lxxv. It is hoped that it may hereafter be found
practicable to publish a separate work containing the
most interesting romances, which are preserved by the
natives of the different districts of the Islands.
Lest this selection of poems should be regarded as
placing the character of the natives in too favorable a
light, it is right to state that one very numerous class
of poems has been altogether omitted as unfit for
publication. Indeed the poems now published
should perhaps be regarded as a selection embody-
ing the best Maori poetry, which has been chosen
from a very large mass of materials, the poems
which have been rejected far exceeding in num-
ber those which it has been thought necessary to
publish.


xii
PREFACE.
The two first portions of the Appendix contain a
summary of the fabulous native history of the world,
from the creation to a considerable period of time
after the Maori race had discovered and occupied
these Islands. This has been read to old natives in
several parts of the Islands, and has been admitted
by them to correctly state a portion, although only
a portion of the traditions handed down to them
from their ancestors. The remaining portions of
these traditions have been furnished by the natives;
but in order to print the whole of them, it would be
necessary to devote at least one large volume to
that subject alone.
Great care has been taken to render the poems
contained in this volume as accurate as possible;
where errors are detected, some excuse should be
made upon account of the novelty of the subject,
the highly figurative, and hitherto almost entirely
unexplored nature of the language in which they
are composed, and also upon account of the many
occupations of the compiler of this volume, who
could only attend occasionally, and in the intervals
of important business, to the subject, and who was
often unavoidably absent as the work was going
through the press, whilst there was no other person
sufficiently acquainted with the subject to give
effectual aid to Mr. Sutherland, the printer, who,
although unacquainted with the native language,
yet rendered very important assistance in correcting
the press.


PREFACE.
xiii
Translations of the greater portion of the poems
and traditions contained in this volume have already
been prepared, with the intention of publishing
them at some future date. In the mean time, that
the student of the Maori language as it is spoken
may understand the manner in which he should
apply that language in interpreting the poetry of
New Zealand, the following notes upon Maori poetry
are extracted from unpublished remarks upon this
subject by the Rev. R. Maunsell, one of our most
learned Maori scholars :—
In observing “ the construction of Maori poetry,
‘ we shall see that it was not only abrupt and elliptical
‘ to an excess not allowed in English poetry, but that
‘ it also carries its license so far as to disregard rules
‘ of grammar that are strictly observed in prose ; alters
‘ words so as to make them sound more poetically ;
* deals most arbitrarily with the length of syllables,
‘ and sometimes even inverts their order, or adds other
‘ syllables.
“ It is true that these irregularities help much to
c invest Maori poetry with that deep shade which none
c can penetrate without close study of each particular
‘ piece. But it must be remembered that by far the
c largest measure of the difficulty arises from the pecu-
‘ liarly local circumstances, and from the remote and
‘ vague allusions so wrought into the piece, that even
4 one tribe will often be unable to understand the song
‘ of another, especially if it be one of any antiquity.


xiv
PREFACE.
“ Those who have paid attention to the nature of
‘ Maori songs, forms of prayer, and proverbs, will have
‘ it is hoped little difficulty in verifying the preceding
‘ remarks by examples within their own knowledge.
‘ To follow the Maori poet through all the wild irre-
‘ gularities of his flight would be far from the inten-
ts o
‘ tion of these notes; we would only now direct
‘ attention to those peculiarities which it is believed
‘ will be found useful for our purpose.
“ They will be found for the most part to consist
‘ chiefly in omissions of the articles ‘ ko’ and ‘ te,’
‘ omissions of ‘ ai,’ of the pronouns, of such particles
‘ as ‘ nei,’ and of other complementary words, omis-
‘ sions of the nominative case, of the objective, often
‘ of the verb, and verbal particles, omissions of the
‘ prepositions, changes of one preposition into another,
‘ unusual words introduced, and words sometimes
‘ inverted—exceedingly wild and abrupt metaphors,
‘ and transitions unexpected and rapid.”
G. GREY.
July 1853.


KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA HAKIRARA
0 NGA MAORI.
NA TUROA, MO TE KAINGA A TE NGARARA,
I TONA KAKI.
Tera Kopu, hikitia i te ripa,
Hohoro te hara mai, kei te riua au,
Ki Matangihaurua; ko to wairua i hara mai;
I hara mai ra koe, te tai ki a Te Rau,
Taku hoa pakitara, Te kata a Raukawa.
Paki atu e whae, aku rongo hakiki;
Kai ana ki te rae, te one Hakere,
Kia whakarongo ake, Ko Ngati-Koata i te Totara.
Kai auru ai, te Atua i ahau,
Me tarona au, ki’ wawe au te mate;
Ki pono mai koutou, tenei te takoto nei;
Na te aha i patu ? na Rongotakawhiu,
Nga toki kai auru; nga rakau a Maru,
Nana i pokapoka, ka pihanga-rua,
Mau ana, i au.


8
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
NA NUKUPEWAPEWA, TENEI WAIATA, NO TE RIRONGA
O TANA HINAKI-TUNA, I TE WAIPUKE.
Kaore taku ram! ki Te tama-a-Toherau, ka riro atu na;
A Parawlienuamca, no runga i nga hiwi, ki
Pukerau, e Ringa, e
E hara i a au, te parau ;
No nehe ra, te parau ;
He whakataki taku, ki te ao
He korero atu, kia rongo mai koe
Koua rangona hoki
Ko taumata Whakahehe korero
Ko Reotalii ta Hurarau
Ka noho Rarotimu
Ka noho i a Rarotake
Ka puta ki waho ra
Ko Pukupukuterangi
Nana nei te Arulie,
I iuilga i te tuaranui o Rangi e awhi ana,
No te tokonga a Taiie ka horo kei raro,
Ki te tahataha o Rarowhana nei tu ai,
No Nuka noa i kohi mai,
Na te Atoru i pokapoka,
Tautititia hei kaupeka mo Haumia,
Ka puta te pitau ki te ao,
Ko Hinekotauariki.


IIAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 9
KO TE TANGI A TE IKAHERENGUTU, MO ANA TAMARIKI, 1
MATE TAUA ETAIII, I MATE KONGENGE ETAI1I *
Nei ka noho, kapakapa tu ana, te tau o taku manawa
Ki a aku tamariki.
E tia, tenei au, c tama ma, ko te aitanga a Tane, e tuoliu
i uta ra.
E piko nei,
Me te mamaku,
Ki a aku tamariki.
Kei wliea ra ? e, te tamaiti, i karangatia ai,
“Nau mai, e tama.”
Ka riro ra ia, i te taiheke nuk
Ka noho, tenei au, e tama ma, i runga i te kahui papa,
Papa mania;
Papa tahia;
Taliia rawatia;
Kei ai he titiro i te ra, e tu ilio nei;
Te maunga, e tu mai ra;
Ki te hau-kainga, i wliakaarohatia mai, e te konohi tonga.
Tenei, me ruru, ki te wliarc,
Na Whiro-te-tupua;
Kei te ware ware, taku ngakau,
Nga hanga a te rau;
Mei kaia ranei, te marama ? i mate ai.
Mei kaia ranei, te pari ? i horo ai.
Nga buri nei ? i pirau ai,
Mei taua mea, ka ruru nga atua, ki a tatou,
Ka ngaro, i te ngaro, a te moa.
* This lament, said to have been originally composed by Te Ika-liere-ngutu,
was sung by Te Wherowhero, on the death of liis brother Kati, or George
Grey. It is always sung by the aged chiefs if many members of their
family die.
/
B


10
KO N‘GA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Ko te rau kau ’no, te whakawaia ana, ki te whanau a Pani,
A Rongotau,
Nana, te kahui kura,
Nga taonga whakamanamana, e tama ma, a o kuia
Aua atu, ko tawhiti,
Naku pea, koutou koi tiki atu, ki Hawaiki,
Ahu mai ai,
Ka tupu koutou, hei tangata;
Ka ranga e o tupuna nga hau o te Po
O te pukupuku,
O te tau mate.
Hoki mai no ana, ki te pukai, wheo ai.
I tohia ai, koe,
Ki te tohi, o Tutorohakina,
O Tu-te-nganahau;
Kia karo riri, tama,
Kia karo nguha,
Kia karo patu;
Kei te whakahira koe,
I te riri kaiapa, na o matua, ki roto Kairau:
Kia ruku atu koe,
Te ruku, a te Kawau,
Ka ea to ika, he haku, no te moana uri.
Ka ko, o rongo, i runga Haumatao ;
E uia mai koe, e nga whenua,
“ Ko te tama a wai ?”
Ka toa, ka rangona,
Ka tu, i te ihu o te waka, ka rangona;
Ka amohia, te iwi, ka tiketike ki runga;
Koia, patu apiti,
Te kiri kai-mata;
Kihai, taku tamaiti, i waiho e au, i roto Ngaengae,
Ki’ whakaata koe, e Totara i ahua, ki te pu whakakeko;
Ki’ tere matoru, koutou, ko matua, ki roto Manukau;
Ekore, au e mihi
Atu, ki a koutou.


HAKIRARA O NGA MAORI. H
NA TE KAHUKORE, TENEI WAIATA.
Nei, ka noho, i te taruru o Puanga,—
Taku kai rangi—nei,—A whea koe, ka titiro?
Haere, e te kai, haere waewae atu!
E pai, e Angi,—
I horo moana-tia;—
Whaiwhai rawa atu,
Me whai atu, me aha ?
Tena te karanga,
E Whata, e,—Ka hoki au, kei Hawaiki.
He kete haere mai,—Na Karangatioho,
Na Papawhakaoho
Na te iwi tokerau,
Homai, ki a au,
Enei, tuohu kau—
He korenga, ko te mea,
Ka te whakawawe kau,
He taringa, i rongo ake,
Ki a Tuhei-mua,
Kawhakina, te korenga,
Kia whamamao atu,
E hara, te tata mai—
Kei hia, e aku pewa,
Kei akina, e te waha—
Ko nga umu i maha—
He kete huri ano,
I maka atu, ki waho—
Ka ngaro te kai,
E mimiti ta Tuwaewae.
Kotahi rapea,
I whakaaroa iho ai—
Ko te manuhiri puta—
Ka noho ki te marae—
Ka titiro kau atu,
Whakapaua te kanohi.


12
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TANGI NA HINEWHE MO TANA MATUA,
MO TE RAUPARAHA.
Kaore! te arolia ngau kino i roto ra:—
He maunga tu noa, te tihi ki a Kapiti,
Ka riro ra, e, te ki o te wlienua!
Moe mai, e koro, i runga i te kaipuke;
Kia whakamau koe te ata o te moana 1
O tohu aio, e tu ai koe
Ki te whakahau riri. Whakaliaere ara
Na runga i te taiheke, kia poke atu
Koe te tihi ki Ingarani.—
Taku rata tu tahi, taku whakamarumaru!—
Unuliia noatia i waenga i te hono,
I te nui a Te’Toa, te kapohia koe
I te mata whaura, i te ranga maro,
I te ngutu o te pu: kia pa te karanga
“ E Tania ma! e, ka rere au ki te po !”
Ma wai e whakahoki te wai-ora ki muri ?—
Ka ea to mate, ma o mokopuna,
Ma Te Wherowhero e, ma te Tumuhuia—
Tenei nga Iwi, te takoto tonu nei me he moe-toitoi,
Haere ra, e koro, hei mau nga rongo ma te Atua i te rangi
Ma Tamihana, ma Matena,
Na korua ra hoki, i tiki ki te reinga, i kawea mai ai
Ko te ture pai,—ko te ture kohuru, i parea mai nei:—
Naku anake nga hara i raru ai koe I


IIAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
13
HE TANGI NA TE RANG1HAEATA MO TE RAUPARAHA.
Taku waka whakairo, e !
Taku waka whakateretere,
Ki runga i te ngaru na, i,
Tena ka pakaru, e !
Kei te Manuao e pukai ana,
Nga maramara na, i!
Haere ra, c Kali a, c,
I te aroaro o Tu-ma-tau-enga na, i!
Te mana o te Kawana, e!
Te inati o Nga-ti-Raukawa na, i!
Haere ra, e Rail a, e,
I te aroaro o Iliu Karaiti! na, i!
Te mana o te Kawana, e !
Te inati o Nga-ti-Toa na, i!
Ki atu ana au, ‘ e koro, haeliae matariki na, e!’
Ki mai ana koe, ‘ waiho i Porirua,
I te kainga ururua.’
Kia ngata ai to puku, e hao nei koe na, i!
Ekore au e tangi i enei nga raro, na, e,
Tukua atu ki tua ki nga ra o te waru, e ! i!
Ka kolii au i aku tini mahara na, i!


14 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TANGI, MO MOKOWERA, I MATE IA KI
WHAREKURA, KEI OHIWA *
Haere ra, e Moko,
Te ata o te taua,
Te ata o Tumatauhinai,
Te inati o te Peritao,
Ekore lioki koe, e nuia ilio, i enei nga raro,
Te ra o te waru, e,
Ka kohi au? i aku maliara,
Ki atu ana au5 “ e haehae matariki,”
Ki ana mai, ia, “ waiho i Wharekura,
I te ururua,”
Kia ngata ai to puku, e hao nei, ki te riri.
* This Tangi was one of the sources from which Te Raugihaeata obtained
the materials for the preceding tangi for Te Rauparaha. It is the custom
of the natives to compose their poetry rather by combining materials drawn
from ancient poems, than by inventing original matter. An apparently
recent poem is thus sometimes really of very ancient origin.


HAKIRARA O NGA MAORI. 15
HE WAIATA NA TOPEORA.
Rangi korerehu,
I marewa atu ai, Tahuri mai hoki,
Korua ko to kanohi, waihoki te mea
Ka ruia ia ra, ki to wahine, Taea te homai
Hei whakaara i taku moe—Whano, ka liurihia
Te tira o Riripo—Kore tohunga mana
Hei wehe ki te wai—A. hemo ake ai
Te aroha i ahau—Tu mai e koro,
I kawea ake au, nga rere tangi mai
O te wai kohatu, kia tutaki ake
Ko koe nei, e te Hinu, tito te taiapo,
Na Karanga te tau, kei hoatu hold,
Hei pae takualii—Hohoro i aku ngutu
E mau ana^te tinana.
HE WAIATA NA TOPEORA.
Kaore ! te Ngongirua, o te tau ra, 11a Karanga
Whakarehu rawa iho
He wairua—mongina,
Whitirere rawa ake,
Ka hewa kei te ao.
Hua atu e Moa
Ka wareware ano,
Ka te hapai mai.
Te kai maunga koe,
O Pirongia i runga.
Kia marama atu,
Taku nei titiro,
Nga ngaru e horo,
O nga mata kurae,
O Honipaka i waho,
Ki te hoko a ’TiToa
Mauru—Te manako.


16 KO NG A* MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TANC4T, NA TE KAIIUKORE, MO TANA
KETE IIURI, I PIRAU.
Takiri mai te ata i tua—Ko te ata i a au e i—
Aue kau au,
Ki te iwi ka ngaro,
Ekore e ngaro,
He paku waka nui,
Houhia—Ki te rongo
Horahia ki te kura
E tama ranei, e,
Mau ki to patu,
E hine ranei, e,
Puhi ki te kakaia y
E pari e te tai,
Hei kawe i ahau,
Nga tai puhoro.
Ki Otira i runga,
A pa te karanga—
I tarawahiawa,
Tautika te haere, ki to matua, kia te Tara—
Kia tangohia mai,
Ko Uru
Ko Pipitewai, e,
Kurupene Tu, e hine i to manawa,
Kurupene Rongo, i taku manawa,
He manawa tina,
He manawa keukeu,
Ka te turaki taua e hine,
Ki te turanga o Aitua,
O Aitu whakatina,
Ko Aitu whakatoka
Kia toka te whenua,
Kia toka nga tangata;
E kai kawau ana,
Te moenga iho ki te pouriuri,


HAKIRARA 0 NG A MAORI.
17
Ki te potangotango,
Whakaputa e hine,
I te paki, o Hewa,
Pohewahewa noa,
Taua e hine—
Tenei koa taua
Te kiia mai nei,
E to tupuna, e tau nanawe riri, koc.
Kati nei pea ki a taua,
Ko te waka totara,
Pae ana te ika tangata,
Ki to matua, i te muri
E anga to mata, ki te ao, o te tonga,
Ki te ara liaerenga, o to tipuna kua nawa ia,
I nga rangi ra,
E hine ra.
HE TANGI, NA NGA TUPUNA, 0 TE WHAREPOURĪ.
Tera ia, te tai o Ngamotu, ka welie koe i au, e,
He whakamaunga atu, naku, i te ao ka takawe,
Na runga mai, o te motu, e tu noa mai ra
Koe, ki a au e i—
Naku, koe i a waiho, i taku whenua iti,
Te rokolianga, te taranga, i a taua,
Ka mihi, mamao au, ki te iwi ra i a,
E paria, e te tai, pikitu, pikirere,
Piki, takina mai ra, te kawa i Muriwhenua,
Te kawea au, te tere, Tena taku manu,
He manu ka oma noa,
Runa ki te whare, te hau o Matariki
Mate whare porutu, u,
Ma te rahi, a ’Ti Awa, e kautere mai ra,
Ka urupa, taku aroha na-i-a.
c


1'8 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TAU.
Kaore te whakama,
Ki oku korero,
E tara, e te ngutu,
E tika ? e whae ?
Mei ata kite koe
Taku tonuitanga,
To rua patu, E roa i au,
Te one i Turangi, kia tae au e,
Te paepae, o te rua, i a Maheuheu.
Te awhiwhi mai,
He rukenga naku,
I aku rangi mananga.
Tena te pari kai
Kei oku matua
Te hikoi atu. E uru e wehi ana.
Te ai, he kopapa,
Hei reti i au, kia uru atu ana
Ko Tumuakewhenua
Kia hopu taku ringa
Te pu ki Hawaiki.
Tena, aku rongo,
Ka riro i a Karaha, te tailiekenga atu,
O Taumatamaire,
Ka rongo Taweke
I aku rongo tupua
Hei paki, ki te whare.


IIAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
19
HE TAU NA MARUAITERANGI.
Nei, ka noho, i te Keriateua,
Whakarongo mai ra, e Rangi, aku wa noho kau,
I te wao ngaki kai, a te iwi.
Nui tou nui,
Ko wai, kia whanatu,
Ki te tali a, o te umu,
Me titere mai, kia kai atu au, ko te waha.
I ngaki, ano au, na te Atua, i huna iho.
He pono, ano ra, taku aniwatanga, ki te kai a Tiki,
E te tahuri mai, ka kitea mai, te mangu i taku mata,
Na te tau au, koi ki mai, kia tokoruatia, ki taku
whakaaro
Ka iri te hina, ka halia te pahau, me tuku atu koe ki a
Korotiwha,
Kia roa te mahinga, hei konei au, whakamau atu ai,
E maha nga rangi, ka tautau te remu, ka taikuiatia
ki te whare.


KO TE TANGI A TARAAWHA MO TANA TAMAIT1 NA RERE-
TAWHANGAWHANGA I PATU. NO NGATIRUANUI A TA-
RAAWHA.
Ra te tai uru;
Ka koto ki te awa; he ho mai aroha.
Kia tangi atu au, e tama i konei,
E tama tukino!
I te tira haerenga, e kawea ana koe,
E te hianga rere; he hinengaro nunui.
Kei o matua. Kahore hoki te mata.
I hoki mai ki muri; kia ki atu au
“ He ara aitua, te ara i runga Mahaukura
“ He whenua kau ano, e ko te takotoranga,
“ Koia te umu e tuwhera, paia iho te wai
“ Koia te wai pa, kia rongo mai koe.”
E tama, ware ware ;
He ware ware au,
Nga ngaki, e ngakia mai e koe,
Tena ano ra te tangata ngaki kai,
Te kopu pea, i takoto mai ai,
Tama ra.
Te whanaunga, i.
I pataia ai,
Te mau atu ai—E maha nga rangi!
E hira koa te toa i a Rere,
Te toa o Rehua ? kahore au i rongo.
Te taha i mate ai,
I tangohia ai koe,
Ki te kurawiniwini,
Ki te kurawanawana;
Nga mahi a te iti.
Moe mai, e tama,
Te moenga matao,


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
21
Kia moe atu au,
Te moenga i ahuru.
Ekore puta atu,
I runga te tuturi,
I runga te tataramoa,
Nga heihei o Matuku.
Kaore i liuna,
Te kaka tinotangata—
I kona Mauri
A te Kina
T utahi-arahanga
Uruliape-ki-te-rangi; ka kite Te Pononga,
Taraponga tona patu,
E kia rangona ai
Te toa patu tangata i.
E ai e tama
Ma rau a Puteuru, ma te uri o Maru
O Tu-te-nganahau nana nga patu
Nga tao kaitohi, ki te takutai o Rurutu.
I rangona ki reira a Ururangiwhekc
A Ururangipapa, e riri ana i waho,
Turakina, kia hinga ilio ana,
Ko te Horihori i noho i te tuwhenua
Paku te whenua
Ngatata te papa i runga nei,
E tama ki a koe.
E uia iho koc
Mau e ki akc, “ ko te ngako tena,
“ O Maramara te Ihonga,
“ O Tutakiao,”
Ka tau ia ki raro i
No nga puau
Hurilianga puau
No te tilii au,
O te rakau, e tu ki Tawhitinui.


22
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Te tapu i a koe, a te Rangitakaliia,
T u-hokai-nuku,
T u-liokai-rangi,
T e -reo-i-a-T uri ,
Hei ara mou, ka wliano ai koe,
Nga wai kirikiri, i roto i Oao.
Kia ahuria, o iwi matariki, e te rau e pae.
Tama a Hinemanu i
Maua to tamaiti, ki walio nga rae
Ki te toka tutahi, kia kai apu
Te ika i te moana ; ka whakahoki mai
Ki runga i Okare, ki karanga atu au,
“ Haere mai e tama, i runga i te hakari,
“ E haria mai nei,
“ E te iwi ra i a.”
HE TANGI MO TE TAMAITI.
Aue ! aue!
Pakipaki kau, au, ki te tuakiri o te whare;
Kei whea te mea, e uaratia ? e taku kurupounamu
Whakaputa e, tama, ki walio ra—
Tomokia e, koe, i te wliare i to tuahine, i a te Paea
Kia whakawhiwhia koe ki te rau o Papauma;
Ka pai taku mea te liaere,
Nga pikitanga, kei Waipokaia.
Ka kitea mai koe e o papa,
Hei karanga mai,
“ Naumai” nau ake, takahia, te pae ki te Aralianga,
Ma Ngati-Awa, e whakatangi ki te rapa wai hoe,
Tohu, e tama, ko te kore i to iwi mokai,
Ka riro te karanga, pa wawe ki tawhiti,
Ka patata taku tu, te taumata ki Kapu ra,
Ka hoki mai taku mea ki au-e-e.


HAKIRARA O NGA MAORI. 23
KO TE TAU TENEI A RAWIRI WHATINO
MO TE KAWANA.
E taea, c au, te po ka ketua—
Poupourere ake—
“ Kei wliea nei ra, e—
“Taku manu wheko ata?” i—
Kopia pukutia, e—
Ki rafo te marua i.
Te mata-kahi maire—Aea ranei
Kia tutahi taua—
I te riri whakapau,
Kei o matua, e—
Tenerau, e !
Te harapuka noa nei! e—
Te kaha ka motu nui
Ki raro ki a Miru, e—
I awhenua au—
Ki Hawaiki atua, e—
Numia ki te whare—
Ki te kahui toroa, e—
Kia inoia mai—
Te-niho-matai-o-Tangaroa, e,
Hei ara mou—
Ki Hikurangi, e—e.


24 KO NG A MOTE ATE A, ME NGA
KO TE TANGI A RARAWA-I-TE-RANGI MO TE KORE, I TE
KITENGA Al I TONA UPOKO, E IRI ANA I RUNGA I TE
TURUTURU.
Kaore te whakama,
Ki a au ra, e takakau noa nei,
He po kia moea,—
He ao ka tiroilia,
Te takiringa mai,
O te ata i nga pae,
Kia tohu ake au—
Ko nga maliinga—Kiliai hoki mai.
Heoti te tangata,
I kore mahara ki roto;
Te muri arolia,
Ki to tau tuniau.
Tenei ano ra,
O maru i waiho,
Te mau nei, e,
Kei taku tuakiri.
Ko aku mata i rehu,
E whakawhetu mai ana roto.
Ma te aha e kawe,
Te tawhatinga kei te Hakanga,
Kia komihi au,
E Kore ! ki a koe,
Nau i a waiho,
Te kiri awhinga nei.


HAKIRARA 0 NG A MAORI. 25
HE TANGI.*
Takarokaro noa ana,
Te whetu maori o runga;
Ka momoe nga uruahu o Rehua i te rangi,
Mana e whakamana Uenuku-kopako,
Te atua tawhanawhana; mei aliatia hoki ?
Na Wari a Hau,
Nana i kapo matamata, i te riri;
Te whakaaro ai,
Ka whati nga rata whakaruru o runga,
Hei kawe mohou,
Ki te mata whaura, i
Te puta tu awatea;
I runga te Waitawa,
Pae ana te pakeke,
I te nui a Te’Tu;
Kei a Rangi a Te Ama, e
Rurea te toka niatalio,
Ka tupoki
Te waka, e.
Taku awe kotuku, no nga rakau a Te Ru, c
Puhia mai nei, e te hau muri, pa whakarua;
Taku mahuri totara,
E tu, ki te rakau a Hine-tapeka.
Tena, ka paea, nga mata wai o Rotocliu;
Pohche noa o teina i te ao.
Whakamau tahi atu, te titiro,
Te pae ka riakina,
Ko Rangitoto, e tu kau mai ra,
Ka maunu te Taniwha, i te rua.
I murua'atu i te uru,
* This Lament is said to be of very ancient composition, and, as a speci-
men of poetry, is highly prized: on the death of Te Rauparaha in 1849 it
was sung by all his friends.
b


26 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Nga tuatara no Matea,
Nau ra iana.
Kei whakangawari, nga hau
Kalia mai o tawhiti,
O te tuarangi, i takina mai ai,
Ko te ika kino a Tu,
Ko to tupuna kei a Tuku a Hika, e, i.
Rangaranga, te hau o te whenua;
Tutu, nga tangata.
I moea, ki te po,
Huri nui e te hinengaro, e puanu kino ana,
Te puanu o te hukarere ;
Kei roto e kani ana,
Te hau marama mate, o Te Tamatea;
O Tama-i-te-ngaua,
E moe iho ra, i te whare-rangi,
Tahi au, e te hoa.
He whakahuru korc, mo to kiri;
Tawharua nei, ki te muka haroharo,
O te Rawhiti.
Tu ake tama i te ata,
Kaore, he korero,
I puaki;
Kia whatiia, i te rara
O te karakia, kia hirihiri koe,
I te Pouawhi,
I te Wharangi,
I a Awatearoa,
I te Manuka,
I Whakatane;
Ko te ara tena,
O to tupuna, o Wairakewa,
I kau mai ai, i tawhiti, c, i.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 27
KO TE WAIATA A MEROITI, HE WAHINE TAUREKAREKA
NA TE WHATA, HE RANGATIRA NO NGATIAWA, NO
NGATITOA HOKI.
Pa to hau, ki te Ta-wai-Hora;
Na runga ana mai, te hiwi kei Omere.
Kai atu o mata, kai atu ki Arapawa ra, e
E hoehoea mai e NgaiTapahi :
“ Hoki atu e Tau, i te whaititanga;
“ Kei ara mai, nga tai o Ngawhatu ra,” i a
“He aha rawa, te mea, e tohe riria nei?
“ He ao, ka tau; kei ako au, kei keukeu.
“ Me whakatu au, liei pou rahui, e
“ Kei kake puwhara, te ngutu te Rimu rapa ”
He aroha ianei, kiakoe, e Kupu !
Ko a taua mahinga, i maharatia ai,
Me kawe taua e, ki te wai huri ai, e
Kia mutu ake ai, te aroha i ahau.


28 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
KO TE TANGI MO TE HEUHEU I HOROA E TE WHENUA.
Ra te haeata! takina mai, i te ripa!
Te tara ki Tauhara!
Ko taku hoa pea, tenei, ka hold mai ?
Aue! kau atu ana au, i te ao;
Ka riroia koe ra!—
Haere ra, e te nui; haere ra, e te wehi;
Haere ra, nga rata whakaruru hau ki te muri;
Me kowai te atua, nana koutou, kei huri kino iho, ki te mate ?
Moe mai, e Pa, i roto te whare kino;
A tiponahia, te tau, o Kaukau,
Te ika a Ngahue, i waiho
I te ao, liei tohou mohou.
A hurihurihia, to tupu hauroa, to tupu haunui, e i
A kite iho au, to kiri i ahua, ki te wai ngarahu,
To mata, i haea, ki te uhi matarau;
Waiho nei, nga iwi, huhe kau ake.
Tatai kau ana, te whetu, o te rangi,
Ka riro, a Tutahi, ma Rehua-kai-tangata,
Te whetu whakataha, i te Mangaroa,
Ko koe ra, i!
Tu kau Tongariro, i te tonga;
Tena, te puhi o te Arawa,
Ka manu i te wai, e! a
Ka whakawai mai, te wahine i te uru.
Nau i a waiho, Hiramai-i-te-uru,
Hiramai-te-whatu-moana,
I, te Papae-o-te-kotore, o to tupuna, o Rongomaihuia,
Torona te po, i a koe.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
29
E tama, na Rangi, kati ra te moe, e-e!
Maranga mai ki runga, e! mau ki to patu;
Korero i o tohu !
Te kura, takai puni,
Te toka, tu moana,
I te tukutahi whakarere;
Waiho i tai-whakaea,
I te Hawaiki-pepeke, e-e-e!
Ka hinga, ka takoto, kei te whenua, u-u-u !
Ka haruru to rongo, o-o-o !
Ki te talia o te rangi, i-i-i!
HE RANGI-POI.*
Me tipao, taku haere,
Ki Nukutaurua,
Ki a Te Kahu-o-te-rangi,
Kei riri mai Hinewehi, ki a au ;
Me tuku atu,
Ki a koe anake, te mutunga,
Whiti ana te ra, i tua.
HE KARAKIA TAMARIKI.
E rere, e rere, e te kotare,
Ki runga, ki te puwharawhara;
Ruru ai, o parirau,
Ka mate koe, i te ua.
Tihore mai, i uta: *
Tiliore mai, i tai:
He rangi, ka maomao,
Mao mao, mao te ua.
* Sung at Auckland to the Governor by Te Rauparalia, previously to his
release, to signify that no jealousy need exist regarding his influence over
the native tribes.


30
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE WATATA AROHA.*
Kati, te roimata,
Te utu, kei aku kamo;
Noho mai i roto na;
Kia tohungia koe.
Maku nei, e huri,
Ki te hurilianga ke;
Kei ara, kei puta atu,
Te arolia i air
HE WAIATA AROHA.
Tera te pukohu, mau tonu mai,
Pukehina;
Ko te ara tonu ia, i haere ai, taku torere.
Tahuri mai,
Ki muri ra, kia ringia atu, he wai
Kei aku kamo.
Ehara i a au nana rawa, i
Tuatahi;
Nau rawa i tuapeka, ki te iti
I ahau.
*9
No reira, te ngakau, i whakawai
Rangi ai;
He konohi aroha, noku, ki
A koe ra.
A fragment. I have not been able to obtain the entire poem.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 31
HE WAIATA AROHA.*
Tera te puia, ki Ohinemutu ra;
Kia tangi atu au. Pehea, ka tauwehe,
Te aroha i roto ra,
Ho mai me riringi, ki te hua roimata,
E mapuna, i aku kamo
Kei te aha, te tapu, e whakawehia nei ?
He ingoa, iri kau, ki te muri rangaranga.
Ho ake rawa nei, te wa o te mahara,
Ka eke, i te ngaro; ka noho, taute au.
HE WAIATA AROHA.f
E pari, e te tai, whakaki ki te awa,
Nei au, ka tu, ko te hoe, ki te ringa:
Ma te muri raro, au, e karawhiu;
Kiliai whakarangona, te riri a te kohake.
Me aha ? i a roto, nana, ka whana tonu.
Kei tohu, te makau, ka pau te whakarau,
Te tuku-pototia, aku rangi, ki te noho.
Ekore matea, ko te kianga iho,
“ E ka, ko te ahi, whakamau tonu ake,
“ Nga tomokanga koe, o Tahere i runga;
“ Ko te kainga ra, e noho ai au.”
* Sung by Heke at Kaikohi, after the fall of the Ruapekapeka.
+ Sung by Tewherowhero, at a great meeting of the Waikato tribes, in the
presence of the Governor, when the question of a war with the tribes of
Whangaroa was discussed, to indicate that he was averse to the war being
entered on; but that, if his tribe did embark in it, he could never desert
those whom he loved so much.


32
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TAU.*
He Hokioi, i runga, lie Hokioi, i runga, hu.
Kei te aputa koe, na, o te rangi, e noho ana,
Te hoa moenga, no whatitiri matakataka;
Hei aha, tera, e tararua marire, ona hikumaro ?
Rua maro tonu, ona hakikau;
E liuliu-u nei, i runga te rangi,
Hokioi, Hokioi.
HE WAIATA MO POUKAWA-RAWHIRAWIII.
Kaore te aroha, mohukiliuki noa;
Te paanga mai, kei ahau;
Me he ahi, e toro, kei Hukanui,
E Moka, tenei, ka tata mai.
Kei tohu mai, e Kiri,
Kei te au, ko te moe,
Kei te matatu tonu, i te roa o tc po;
Kai-toro-puku ai, te aroha i au.
Ekore ra, e puakina,
Kei rangona, e te tini.
Tc putanga ki waho, ra,
Ka tohu, aku mata,
Nga parae, ka takoto
Ki Tauwhare, ra ia.
Ko te ara tonu, ia,
E whanatu ai au,
Kia urutomokia
Tc whare, o Rawhirawhi.
Kei riri, e whae ?
He nui parahaere,
Mau ano, te tinana;
Maku, te ata,
O te tapara kau atu, e-e-e.
* Sent as a message, by Te Rauparalia, when about to engage in a war,
to the Ngatiawa tribe, who had then just obtained muskets, to know why
they, who had such implements at their disposal, would not join him.


HAKIRARA g NGA MAORI. 33
HE TANGI, NA KIHAROA, NO MUA NOA ATU.
Tahuna mai te ahi,
Ki runga, i a Te Poa;
Ko te alii, i tahuna
Mo Whakaturia;
Ko te peka tena,
I marere, ki raro ki te whenua.
Takiritia ra,
He kai, ma te ope taua;
E Rohi, e tangi,
Ka whiti to manawa;
- Ekore to mate,
E wawe te rautupu;
Me uta ke ake,
Ki nga pumaliara,
E taka mai tua,
E whakaroaka ana,
I nga mate tawhito.
Tangi tikapa ana, te wahine i te uru;
Tu ake, tirohia te hua i Motu-tawa;
Ka kite Wharo, ka papare i a Ngae ; he
Aha te huanga ? ka neha o namata.
Whakahaere ara, na runga o nga hiwi,
Kia kai apu, te ika i Rangiriri,
Hoki mai, e Pa, ka whara koutou, i te paratai.
Tena, nga kauri, kei Waiharakeke,
I kitea iho ai,
He mango ihu nui,
Pae ake, ki te one na, i
No runga i te hiwi, e-i.


34 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Takahui rangi ai, te po i Rangitoto,
Ma wai ? e whakamana, i te waka ka tukoki ?
Kihai whakataua, te huru o Tapaka.
Haea mai, ra, ki te mere-tuatini,
Kia kai Puponga, kia rato nga iwi.
E Tama, kahupeka, i to whakatikanga,
Ka tahuri rawa koe, ki tua o nga pae;
Kia korero koe, i te ngutu, o te manu :
Kia hoki mai ai, to wairua ki te ao na-i.
HE WAIATA NO MUA.
Takoto iho, ki taku moenga,
E, te au rawa nei, ki ti whare,
Ko te moe tenei, a te manu
Me koropeke.
E ko wai te tangata, e haruru mai, te. whatitoka o toku whare ?
Aea, ano koe, ko Te Rawe;
Ko te Rawerawe, a Te Atanga,
Hoki atu ra koe, i waho na.
E haere tahi ana taua,
Naku nei, Rangituturu i waiho atu, i O whare ra—
Hara mai nei au, ki konei,
Noho ruru ai.
Ka mea e koro, ka wewete,
I to makau;
Kia tapurekatia, ka waiho i te whare,
A e mea ana, e te ngakau, kia tuarua
Tia te hokinga.
Taku kairautanga, ki te tan,
A ia wahine;


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 35
Aea ano au, he manu e rere,
Tau atu ko tawhiti, ko te pae,
Kei a Te Popoki.
Kei huia a whare, tia e te hau,
No Ngatoko.
Ue ! te raru e !
HE WAIATA AROHA TENEI, MO TE WAHINE NA TE RAKAU,
HAKAHAKA.
Ra te ao uru, pukohu i te uru,
Te tara, ki te Iringa, kia liikoia atu,
Me tango mai koe, he tau ki te moenga.
Iaua, e hine, kia whakaaro roto,
He whakaaronga iho, ka rere ke te tu,
Taku kiri kai-kahu, e ora na te tau.
Kei whea o neko ? e whakaputu mai ra;
Ka huri, ki te tai o Timaru, i runga,
Ki a Whahanui, e ka wehea i au;
He aroha tangi atu, naku, i konei.
Kia rei nui au,
Nga utu e rau,
O Tararua i runga,
Ki aku tau e rua;
Nana i hau miri,
I waiho ai au,
Kei te wati kino
Mai, te roimata..


HE TANGI, NA MAKERE, MO ANA TAMARIKI I MATE TAUA.
E hine, a Ki, e
Ka moenga ke koe,
Ka pau te takiri, ki te ata kahurangi,
Roto te wbare nui, kei a bine a Wai, he
Mana, e tuku iho,
Ki te takapau bora nui.
Rangona te kakara,
Te kakara wahine, i te ipo a ’Ti-Hine;
Ehara ano, i te tangata,
Na Huinga ano,
Na Mahara ano,
Na Te Hikonga-a-rangi ano,
Nana, korua koi, tohatoha marire iho,
Mo te umu o te hau, e.
Tenei te tangata, ko taringa puta iti,
Ekore e whakarongo mai, ki te korero;
Kaore o te ao nei tangata, hei ngaki kai, i nga tu,
Tena nga hua-tarau o Tane, liei ngaki i to mate,
Hei kawe i a au, te rae ki Okawa,
Kia naomia mai, te ate o te whenua.
Aua, ko te tangata, me patu marire.
Me mabara marire iho, ki roto Wharekura, ki nga whare
punanga korero,
I pu ai, te riri, e-i
Taku kotuku moe awa ;
Taku tumu herenga-waka;
Mana i okooko,
Te aka whero, o te whenua.
Ka rangona koe, ko Otahu.


HAKIRARA O NGA MAORI.
37
Te wehi, o te whenua; e
He kawau topatopa, ki roto te Manga-iti;
He Takupu horo ika, e.
Hakahaka, koa ra,
Hikawera e tu mai ra, i
Mea, ka ngaro noa, te rua o Kaiwhare.
E tama ma nei,
Karihitia mai, e koe, ki te wai o te niho,
Ekore e tupu te kawa tangata, ki te ao marama
Ekore e ngaro; he puia taro nui, ngata taniwha, rau,
He aua matawhero,
Hei ika moe kopua,
No roto i Werohia.
Tenei te hoanga,
Te takoto i raro nei,
Waiho, kia oroia,
He whati toki nui.
Haere ai koe, i te ara titaha;
Haere ai koe, i te ara kohuru;
Kupenga taratara, i whakahaoa iho i,
Paenga paraua, ki roto te Hikumutu.
Taku ika topuni, ka moe ki reira na i,
Hou o Rakei, i whakahaerea iho i;
Kiri o Rongomai, ka pau te whakarato,
Ki te ahi kai rikiriki e-i,
Ko wai ra e ? te Atua mana o te rangi,
Me ko Uenuku ra, he Atua kai tangata,
Ianei, i-i.


38 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
KO TE TANGI TENEI, A NGA TAMARIKI TOKORUA, I TE
ARAHANGA AT, I A RAUA, KIA PATUA, E TE TAMA, A
HONGI-HIKA, I TE PA O PAHIRUA, I TE TOTARA, KEI
HAURAKI.
Kao re te aroha! e komingomingo nei,
Te hoki noa atu, i tarawahi awa,
He kore tohunga mana, hei wehe ki te wai,
Kia hemo ake ai, te aroha i a au.
Tenei ka tope mai, te uhi a Mataora,
He kore no Tukirau, kihai ra i waiho,
Hei whakawehi e-i, mo te hanga i raro nei.
Noku, nga turituri pawera rawa, au,
Taku turanga ake, i te hihi o te whare,
E rumaki tonu ana, he wai kei aku kamo.
HE WAIATA W AW ATA, NA NGATIKAHUNGUNU I TE KITENGA
Al I TE STEAMER TUATAHI.
Haere noa ana,
Au nei, ki te kimi taiki, e
Miria mai, te pohutu,
O te akau, kia mate ra.
Omanga a Tima mai,
Nou e Kawana e,
Kai tonu,
Ki te rae,
O te Matau ra ia-e.
Ko au nei,
Te whanatu,
Hei te tiroa,
Hei te kakau whakawhana;
Ha!
Aue, e-e.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 39
HE NGERI KARANGA MANUHIRI *
Haere mai,
E te manuliiri tua rangi,
Na taku potiki,
Koe i tiki atu,
Ki taha-tu, o te rangi.
Kukume mai ai, a-a
Haere mai
Haere mai.
HE WAIATA TAWH1TO NA TE TURUNGAHAU.
E moe, ki te po,
Kia moe kau au,
Hara mai e te hoa, ka waitohu rawa mai;
Kia mohio au,
Tenei kei roto.
Ko ana muna pea,
I tuhia mai ai;
E pai taku rongo, he rongo whai makau,
Kei haere aku rongo, te puke kai-taua,
O Kaitangi i runga.
Ki te hoko, a ’Te-Kahu,
Ko te aha i au :
I tohea mai ai,
Naku ano ra, e hua ki te tinana,
Ka hara mai ai, e ;
Te makau a te rau,
Ko au pea, te whakaahuatia.
♦ The words printed in italics are sung as a chorus by the whole assembly;
the rest of the song is sung by one voice.


40 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE WHAKAARAARA.
He po, he po. He ao, he ao.
Takiri mai te ata,
Korihi te manu,
Tino awatea,
Ka ao, ka ao, ka awatea.
HE TANGI, MO TE TOA O TUHOURANGI.
He aha ra ? kei toku ihu, e waitohu noa nei,
Te mutu noa, i te rangi tahi,
He wawara taua pea, tenei, ka tata mai.
Harahara aitu, harahara atai,
He aroha tonu ake, noku, ki te mate;
E whakaingoingo mai ra, i te tuaro pari ki Aratalia.
Pupuke mahara e roto i to hinengaro,
Ki o kame, ka waiho noa iho, i te ao;
To whenua kura, ka mahue; ka paea te koko ki Otangi-
moana.
To putea, te ata taka, i runga i to ringaringa ;
Me he ua turuki nei, te whekoi ana, i we moana;
Ko koe anake, i tipao haere, i runga i nga maunga.
E to ana, i tona waka, i a te kumukumu:
Ka puta kei waho, kei nga whakaihu ki Maungaroa,
He ripa kawau, kei runga kei te taumata.
Titiro ki Ruawaliia, ki Tarawera,
Notemea, i whakakopaia mai, e Taraiti,
Ka mau te hu, ka hoki te waiora ki te ao.
Ko te heke ra, o Maruiwi, toremi ai ki te reinga:
Nau ano, i maka mai, to kupu, ki te muri, ki te tonga;
He ware koia tou ? i te paenga tohora, i te whakawhitianga
i Tumutara.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 41
------------:--------------T--------------------------
He roa te tau, i te tolienga, ka horo te pa, ka riro mai a
Te Rama;
Ehara pea i te potiki tauroto waenga, a Papawharanui,
Nana i lioro, te whetu, te marama.
Horahia mai ano, kia takoto i to aio ;
Moa i rokiroki.
HE TANGI NA PAREWAHAIKA, MO TANA MATUA TANE.
E noho ana, ka kohuki e roto,
Te whakarewanga ki Rotomahana;
Kia hoe waka mai, te marea,
He kawekawenga na te mamae.
Ka takoto iti koe, i te kino, ,
Nga tuapapa i te Tarata;
Kia tararo, e to wahine, i awhi ai korua.
To uru tapu, i houa iho, ki to atua.
I ahatia ? i whati ai te marama ?
Nau i hokai, to tilii ki Tongariro,
I tukua mai ai, nga naku o te tonga
Hei whakaongaonga, ka tu i te hokeka;
Tenei te waiwhero, te paheke i raro ra,
Hei whakamatara, mo te hunga makutu.
Mo korua talii, ko Parerewha,
Wahine i hanga kino, i hara mai nei,
Me ana ripi, hei totohi i nga toihau.
F


42 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TANGI.
Kauwhautia mai, te kauwau o te kino,
I pu ai te riri, i mau ai te pakanga,
I hirihiria ai, te niho o Takurua,
Ka rato tahi ano, ki te papa teretere,
Ki Waikawau, ki Puketehe ra ia, ka rere ki Tauranga.
Ianei, e te iwi, kia man te pupuri,
I te iti oneone, i kiia iho ai.
No muri, e tama, kei pehia koe, e nga ki rarahi,
Whakaputa to reo, ki te kauwhau riri, ki te korero o te toa;
Kia hapainga koe, e te mano e takoto.
Nei koa taua, te kiia mai nei,
He kamenga mahue; e mahue ana Manaia, mo Raroke-
nonui
E mahue ana Moeliau, mo Pakihi, mo Koukou-rahi, ka rato
i te kino.
Herea mai, e koe, i a ’A Puhi taniwa rau, hei huna, kia
ngaro;
Ekore e ngaro, he takere waka nui
Ko te potiki toa na Marutuahu
I pepehatia ai,
“ Ko-Te-Ngako-ringa-kino.”
Herea mai, e koe, i te tai marangai, kia motite, kia motata;
Nowhea e ngaro, ko Te Manu-na-runga, e horo i te tangata
Nei koa taua, te kiia mai nei, he pahore i te niho;
E pai ana tena, ka te tami atu, ki te umu taurekareka.
I whakaita iho, i maua, e koe, i te whaka, u-whare
Kihai koe i kite, i te wharona awatea;
I te manawa tohe riri, no Te Atua-o-te-po, e i.
Mo Hahu-koiwi i whakatahaina ai, mo Tarake-puha i tau-
wehea ai
Mo Te Ahi Tapoa ka mamao ki tawhiti.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
43
KARAKIA MO TE HORE, KURUPO, HE KEA RANEI.
Ka ripiripi, ka toetoe, ka haehae ko nga tino,
He tapu koe, he kea koe
Me alia ? me tao ki te umu,
Te matua, o te katitohe, he kea,
Inumia, ki te wai o koropupu,
E te manini kura, e te manini kura,—ha—i.
E te tiputipu nei, tairoria!
E te kea nei, tairoria!
Haere ki Hawaiki, tairoria!
Kia whiwhi ai koe, tairoria!
Kia mana ai koe, tairoria,—ha!
Taku kiri, ka rekareka, ha—i,
Haere, i te tai timu,
Haere, i te tai heke,
Haere, i te tai manunu, ki tawhiti,
Haere, ki tou tupuranga mai,
Haere, ki tou nohoanga mai.


44 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TA KOPITO.
Mimiro,
Mimiro,
I to manawa,
Pera hoki ra5
Te Whai, a Nuku,
Te Wliai, a Rangi.
Tina te manawa,
Whena te manawa,
Ko te manawa o te Kopi.
Te wlianatu na,
Huru-huru-mata-kiore,
E teina no Tu,
Whakaahu te tara, ki Hikurangi.
He alia ra te kai ?
I haere, ki roto, ki topuku;
Tutu ai,
Ngangana ai,
Aurere ai.
He puha pea ?
He poliue pea ?
He aruhe pea ?
He kumara pea ?
He taro pea ?
He karaka pea ?
He line pea ?
He tawa pea ?
He korau pea ?
He hakekeke pea ?
He harori pea ?
He mamaku pea ?
He pipi pea ?


HAKIRARA O NG A MAORI.
45
He ika pea ?
Nga kai, i haere, ki roto, ki to puku?
Tutu ai,
Ngangana ai,
Aurere ai, e.
Tenei au, ka ngarue,
Ngarue ki uta,
Ngarue ki tai,
Tenei au, ka ngarue,
Ngarue ki te whakatau ware ware,
Ka pa mai, ki taku aro,
Whai runga,
Wliai raro,
Whai mataora,
Tu te auahi
Mate te auahi
Werohia to huha,
T akawhitiwhiti,
Takaoraora,
Ki tena tama,
He polio tikoko e,
Kei te anu, o te paroro,
I hu nui mai nei na.
Oriori,
Oraora,
Ko mata,
Taki whai,
Te pupu,
Takeke rua,
Konokono,
Ka eke, kei runga
Kei Herekawa.
E
E
E
Ka ora koe,
E
Ka ora koe.


46
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE POPO TAMARIKI, HE MEA TAWH1TO NOA ATU,
NO TAUPO.
E Tama, i kimihia, i raro i a Papa
Kikiri ake ana, i te rua o te ra,
Kore koe e kite, nga taumata ki Onukahukura,
Tangi to tapuae, ka rongo ô papa, ka hoki ki te ao na.
E tangi ana koe ? he makariri tou ?
Nau i kuhu mai, i te waenga o Takurua;
Ka whakapin noa, te kora a Mahuika, ka taka te ahuru
Tenei, e tama, te whare i atohia, te kaka o te waero.
Kei o tuakana, e mau ana Tamore, i te kaki,
Hei ata mohou, tu ake ki runga ra;
Tohou waka na, ko *Whakaterekohukohu, e hoe ai i te wai
A u atu nga kurae, ki te Kawakawa.
Tangi te matoro, ki te whare wahine, i a Tikina, i a Takaia
Tangi to waewae, i te tua kirikiri, ki Okokako;
Horo te whakaputa, i te kongutu awa i Otutira
Kitea mai koe, Te Rangikaiwhiria,
Tohou apa na ? e haere ai, nga pikitanga, kei Whakapipi,
A heke ki tua ra, te matatikerewhanga ki te Raupo,
A hengia koe, he tira no te muri i.
Awhea ka rarahu, kia turupoutia, te remu o te huia,
Whakataua mai te awe o te toroa, ka hoki e,
Tika mai na uta, na! te awa i Whanganui;
Anga to aroaro, nga pukepuke ki Hauhungaroa,
Tikina, huakina, i te keke o to kuia,
Kia takiritia, ko te Ranga-ranga-a-Maui!
Hei whakatau mai ki to ringa—ka hoki e.
♦ Whakaterekohukohu is an ancient Heitiki of great size, and of much
value in the estimation of the Natives. After having been many times taken
as a trophy, Hongi carried it off from the Waikato tribes, and it remained
in the possession of his family until the conclusion of the northern rebel-
lion, when Heke at his interview with the Governor laid it before him.


HAKIRARA 0 NG A MAORI. 47
HE POHANE.
Whakarongo ki te tai, e tangi haere ana,
Whakarikiriki ai, te rae kei te Hurulii;
Tohu aio mai, nohou, e Te Hiroa,
Na-ahau ra, te kikini, i manuka ai au.
Ao o te ori, e whatino mai ra, e
Haere ano koe, te hiwi ki Aotea ra,
Kei raro Te Herepu, e moea iho nei, e
E tamaua nei, e maua, ko ngakau.
Kainga iho, te kai, te rau, ki roto ra, e
Ka whanake te aroha, i te pito ngakau,
Me tia, ki te miri, kia wawe, ko te ngaro, e
Me wehe, ki te wai, kia ora ai au, e
Koi haehae oratia, koi taiaritia, a-a.
HAKA ORIORI, NA TE RANGIKAHEKE, KI TANA POTIKI
KI TE AUHIKAI.
Ko taku potiki,
Ko Te Auhikai,
Ko Te Manawa-puha, ki te Pariwhaiti;
Ko taku potiki, kai kutu, kai riha, kai roro, kai takataka,
O nga iwi kupukupu, nana te ki, nana te kohuru.
He tangi kai tou ?
Kahore ra he iwi, i ora nei,
Tena ka riro, i te hurihanga nui, ki te motu, e
Hoki mai, hoki ra, ki au, kia whakamau atu, taua,
Ki nga haupu, tata ki te uru. Unumia atu te wai ki
Rangataua
Tou uanga, kei te matarae i Whakaneke,
Ko Kaiawa to kai.


48
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Ko te iti rawa, hoki o te polio,
Hei waonga, mo te hokowhitu, i a Tamaroto, ko Tukai-
rangi, e tama, e.
Mano tini, ki Maunga-nui, kihai toro te ringa;
Ma wai hoki koa, e kimi rawa ki tawiti, ki Rakaumanga-
manga, ki aua noa atu.
Kua rite tahi ano koa, i te whakamara Maketu, e tama, e.
Mau e ki mai, te mate o te Atua,
I rahua reretia, i te takere, o te kete, 11a Ngapuhi.
Ko Kaipo, ka ea te mate ra.
Na Taliupo, i tahu te pure, hei kukume mai, mo Ngapulii
ki uta;
Mata kite mana, mata kiore.
Ko te tiketike o nga maunga, hei wahawahanga, mo te
koiwi, i tapu ai, Rotorua.
I kohukia ai, te ngakau, o Turikina, o Huriwaka,
“ E Pa ma pupuri whenua, whakaupa riri e.”
Kai iho ra, i te angaanga, o Ngapuhi, o Te Ngare. I tupu
ai, nga mauku o te paripari, ko nga makawe, o Utamate.
Whatitiri, poaka puuihi, ki te parae.
Te mahara koe, mo Te Puhi, mo te ringiringitanga, o te
angaanga o to papa, i Waipapa.
Hamuti, kainga e te kiore, ki te parae.
Te purutia, i Hauraki,
Rere ke mai, ki Waikato,
Ki te kainga, o Huatahi, o te tama, a Rangiwewehi, e.


HAKIRARA 0 NG A MAORI. 49
HE TANGI, I TITOA E TE RANGIKAHEKE, MO TANA TAMAITI,
MO TE AUHIKAI, KUA MATE KI ROTORUA.
Kati ra te moc, ra ia, maranga mai ki runga, ka tu taua, ki
runga, te taowaka, e-e-i
Ka puta ki tua ra, ka titiro te kanohi, ki te aualii, ka mai
Kei o teina, maro tonu ata, e-e-i, taua, ra to whaea,
Kei te matarae e titiro ana, ki te waka no runga.
Ka ki to polio, e-e-i, ka tuku, ki raro ra, kei to tuahinc, ra ai,
Kia whangaia mai, ki te kai, moe petipeti.
Maro tonu atu, e-e-i, taua, Te Purangi, hei powhiri mai,
“ Nau mai e tama na, a i.”
Kaliore he mahi, i ngaro i te tangata, e-i, tena Tangaroa,
kei te koko, i a Ruamoana, e putu ana ia e.
He tangi kai tou ? e-e, na o papa ke i ho mai, te Kanawa,
ko Taipapakirua, e-e-i
Ko te Rauhina-rawa c-e, ko Hine-rimu, e-e.
Koa, he nui, mo te tangata ki te ao mai.
Heoti hoki, mo Tane, ra ai, taku puripuri ake i to papa, kia
kite iho taua, i te titiwai, e-e-i
Kei Runanga-rawa e-i, to Tane, tona rutunga nei, e-e-i
Kei Raroa-rawa e-e-i, kei Ohinekonehu, kei aTewekatona
turumatanga, na-a-i.
Hoki mai ki ahau,- e-e, kia whakamau ake, taua, te Riu-o-
te-mania, te Umu-o-pu-iti, Paepae-tangaroa.
Kei au ranei to hara e-i, i komuhua mai nei taua, i te tara
o te whare, ra ai,
Kauaka e koa, inainei, he mate tino tangata, tena erenga
mai.
G


50 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TANGI NA MOTUHIA MO TANA TANE I MATE
I MOKOIA.
Tenei taku poho ee te tuwhera kau nei, e kore riro mai ee
Ngapuhi i raro ra ei, hei poupou ake mo aku potiki, ka
noho matua kore ra ei
Buna te takiri ee koherahia atu, he tohu waimarie-ee,
Noliea e marie ra ai, e taoro ana nga mahi o tawiti-eei
Hei huna mo koutou ee, hei whakapani hika, ka kite au i
te huhi e-i,
Ko te tau ’Atikura ee, 11a Hine a Te Tuhi, nana i hora atn
ki runga o Mokoia:
I taka ai te putea ee, i tere ai Kahu-kura, te moenga o te
rangatira, ko Tanemahuta ei,
Te huhia te makau eei, te kiri o Irawaru, te whatu-o-
Poutini, ki te wao tapatu te piko Hawaiki ee—
Kaitoa hoki ra e Haro, kia kumea atu to uru
Mawhatu, ka oria e te hau, ki waho o te Iringa
He tukemata ano to te taonga eei, he wehi ano to te tangata,
haere ra e te nui.
Te pa mai ko te hau ei, i te rangi hoki ra i ariki ai te
tangata eei;
Kei toi ana te whenua ei, kei whakahi ai Haroa, koia
anake ia—,
Me uta koe, ki te waka e i, kia koia atu c te au, e heke i
raro Ohau, e-e.
Kia mihi kau au, e-i.
Ki te kainga ra, ka tuwhera kau nei, haha te whenua, e-e-i
E oi noa ana e i, te tai o te Awahou, tena ka riro, e-i
Nga parera noho o te puau e i, i a Te Weritarora, i a Te
Moana-roa i a Tara-kumekume, haere ra, koutou, ko
teina, e-i
Ko wai rawa, hai titiro e-e-i, te tihi ki Matawhaura, e tu
kau mai ra, ka raorao ki raro, e-i.
Maku e moe iho e-e-i, to whakaoho po, ki a au potiki, ka
muri arolia au; ka he te mahara na, i.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
51
NA NGAHU1A, TENEI WAIATA.
E Tai ma e, tenei au, te haere ware nei,
Tera aku rongo, te mauria atu ra, e nga rau e maha,
Kotahi te whakaaro, ko tauwhetoko, e koke ra i te whenua,
Kei puta atu an, ki walio o te whare,
Ka mate tonu au, te kore tohunga ra,
Hei wehe ki te wai, kia tauaraitia.
HE TANGI HOU, NA TE HEUHEU.*
Tenei, ka noho, ki te take o te Kara;
Whakatau rawa iho, taku noho ki raro ra;
Whakamau te titiro, te ao, ka riaki,
Na runga ana mai, te hiwi ki Takapuna,
I raro ra Kawana, e aroha nei i au, e
Toro mai to ringa, kia hari-ruia,
Ka tika-mauru, te aroha i au, e.
HE MATAKITE.f
E to he ra, te tau-ua^
Aha / 'ha !
E tohe ra, te tau-ua, ki-
-A tae at tau-ua, ki
Te wai kirikiri;
Kia ai he rongo
Moku, ki taku
Whenua.
I-i-i, a,
* A song by the present Te Ileuheu of Taupo, 1850, on the occasion of
the British flag being sent to him as a present by the Governor.
+ The words printed in italics are sung by the whole assembly as a chorus;
the rest of the song is sung by one voice.


52 KO NGA MOTE ATE A, ME NGA
HE TANGI NA HINEMOA, MO TANA TANE, MO TUTANEKAI*
Te tau, e; to tau a te rau, ka wehe i a au, c,
Aha i wehe ai ? ka uru kei roto, tc niho o Mokoroa,
Rarahu tu ana, i ona peke ngahuru,
Tangi ana, te wheoro, ki te tuakiri,
He whana taua nei, te wa o te mamae,
Tikina mai au, whakawairekatia,
Kia hoki ake ai, te korou ki te ao; c,
Ekore lioki ake, lie ngaki mate pea; c.
Keria mai au, ki te ruahaeroa, e,
A ngaro ai ra, te wairua.
KO TE KAUWHAU TENEI O TE KAUHOENGA ATU O
HINE-MOA KI MOKOIA.
w Titiro e Kawana—a whakarongo mai hoki. Ko te
wahi e nohoia na e koe, ko te wahi tena i noho ai to maotu
tupuna a Hine-Moa, i tona kauanga mai. Kia kauwhau-
tia atu ia na, e ahau, kia koe.
“ Na, ko Rangi-Uru tc matua wahine o Tutanekai, ko
Whakaue-Kaipapa tana tane tupu; he tane taliac a Tu-
wharetoa. Ko ana tamariki matamua tokotoru, ko o ratou
ingoa, Ko Tawakeheimoa, Ko Ngararanui, Ko Tuteaiti;
muri iho o te tokotoru, ka moea tahaetia a Rangi-Uru e
Tuwharetoa. I haere manuhiri mai a Tuwharetoa, nana a
Tutanekai, he poriro ia, otira i moea ano e Whakaue a
Rangi-Uru; ka hapu ano, he tamaiti, ko Kopako tona
ingoa; ka hapu ano hoki ia i muri iho i a Kopako, he tama-
hine, Ko Tupa tona ingoa, ko te whakapakanga ia o nga
tamariki a Whakaue.
* Hine-Moa was a celebrated beauty and poetess of Rotorua, who lived
perhaps three hundred years ago (certainly not less.) The descendants of
her children by Tutanekai now form a numerous tribe in Rotorua. The
legend of her marriage to Tutanekai is next given.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
53
“ E noho tonu ana ratou ki Mokoia ; Ko Tutanekai, ka
atawhaitia e Whakaue, ano ko tana tamaiti tupu ake. Ka
tupu nei a Tutanekai ratou ko ana tuakana, ka whakata-
ngata. Na; ka tae mai te rongo o Hine-Moa. He wahine
pai tera, he rangatira hoki ia, ko tona matua tane ko Umu-
karia, ko tona matua wahine ko Hine-Maru, na, pirangi ana
nga tuakana, pirangi ana te teina, ki taua wahine.
“ Na, ka hanga e Tutanekai tona pourewa ki reira ki
Kaiweka. Ka huihui raua ko tona hoa ko Tiki, na he
putorino ta Tutanekai, he koauau ta Tiki. Na, ka piki
raua ki runga ki to raua atamira, ka whakatangi i a raua
pu i te po, i nga po marino. Na, ka kawea atu te tangi e
te hau-whenua-a-po, ki Owhata, ki te kainga i noho ai te
puhi humarire nei a Hine-Moa te tuahine o Wahiao.
“ Ka rongo a Hine-Moa ki te rekareka mai o te tangi o
nga pu a Tutanekai raua ko tona hoa takatapui ko Tiki, ka
hari tona ngakau i roto i a ia. Na, pera tonu te tikanga a
Tutanekai raua ko Tiki, i nga po katoa; ka mea a Hine-
Moa na Tutanekai te pu e rangona atu nei e ia.
“ He puhi hoki a Hine-Moa, otira kua kitekite noa ake
hoki raua i a raua, i nga wa e huihui ai nga tangata o
Rotorua.
“ I aua huihuinga, ka kite a Hine-Moa i a Tutanekai, ka
titiro atu, ka titiro mai, a ahua pai tonu ki to tetehi ngakau
ki to tetehi ngakau; e wawata puku ana tetehi me tetehi,
kia raua ake. Kaore ia, a Tutanekai, i mohio ‘ ki te mea
ranei ka haere atu au ki te matoro i a Hine-Moa, ekore pea
ia e pai mai ki ahau.’ Ka mea a Hine-Moa, ki te mea ka
tonoa atu he karere ki a Tutanekai, ka mea tona ngakau,
‘ ekore pea a Tutanekai, e pai mai ki a ahau.’
“ He nui hoki nga ra i huihui ai, i titiro whakatau ai
raua, tetehi ki tetehi; a muri rawa iho, ka tonoa atu te
karere a Tutanekai kia haere atu ki a Hine-Moa. Ka kite
a Hine-Moa i taua karere, ka mea ‘ E hi! Kua rite tahi o
maua nei hiahia.’ I muri iho o aua huihuinga, ka hoki
ratou ki o ratou wahi, ka huihui nga whare tapere, ka mea
nga wlianaunga o Tutanekai, ara ona tuakana, ‘ Ko wai o
tatou kua pa ki a Hine-Moa’ ka mea etahi, c Ko ahau.’


54
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Otira ka ui atu hoki ki a Tutanekai, ka mea atu a Tutane-
kai, c Kua pa atu ahau ki a Hine-Moa.’ Ka mea nga wha-
naunga. ‘ Kahore, ekore e tahuri mai ki a koe, ki te tutua,
ki te poriro.’ Na, ka mea ia ki tona matua whangai kua
whakaaro ki ana kupu i mea atu ra ki a ia, ta te mea, kua
pa ia ki a Hine-Moa; kua ata whakaritea hoki e raua i rau-
rangi ra te wa hei haerenga mai mo Hine-Moa kia ia. Ka
mea a Hine-Moa, ‘ He aha te tohu mo taku haerenga mai ?’
Ka mea a Tutanekai, ‘ E tangi he pu i nga po katoa, ko
ahau tena, hoe mai.’
“ Otira, ko Whakaue, i pupuri tonu i te kupu a Tutane-
kai i whakapuaki atu ra ki a i a.
“ Na, no te turuawepo, ka piki a Tutanekai raua ko tona
hoa ko Tiki ki runga ki to raua atamira; i reira ka tango
tetehi ki te torino, ko tetehi ki te koauau. Ka rongo a
Hine-Moa, ka hihiri kia hoe atu ia ma runga i te waka;
otira kua tupato te iwi o Hine-Moa ki nga waka; ko nga
waka he mea toto ki uta ; pera tona i nga ra katoa, i nga
po hoki te iwi. Na, ka maliara tona ngakau, 6 Me pehea
ra ka whiti ai au ki Mokoia, ina hoki e mohio tonu ana te
iwi nei.’ Whakatau noa iho ia ki te noho. Ano te rangi o
te koauau a Tutanekai, me he ru na no e ueue ana ia tua
wahine kia haere atu ki te kare a roto a tona ngakau. Te
puta ana mahara i te kore waka, ka mea ia, ‘ Ekore ranei
au e whiti ki te kauhoe ?’ Ka tango ia i nga taha e ono,
hei whakatere mona, kei totohu ki te wai: e toru ki tetehi
taha, e toru ki tetehi taha. Ka haere mai ia ki runga ki te
kowhatu, ko Iri-iri-kapua te ingoa; ka haere mai ia ki ta-
tahi, ko Wairerewai te ingoa o te wahi i waihotia ai ona
pakikau; ka makere atu ia ki te wai; ka tae mai ki te
tumu a tona matua a Umukaria, kei waho i te moana, ko
Hinewhata te ingoa, ka mau ona ringa ki reira; ka whakata
i tona manawa, a ka mutu te ngenge o ona pokihiwi, Na,
ka kauhoe atu ia; ka ngenge, ka manu ia i te au o te
moana, e tere tonu ana ia i runga i nga kiaka. A ka ngaro
te ngenge, ka kauhoe ano a Hine-Moa. Otiia, kaore ia i
ata kite atu i Mokoia i te pouri o te po, ko tona kai tohu-
tohu, ko te rangi o te pu a Tutanekai; ko te tohu tera i


HAKIRARA 0 NG A MAORI.
55
tika atu ai ia ki Waikimihia. Kei runga atu hoki o te
waiariki ra, te kainga o Tutanekai, a ka u atu ki Mokoia.
“ A, ko te wahi i u ai ia, he waiariki, ko Waikimihia te
ingoa; ka noho ia ki roto ki te whakamahana i a ia, he
wiri hoki nona i te maeke, i te kauanga mai i te po i te
moana o Rotorua. I te whakama hoki pea ki a Tutanekai,
ko te rua ter a o ona wiringa.
“ I a Hine-Moa ano e whakamahana ana i a ia i roto i te
waiariki, ka pa te hiainu ki a Tutanekai, ka mea atu ki
tana taurekareka, c Tikina he wai moku,’ ka haere tana
taurekareka ki te tiki wai; ka utu i te taha ki te wai. Ka
karanga atu a Hine-Moa, ki taua taurekareka nei, ano he
reo tane—c Mo wai, to wai ?’ Ka mea mai te taurekareka
ra,—‘ Mo Tutanekai,’ Na, kamea atu a Hine-Moa, ‘Homai
ki ahauka hoatu e ia te wai ki a Hine-Moa, ka inumia. Ka
mutu te inu, ka wahia te taha. Ka mea mai te taurekareka,
‘ He aha koe i wahi ai i te takawai o Tutanekai ?’ Kaore
he kupu a Hine-Moa. Ka hoki te pononga, ka mea mai a
Tutanekai, ‘ Kei whea te wai moku, ka mea atu te taure-
kareka kua pakaru te kiaka.’ Ka mea mai a Tutanekai,
‘ Na wai i wahi ?’ Ka mea atu ia, 6 Na te tangata.’ Ka
mea mai a Tutanekai—‘ haere, e hoki.’ Na, ka mau ki te
taha, i te tuarua, ka utu i te taha; ka mea a Hine-Moa,
(Mo wai to wai ?’ ka mea mai te rnokai ra—‘ mo Tutane-
kai.’ Ka mea atu ano a Hine-Moa, 6 A, homai ano ki a au,
‘ e mate wai ana ano ahau.’ Ka hoatu ano e te pononga
ra, ka tango mai a Hine-Moa, ka inu, a wahia iho ana te
kiaka. Pera tonu ta raua na mahi. Ka haere te mokai ra
kia Tatanekai, ka mea mai ia, ‘ Kei whea hoki to wai?’ ka
mea tana mokai, ‘ kua riro atu ano.’ ‘1 a wai ?’ ‘ He
tangata ra kei te wai.’ ‘ Ko wai tena tangata?’ Aua hoki,
he tauhou ia.’ ‘ Kua mohio ano ia, moku tena wai, he aha
ia i wahi ai ? Ka mate au i te whanowhanoa.’
“ Ka mau a Tutanekai ki ona kahu me tana patu. He
kahakaha ona kakahu, he tawaru ki waho. Ka haere ia,
ka tae iho ki te wai, ka mea, ‘ Kei whea te tangata i wahi
nei i aku kiaka ?’ Ka mohio ake a Hine-Moa ki te reo,
ara ko te kare-a-roto tenei, ina te ahua o te reo. Ka wha-


56 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
kapupuni ia ki nga tauwharewliarenga kowhatu o te wai
ariki. Otira ehara i te whakapupuni pononga, he whaka-
ngaio nana ki a Tutanekai, ka kitea mai nei ki a ia. Ka
haha a Tutanekai i nga pareparenga o te waiariki, rapu
rawa atu ; e takoto whakamaake ana i raro i nga tauwha-
renga kowhatu. Ka mau ia ki te ringa, ka mea, (E ! ko
wai tenei?’ Ka mea a Hine-Moa, ‘ko ahau, e Tutanekai.’
Ka mea a Tutanekai, ‘ ko wai koe ?’ Ka mea ia, ‘ ko au,
ko Hine-Moa!’ Ka mea a Tutanekai, ‘ E—e— ho ake taua
ki te whare,’ ka mea ia, ‘ Ae.’ Ka whakatika ake i roto i
te wai. Ano te kiri! me he Tapukorako. Tu, ka tu ki
uta o te wai, me he Kotuku. Ka tae a Tutanekai, ki tetehi
on a kakahu, ka whakahoroa atu ki a ia, ka mau ia. Na,
ka haere raua, ka tae ki te whare, ka momoe, ko to te Maori
ritenga tawhito tenei, ana ka marenatia.
“ Ka hi te ata, ka puta katoa ki waho nga tangata o te
pa ki te tahu kai, ka kai nga tangata o te pa; ka wliakaroa
a Tutanekai ki roto ki tona whare. Ke mea Whakaue,
‘ Ka tahi ano te ata o Tutanekai i moe roa ai, he mate pea
to taku potiki. Tikina a Tutanekai, whakaarahia mai.’
Ka haere mai te kai tiki; ka to i te pihanga o te whare; ka
titiro atu ia. ‘ E—e— e wha nga wae wae;’ e ka miharo
ia, ka mea, 6 Ko wai ra tona lioa ?’ Heoti ano, ka nunu-
mikino tona hokinga; ka tae ki a Whakaue, ka mea atu ki
a ia, ‘ E wha waewae i kite atu ai ahau i roto.’ Ka mea
mai a Whakaue, ‘Ko wai ra te hoa? Haere ano, e hoki.’
Na, ka haere ano ia; ka tae ki te whare, ka titiro ki a raua,
ka tahi ka kitea ko Hine-Moa. Ka tahi ka karangatia
‘ E—e ! ko Hine-Moa, ko Hine-Moa, kei a Tutanekai!’
Ka rongo te iwi katoa—ka pa te karanga a te katoa, ‘ E—e!
ko Hine-Moa, ko Hine-Moa, kei a Tutanekai!’ Ka rongo
nga tuakana, ka mea, ‘He hori hori.’ Kaore, he puhaehae
no ratou. Ka tahi a Tutanekai ka puta ki waho, me Hine-
Moa hoki. Ka kite atu nga tuakana, ko Hine-Moa tenei,
ka mea, koia ano, he tika.’
“ I muri iho, ka whakaaro a Tiki, ‘ Ka moe a Tutanekai
i tana whaiaipo, i a Hine-Moa, kahore he hoa moku.’ Ka
pouriia; ka hoki ki tona kainga. Ka arolia a Tutanekai


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
57
ki a Tiki; ka mea atu kia, Whakaue, ‘ Ka mate aliau i te
aroha ki taku hoa ki a Tiki.’ Ka mea mai a Whakaue,
‘ Ki te aha ?’ Ka mea atu a Tutanekai, ‘ Ko taku tualiine
ra, kia whakamoea ma taku hoa takatapui, ma’ Tiki.’ ‘Ae;’
whakaae ana tona matua whangai. Katahi ka hoatu tona
tuahine ki a Tiki; na, ka moea tona tualiine e Tiki.
“ Ko nga uri o Hine-Moa raua ko Tutanekai, koia ano
enei, e noho mai i Rotorua nei. Kaore hoki i te makere
ki raro o nga ngutu ona uri te korero ki te humariretanga
ki te kauanga hoki o Hine-Moa. No reira tenei waiata,
Koia tenei,
“ Noku anake ra te tupuana i kau mai,
Ko Hine-Moa, ko an,” &c.
HE WHAKAWAI TAANGA MOKO.
E noho ana, e kai-tahi ana,
Ki te titiro, ki nga rewa
I te ihu, o Tutetawha,
E wekoki ana, me he peke ngarara.
Taia mai ra, ki te uhi a Mataora,
Taria, e tuku atu,
Ki to wahine, takiri karito kowhara,
Naku, koe i whakanako.
Te tangata, i te whakautu,
Kia ata whakanakonako;
Tangata, i te whakautu kore,
Kokoia, kia tatahi.
Patua i te whakatangitangi;
E hiki, Tangaroa !
E hiki, Tangaroa!
n


58 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
MO TE TAANGA NGUTU KAUAE, MO TE WAHINE, TENEI
WAIATA KARAKIA WHAKAWAI.
Ta KO to ra, e hine,
Pirori e,
Kia taia o ngutu,
Pirori e,
Mo to haerenga atu, ki nga whare tapere,
I kiia ana mai,
Ko hea tenei wahine kino ?
E haere mai nei.
Takoto ra, e hinc
Pirori e,
Kia taia o ngutu,
To kauae,
Kia pai ai koe :
Pirori e
Mo to haerenga, ki nga whare matoro,
E kiia ana mai koe,
Ko hea tenei wahine ngutu whero ?
E haere mai nei.
Pirori e,
Ho mai koe, kia taia,
Pirori e,
Mo to haerenga, ki nga whare takaro,
Ka kiia mai koe,
Ko hea tenei wahine ngutu more ?
E haere mai nei,
Pirori e
Ka taia, ka taia,
Pirori e
Ho mai to kauae, kia taia;
Pirori e,
Mo to haerenga atu, ki nga whare ropa,


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
59
E kiia mai ana,
Ko hea tenei wahine kauae whero ?
E haere mai nei.
Pirori, e,
Ka taia, i te ata
O Hinerauwharangi;
Pirori, e,
I te ata o Rukutia;
Pirori, e,
I te ata o Hineteiwaiwa.
Pirori e,
Pu-rakau mai i uta,
Ka tukia,
E moe Rangi
Ka riro,
Ki te tai honuhonu,
Ka riro,
Ki te tai karekare.
He Uru,
He-re-te-ipo-he,
He Uru,
He Rangi,
Tahatiti,
Rua-tapu,
Rongo-mai,
Kahu-kura,
Tu atu au, e-e-e-i.
Noku, te upoko tuhi,
Ko Te Rongorere;
Ko te hara tutunga,
Mai o ru-unga;
Ko te hara tutunga,
Mai o ra-aro;
O te toanga atu o tera,
I raro, i tona rua, i raro.


60
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Ka whanake,
Ka whanake,
Pirori e,
Ka whanake, i te ata,
Pirori, e;
Ka tai a,
Ka taia,
Pirori, e,
Ka taia,
Tamerereti,
Uetonga,
I te ata tapu nei,
O Rireto-oro.
Pu-rakau mai i uta,
Ka tukia,
E moe Rangi,
Ka riro,
Ki te tai honuhonu,
Ka riro,
Ki te tai karekare,
He Urn!
He-re-te-ipo he-e!
Waiho nga muna,
Waihoki nga tamariki:
Waiho nga poroaki,
Waihoki nga wahine:
Te haere tenei,
Te kapua hokaia,
I runga o Raukawa.
Ka winiwini, taku tangi,
E tangi, e whakawai ana,
Kaore ko au,
Ko Rongo, Ko Papa,
He whakaurunga hoe
Ki-toro-he.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 61
HE PEPEHA, HE MEA E WAIATATIA ANA, KI TE MARAMA.
Te Marama! e,
Te Marama, i haere ake, i raro,
I to maua nei wliaea,
I a Reretoro.
HE WAIATA TAWHITO.
E tangi e, te ihu e, whaki whakarere,
Au anake ra, kei te poti o te ngutu,
E mate ana roto, ki te tau a te rau,
Kihai penei, i taku whanaketanga,
Te houtupu e, kia au iho ai, taku moe ki te whare.
Me toko, kia mamao,
Penei e te hoa, kawhakina taku iti,
A noho i te au, o Kuri—aropawa:
A tomokia atu te whare o Miroa,
A whia au, te whakarewarangi,
A titi taku rangi, te remu o te toroa,
A pa ki au, nui whakama noa.
HE WHAKAARAARA.
E ara, e ara, e tenei pa, e tera pa,
Kei apitia koe, ki te toto; whakapuru tonu,
Whakapuru tonu, te tai ki Harihari;
Ka tangi tiari, te tai ki Mokau;
Kaore iara, e kimi ana, e whai ana,
I nga rae ra, piringa liakoakoa;
Ka ao mai, ka ao mai,
Te ra ki tua.


62 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE WAIATA NA HARURU MO TE KURUKANGA.
Ka waia te kanohi, kei te tirohanga atu,
Nga taumata koe, o Whakapaumahara,
He manu ko angeau, e taea te rere atu,
E taea te hokahoka, lie parirau moku.
Kiliai, taku manawa i piri mai ki a au,
I tarewa tonu atu, te aohau e rere,
Na runga ana mai, o nga hiwi ra ia,
Kei tua te tane, e aroha nei a au.
E kai-arohi ana i au, ki te whare,
Ka kino te tane, ki te noho tahi mai,
Ka motu koe, ko tawiti, ka rau
Aku mahara, mo te roimata ra, e
Paheke aku kamo.
HE WHAKAARAARA, NA OTAKOU.
Tenei te ruru, te koukou mai nei,
Kihai mahitihiti, kihai marangaranga,
Te upoko nui, o te ruru,
Terekou,
He po
He po
He ao
He ao
He awatea, e-e.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 63
NA TE RANGIKAUARIRO TENEI WAIATA TANGI, MO TE
ARAKAU, I MATE PAREKURA, I A NGATIWHAKAUE ANO.
NO NGATIWHAKAUE ANO HOKI, A TE ARAKAU.
Kumea atu ra! e-e
Toia atu ra, te puhi o te Arawa, ka tere ki raro ra.
Nau ko-ara, te tau ai, i to tau, i te tau o Toroa.
Kihai i tatari, kia mene Uenukukopako,
Kia tae mai ra Te Katahikawera,
Ka haere ai ra, ki te kawe (a) riri,
Nga hurihuri manuka, i raro Te Whakarua.
To huruliuru kiwi, e
To kakahu, e koro, i haere ai ki te mate;
Nau i a waiho, a te Haupatahi,
Nau i whakahoki mai, Tautoto ki a au.
Naku i whakahoha, he moenga mokai,
I tauwehea ai taua, e-i.
Waiho ki a wai a taua karakia, koro-koro-riki nei,
To Atua ra ia, Rongo-mai-wai-iti.
*
E tiu ra ki te muri, e
Nga haupapa kowhatu, i raro Mangorewa,
Ki te huaanga nui, kei a tama na Tau,
Mana pea koe whakahaereere atu, nga whanga e rau o
Tauranga,
Hei utuutu haukai, kei a Pu, a Pare, ra ai,
E haere ra, ki te tonga, e
Nga wai pouri i tua o Tarawera,
Kei tutuki to waewae, i a Ririwai,
He hautaonga nui, kei a Tuku-a-hika; e-ei.
E ahu ra, ki runga ra, e
Kei pikitia ai e koe, te hiwi ki te Rangatawhao;
Puta rawa i Heretaunga, i to huanga, i a TeRangikoiaanake,
Hoki kau ana mai, ki te kainga, kaore he taonga.
E tui ra, ki te muri, e
Nga hurihuri manuka, i raro o Tumutara,


64 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
Nga rakau tu iho, i runga Ihoweka,
Nga wae e rere, i raro Rangitaiki;
Nga puke tu iho, i runga o Tauaki,
Kia marama koe, ko te whakamau atu,
Nga kognutu awa, i raro Whakatane,
Nga rae, ka rou, i waho Kohi,
Ki o iramutu,
Ki a Te Umatu-ura, mana e ho mai, te muri aroha ki a
taua na i.
NA RANGITANE TENEI WAIATA. HE WAIATA AROHA, I
WAIATATIA, KI PUKE TAW A KE1 TE TAHA O TE HUARAHI,
E MARO MAI ANA I WHAKATU KI MOTUWEKA.
Ka piki au, ki runga ki te Tawa,
Kia marama au te titiro,
Ki Wharekahokaho,
Ki te tahu i rangia,
O te haramaitanga,
* O te kai-rakau,
Tauaraitia atu ana.
HE WAIATA NA NGAITAHU, HE WHAKAPARAHAKO MO TE
KAIKORE.
Takoto mai,
Nga pito one,
Ki Waiparapara,
Ka tuwhera mai;
I kona hold au, e paruhi kau ana,
Naku i kakekake, te hiwi ki Kairuru,
Kotahi rawa te mea e kai, i a au,
Ko aku kai tawhito, kia taka mai hoki,
Kia taka mai e, ki roto ki te whanga;
Kia maru-ahiahi,
Ka whakatapoko ai i-i.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
65
IIE WAIATA, NA NGAITAHU, IIE WAHINE NANA, MO TE
WHAKARERENGA A TE URŪNGAIO I A IA.
Ka mutu ia te Iioranga, i te Kaliu;
Kei mau ana te ao, ki te Whanga
Ki te Takupu ra ia, ki a te Uru-ngaio;
Te hoa i a Heke; kia moliio au,
Titiwhakaliiwa, taku tama, i au;
Awhe ana i tua ra,
I taku hemiliemi, i-i-i.
HE WAIATA NO MUA NA NGAITUMATAKOKIRI.
Nau mai, e Tama,
Ki roto nei taua,
Ki titiro iho au,
Taku tonga-rerewlia;
He motoi-taringa,
No roto i te kopa.
Na to wliaea,
Na to tuahine,
Na Hine-po-rangi,
He awe toroa,
No runga i Karewa,
Nana i unu mai.
Tukua mai kia rere,
E tomo, e Pa,
Ki Mirumiru-te-po,
Te Tatau-o-te-po,
Ko te whare tena,
O Ruakumea,
O Rua-toia,
O Miru-ra-e,
i


66 KO NGA. MOTEATEA, ME NGA
O Tu-horo-punga,
O Kai-ponu-kino;
Nana koe i maka,
Ki te apai o te whare, i.
E tama ma, e,
Tauwhirotia mai,
Te waka o te makau;
Me tuku kia wliano,
Nga mata kurae
Ki Rua-taniwha, e
Ki’ wawe ia te u,
Ki Otamaiea,
Tahuri atu ki tua,
Ki Onetahua, e
Te whenua ra, e
Kihai an i kite,
& E takahia mai
E Tuki-hawaiki.
HE TANGI NA TE IKAHERENGUTU,
Whakatu, wheratia, e hine
To ipu whakataha, hei kohu,
I te wai-roro, no Paritutu;
“ Hara mai nei koe, ki a au ?
“ Te anga atu ai ki a Ngapuhi ?
“ I waiho atu ai, Te Hautapa,
“ Hei piringa paua, ki Owhiti ?”
He pu koia, kei taku ringa,
Kia piki atu au, i Ngamotu,
Ko nga kainga riri, e Pewa,
A o tupuna, e manahau ana,
Taku rakau, ko te Rewarewa,
I tu ai te whata okaoka ki te rae,
Ki te Keteiwi, ka liurumutu.


HAKIRARA O NGA MAORI. 67
HE NGERI.*
Ka tito au, ka tito au,
Ka tito au, ki a Kupe /
Te tangata, nana i hoehoe, te moana,
(Te tangata, nana i topetope, te whenua,)
Tu ke, a Kaputi!
Tu ke, Mana ! tan ke,
Arapawa /
Ko nga tohu tena,
A taku tupuna, a Kupe,
Nana i whakatomene, Titapua,
Ka toreke i an, te wlienua nei.
HE HARI*
E Tama, te uaua, e,
E Tama, te uaua, e,
E Tama, te maroro,
Ina hoki ra, te tohe a te uaua, na,
Kei taku ringa, e man ana,
Te upoko, o te kawau tataki !
Hi! he! ha!
♦ The words printed in italics are sung by the whole war party as choruses.
The rest of the songs are sung by one voice.


68 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE WAIATA MO TE AROHA KI TE TANGATA.
Kaore te korero, e,
Tarawautia nei,
Ko au, ka irihia, ki
Te poti o te ngutu.
Mauria e Ura,
Oku koha korero.
Mokai te ngakau, i,
Whakawairangi ai,
Whakarongo, e taku ngakau,
Ki oku korero.
He tupeha tau a,
Ka rangona, e te tini.
I hoki te rongotoa,
O Te Mutu, i te ripa,
Na roto, i pirangi,
Hei tino tau iho.
Kei te ao e rere,
Ko toku rite ia,
E karawhiua ana,
Te ripa, ki Wharekawa,
Ka mauru, te aroha,
Ki taku hoa moenga.
Na wai, hoki te mea,
Ka makaurautia,
Ki tau wahine,
Ki te punga,
I mau ai.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 69
HE TANGI NA TUPAEA MO TONA TEINA MO KOROIIIKO.
Tera te whetu, kapokapo ana mai,
Ko Meremcre ano, taku e hiko atu;
Tauhokai ana, Kopu, i te ata,
Ko taku teina tonu, tenei, ka lioki mai.
Taku tira kahurangi, ka makere i a au;
Naku i tuku atu, i te hina pouri,
Nga titahatanga, i waho te Tahua, e whano ana ra ki te
kawea riri,
Kia tu mai koe, i mua i te upoko, i te whana tuku-turi, i
te nui a ’Ti Tahu;
Kia puhia koe, te ahi a te Tupua;
Kia whakamuraia, te paura, o tawhiti,
Kia whakatauki, aue he mamae, he mamae ra.
Haehaea koe, ki te mira o tawhiti,
Kia rewa to hinu, ki roto o Kaituna;
Iri mai, e Pa, i runga i te ata-mira,
Kupa mai, e te hoa, kia rongo atu au i te takiritanga o te
ata na;
Me whakahoki koe, nga Matatahuna, i waho Tauranga,
Mao potiki, koe hurihuri iho, ki te papa o te waka;
Ki titiro au, to kiri rauiti;
To mata i haea, ko te toroa a tai;
He toroa tataki, no runga i Karewa, na.


70 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TANGI NA TE HEUHEU. *
Takoto te marino, horahia i waho;
Tarenga haki mai, nau, e Kawana,
Tae rawa te uira, te tihi ki Tongariro,
Maunga rahiri nau, e Kerei.
Nunumi kino ana, te pikinga i Kaiwhare ra,
Aha to te kanohi ? te hoki mai whaka-muri, e,
’A ringa atu, te waikamo i roto ra, e,
Paheke nui ana, ko te ia, e huri o Taupo ra, e.
Ko te rite i au, e, naku nei, whakaupa
He whakautanga rau; te iri noa atu,
Te tiwai haere, nou na, e Te Kupa.
Hei kawe ki tawiti, noho ana i te rae
O Horotiu ra, kia tomokia atu, te whare, i a Mata,
Kia whakaata mai, ki te kahu rinena ;
Kia tararo au, te remu o te hiraka.
HE MATA, f
Ka kowhiti te marama,
I te taringa atu,
Ki a Te Waka,
E i te kai-rakau.
Keria he toke,
Keria he toke,
A hei toke toke hi tuna,
Kaipuku ma-ahau, e
Kawiti, te toke, toke.
* Sung upon the occasion of the Governor quitting Taupo in 1849.
f The words printed in italics are sung by the whole assembly as a chorus.
The rest of the song is sung by one voice.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 71
HE NGERI. *
Hanga ra, he patu tutai, na,
Kati ano ra, e Kawana,
Te utu, mo nga tupapaku,
Ko nga rarangi maunga, o Tawatai&hiti,
Utaina atu, utaina atu hoki, a
Te Whao, ki Akarana,
Upoko moremore,
E wha, ka ao te ra, e rima, ka ao le ra,
Mei tala ki te wliakangarungaru o Ponga.
Ka ao te ra.
HE HARI.f
Kati ano ra, e, Te Matatalii,
Te utu, mo nga tupapaku,
Ko te rarangi maunga, o Tawatawhiti,
Utaina atu, Tuwliangai,
Tapamoremore, ki Hauraki,
E wha, ka ao te ra, e rima, ka ao te ra,
Mai tata, ki te wliakangarungaru o Ponga,
Ka ao te ra.
♦ Sung by the Native Allies after the fall of the Ruapekapeka, when they
found, amongst the killed of the enemy, a bald-headed and deformed heathen
priest of the name of Te Whao.
f This is the original of the last war-song. Another illustration is thus
afforded of the manner in which the Natives adapt ancient poems to modern
occasions.
The words printed in italics are sung by the whole assembly as a chorus.
The rest of the song is sung by one voice.


72
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
NA OTAKOU. HE KARAKIA TAMARIKI KIA WHITI TE RA,
ME KA HAERE KI TE KAUKAU.
Upoko,
Upoko,
Whiti te ra,
Hei kai mau, te kutu o taku upoko,
Upoko,
Upoko,
White te ra.
NA TE NGATIAWA. HE KARAKIA TAMARIKI, KIA WHITI
TE RA, ME KA HAERE KI TE KAUKAU.
E wiiiti, e whiti, e taku ra
E para, e para, e taku ra
To tupuna, i ho mai, i te rangi i tua.
HE NGERI*
Tahurī, tahuri
Tahuri, c Te Kapa,
Tahuri, e Rongomaiwhiti,
Ko to arero tena
E whatero, i mua ra,
I o rangi koroke;
Whakakapo-aitia;
Kei te paku tana, hu, a.
* The words printed in italics are sung by the whole war party as a chorus.
The rest of the song is sung by one voice,


HAKIRARA O NGA MAORI. 73
HE NGERI *
Haere atu, ki te pai,
A Potatau.
“ He pai ranei
“ He kahore ranei
“ He pai ranei ?”
a He kahore ranei
He whakanewhanewha,
I aku mata,
Kia ware ai au;
“ Ko wai au, kia ware ? ”
HE TANGI NA HE KAUMATUA O NG ATT AW A.
E ua e, te ua ua mai, i waho na;
Hei roto nei au, whakawairau ai.
He ra ka tautau, ki runga o Kaitangi,
Ka tohu au, e ko te hoa, ka wehea,
I pupuke a wai, te roimata i aku kamo,
Ma wai e whai atu, tona kaiheuea,
Tona kainga hoe, ka eke kei Toka-puta,
Kei roto kei te Ahuru, kei whitia i raro ra,
Kei te kai a kiri, ka hoki mai ki a au,
Ka whano ano koe, ka wliano, ka oti atu ;
Ka waiho au, e te tau, kia karangi ana;
Te liekenga i te Tutu,
Ka hinga au, ka turori.
* The words printed in italics are sung by the whole assembly as a chorus.
The rest of the song is sung by one voice.—In January, 1847, Ileke came to
Korerareka to meet the Governor, who refused to receive him except onboard
a man-of-war. Heke and his tribe then sang this soug to show their dis-
trust; and that he would not venture on board a man-of-war.
K


74
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
NA TE KAKARIKI, TENEI TANGI.
E te kaka! e rere atu ra ra, ho mai aku kura,
Naku ano aku kura, i tiki ki te motu tapu, na Tinirau.
Torete kaureke, torete kaureke.
E te kaka, e rere atu, ra, ra,
“ E rere ana koe ki hea ?”
“ E rere ana ki Poutahi ?”
u E rere ana ki Puke-wanake ?”
“ Ki te kawe korero ki a Te Iripa ?”
Kahore hoki au, e aha atu nei, ki a koe;
Ka tu au, i te rahui whakaioio, na Toko-ahu;
Tenei au, kei te ruhi noa, kei te ngenge noa,
Ta te raumati hanga. Torete kaureke, torete kaureke.
HE HAKA TAUA NA KAUTU.
Aue, aue,
Aku matua e,
Tata tu te rau o to patu,
E Kohutu, kia whakaputa i te whana kai tangata
E kore au e aha atu ki te toa
O Tuterangiwhakataka. Ka riro
O Te Matau, ko nga paetauarai o Taranaki.
I hoki mai koutou, ki te aha?
Noho'hu ana,
Hoki matou.
To korokoro
E Karewa, whakaora i Ngatiruanui.
Te tuwhera to riu
E Kaokao, kia ripia iho, ki te rau o te panakenake.
E wawa kau ake nei, nga kowhatu
O Waitara. Ko nga kutu
O Rangihawe,
Ko nga roro; O te Onemihi, te kai a Mounga.
O Tamaliiri, taku tolietohe tatangi.
Hu kau ana, te roro, i aku niho.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 75
HE HAKA PATU PAKAKE.
To ana te pakake,
Ki ro te wai;
Kume ana Te Koreke,
Ki uta.
Ka tangi, te pakake,
Aue! taukiri!
Kei te patua au,
Hei puru rourou,
Mo te pari-whakatau.
KO TE TUA, MO TE TANE.
Tohi ki te vvai no Tu;
Whano koe.
Tangaengae.
Ki te hopu tangata,
Tangaengae.
Ki te piki maunga,
Tangaengae.
Me ho mai, tangaengae,
Mo te tama nei.
Whano koe
Tangaengae.
Kia riri ai,
Tangaengae.
Kia niwha ai,
Tangaengae.
Ki te patu tangata,
Tangaengae.
Ki te tomo pa,
Tangaengae.


76
KO NGA MOTE ATE A, ME NGA
Ki te patu whakaara,
Tangaengae.
Ki te tu parekura,
Tangaengae.
Kia riri ai,
Tangaengae.
Kia toa ai,
Tangaengae.
Ki te mau patu,
Tangaengae.
Ki te mau tao,
Tangaengae.
Ki te riri,
Tangaengae.
Ki te toa,
Tangaengae.
Ki te mau patu kowhatu,
Tangaengae.
Ki te mau taiaha,
Tangaengae.
Me ho mai, tangaengae,
Hei whakatupu tangaengae,
Mo te tama nei.
Whano koe,
Tangaengae.
Ki nga maunga nunui,
Tangaengae.
Ki nga rakau whakahihi,
Tangaengae.
Ki nga rakau whakahihi o te wao,
Tangaengae.
Me ho mai tangaengae,
Hei whakatupu tangaengae,
Mo te tama nei.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI.
77
Whano koe,
Tangaengae.
Ki nga ngaru teitei, o te moana,
Tangaengae.
Kia turakina i tai,
Tangaengae.
Me ho mai tangaengae,
Hei whakatupu tangaengae,
Mo te tama nei.
Whano koer
Tangaengae.
Ki te mahi kai, mau,
Tangaengae.
Ki te hanga whare nui, mou,
Tangaengae.
Ki te hanga waka taua,
Tangaengae.
Ki te karanga pahi,
Tangaengae.
Ki te whakatupu kupenga, mau,
Tangaengae.
Ki te hi ika, mau,
Tangaengae.
Ki te hao mahi, mau,
Tangaengae.
Me ho mai tangaengae,
Hei whakatupu tangaengae,
Mo te tama nei.
E ahua mai ra,
Te toro, i a Kiharoa,
Hei kawe rawa, i a au,
Ki te one, i Rangaunu,
Kei te rerenga, ki te Po;
Ko wai au ka kite.
♦ No te nohinohinga o te tamaiti, ka tapahia tana tangaengae, e tona
matua, na katalii, ka karakatia ia, kia ora ai, kia toa ai, kia kaha ai.


78 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
TENEI ANO TE TUA, MO TE WAHINE.
Tohi ki te wai, no Tu,
Whano koe,
Tangaengae.
Ki te mahi kai, mau,
Tangaengae.
Ki te whatu puweru, mou,
Tangaengae.
Ki te whatu kaitaka, mou,
Tangaengae.
Ki te karanga pahi,
Tangaengae.
Ki te waha wahie, mau,
Tangaengae.
Ki te keri mataitai, mau,
Tangaengae.
Me ho mai tangaengae,
Hei whakatupu tangaengae,
Mo te tapairu nei.
E ahua mai ra,
Te toro, i a Kiharoa,
Hei kawe rawa, i a au,
Ki te one, Rangaunu,
Kei te rerenga, ki te Po;
Ko wai au ka kite.
HAKA.
I taia to moko ki te aha ?
E te tahuri mai ai ?
E te karanga mai ai ?
Aua ko te waha kia ki
Haere ra e te iwi.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 79
KO TE HAKA A TAHATAHA, TE WAHINE A TE UIRA TE
RANGATIRA O NGATI-POU.*
He aha ra he kai, ma te tuna o te raupo,
E anga mai ai ?
Aha! ha /
Ko nga mongamonga o nga wheua o Tawhiroi,
Whiua ki Whangape, ki reira whiriwhiri ai, kia pahoho.
I, i, i,
Me whakatapu ranei ?
Me whakanoa ranei ?
Me whakatapu ranei ?
Me whakanoa ranei 1
Me marau ki Kariwha, kia manana ake ko te puhi-tuna,
He9 rino ;
He tuna ha,
A te kai a te koioio.
HE MATAARA PA NA NGAPUHI.
Kapakapa tu ana te uira i runga i Hikurangi
Ka whati ra te tihi ki Tuawera, ka tarehua
Ungatahu, ungatahu
Waihoa ra he kai whakapukepuke i era whenua,
Kia whakamau au e te tatao i roto i Hokianga;
Ka whai te riri.
* The words printed in italics are sung by the chorus.


80 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE TANGI NA TE POUMUA, MO TANA MARA, MO PUWHENUA
1 MATE I TE ATUA.
Taku mara rongo nui, ka ngaro koe i a au, e-i
I mate ano koe, i amohia e au ki te tao.
Kore aku hara nui ki a koe,
E rere i te rangi e i, e tae au ma-hau.
E tere i te wai e i, e tae au ma-hau.
Te tokotoru e haere nei, e tae au ma-hau.
Aianei kia ngaro a Te Papa, kia moru Hawaiki.
He aha kei aku ringa, kei Onehunga, kei Onetuakina, e i
HÅ«a watu, ka tukua ko tou hau, he mouri
Hua makaka, ka tukua ko tou hau, he mouri
E tama, a Rukutia hoaina mai e koe,
Manawa i te huri papa e i.
Kia ea ake to ika, he koropupu.
He mango ro wai ata, te ika o te mara, e i
Ka hua au e te hoa, me atawhai iho to taua kainga moku
Maku e hapai, ki runga o nga iwi,
Tae kau te rongo ki a Tama-a-maru-kainga mo a maua
korero, e i.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI. 81
HE NGERI, NO NAMATA.
E Rang i,
E Papa,
Ka wehe ra te makau i a au.
E, mei pewhea te tau, i mawehe atu ai o tatou kiri
Pipiri ai;
E whakatae ana koe i taku kanga,
Kia taea,
E no mua ra, nga hara, whakapiri tonu,
Ka tahi nei ka puaki.
Tini ki te uru,
Kaore noa iho ano;
Tini ki te tonga,
Kaore noa iho ano;
Tana hokinga mai,
Waiho kino ana i a au.
E tama ma,
E hine ma,
Me pewhea ra tatou,
Me tango mai ki te patu a Tawake;
Me ri ake ki te mangemange,
Kei tae au, kei titiro,
E ko te arohirohirotanga mai o te wairua o te makau,
E tenei ake nga rangi, e hoki ai,
Kati ra, waiho au, i te rae kainga hau
Au, ki Tapapa
Ki reira tu kau ai,
Me he rakau mamore, au nei
Tu tonu.
t


82
KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE WAIATA, NO NAMATA.
Ra te au ahi,
Kokiri ana ia i te pae,
O Tautari i runga.
Kei hoki te koha,
Ki taku matua.
Naku i whakaupa,
Ki te koraki huinga mai,
A oku hoa.
Hara mai, e Te Tuhi,
Kohari rawa,
Koe, i a au.
E te manawa i raro,
Tenei ka irirangi,
Kei runga ia,
Kihai tau iho,
Kia tamirotia,
Kia pine mai;
E kaka tonu ana.
E ai te ao rere,
Hoki atu, e Rehu,
Nga uru rakau,
Ki Tuhora ra.
Kei tata mai e;
Mau wehi rawa,
Ki taku moenga;
Ka hira taku mate,
I te parekura,
I Orona.
Kei whea, he
Haerenga ?
He wairua po;
Kia tangi au;
Te tu tahi atu,
Te rarua haere.


HAKIRARA 0 NGA MAORI, 83
HE TANGI, NA MOKONUIARANGI, MO TANA TAMAITI, MO
TE KURU-O-TE MARAMA.
Takoto mai ra,
I te anuanu
I te matao.
’A tuhi to toto,
Ka rapa i te rangi,
He uira,
He kanapu,
Te tohu o te ariki.
Ra pea koe kei roto te wai tapu,
Kei te toka tu ki waho,
Te kawa i a Aitu;
Te kawa i a Maru ;
I to atua ra.
Na koutou ra,
Kei whakahi ki te uru, ki
Nga iwi nunui,
Kia peratia Hauraki,
Me Ihumotomotokia,
Me Maikukutea.
Na te ngaru, i ta
Ki te one pae ai,
Na tona rite, he hinganga ika kei te akau;
He paenga whakairo,
Ki roto o Kaiweka,
I te rahi a ’Ti-Ue ;
I a Te Aramoana,
Nana i ue mai,
I maunu atu ai, Te Kuruotemarama i
Nga tapiri o Rehua,
Na-i.


84 KO NGA MOTEATEA, ME NGA
HE KEKA, NA KOROPANGA, MO ANA TAMARIKI.*
Ko taku
Kai) ko Ngapuhi)
Ko taku
Kai, ko Ngati Paoa, na9
'‘Ana taku tamaiti,
Wliakataki ora ki te motu
Tunu atu ai,
Hei ora mona, ki tona whenua kerikeri pipi atu ai.
Hei)
Hei)
Hei keri-keri pipi) i.
KO TE TANGI, A NGARARAUHE, MO TONA WAKA.
Ra Tawera, i hara mai koe na; te tapu i a Tane,
Koua whatarerea.
He aha, te kai e,
I tangi ai te atua ?
Ko te panepane,
O Manawawhiti ?
Me titore,
Ki Hawa-Hapuku ra,
“ Hei uta”
“ Hei tai”
Me aha i te tapu ?
Ka mate taku waka;
Raparapateuira,
He upoko rakau,
Ka mate koe, waka, i.
♦ The words printed in italics are sung by the whole assembly as a chorus.
The rest of the song is sung by one voice.