Citation
Annual report of the Immigration Department

Material Information

Title:
Annual report of the Immigration Department
Creator:
Singapore. Immigration Department.
Place of Publication:
Singapore
Publisher:
Government Printing Office
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 volume
Materials:
Paper
Measurements:
25 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Singapore -- Emigration and immigration ( lcsh )
Malaysia -- Emigration and immigration ( lcsh )
Emigration and immigration ( lcsh )
Genre:
Government publication
National government publication
Periodicals
serial ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Asia -- Singapore
Asia -- Singapura
亞洲 -- 新加坡
亚洲 -- 新加坡
ஆசியா -- சிங்கப்பூர்
Coordinates:
1.3 x 103.8

Notes

General Note:
At the head of title: "Colony of Singapore"

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS, Univerity of London
Rights Management:
This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial License.
Resource Identifier:
13786951 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
COLONY OF SINGAPORE

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT

1953



Printed at the Government Printing Office, Singapore,

by F. S. Horslin, Government Printer

To be purchased from Government Publications Bureau,
General Post Office, Fullerton Building, Singapore

1954

Price: 50 cents.

HI325/68701


\


COLONY OF SINGAPORE

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT

1953

BY

J. L. J. HAXWORTH

Controller of Immigration
Singapore

Printed at the Government Printing Office, Singapore,
by F. S. Horslin, Government Printer

1954


2

Control over the entry of newcomers is obtained through the Immigration
(Prohibition of Entry) Order, 1953, which makes ail Commonwealth Citizens,
British Protected Persons and Citizens of Eire, prohibited immigrants unless
they come within the Schedule to the Order in which are specified the various
categories of persons whose entry is considered desirable and beneficial to the
progress and development of Malaya. Aliens who fall within these categories
may also be permitted entry at the discretion of the Controller. Provision is
made for the issue of various passes to facilitate the entry of visitors and of
persons who would otherwise be prohibited immigrants under the Order.

EXAMINATION OF PASSENGERS

During the year 11,309 incoming ships were examined by officers of the
Department. These carried 74,912 landing and 140,755 transit passengers.
8,619 outgoing vessels were examined and the departure of 3,600 passengers
was checked. 3,035 incoming planes were examined and 39,709 landing and
17,757 transit passengers were checked. 617 outgoing planes were examined
and the departure of 1,225 passengers was confirmed.

It is interesting to compare these totals v/ith pre-war figures. In 1938,
5,238 vessels were cleared and in 1939, 5,252. In the latter year, 26,515 alien
passengers were landed. Singapore is now handling about four times as many
passengers as immediately pre-war. The rapid growth of air traffic is of
particular interest. During 1953, more than 20 per cent of the total number
of passengers arriving in Singapore, came by air.

In addition to passenger-carrying vessels, ships carrying alien crews were
subject to periodical checks and the majority of the ships arriving from China
Ports, Hongkong, Indo-China and Thailand were searched. 58 stowaways
were either reported or found, and 69 persons were refused permission to
land. The comparatively small number of refusals is due to strict enforcement
of passport control which ensured that any person wishing to travel to Singa-
pore is assured of permission to land before commencing the journey.

Liaison between the respective Controllers of Immigration has ensured
the continuance and the successful operation of the pre-war method of clearing
passengers for the whole of Malaya at their first point of entry.

The Appendix gives statistics of persons arriving in Malaya by sea and
air during the year. Table C shows that there was an excess of 29,354 arrivals
over departures. This is due to the very considerable influx of immigrants of
Indian and Pakistani races. Figures for persons of Chinese race show a deficit
of 6,405, due no doubt to the continuation of the custom of retiring to China
in old age.

CONTROL OF IMMIGRANTS

Throughout the year the entry of aliens was subject to strict control.
From 1st August, with the coming into force of the new Immigration Ordin-
ance, the control was extended to cover Commonwealth Citizens.

From 1st August until the end of the year 671 Entry Permits were issued '
to facilitate the entry of citizens of Ceylon, India and Pakistan and 319 were
issued to other Commonwealth Citizens. The majority of the latter are em-
ployees of well established business houses in Singapore.

During the year 5,082 applications for the entry of aliens were received,
the great majority of these being for Chinese nationals. 2,828 Entry Permits
were issued, covering 3,936 persons, and 2,030 applications were refused.
Almost all the applications were for the entry of wives and children under
twelve years of age of local residents. A few applications were approved on


3

compassionate grounds. The applications received reflect very clearly the
course of events in China particularly the affects of the Agrarian Reform
movement.

CONTROL OF RE-ENTRY

Since 1951, alien residents wishing to return to Singapore after a stay
abroad have been required to obtain visas. Since the coming into force of the
new Immigration Ordinance they are in addition required to obtain Re-Entry
Permits. The Immigration Ordinance also requires Commonwealth Citizens
and British Protected Persons, who have not an unrestricted right of entry,
to obtain Re-Entry Permits. In their case this is usually given as an endorse-
ment of their travel documents.

Announcement in the Press during February and March regarding the
new regulations governing entry and re-entry to Malaya caused some con-
cern amongst British Subject residents who were about to leave the Colony
temporarily. They feared that their eligibility to land might be questioned
on return. To avoid this possibility arrangements were made to endorse British
Passports with either a Re-Entry Permit or a Certificate of Exemption in the
form provided under the new Regulations. During March, 1,216 endorsements
were given. This procedure continued when the new Ordinance came into
force and by the end of the year 10,611 endorsements had been granted.

Since the end of the war the Department has been issuing combined
travel documents and Re-Entry Permits to Indian nationals. This practice
continued throughout the year and a total of 3,639 Permits were issued.

During the year re-entry facilities were granted to 10,540 aliens. About
a quarter of these were regular travellers, mostly traders moving between the
Colony, Indonesia and Borneo. Such persons are given continuous re-entry
facilities and issued with visas valid for any number of entries within six
months. This movement is recognized by the Department as being of par-
amount importance to the trade of Singapore and is treated accordingly.

The re-entry of aliens from China was very strictly controlled. The policy
of refusing re-entry facilities to persons in the age group 16 to 30 has been
maintained and facilities were granted to others only under special circum-
stances. During the year re-entry facilities were granted to 165 males and
13 females, the period of validity of the permit was restricted to three months
in all but a few cases.

GENERAL

3,474 British Passports and 8,736 temporary travel documents were issued
during the year. The issue of large numbers of temporary travel documents
is due to two main causes, firstly, the absence of a Consular Representative
of the Chinese Peoples Government throws the burden of issuing Chinese
nationals with travel documents on to the Department, secondly, it has become
the practice for H.M. Forces to move considerable bodies of servicemen by
air and for this purpose Emergency Certificates are needed.

There were two prosecutions during the year, both resulting in convic-
tions.

Since the coming into force of the new Ordinance, the Department has
assumed responsibility for the repatriation of destitute and other persons
needing repatriation. From 1st August until the end of the year, 45 persons
were repatriated by the Department, all of them to China.

On the 31st December, 1952, the Head Office moved to the ground floor
of the new Government Offices, Palmer Road, off Anson Road, Singapore,
and opened for public business on 2nd January, 1953. The new office is a
great improvement on the former office in the Chinese Protectorate Building,
Havelock Road.


4

STAFF

Mr. J. L. J. Haxworth officiated as Controller of Immigration throughout
the year.

Mr. F. Sharp officiated as Deputy Controller of Immigration throughout
the year.

Mr. M. C. Compton, M.C.S., was appointed Supernumerary Deputy Con-
troller of Immigration with effect from 23rd December, 1953.

The following officers officiated as Assistant Controllers of Immigration
during the year:

Mr. G. D. A. Fox from 5th May when he returned from leave.

Mr. T. Mackie throughout the year.

Mr. G. St. G. Farmer from 1st January to 30th May when he pro-
ceeded on leave and from 9th December when he returned.

Mr. H. E. Noble throughout the year.

Mr. Lim Joo Hock throughout the year.

Mr. Tan Kai Cher throughout the year.

Mr. Frankie Lee Siew Kwong throughout the year.

The following officers officiated as
migration throughout the year:

Mr. Abdul Rahim.

Mr. Horlington Choong.

Mr. Mohamed bin Mohd. Salleh.
Mr. Noor Mohamed.

Mr. F. R. Sabapathy.

Mr. R. O. Daniel.

Mr. Chan Yen Cheong.

Deputy Assistant Controllers of Im-

Mr. Bostam Kurshi.

Mr. Ong Kian Chong.

Mr. A. E. Chelvan.

Mr. Anwar Ibrahim.

Mr. Tan Han Tuan.

Mr. Tan Boon Seng.

Mr. B. R. Marks.


APPENDIX

MALAYA MIGRATION STATISTICS

(Supplied by Registrar of Malayan Statistics, Singapore)

(A) ARRIVALS OF PASSENGERS BY RACIAL GROUPS INTO MALAYA DURING THE YEAR 1953
(figures include arrivals by Sea, Land and Air but exclude movements between Singapore and the Federation of Malaya)

Racial Group SINGAPORE FEDERATION OF MALAYA TOTAL MALAYA
ADULTS CHILDREN * Total ADULTS CHILDREN * Total ADULTS CHILDREN * Total
Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
European 20,114 8,798 2,291 1,144 32,347 1,621 1,083 232 238 3,174 21,735 9,881 2,523 1,382 35,521
Eurasian 177 125 57 45 404 99 63 8 10 180 276 188 65 55 584
Chinese 19,996 10,146 3,027 2,088 35,257 22,440 7,619 1,027 802 31,888 42,436 17,765 4,054 2,890 67,145
Malaysian 5,322 1,685 334 328 7,669 53,731 50,616 3,059 2,910 110,316 59,053 52,301 3,393 3,238 117,985
Indian and Pakistani 20,517 2,342 1,036 654 24,549 31,741 3,946 1,985 1,525 39,197 52,258 6,288 3,021 2,179 63,746
Japanese 198 24 10 232 198 24 10 232
Other Races 1,438 358 82 77 1,955 13,407 6,637 516 550 21,110 14,845 6,995 598 627 23,065
Total all races 67,762 23,478 6,837 4,336 102,413 123,039 69,964 6,837 6,035 205,865 190,801 93,442 13,664 10,371 308,278

Under 12 years of age.


APPENDIXcontinued

MALAYA MIGRATION STATISTICScontinued
(Supplied by Registrar of Malayan Statistics, Singapore)

(B) DEPARTURES OF PASSENGERS BY RACIAL GROUPS FROM MALAYA DURING THE YEAR 1953
(figures include departures by Sea, Land and Air but exclude movements between Singapore and the Federation of Malaya)

Racial Group SINGAPORE FEDERATION OF MALAYA TOTAL MALAYA
ADULTS CHILDREN * Total ADULTS CHILDREN * Total ADULTS CHILDREN * Total
Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
European 21,495 8,697 2,044 961 33,197 1,072 583 126 120 1,901 22,567 9,280 2,170 1,081 35,098
Eurasian 185 127 56 39 407 58 29 10 5 102 243 156 66 44 509
Chinese 29,157 7,251 2,439 1,241 40,088 23,334 7,876 1,256 996 33,462 52,491 15,127 3,695 2,237 73,550
Malaysian 5,716 1,741 497 462 8,416 46,824 ' 48,342 3,069 2,846 101,081 52,540 50,083 3,566 3,308 109,497
Indian and Pakistani 15,025 1,866 931 643 18,465 15,927 1,954 1,077 914 19,872 30,952 3,820 2,008 1,557 38,337
Japanese 216 13 6 1 236 216 13 6 1 236
Other Races 1,542 446 158 110 2,256 12,112 6,495 404 430 19,441 13,654 6,941 562 540 21,697
Total all races 73,336 20,141 6,131 3,457 103,065 99,327 65,279 1 5,942 5,311 175,859 172,663 85,420 12,073 8,768 278,924

* Under 12 years of age.


APPENDIXcontinued

MALAYA MIGRATION STATISTICScontinued

(Supplied by Registrar of Malayan Statistics, Singapore)

(C) EXCESS ( + ) OR DEFICIT ( ) OF ARRIVALS IN RELATION TO DEPARTURES BY RACIAL GROUPS DURING THE YEAR 1953

(i.e. figures in Table A minus figures in Table B)

SINGAPORE FEDERATION OF MALAYA TOTAL MALAYA
Racial Group ADULTS CHILDREN * ADULTS CHILDREN * ADULTS CHILDREN 4c
Total Total Total

Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
European - 1,381 + 101 + 247 4- 183 - 850 + 549 4- 500 + 106 4- 118 4- 1,273 - 832 + 601 + 353 4- 301 + 423
Eurasian 8 2 + 1 4- 6 3 + 41 4- 34 - 2 + 5 4- 78 4- 33 + 32 - 1 4- 11 4- 75
Chinese - 9,161 + 2,895 + 588 + 847 - 4,831 - 894 - 257 - 229 - 194 - 1,574 -10,055 + 2,638 + 359 4- 653 - 6,405
Malaysian .. - 394 - 56 - 163 - 134 - 747 4- 6,907 + 2,274 - 10 4- 64 4- 9,235 4- 6,513 + 2,218 - 173 - 70 + 8,488
Indian and Pakistani + 5,492 + 476 + 105 + 11 + 6,084 4-15,814 4- 1,992 4- 908 4- 611 4-19,325 4-21,306 + 2,468 + 1,013 + 622 +25,409
Japanese - 18 + 11 + 4 - 1 4 - 18 4- 11 + 4 - 1 - 4
Other Races - 104 ! - 88 76 - 33 - 301 4- 1,295 + 142 + 112 4- 120 4- 1,669 + 1,191 4- 54 4- 36 + 87 + 1,368
Total all races | 5,574 4- 3,337 + 706 4- 879 - 652 4-23,712 4- 4,685 4- 885 + 724 4-30,006 + 18,138 + 8,022 4- 1,591 4- 1 1,603 +29,354

* Under 12 years of age.










0421375-7/M


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