Citation
Annual Report

Material Information

Title:
Annual Report
Alternate Title:
Hans Rausing Endangered Lanaguages Project, Annual Report
Creator:
Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
SOAS, University of London
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 volume

Learning Resource Information

Intended User Roles:
Learner

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Language and languages -- Documentation -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Endangered languages -- Documentation -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Linguistics -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Linguistic minorities -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Language attrition -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Languages -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Language obsolescence -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
Temporal Coverage:
2006 -
Target Audience:
Specialized ( marctarget )

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial License. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
THE HANS RAUSING
Endangered Languages Project
Because every last word means
another lost world...
Annual Report
2006
"Documentary linguistics
aims to make an enduring
record of endangered
languages and to support
speakers of these
languages in their desire
to maintain them"


Contents
2
Endangered languages documentation and support
3
HRELP
4
Activities throughout the year
5
Training for documentation and support at SOAS
6
ELDP
8
ELDP panel membership
11
Four examples of ELDP funded work
14
Map showing research projects
16
Endangered Languages Academic Programme
20
ELAP staff
23
Endangered Languages Archive
27
ELDP Training June 2006
28
ELAR Staff


Endangered languages
documentation and support
It is generally agreed that
today there are about 6,500
languages spoken across
the world and at least half
of these are under threat
of extinction. This is mainly
because speakers of smaller
languages are switching to
other larger languages and
not passing on their heritage
tongue to their children. They
do this for perceived economic,
social or political advantages,
or because they feel ashamed
of their ancestral language.
The language can thus be lost
in one or two generations, often
to the great regret of their
descendants.
Over the past 10 years a
new field of study called
"Language Documentation"
or "Documentary Linguistics"
has developed. Documentary
linguistics is "concerned
with the methods, tools, and
theoretical underpinnings for
compiling a representative and
lasting multipurpose record
of a natural language or one
of its varieties" (Gippert,
Himmelmann and Mosel 2006:
v). It has developed over the
last decade in large part in
response to the urgent need
to make an enduring record of
the world's many endangered
languages and to support
speakers of these languages in
their desire to maintain them.
It is also fueled by information
and communication
technologies which make
documentation and the
preservation and dissemination
of language data possible
in ways which could not
previously be envisioned. But,
essentially, it also concerns
itself with role of language
speakers and their rights and
needs in ways not previously
considered within linguistics. In
a recently published textbook,
Himmelmann (2006:15)
identifies the following as
important new features of
documentary linguistics:
Focus on primary data
- language documentation
concerns the collection
and analysis of an array of
primary language data to be
made available for a wide
range of users;
Explicit concern for
accountability access
to primary data and
representations of it makes
evaluation of linguistic
analyses possible and
expected;
Concern for long-term
storage and preservation
of primary data language
documentation includes a
focus on archiving in order
to ensure that documentary
materials are made available
to potential users into the
distant future;
Work in interdisciplinary
teams documentation
requires input and expertise
from a range of disciplines
and is not restricted to
linguistics alone;
Close cooperation with
and direct involvement of
the speech community
- language documentation
requires active and
collaborative work with
community members both
as producers of language
materials and as co-
researchers.
Language documentation is
built on a corpus of audio
and/or video materials with
transcription, annotation,
translation into a language
of wider communication,
and relevant metadata on
context and use of the
materials. Such a corpus
can be archived for current
and future use by scholars,
speakers and interested others.
Woodbury 2003 advocates
that ideally, the corpus will be
large, cover a diverse range
of genres and contexts, be
expandable, opportunistic,
portable, transparent, ethical
and preservable. As a result,
documentation is increasingly
done by teams, including
community members, rather
than by individuals, because
both the technical skills and
the amount of time required
to create this corpus make
it difficult to achieve for a
single linguist working alone.
Importantly, outcomes of
documentary linguistics
research should be directly
relevant and valuable to the
community of speakers whose
language is being documented
so that their languages can
receive the support they need
in the face of pressures from
other dominant groups and
languages.


HRELP
The Hans Rausing Endangered
Languages Project (HRELP)
was established with a
commitment of £20 million
from the Lisbet Rausing
Charitable Fund to document
as many endangered languages
as possible and to encourage
the development of relevant
skills across the world.
It has the following three
components:
Endangered Languages
Documentation Programme
(ELDP). Designed to provide
approximately £15 million
over an 8-10 year period
in competitive research
grants to encourage the
development of linguistic
fieldwork in endangered
languages (especially by
younger scholars) and to
support documentation of as
many threatened languages as
possible. ELDP is governed by
an international selection panel
chaired by Prof Barry Supple;
its grants are administered
by the School of Oriental and
African Studies (SOAS).
Endangered Languages
Academic Programme
(ELAP). Aimed at training
the next generation of
language documenters, it
offers students an array
of opportunities: an MA in
Language Documentation
and Description, a PhD in
Field Linguistics, and post-
doctoral fellowships at SOAS.
We also offer a comprehensive
programme of public lectures,
seminars and training
courses. Prof Peter K. Austin,
Marit Rausing Chair in Field
Linguistics, is Director of ELAP
Endangered Languages Archive
(ELAR). Established at SOAS in
early 2004, this will be one of
the prime resources for study
and methodology in the field
of digital language archiving.
David Nathan is Director of
ELAR.
The mission of HRELP is to:
Provide opportunities for
fieldworkers, academics,
students, collaborative
ventures and international
organisations to work
together with endangered
language communities
to ensure that everything
possible is done to record
and encourage linguistic,
cultural and human
diversity;
Award approximately £1
million a year in research
grants to high quality
projects;
Train new generations of
linguists to research and
develop work that opens up
new fields of study;
Set up an innovative,
comprehensive endangered
languages digital archive
as a major international
resource for scholars,
communities and other
interested persons;
Endeavour to raise as much
additional funds as possible
to build the scale, scope and
effectiveness of our work;
Welcome all those able
to donate time, money or
expertise to help build on
the solid base HRELP has
established.
HRELP hosted the UK premiere of "The Last
Speakers". The poster was designed by Zara
Pybus, David Nathan & Tom Castle.


Activities throughout the year
This annual report covers the
period from September 2005
to August 2006 for the ELDR
ELAP and ELAR programmes.
In 2006, ELDP awarded 27
grants for a total of £756,333,
an amount almost double that
awarded in 2005.
ELAP had its third intake of
students, enrolling fifteen
MA students along with
four new PhD students (see
pl6 for further details).
There were some changes to
staff: Dr Oliver Bond joined
as an ESRC post-doctoral
researcher in May 2006 to
work on cross-linguistic study
of negation, and Zara Pybus
left as ELAP Administrator
and was replaced by Alison
Kelly. In August Dr Friederike
Lupke began maternity leave,
and was replaced by Dr Gail
Coelho through a three-
month temporary lectureship.
Dr David Bradley, La Trobe
University, spent three months
at SOAS as Leverhulme Visiting
Professor and gave a series
of lectures on his research
which focuses on South-east
Asian languages. ELAP ran two
series of seminars and two
workshops throughout the year,
and hosted the annual HRELP
public lecture on 10th February
2006, which was presented
by Dr Dietrich Schuller,
Austrian Phonogramarchiv,
with the title "Endangered
archives of endangered
languages". The third in a
series of publications entitled
Language Documentation and
Description was published in
December 2005 (see details
below), and a fourth volume
will appear in early 2007.
ELAR's premises were
completed in September 2005
Dr Dietrich Schuller presenting the annual HRELP public lecture "Endangered archives of
endangered languages".
and the archive was officially
opened for activities in October.
Equipment for mass data
storage was commissioned,
and the first deposit was
made. Since then, several
other materials for deposit
have been received from ELDP
grantees: Yeshes Vodgsal
Acuo (IPF0071), Wayan Arka
(IPF0011, two deposits), Nora
England (MDP0018), Louis
Goldstein (FTG0025), Antoine
Guillaume (IPF0007), Birgit
Hellwig (IPF0010), Catriona
Hyslop (IPF0002), Romero
Mendez (FTG0029), Stephen
Morey (IPF0081), Knut Olawsky
(IPF0001), and Alice Taff
(IPF0013), with several more
due soon. Other developments
during the year included:
completion of software
design, commissioning
of a robot tape library for
backup and transport of data
offsite, installation of Dobbin
specialist software for audio
archives that provides quality
feedback and automated audio
processing, an agreement
with Oxford Text Archive that
provides data replication
as well as a firm additional
long-term data repository,
formation of an inventory of
audio recording and associated
equipment for ELAP and ELAR
field-workers, and an on-line
equipment loan management
system. ELAR has also been
involved in the wider activities
of HRELP; these are described
in more detail below.


Training for documentation
and support at SOAS
Attendees of the June 2006 ELDP training course at SOAS
The School of Oriental and
African Studies is the premier
institution in the UK for the
study of African and Asian
languages and cultures,
and has a strong tradition
of research, teaching and
publication on minority
languages. In addition HRELP
has developed a varied
programme of training in
language documentation and
support focused on minority
and endangered languages.
This includes twice yearly
workshops which discuss
important issues of theory and
practice in the field. In 2005-
06 the two workshop topics
were "Meaning and translation
in language documentation"
and "Endangered languages
and literacy"; both workshops
were attended by over 50
participants. The papers
discussed at these sessions
will be published in Language
Documentation and
Description Volume 4 which
will appear in early 2007.
Other smaller specialist
Grantees and training staff at ELDP training, June 2006.
workshops on "Australian
Aboriginal languages" and
"Audio recording, digitisation
and archiving" were held during
the year. We also run a six-
day training course for ELDP
grantees where fundamental
issues and skills in language
documentation and support
are covered, with special focus
on audio and video recording,
use of computers to support
research, data management
and archiving, metadata, and
development of multimedia
and practical materials for
communities. The course was
attended by 16 grantees from
all over the world and was
taught by ELAR and ELAP staff,
as well as outside specialists.
We have developed a set of
teaching materials for this
training course, some of which
is available through the HRELP
web site.
Name Project Title
Lea Brown Field Research in Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea
Katia Chirkova Documentation of four varieties of Baima
Sarah Cutfield Dalbon Oral Histories Project
Connie Dickinson Cha'palaa Documentation Project
Matthew Dryer Field Research in Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea
Valerie Guerin Discovering Mafea: Texts, grammar and lexicon
Antoine Guillaume Takana and Reyesano: documentation of two almost extinct languages of Bolivia
Joana Jansen Yakima Language Documentation and Grammar
Eladio Mateo-Toledo Documentation of the syntax and specialised uses of Q'anjob'al (Maya)
Stephen Morey A comprehensive comparative grammar of the Turung and Singpho langauges of Assam
Palash Nath A comprehensive comparative grammar of the Turung and Singpho langauges of Assam
Der-Hwa Victoria Rau Digital Archiving Yami Language Documentation
Ubiray Rezende Sketch grammar, texts, and dictionary of Enawene-Nawe (Arawak, Brazil)
Myfany Turpin Arandic Songs Project: documenting Aboriginal verbal art in Central Australia
Rosa Vallejos Kokama-Kokamilla: texts, grammar and lexicon
Jean-Christophe Verstraete Documentation of five Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula, Australia
Alejandra Vidal Documenting Pilaga Language (Guaycuruan): Bilingual dictionary with grammatical and ethnographic notes
Meng-Chien Yang Digital Archiving Yami Language Documentation


Endangered Languages Documentation
Programme (ELDP)
The Endangered Languages
Documentation Programme
(ELDP) is administered by a
team whose office is located
in the School of Oriental and
African Studies. The selection
process for grant applications
is overseen by an international
panel of experts, chaired by
Professor Barry Supple, who
represents the Lisbet Rausing
Charitable Fund.
The ELDP office supports both
the work of the international
panel and that of grant
holders by administering
the application process and
managing awarded grants. In
the last year, the office has
seen a complete change of
personnel. Current staff are
Kathryn Oatey, Jean Tullett,
Karen Remnant and Breon de
Soyza (See page 10).
Contact details for all the ELDP
staff can be found on the
ELDP website at http: //www.
hrelp.org/aboutus/staff/.
Deadlines for the next round
The timetable for the next
rounds of applications is on
the website at http: //www.
hrelp.org/grants/apply/
information/.
Number of grants by research location
Number of languages by continent
Budget amount by location of project
Distribution by type of grant


ELDP round 4 grants awarded 2006
Principal Investigator Host Institution Funding Project Language
AFRICA
Stuart McGill School of Oriental and African Studies £5,010 Western Acipa
Sophie Salffner School of Oriental and African Studies £7,945 Ukaan, a language of Southern Nigeria
Dr Anne Vilain University Stendhal £7,857 Baba'l, a Bantu language
Dr Moges Yigezu Addis Ababa University £5,460 Koegu, South Western Ethiopia
ASIA
Gerardo De Caro School of Oriental and African Studies £6,789 Talyshi
Burgel Faehndrich University of Hawaii at Manoa £12,975 Karilang, Datong & Haliqi
Dr Karen Grunow-Harsta University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee £8,195 Two Magar dialects: Tanahu and Syangja
Prof Jinfang Li Central University of Nationalities £88,906 Two Gelao Varieties: Zou Lei and A Hou
Dr Charles Macdonald CNRS £5,280 Palawan-Tagalog
AUSTRALIA PACIFIC
Dr Linda Barwick University of Sydney £120,670 Song traditions of Western Arnhem Land
Sarah Cutfield Monash University £14,982 Dalabon Oral Histories Project
Ryoko Hattori University of Hawaii at Manoa £8,473 Pingilapese
Carmel O'Shannessy University of Melbourne £83,418 Lajamanu Warlpiri
Erich Round Yale University £20,731 Kayardild
Dr Myfany Turpin University of Queensland £79,866 Arandic Songs project
Dr Jean-Christophe Verstraete University of Leuven £79,750 Five Paman languages, Cape York Peninsula
CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA
Gabriela Caballero Hernandez University of California £15,000 Tarahumara
Dr Connie Dickinson Universidad San Francisco de Quito £10,000 Cha'palaa
Dr Veronica Grondona Eastern Michigan University £44,387 Wichi
Dr Gilles Polian CIESAS-Sureste £6,080 Central Tseltal
Jorge Gomez Rendon University of Amsterdam £7,940 Sia Pedee, Ecuador
Rosa Vallejos University of Oregon £15,187 Kokama-Kokamilla
Marine Vuillermet CNRS £8,402 Ese Ejja, Bolivia
NORTH AMERICA
Dr Marianne Ignace Simon Fraser University £7,700 Northern (Massett) Haida
Indrek Park Indiana University £9,982 Hidatsa
Tyler Peterson University of British Columbia £10,000 Gitskan
Conor Quinn Massachusetts Institute of Technology £65,352 Passamaquoddy-Maliseet


ELDP panel membership
The members of the panel and
their areas of expertise are:
Barry Supple, Chair
University of Cambridge
Barry Supple studied at
the London School of
Economics and the University
of Cambridge, where he
was awarded a PhD for a
dissertation on seventeenth-
century trade fluctuations.
Between 1955 and 1981 he
held academic appointments at
the Harvard Business School,
McGill University, the University
of Sussex and the University of
Oxford. He was elected to the
Chair of Economic History in
Cambridge in 1981 and to the
Mastership of St Catharine's
College in 1983.
Barry has been President
of the Economic History
Society, a Council member
of the UK Social Science
Research Council, Chairman
of its Postgraduate Training
Board and its Economic and
Social History Committee,
and Chairman of the Modern
History Section and Foreign
Secretary of the British
Academy. In 1993 he left
Cambridge to be Director of
the Leverhulme Trust, from
which post he retired in 2001.
He has published books
and articles on economic
growth and performance,
American railroads, the coal
and insurance industries
and general historical and
academic issues.
Felix K. Ameka
Leiden University
Felix K. Ameka lectures in
the Department of African
Languages and Cultures of
Leiden University and is also
an Associate Researcher of
the Language and Cognition
Group at the Max Planck
Institute for Psycholinguistics,
Nijmegen. He has a wide range
of interests and has fieldwork
experience in Australia and
West Africa. Apart from the
description and documentation
of languages, he is interested
in the cultural, cognitive and
human social interactional
motivations of grammar and
how speakers use grammar.
He has conducted field-based
research and published
extensively on the grammar,
semantics, and pragmatics of
Ewe, his mother tongue, and on
other West African languages
such as Akan. He is currently
involved in and coordinates
the documentation of four
of the little studied Ghana-
Togo-Mountain languages:
Likpe, Logba, Nyagbo and Tafi.
These languages are massively
influenced by surrounding
bigger languages like Ewe and
Akan.
As a trained linguist who has
worked on his native language
and on other languages, he has
a continuing concern about
the role of native knowledge
in documentary linguistics
and how the different types
of expertise can be tapped
in a collaborative manner
to generate optimal records
of languages. He is also
interested in the challenges
that documentary linguistics
poses for linguistic training and
academic linguistic practices.
His other research interests lie
in typology and comparative
grammar, anthropological
linguistics, ethnography of
communication, cross-cultural
semantics and pragmatics.
He is also interested in how
ELDP panel and support staff. Left to right: Lenore Grenoble, Felix Ameka,
William Foley, Anthony Woodbury, Jean Tullett, Roberto Zavala, Maureen Gaskin,
Peter Austin, Barry Supple and David Nathan.


the structure and semantics
of languages are affected and
modulated over time and when
they come into contact with
other languages.
William Foley
University of Sydney
William Foley is Professor of
Linguistics at the University
of Sydney, Australia and has a
wide range of interests.
He has worked in syntactic
theory from a lexicalist
approach and examined the
role of semantics in syntax.
He is particularly interested
in the usefulness of modern
syntactic theories in the
description of the Austronesian
and Papuan languages of
the Pacific, which is his main
area of specialisation. Over
the last 20 years he has
conducted extensive periods
of fieldwork in Pacific area
languages, specifically in
the Papuan languages of the
Sepik region of Papua New
Guinea, such as Yimas, Watam
and Mambuwan, as well as
some Austronesian languages
such as Palauan, Fijian and
Tagalog. This fieldwork is the
discipline which guides his
continuing development of
syntactic theories, so that for
him theory and description
constantly reinforce each other
synergistically.
William Foley's other main
area of interest, again one
forged ultimately out of
his interest in fieldwork, is
anthropological linguistics.
He is strongly committed
to a view of linguistics
as ultimately a branch of
anthropology and believes
that language can only really
be adequately understood
when it is conceived as both a
psychological and a social skill.
Lenore Grenoble
Dartmouth College
Lenore Grenoble is currently
a Professor at Dartmouth
College where she holds a joint
appointment in Linguistics
and Cognitive Science and
the Department of Russian.
Her current research
interests include the study
of discourse phenomena,
contact linguistics, language
endangerment, and the
relationship between language
policy, use and attrition, as
well as other issues in the
documentation and study
of endangered minority
languages. Her research
is focused on the study of
indigenous languages of
Siberia, where she conducts
fieldwork, most specifically on
the Tungus languages.
More recently she has been
involved in collaborative
research with polar scientists,
anthropologists and other
social scientists to investigate
the impact of environmental
change on the linguistic, social
and economic conditions of
the peoples of the North.
Together with Lindsay Whaley,
she has created an open-
access electronic journal
"Linguistic Discovery" devoted
to research on lesser-studied
languages, which is supported
by the Baker-Berry Library
at Dartmouth College. The
journal was designed to enable
linguists throughout the world
to have free and unlimited
access to publish and read
linguistic research on lesser-
studied and endangered
languages.
Anju Saxena
Uppsala University
Anju Saxena's training as a
researcher and teacher as well
as her subsequent professional
career in academia have
all been in the discipline of
General Linguistics. She was
born and raised in Delhi,
where she also completed
her undergraduate education
in linguistics. A never-waning
fascination with South Asia
as a cornucopia of food for
linguistic thought has led
to her linguistic research
being centred on South Asian
languages. She has made
linguistic investigations of
ancient languages (Sanskrit
and Classical Tibetan),
but most of her work has
been on modern languages
(representing three major
language families of South
Asia), where she has conducted
and supervised fieldwork on
lesser-known languages in
North India (e.g. Kinnauri,
Gahri and Tinani).
Anthony C Woodbury
University of Texas, Austin
Anthony Woodbury is interested
in linguistic diversity and its
preservation. He received his
BA and MA in Linguistics at the
University of Chicago in 1975
and his PhD in Linguistics at


the University of California
at Berkeley in 1981. He has
taught in the Linguistics
Department at the University
of Texas at Austin since 1980,
where he is now Professor and
Department chair.
He has had a career-long
research interest in the Yupik-
Inuit-Aleut language family,
has written on the family's
prehistory, on Greenlandic
and Aleut syntax, and on a
wide range of topics arising
from his long association
with the Cup'ik speaking
community of Chevak, Alaska,
including Cup'ik prosody,
intonation, expressive
phonology; morphology and
syntax; and oral literature and
conversational discourse. He is
currently involved in an effort
there to establish Cup'ik in
the schools. In recent years,
he has become involved in the
University of Texas' Centre
for Indigenous Languages of
Latin America, helping bring
indigenous graduate students
to study linguistics, and co-
founding, with Joel Sherzer and
Heidi Johnson, the Archive for
the Indigenous Languages of
Latin America.
Roberto Zavala-Mandano
CIESAS-Sureste
Roberto Zavala is Associate
Professor at CIESAS-Sureste,
a Mexican interdisciplinary
research centre for Social
Sciences, located in San
Cristobal de las Casas,
Chiapas. He got his BA in
Linguistics at the National
School of Anthropology and
History in Mexico, and his MA
and PhD in Linguistics at the
University of Oregon. He has
conducted extensive fieldwork
on Mayan, Uto-Aztecan and
Mixe-Zoquean languages
spoken in Middle-America and
has written two grammars: one
on Akatek-Maya and another
on Olutec-Mixe-Zoquean. He
has written several papers on
Wastek, Akatek and Olutec.
He is currently working on
language contact in the
southern part of Mesoamerica,
and language documentation
of Zoque, Olutec and Choi.
Peter K Austin
SOAS
Director, Endangered Languages
Academic Programme, School
of Oriental and African Studies,
University of London
See under ELAP staff (p20)
David Nathan
SOAS
Director, Endangered
Languages Archive, School of
Oriental and African Studies,
University of London
See under ELAR staff (p28)
The Staff
Kathryn Oatey manages the
grant funding programme
and oversees the development
and administration of ELDP
activities. Kathryn previously
worked for the British Council
and the Wellcome Trust, both
of which are international
charities who have grant
awarding programmes in
various fields. She has worked
in Nepal, India, Ghana,
Mozambique, South Africa and
Russia.
Jean Tullett studied Linguistics
as part of her first degree and
is the ELDP Research Grants
Officer. Jean is the first point
of contact for all potential
applicants and grant holders.
Earlier in her career she
worked for the World Council
of Churches, an international
grant giving charity, and
she previously dealt with
scholarships for international
students at SOAS.
Left to right: Anthony Woodbury, Peter Austin, Anju Saxena, Felix Ameka, Lenore Grenoble,
William Foley, Jean Tullett, Barry Supple, Maureen Gaskin, Vera Szoelloesi-Brenig, and
Roberto Zavala.
Jean is responsible for the
financial aspects of all grants
and applications, and she
implements the reporting
procedures. She also supports
the ELDP panel members and
organises the annual panel
meetings.
Karen Remnant, who is due
to start in October 2006, will
deputise for Jean Tullett, and
Breon de Soyza currently
provides administrative
support to the team.


Four examples of ELDP funded work
Professor Anvita Abbi
Vanishing Voices of the Great Andamanese
Great Andamanese is a mixed
language of ten disparate
groups of a tribe that once
inhabited the entire region of
the Andaman Islands.
The project aims to undertake
extensive fieldwork to make
audio and video recordings
of speakers, collect oral texts
including songs, produce an
illustrated trilingual Hindi/
Great Andamanese/English
dictionary, and write a
comprehensive grammar and
sociolinguistic sketch.
Great Andamanese waist band.
Great Andamanese with Professor Anvita Abbi's team.
Nora C. England
Documentation of Two Mayan Languages of Guatemala: Uspanteko and Sakapulteko
Uspanteko is one of the
smallest of the Mayan
languages with only about
1,000 speakers. Both
Sakapulteko and Uspanteko
are strongly threatened by shift
to Spanish and, in the case of
Uspanteko, to K'ichee' (another
Mayan language).
The work on these two
languages was coordinated
from the beginning with the
local Linguistic Communities
of the Academy of Mayan
Languages which was kept
informed throughout of
progress, as were other
community institutions and
leaders.
The work was carried out by
teams of three people under
the supervision of the PI,
Nora England. Each team
had a coordinator who was
a linguist and speaker of a
different Mayan language, and
two community researchers
who were speakers of the
language being documented
and were specifically trained
for this project by the team
coordinators and the PI.
The final products included
over 100 recorded texts in
each language (50 of these
in Sakapulteko and 32 in
Uspanteko were completely
glossed), lexical databases
of over 8,000 entries in
Sakapulteko and over 6,000
in Uspanteko, and grammars
of over 700 pages for each
language. A full set of the
audio recordings, paper and
digital copies of the grammar,
and a paper copy of the draft
dictionary were given to the
Linguistic Community, and
paper copies of a selection of
texts and of the grammar were
given to each secondary school
in the town. Audio recordings
of each text were given to the
person who had recorded the
text.
OKMA (Oxlajuuj Keej Maya'
Ajtz'iib'), the institution in
charge of the research, plans
to publish the grammars and
dictionaries. The audio files,
lexical database, grammars,
and transcriptions of the
texts have been submitted to
ELAR for archiving and will be
submitted to AILLA as well.


Antoine Guillaume
Takana and Reysano: documentation of two almost extinct languages of Bolivia
This project made it possible
to find fluent speakers of
Reyesano, to collect a sizeable
amount of material, and to
produce annotations and
analyses of these data in order
to allow future users to make
sense of it.
Ricardo Roca (81 years old at the time) and Antoine Guillaume
at Ricardo's house during a text transcription session. Ricardo
was a talented traditional musician. He made possible the
organisation of a fiesta where various Reyesano speakers were
brought together.
The analysis of the
grammatical structure of
Reyesano has revealed
interesting features, such as
a peculiar hierarchical and
inverse-like agreement system
and an intriguing head-
marking typological profile,
two characteristics which are
unique within the Tacanan
family.
Emilia Yumani (73 years old at the time), Mercedes Alvarado (87 years old at the time)
and Antoine Guillaume. At the house of one of Mercedes' sons, Emilia and Mercedes came
together for conversation, a difficult task because Emilia has a very light/soft voice and
Mercedes is half deaf.
The project has also been
fruitful for the Reyesano
community, in reinforcing
efforts being made by some
community members in
documenting and revitalising
their language, and in allowing
pedagogical materials to be
created, such as a bilingual
Reyesano-Spanish dictionary
and a pedagogical grammar.
The church of the Reyes, one of the most central buildings in
the town. Reyes was founded as a Jesuit mission in the 18th
century. Photo: Antoine Guillaume.
Reyesano was said to be
probably extinct without any
record apart from a list of only
150 words.
Antoine Guillaume and Marco Mano
at Marco's house. Marco had better
knowledge than anyone else of the
Reyesano lexicon. He could remember
many specific Reyesano terms for
animals, plants, etc.
Manuel Mamani (76 years old at the
time) at his house while recording a story.
Manuel was one of the best Reyesano
story tellers.


Alice Taff
Aleut conversation corpus
The aims of this project have
been, first, to record, in video
and audio, a major corpus
of Unangam Tunuu (Aleut
language) conversations among
fluent speakers in order to
answer the question, "How
was Unangam Tunuu spoken
in 2005?" We accomplished
our first aim by recording
a total of 52.5 hours of
spontaneous speech across
the region from 66 of the
90-some speakers (73%), a
brilliant result achieved by the
entire language community.
The recordings were made, for
the most part, simultaneously
on audio CD and video tape.
From September 2005, we
stopped recording and focused
on bilingual annotation and
preparing the materials for
deposit.
The second aim, to make time-
aligned bilingual annotations
of the recordings, has resulted
in time-aligned English
translation for 16% of the
corpus and Unangam Tunuu
In March 2006, Beverly Kashevarof Mierzejek and her father, Andronik Kashevarof
senior, create the time-aligned Unangan (Eastern Aleut) transcription and English
translation for a conversation previously recorded at their home in St. George
Island, Alaska. Photo: Alice Taff.
transcription for 10% of the
corpus. Highly labour intensive,
this bilingual annotation
is ongoing and files will be
deposited with archives as they
are completed.
The third aim has been to
teach language community
assistants professional
recording techniques,
linguistics basics, data
collection requirements,
and Aleut literacy. Twelve
assistants received training,
assisted in recording sessions,
and worked on bilingual
annotation. The majority of
the annotations were done
by 4 of these assistants;
before this work only 2 were
literate; now all 4 are. All
these assistants used Praat
phonetics software to listen
to and specify time-alignment
for their transcriptions. Six
fluent speakers assisted
with bilingual annotation,
giving English translations
and pronouncing full forms
of the words shortened in
rapid speech while younger
"understanders" entered the
data into text files. Of these
6 elders, 1 was literate. Now
the other 5 have learned to
read and spell by watching
the computer screen as their
words appear in print. Because
they have been working with
elders in activities that value
their ancestral language,
understanders are also
beginning to speak Unangam
Tunuu.
Mary bourauKOTSKy, nama uieyer, ana ner motner, Maria lurnpaugn. concentraie on
the exacting task of bilingual annotation during a week-long session in Anchorage,
Alaska, March 2006. Photo: Alice Taff.


Endangered Languages Documentation Programme
Research Projects 2006
14
15


Endangered Languages
Academic Programme (ELAP)
The Endangered Languages
Academic Programme
had its third full year of
operation, enrolling fifteen
MA students along with four
new PhD students. The MA
students come from a wide
variety of backgrounds and
have experience as foreign
language teachers, English as
a foreign language teachers,
information technology
specialists, translators and
school teachers. They come
from a range of countries and
places within the UK. The four
new PhD students are Gerardo
De Caro (former ELAP MA
student) who is working on
ergativity in Talyshi, spoken
on the border areas between
Iran and Azerbaijan, Stuart
McGill who is studying Acipu, a
Niger-Congo language spoken
in northwest Nigeria, Mary
Raymond (former ELAP MA
student) who is working on
Kubakota, spoken on Ranongga
Island in the Solomons,
and Sophie Salffner (also a
former ELAP MA student)
who is carrying out research
on Ukaan, a language spoken
in four villages in Southern
Nigeria. Gerardo De Caro and
Sophie Salffner received SOAS
scholarships, Mary Raymond
is supported by the AHRC and
Stuart McGill has an ELAP
scholarship. The four new
students upgraded from the
MPhil to PhD in June 2006 and
commenced the fieldwork and
data collection phases of their
research.
There were some staff changes
during the year: Oliver Bond
came to SOAS in May 2006 as
an ESRC post-doctoral fellow.
His PhD was awarded by the
University of Manchester and
his thesis, entitled 'Aspects of
Eleme verbal morphosyntax',
discusses Eleme fieldwork data
from a functional-typological
perspective, with a focus on
participant reference (including
logophoric reference and
applicative morphology) and
tense-aspect morphology.
Oliver's post-doctoral research
project, entitled 'Negative
strategies in the Ogonoid
languages', aims to contribute
to a broader understanding
of the properties of negation
in language. In August 2006
Zara Pybus left the post of
ELAP Administrator to take up
a job in the charity sector; she
was replaced by Alison Kelly
who had previously worked in
the Language Centre at SOAS.
Dr David Bradley, La Trobe
University, spent February-June
at ELAP as Leverhulme Visiting
Professor and gave a series of
seminars on his research on
South-east Asian languages, as
well as consulting widely with
staff and students at SOAS and
elsewhere in the UK.
In December 2005 ELAP
published the 3rd of a
series of papers entitled
"Language Documentation and
Description" Volume 3.
"Language Documentation
and Description" Volume 3
contains the following:
"Introduction"
Peter K. Austin
"Cross-disciplinarity
in the documentation
work of anthropologists
and linguists"
Thomas Widlok
"Ethnographically informed
language documentation"
K. David Harrison
"When our values
conflict with theirs:
linguists and community
empowerment in Melanesia"
Lise M. Dobrin
"A musicologist's wish list:
some issues, practices
and practicalities in
musical aspects of
language documentation"
Linda Barwick
"Language documentation
and ecology: areas
of interaction"
Gail Coelho
"Small is beautiful:
contributions of field-
based corpora to different
linguistic disciplines,
illustrated by Jalonke"
Friederike Lupke
"Documenting
child language"
Sonja Eisenbeiss
"The digital skills of
language documentation"
Robert Munro
"Personhood and
linguistic identity,
purism and variation"
William A. Foley
"It takes two to tango:
linguistic and cultural
(co-)variation in digital
documentation"
Anju Saxena
"Why Rama and not
Rama Cay Creole?"
Colette Grinevald
"Language contact, language
endangerment, and the role
of the 'salvation linguist' "
Yaron Matras
"Ancestral languages and
(imagined) creolization"
Anthony C. Woodbury


Other Activities
Other activities of ELAP during
the year include:
A weekly seminar series co
ordinated by Professor Austin
which included the following
presentations on endangered
languages topics
22nd November 2005
"The 'goe' in Goemai the
development of modifiers
in a Chadic language"
Birgit Hellwig, SOAS
29th November 2005
"Endangered numerals"
Bernard Comrie, Max Planck
Institute for Evolutionary
Anthropology, Leipzig
18th October 2005
"The native Lepcha
orthography" Heleen
Plaisier, Leiden University
25th October 2005
"Adverbs in Lakota" Bruce
Ingham SOAS
6th December 2005
"An unusual typological
mode for handling
countability in Mirana
(North West Amazon)" Frank
Seifart, Ruhr University,
Bochum
21st March 2006
"Protocol and the language
data life-cycle at ELAR"
David Nathan, ELAR
9th May 2006
"Negative strategies in
Eleme" Oliver Bond, ELAP
23rd May 2006
"Aboriginal Languages in
Canada: Past, Present,
Future" Keren Rice,
University of Toronto
13th June 2006
"Right(s), Permission(s)
and Protocol(s) in Language
Documentation: Laves' 1931
Noongar Field Notes" John
Henderson, University of
Western Australia
A fortnightly series of research
seminars for SOAS researchers
and PhD students was co-
ordinated by Dr Leora Bar-el
and included the following
presentations:
21st October 2005
"Depositing with ELAR:
accepting, accessioning and
archiving" Robert Munro
and David Nathan
27th October 2005
"Transitivity in Salish"
Leora Bar-el
17th November 2005
"Semantic aspects of
the noun class system in
Gujjolay Eegima" Serge
Sagna
1st December 2005
"Ergative Extraction in
Yukatek and Lakandon
Maya", Henrik Bergqvist
8th February 2006
"In/alienable possession"
Peter Budd
22nd February 2006
"Directional verbs in
Arop-Lokep and Karnai"
Mary Raymond
8th March 2006
"Patterns of pronominal
alignment in Northern
Talyshi" Gerado De Caro
15th March 2006
"Sketch grammars in
language documentation
and description What?
How? Where?" Sophie
Salffner
11th May 2006
"Verb Serialization in Betta
Kurumba" Gail Coelho
25th May 2006
"Sentence connectives and
deictic shift in Paasaal
narrative" Stuart McGill
Workshops for specialists and
members of the general public:
Endangered Languages
and Literacy
3rd December 2005
with presentations by:
Yonas M. Asfaha, University
of Tilburg, The Netherlands
Eva Csato, Uppsala
University
Graham Furniss, Africa
Department SOAS
Friederike Lupke, ELAP
David Nathan, ELAR
Uta Papen, University of
Lancaster
Mary Raymond, ELAP
Frank Seifart, Ruhr-
Universitat Bochum,
Germany
Justin Watkins, Southeast
Asia Department SOAS
Language contact and
variation in language
documentation
11th February 2006
with presentations by:
Felix Ameka, Leiden
University
Leora Bar-el, ELAP
Henrik Bergqvist, ELAP
David Bradley, La Trobe
University and Leverhulme
Visiting Professor, SOAS
William Foley, University of
Sydney
Prof Lenore Grenoble,
Dartmouth College
Robert Munro, ELAR
Anthony C Woodbury,
University of Texas
Both workshops were attended
by over 50 people and
resulted in lively discussion.
Revised versions of the
papers presented at these
workshops will appear in
Language Documentation
and Description, Vol 4, to be
published in early 2007.


We hosted the UK premiere
of a film on endangered
languages: 'In Languages
We Live: Voices of the World"
directed by Janus Billeskov
Jansen. The event, on 6th
February 2006, was attended
by over 60 people and the
director participated in a
question-answer session before
the film showing.
A public lecture on 10th
February 2006 was presented
by Dr Dietrich Schuller,
Austrian Phonogramarchiv, with
the title "Endangered archives
of endangered languages".
The lecture was attended by
approximately 70 people.
A special workshop was held on
19th May 2006, on Australian
Aboriginal Languages with
presentations by Peter K.
Austin, ELAR David Nathan,
ELAR, and Jean-Christophe
Verstraete, University of Leuven
Training courses for ELDP
grantees were run jointly by
ELAP and ELAR staff together
with invited external presenters
on 21-27th June 2006. The
course was attended by
16 grantees and covered a
range of topics in language
documentation, with a focus
on sound and video recording,
intellectual property rights
and ethics, data management,
software for language analysis,
metadata, archiving and
preparation of multimedia
and practical materials for
communities.
Professor Austin served on
the Linguistic Society of
America (LSA) Committee on
Endangered Languages and
their Preservation, the HEFCE
Research Assessment Exercise
Panel for Linguistics, the Arts
and Humanities Data Service
advisory board on languages
and linguistics, the Cambridge
University Press Linguistics
Board, the Board of the journal
'Indonesia and the Malay
World', and the Northcote
Trust. He was a member of
research grants selection
panels for the National Science
Foundation and National
Endowment of Humanities,
the Volkswagen Foundation's
DoBeS project, and the
Northcote Trust.
Professor Austin visited and
gave presentations at a number
of universities in the UK
and overseas and took part
in several conferences and
symposia during this period:
30th September 2005
workshop on Language
Contact, University of
Manchester
26th October 2005
seminar "Language Contact
in Australia", Department of
Classics and Archaeology,
Cambridge University
24th January 2006
seminar "Linguistic Ecology
of Lombok, eastern
Indonesia", Linguistic Circle
of Oxford
3rd February 2006
public lecture "Survival of
Languages", Darwin College,
Cambridge University
20th February 2006
UNESCO, Paris
2nd-5th April 2006
co-organiser of Third
Oxford-Kobe Linguistics
Seminar "The Linguistics
of Endangered Languages",
Kobe, Japan
24-26th May 2006
lecture series "Language
Documentation", Federico II
University, Naples, Italy
2nd-3rd June 2006
UK Austronesian Research
Group, St Catherine's
College, Oxford University
15-16th June 2006
DoBeS training workshop,
Max Planck Institute for
Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen,
The Netherlands
27-30th June 2006
keynote lecture "Hierarchies
of clause linkage",
International Symposium
on the Grammar and
Pragmatics of Complex
Sentences (Subordination
and Coordination), Tomsk
Pedagogical University,
Tomsk, Russia
10-13th July 2006
advisory committee
member, Linguamon House
of Languages, Barcelona,
Spain
Other ELAP staff gave invited
seminars and conference
papers during the year:
Leora Bar-el at the University
of Toronto, University of
British Columbia, University of
Surrey, Manchester University,
Linguistics Association of
Great Britain
Oliver Bond at University of
Surrey, African Linguistics
Congress Addis Abbaba
Ethiopia, Linguistics
Association of Great Britain
Friederike Lupke at University
of Surrey, Lancaster University
Gerardo De Caro, Stuart
McGill, Mary Raymond and
Sophie Salffner attended the
Leipzig Spring School on
Language Typology and each
gave a paper on their research
at the associated student
conference.
Professor Austin gave several
press interviews during this
period with the BBC.


Publications
Austin, Peter K. 2006
"Data and language
documentation" in Jost
Gippert, Nikolaus Himmelmann
and Ulrike Mosel (eds.)
Fundamentals of Language
Documentation. Berlin: Mouton
de Gruyter
Austin, Peter K. 2006
"Content questions in
Sasak, eastern Indonesia: an
optimality theoretic syntax
account" in Holger Warnk and
Fritz Schulz (eds.) Papers in
south-east Asian languages
presented to Bernd Nothofer.
Wiesbaden: Harrasowitz Verlag
Austin, Peter K. 2006
Article 5040 "Languages of
the World: Gamilaraay" in
Keith Brown (ed.) International
Encyclopedia of Language
and Linguistics, 2nd edition.
Oxford: Elsevier
Austin, Peter K. 2006
Article 5042 "Languages of
the World: Jiwarli" in Keith
Brown (ed.) International
Encyclopedia of Language
and Linguistics, 2nd edition.
Oxford: Elsevier
Austin, Peter K. 2006
Article 1711 "Countries and
Language Australia" in Keith
Brown (ed.) International
Encyclopedia of Language
and Linguistics, 2nd edition.
Oxford: Elsevier
Austin, Peter K. and Lenore
Grenoble 2006
"Current Trends in Language
Documentation" in Peter
K. Austin (ed.) Language
Documentation and
Description, Vol 4 SOAS:
HRELP
Bond, Oliver 2006
"A Broader Perspective on
Point of View: Logophoricity
in Ogonoid languages" in John
Mugane, John P Hutchinson
and Dee A. Worman (eds.),
Selected Proceedings of the
35th Annual Conference on
African Linguistics: African
Languages and Linguistics in
Broad Perspective. Somerville,
MA: Cascadilla Proceedings
Project
Bond, Oliver 2006
Review of Standard Negation:
The Negation of Declarative
Verbal Main Clauses in a
Typological Perspective.
Empirical Approaches to
Language Typology 31.
Miestamo, Matti. 2005. Berlin:
Mouton de Gruyter.
http://linguistlist.org/
issues/I7/17-1982.html
Coelho, Gail 2006
"Gathering plant and animal
names" in Language Archives
Newsletter 7 and http: //www.
mpi.nl/LAN
Coelho, Gail 2006
"Language documentation and
ecology: Areas of interaction"
in Peter K. Austin (ed.)
Language Documentation and
Description 3, pp 63-74. SOAS:
HRELP
Plant names in Betta Kurumba: Pandlpeyriye (Lycopersicum
esculentum). Photo: Gail Coelho.
The bitjgi tree (Pterocarpus marsupium). Photo: Gail Coelho.


ELAP staff
Academic staff
Professor Peter Austin
Marit Rausing Chair in
Field Linguistics. Director,
Endangered Languages
Academic Programme.
Peter Austin studied at the
Australian National University,
completing a BA with first
class Honours in Asian Studies
(Japanese and Linguistics) in
1974, and a PhD in 1978 on
the Diyari language spoken
in the far north of South
Australia. He taught at the
University of Western Australia
(1978), held a Harkness
Fellowship at UCLA and MIT
(1979-80), and in 1981 set up
the Department of Linguistics
at La Trobe University. In
1989 he was instrumental in
establishing Japanese language
teaching at La Trobe. In 1996
he was appointed Foundation
Professor of Linguistics at the
University of Melbourne, and
joined SOAS in January 2003.
Professor Austin's research
interests cover descriptive,
theoretical and applied
linguistics. He has extensive
fieldwork experience on
Australian Aboriginal languages
(northern New South Wales,
northern South Australia, and
north-west Western Australia)
and has co-authored the first
fully page-formatted hypertext
dictionary on the World Wide
Web, a bilingual dictionary
of Gamilaraay (Kamilaroi),
northern New South Wales,
as well as publishing seven
bilingual dictionaries of
Aboriginal languages. Since
1995 he has been carrying
out research on Sasak and
Sumbawan, Austronesian
languages spoken on Lombok
and Sumbawa islands, eastern
Indonesia. His theoretical
research is mainly on syntax
and focuses on Lexical
Functional Grammar, morpho-
syntactic typology, computer-
aided lexicography and
multi-media for endangered
languages. He has also
published on historical and
comparative linguistics,
typology, and Aboriginal history
and biography.
Leora Bar-el
Post-doctoral Fellow in
Language Documentation and
Description.
Leora Bar-el received a
Combined Honours BA
in English Literature and
Linguistics from the University
of Western Ontario in London,
Ontario, Canada in 1996. It
was there that she was first
introduced to, and became
interested in, First Nations
languages.
Leora moved to Vancouver,
British Columbia, Canada,
to pursue graduate work in
linguistics and there she began
to work on Salish languages.
Since 1997 she has been
conducting fieldwork with the
last remaining speakers of
the Skwxwu7mesh language
(Central Salish), an extremely
endangered language spoken
in British Columbia. In
1998 Leora received an MA
degree in Linguistics from
the University of British
Columbia. Her MA thesis
focuses on verbal plurality
and adverbial quantification in
Skwxwu7mesh. In the course
of her graduate studies, Leora
has conducted research on
other Salish languages, as well
as Plains Cree, an Algonquian
language. Her research
areas have included: aspect,
Aktionsart, reduplication,
number, intonation and stress.
Being engaged in research
that contributes to the
documentation of endangered
languages has also led to
Leora's interest in and research
on language revitalisation
practices in Canada and
communities around the world.
Leora completed a PhD in
Linguistics in 2005 at the
University of British Columbia
entitled "Aspectual Distinctions
in Skwxwu7mesh" which looks
at an aspectual classification
of predicates, the perfective/
imperfective distinction and an
exploration of cross-linguistic
variation in these areas. She
plans to continue conducting
fieldwork on Salish during her
post-doctoral research which
will focus on the relationship
between aspect, transitivity
and control in three Central
Salish languages.
Dr Oliver Bond
ESRC Post-doctoral Fellow.
Oliver Bond's principal
research interests lie in
typology, historical linguistics
and language documentation,
including fieldwork on Eleme


(Ogonoid, Benue-Congo), an
under-described language
spoken in southeast Nigeria.
Oliver's ESRC research project,
entitled 'Negative strategies
in the Ogonoid languages',
aims to contribute to a
broader understanding of the
properties of negation in
language. The main objective
of the project is to devise
a questionnaire to capture
information relevant to
negative constructions in terms
of their morphosyntactic/
prosodic realisation and the
grammatical distinctions
encoded in pairs of affirmative
and negative constructions.
More specifically, however, it
is conceived of as a device
for the eventual collection of
cross-linguistic data for the
comparison of diachronic
paths of negative elements in
the languages of the world.
Oliver has recently been
awarded a PhD from the
University of Manchester,
where he also studied for a BA
and a MA in Linguistics. His
PhD thesis, entitled 'Aspects of
Eleme verbal morphosyntax',
discusses Eleme fieldwork data
from a functional-typological
perspective, with a focus on
participant reference (including
logophoric reference and
applicative morphology) and
tense-aspect morphology.
Dr Gail Coelho
Post-doctoral Research Fellow
Gail Coelho is working on Betta
Kurumba, an understudied
South Dravidian language
spoken in the Nilgiri Mountains
in southern India. She is
currently working on a book
manuscript which presents a
grammar of Betta Kurumba,
expanding upon a description
of the language provided in her
doctoral dissertation. She has
also begun working on Betta
Kurumba ethnobiology, for
which she has collected native
names for plants and animals,
descriptions of traditional uses
of natural resources, and folk
stories in which animals and
plants are anthropomorphised.
In previous research, she
has worked on theoretical
analyses of reduplication
and lexical stress in a Native
American language, Thompson
River Salish. In addition, her
Master's thesis was a study
of social variation in certain
contact-derived phenomena
in a dialect of Indian English
spoken in Madras, India.
Gail completed her PhD in
linguistics at the University of
Texas at Austin and a Master's
degree in linguistics at the
University of Pittsburgh. She
also has a Master's degree
in English Literature and
Linguistics from the University
of Bombay. She completed
a BA in English Literature at
Stella Maris College, University
of Madras.
Her main research interest is
in language documentation,
for which she believes that it
is particularly important to
document a wide range of
genres of discourse (stories,
songs, riddles, proverbs, etc.)
and to document cultural
knowledge as it is encoded in
language (as, for example, in
the study of ethnobiology).
Within linguistic theory and
description, her interests lie in
morphosyntax, phonology, and
language contact.
Anthony Jukes
ELDP Postdoctoral Research
Fellow.
Anthony Jukes is an ELDP-
funded post-doctoral research
fellow, working to document
and describe Toratan
(Ratahan), an endangered
language spoken by the older
generation in a handful of
villages located in southern
Minahasa, North Sulawesi,
Indonesia. Toratan is an
isolated member of the
Sangiric language family,
surrounded by Minahasan
languages. Like other
languages of the region it is
giving way to Manado Malay
and the national language
Bahasa Indonesia. Its decline
is more advanced than most
regional languages, with no
more than a few hundred fluent
speakers, all of advanced age.
This project aims to document
the language while it is still
possible, and also to work with
the language community on
maintenance strategies.
Anthony studied Linguistics
and Japanese at the University
of Melbourne, completing
a BA (Hons) in 1996, after
which he began research on


Makassarese, a language
with about two million
speakers located in South
Sulawesi, Indonesia, His
MA thesis (1998) describes
the phonology and verbal
morphology of that language.
He then spent some time
working as a research assistant
on an Australian Research
Council funded project on
languages of Lombok and
Sumbawa, and also studied
Indonesian at the South-
East Asian Studies Summer
Institute (SEASSI) at the
University of Oregon. He
returned to the University of
Melbourne to continue work
on Makassarese, especially
the literary genre found in
manuscripts written in an
obsolete local script. His PhD
thesis is a reference grammar
focusing on morphosyntax.
Dr Friederike Liipke
Lecturer in Language
Documentation and Description.
Friederike Lupke studied
African Linguistics, General
Linguistics and Phonetics at
the University of Cologne,
Germany. She spent a year
at the Institut National des
Langues et Civilisations
Orientales (INALCO) in Paris
studying the West African
languages Bambara and Fula.
In 1999, she completed her
MA, which received first class
Honours, with a thesis on
parts of speech in Bambara.
She then took on a PhD
scholarship in the Language
and Cognition Research Group
of the Max Planck Institute for
Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen,
The Netherlands. For her
PhD project, she worked on
Jalonke (Yalunka), a previously
undescribed Mande language
of Guinea. Her PhD thesis is a
field-based account of verbal
argument structure and verb
classes in Jalonke.
Dr Lupke's theoretical
interests range from the
syntax-semantics interface,
especially in the domain of
verbal argument structure
and case marking, to
morphosyntactic typology,
semantic typology and the
influence of cognition, culture
and contact on language. Her
descriptive interests lie in
Jalonke and Mande linguistics
and more generally in language
documentation from a
linguistic point of view. One of
her concerns in this domain
is the use and development
of non-verbal stimuli
facilitating linguistic analysis
in the field and cross-linguistic
comparison. She is interested
in African history and culture,
especially in her geographical
area of work, West Africa.
Support Staff
Alison Kelly
Academic Programme
Administrator.
Alison obtained her BA
in French Studies from
Southampton University in
2000. The program included
a year abroad studying at
the University of Nice during
1998. She worked as an
administrator for Mourant
ECS before taking a course
administrator position in the
Language Centre at SOAS in
2004. She joined HRELP as
the Academic Programme
Administrator in 2006. She
is currently studying towards
the Postgraduate Certificate in
Professional Practice (Higher
Education Administration and
Management).
Alison's main responsibilities
include: dealing with enquiries
from students and the
general public, producing
course handbooks and other
materials, editing the HRELP
web site, minuting meetings,
and providing administrative
support to the Director.


Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR)
The Endangered Languages
Archive provides digital
archiving and associated
services for ELDP grantees
and others working with
endangered languages
We aim to provide
Security keep electronic
endangered language
materials safe
Preservation store
electronic endangered
language materials for the
long term
Discovery help the wider
world to find out about
materials
Protocol respect and
implement sensitivities and
restrictions
Sharing provide access to
materials, where appropriate
Acknowledgement create
citable acknowledgment of
research
Mobilisation help to create
usable language materials
for communities
Quality and standards give
advice for creating materials
of high quality and robust
standards
We also offer auxiliary services
including:
Training
Facilities for digitising media
and documents
Practical resource
development (on a project
by project basis)
ELAR in 2005-6
ELAR's premises were
completed in September 2005
and the archive was officially
opened for activities in October.
Equipment for mass data
storage was commissioned,
and the first deposit was made.
Since then, several other
materials for deposit have been
received from;
Yeshes Vodgsal Acuo (IPF0071),
Wayan Arka (IPF0011),
Nora England (MDP0018),
Louis Goldstein (FTG0025),
Antoine Guillaume (IPF0007),
Birgit Hellwig (IPF0010),
Catriona Hyslop (IPF0002),
Romero Mendez (FTG0029),
Stephen Morey (IPF0081),
Knut Olawsky (IPF0001), and
Alice Taff (IPF0013), with
several more due soon.
Other developments included:
completion of software
design for a state-of-the-art
Open Archives compliant
digital archive
commissioning of a robot
tape library for backup and
transport of data offsite
installation of Dobbin,
specialist software for
audio archives that provides
quality feedback and
automated audio processing
an agreement with Oxford
Text Archive that provides
data replication as well as
a firm additional long-term
data repository
formation of an inventory
of audio recording and
associated equipment for
HRELP field-workers
an on-line equipment loan
management system
23
"Dobbin" training session. Left to Right: David Nathan, Tom Castle, Thorsten Juettner
(Cube-Tec) and Bernard Howard.


David Nathan assisted the
ELDP Panel with assessing
grant applications, advising
on all matters related to
equipment and documentation
methodology, and ELAR co-
ordinated the training of ELDP
grantees in June 2006 (see
p27). Our staff ran sessions
ranging from recording
techniques and archiving to
database technologies.
We advised many ELDP
grantees and others about
equipment and preparing data
for archiving, and advised
on the selection, purchase
and allocation of specialised
equipment for ELAP fieldwork
students.
In February 2006, ELAR
ran a one-day workshop on
"Audio Recording, Digitisation
and Archiving", presented
by leading audio archivist
Dietrich Schuller of the Vienna
Phonogrammarchiv. It was
attended by 21 people who
provided extremely positive
feedback; in addition, Dr
Schuller was able to provide
invaluable advice to ELAR on
audio archiving.
ELAR continues active
participation in the academic
community. David Nathan and
Robert Munro gave lectures
and presentations at national
and international events (see
below).
David Nathan continued
to initiate and develop
multimedia projects, including
CD lecture presentations by
Peter Ladefoged and Dietrich
Schuller, and pedagogical CDs
for Gamilaraay and Karaim.
The Dawes Online project,
conducted jointly together
with the SOAS Library Special
Collections, is digitising,
transcribing, and making an
interactive online version of
a manuscript on the Sydney
language, one of the key
resources for Australian
languages.http: //www.
hrelp.org/dawes. In 2005, a
course based around a CD co-
authored by David with Michael
Christie and Waymamba
Gaykamangu won the
Australian University Teacher
of the Year award (the CD is
entitled "Yolngu Languages and
Culture: Gupapuyngu").
Project development
work includes continued
collaboration in the European
project Distributed Access
Management for Language
Resources (DAM-LR),
a partnership between
ELAR, Max Planck Institute
for Psycholinguistics
(Netherlands), University
of Lund (Sweden), and the
Institute for Dutch Lexicology
at Leiden (Netherlands). The
DAM-LR and Dawes Online
projects have both attracted
external funding.
ELAR is a participant in the
Digital Endangered Languages
and Musics Archives Network
(DELAMAN) which met in
November 2005. Participating
archives include ELAR, DoBeS,
AILLA, Alaska Native Language
Centre, E-MELD, Paradisec, and
the Maori Music Archive. ELAR
will host the DELAMAN meeting
at SOAS from November 2-3,
2006.
ELAR has a new Visitor's
Room where researchers
and depositors can use our
research facilities. Visitors
to date have been Susan
Gehr, Bernard Comrie, Frank
Seifart, Christy Henshaw, David
Bradley, John Henderson,
Chaithra Puttaswamy, and
Edward Garrett.
Poster for the Dawes project designed by David Nathan.


Publications by
ELAR staff
Nathan, D. 2006.
"A Talking Dictionary of
Paakantyi NSW" in Laurel
Dyson, Max Hendriks
& Stephen Grant (eds)
Information technology and
Indigenous People. Hershey PA:
Idea Group.pp 200-204
Nathan, David 2006.
"Thick interfaces: mobilising
language documentation"
in Jost Gippert, Nikolaus
Himmelmann and Ulrike Mosel
(eds.), Essentials of language
documentation. Berlin: Mouton
de Gruyter. pp 363-379.
Nathan, David and
Eva A. Csato 2006.
"Multimedia: A community
oriented information and
communication technology" in
Anju Saxena & Lars Borin (eds)
Lesser-known languages of
South Asia. Status and policies,
case studies and applications
of information technology.
[Trends of Linguistics Series]
Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. pp
257-277.
Nathan, David 2006.
Review of Multilingualism
and Electronic Language
Management. Walter
Daelemans, Theo du Plessis,
Cobus Snyman, and Lut Teck
(editors). U Antwerp; U Free
State; and IHESA, Brussels,
Pretoria: Van Schaik (Studies in
language policy in South Africa,
volume 4). In Computational
Linguistics 32.1 (March 2006),
pp 143-147
Munro, Robert 2005.
"The digital skills of language
documentation", in Peter
K. Austin (ed) Language
Documentation and Description
Volume 3. London: SOAS
Seminars, workshops,
training
David Nathan and Robert
Munro. 2005. Depositing with
ELAR: accepting, accessioning
and archiving. Departmental
Seminar, SOAS October 2005
David Nathan. 2006.
Protocol and the language data
lifecycle at ELAR. Linguistics
Departmental seminar, SOAS
March 2006
David Nathan. 2006.
The Singing Dictionary:
Multimedia for Gamilaraay/
Yuwaalaraay NSW. Presentation
at Special Australianist
Workshop, May 2006
SL
SOAS ELDP Training course,
SOAS June 2006 (co-ordinator
David Nathan), (see p 27)
Karaim Summer School,
on
Trakai Lithuania, July 2006
(co-organiser David Nathan)
a)
Karaim Summer School, Trakai Lithuania, July 06 (co-organiser David Nathan).
25


International
conferences
Broeder, Daan, Peter van
de Kamp, David Nathan,
Freddy Offenga, Sven
Stromqvist, Peter Wittenburg.
2006. "Technologies for
a Federation of Language
Resource Archives" 2006.
Paper presented at LREC
Workshop: Towards a Research
Infrastructure for Language
Resources, 22nd May 2006,
Genoa, Italy
Nathan, David and Remco van
Veenendaal. 2006.
"DAM-LR as a Language
Archive Federation:
strategies and prospects."
Paper presented at LREC
Workshop: Towards a Research
Infrastructure for Language
Resources, 22nd May 2006,
Genoa, Italy
Munro, Robert and David
Nathan. 2005.
"Introducing the ELAR
information system
architecture." The Third
meeting of the Digital
Endangered Languages
and Music Archive Network
(DELAMAN III), Nov 2005,
Austin TX
Munro, Robert. 2006
"Current design issues for
digital archives: Architectures
supporting value-adding
access via a user's preferred
language(s) and granularity
of materials". Paper
presented (by David Nathan)
at the Georgetown University
Roundtable on Linguistics,
Georgetown University, March
2006
Nathan, David. 2006.
"Sound and Unsound
Documentation: Questions
about the roles of audio in
language documentation."
Paper presented at the
Georgetown University
Roundtable on Linguistics,
Georgetown University, March
2006
Robert Munro (right) at the DAM-LR meeting, Lund, January 2006.


June 2006 ELDP training
General view of training session in the ELAR office at SOAS.
Left to right: Myfany Turpin, Katia Chirkova, Sarah Cutfield and
Jean Tullet.
Ubiray Rezende (left) showing how to use solar power. Victoria
Rau Der-Hwa (right) watches.
Left to right: Katia Chirkova, Victoria Rau Der-Hwa, David
Harrison and Sarah Cutfield.
Katia Chirkova presenting her work on Baima.
Professor Peter Austin introducing the training sessions. With
Katia Chirkova and Sarah Cutfield.
Left to right: B'alam (Eladio) Mateo-Toledo, Matthew Dryer, and
Stephen Morey practising their video skills.
Left to right: David Evans, Stephen Morey, Ubiray Rezende
and B'alam (Eladio) Mateo-Toledo.


ELAR Staff
ELAR has seen several staffing
changes this year. Following his
half-time secondment to assist
in setup of our infrastructure,
Robert Kennedy left in March
2006. In April 2006, Robert
Munro completed his two-
year contract, and left having
made important contributions
to the design of ELAR's
archive information systems,
completed a detailed software
model for ELAR's data storage
and catalogue, and provided a
great deal of input into ELAR
and HRELP's website, and
our training and academic
activities. He was succeeded
by David Evans. In order to
support the expanded activities
made possible by HEFCE
funding of equipment, a new
half-time Digital Technician
post was created and is held by
Tom Castle. In addition, several
ELAP students, including
Chaithra Puttaswamy, Louise
Ashmore, and Stuart Brown,
have worked on an occasional
basis in the archive.
David Nathan,
Director
David Nathan has worked
with computing applications
for endangered (especially
Australian Aboriginal)
languages for 12 years. He
ran the ASEDA archive in
Canberra, Australia, and
taught courses in computing,
linguistics, cognitive science,
multimedia development
and English at universities
in Australia, Japan and the
UK. Publications include
the textbook "Australia's
Indigenous Languages"; papers
on lexicography, multimedia,
and indigenous people and
the Internet; and several
multimedia CD-ROMs. He was
co-author (with Peter Austin)
of the web's first hypertext
bilingual dictionary (for
Gamilaraay/Kamilaroi), and
has established several major
web sites. Along with building
up the archive functions, he
is actively involved in other
technical and academic areas:
he is currently working on
CD-ROMs including one for
Gamilaraay (New South Wales),
and is interested in multimedia
interfaces for authoring and
presenting language materials,
and in the methodology of
language documentation.
Thomas Castle,
Digital Technician
Tom studied Three Dimensional
Design at Kingston in Surrey,
completing a BA (Hons) in
1977. He worked in the theatre
- as a designer/maker, and
technician with experimental
groups. Tom developed
skills working with video,
photography and sound for
live performance and events.
In 1982 he moved to Hoxton
Hall, designing, teaching and
providing technical support
for community projects, and
professional performance
companies. In 1990, Tom
became a volunteer counsellor
and obtained a Postgraduate
Diploma in Psychodynamic
Counselling from Birkbeck.
In 1992 he became a
freelance technician, touring
with contemporary dance
groups, Kathak dancers and
experimental puppeteers. In
2004, Tom completed an MA
in Sonic Arts from Middlesex,
experimenting with music,
sound and technology. Tom is
currently involved in setting up
data transfer to the archive,
back-up systems and the
development of a supportive,
specialist working environment
for students and grantees.
David Evans,
Software Developer
David holds a BA in English
Literature (1997) and a
Postgraduate Certificate of
Education (1998) from Cardiff
University, in addition to an
MSc in Computer Science
(2002) at the University of
Wales, Aberystwyth, where
his dissertation was based
on using robots as aids to
teaching topics in Artificial
Intelligence. In 2003 he joined
the National Library of Wales
as a Web Assistant. This role
involved producing online
versions of catalogues and
exhibitions, including 'Celtic
Voices' (http://www.llgc.
org.uk/celticvoices),
an exhibition of items in the
six Celtic languages (Welsh,
Scots Gaelic, Irish, Cornish,
Manx and Breton). He joined
SOAS in April 2006. David's
responsibilities include
maintaining the digital
catalogue of the Endangered
Languages Archive (ELAR), as
well as the database functions
of the HRELP website. David
is a Member of the British
Computer Society, and his
interests include artificial
intelligence, educational
technology and the Semantic
Web.
Bernard Howard,
Technical Officer
Bernard Howard started
work at SOAS as Phonetics
Lab Technician. He provides
technical support, assisting
staff and students with
recording and digitising.
He has also helped with
equipment support for ELAP
fieldwork students and ELAR
and ELDP training events.


SOAS
University of London
This document is the fourth annual report of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP).
It outlines the structure of HRELP and its activities for the year.
All photographs by David Nathan except where stated otherwise.
HRELP, Linguistics Department, SOAS, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square WC1H OXG
Tel: +44(0) 20 7898 4578 Email: elap@soas.ac.uk Web: www.hrelp.org
Designed by Tom Castle


Full Text

PAGE 1

T H E H A N S R A U S I N G Endangered Languages Project Because every last word means another lost world... Annual Report 2006 Documentary linguistics aims to make an enduring record of endangered languages and to support speakers of these languages in their desire to maintain them

PAGE 2

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 1 Contents 2 Endangered languages documentation and support 3 HRELP 4 Activities throughout the year 5 Training for documentation and support at SOAS 6 ELDP 8 ELDP panel membership 11 Four examples of ELDP funded work 14 Map showing research projects 16 Endangered Languages Academic Programme 20 ELAP staff 23 Endangered Languages Archive 27 ELDP Training June 2006 28 ELAR Staff

PAGE 3

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 2 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 3 Endangered languages documentation and support It is generally agreed that today there are about 6,500 languages spoken across the world and at least half of these are under threat of extinction. This is mainly because speakers of smaller languages are switching to other larger languages and not passing on their heritage tongue to their children. They do this for perceived economic, social or political advantages, or because they feel ashamed of their ancestral language. The language can thus be lost in one or two generations, often to the great regret of their descendants. Over the past 10 years a new field of study called Language Documentation or Documentary Linguistics has developed. Documentary linguistics is concerned with the methods, tools, and theoretical underpinnings for compiling a representative and lasting multipurpose record of a natural language or one of its varieties (Gippert, Himmelmann and Mosel 2006: v). It has developed over the last decade in large part in response to the urgent need to make an enduring record of the worlds many endangered languages and to support speakers of these languages in their desire to maintain them. It is also fueled by information and communication technologies which make documentation and the preservation and dissemination of language data possible in ways which could not previously be envisioned. But, essentially, it also concerns itself with role of language speakers and their rights and needs in ways not previously considered within linguistics. In a recently published textbook, Himmelmann (2006:15) identifies the following as important new features of documentary linguistics: Focus on primary data language documentation concerns the collection and analysis of an array of primary language data to be made available for a wide range of users; Explicit concern for accountability access to primary data and representations of it makes evaluation of linguistic analyses possible and expected; Concern for long-term storage and preservation of primary data language documentation includes a focus on archiving in order to ensure that documentary materials are made available to potential users into the distant future; Work in interdisciplinary teams documentation requires input and expertise from a range of disciplines and is not restricted to linguistics alone; Close cooperation with and direct involvement of the speech community language documentation requires active and collaborative work with community members both as producers of language materials and as coresearchers. Language documentation is built on a corpus of audio and/or video materials with transcription, annotation, translation into a language of wider communication, and relevant metadata on context and use of the materials. Such a corpus can be archived for current and future use by scholars, speakers and interested others. Woodbury 2003 advocates that ideally, the corpus will be large, cover a diverse range of genres and contexts, be expandable, opportunistic, portable, transparent, ethical and preservable. As a result, documentation is increasingly done by teams, including community members, rather than by individuals, because both the technical skills and the amount of time required to create this corpus make it difficult to achieve for a single linguist working alone. Importantly, outcomes of documentary linguistics research should be directly relevant and valuable to the community of speakers whose language is being documented so that their languages can receive the support they need in the face of pressures from other dominant groups and languages. The Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) was established with a commitment of million from the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund to document as many endangered languages as possible and to encourage the development of relevant skills across the world. It has the following three components: Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (ELDP). Designed to provide approximately million over an 8-10 year period in competitive research grants to encourage the development of linguistic fieldwork in endangered languages (especially by younger scholars) and to support documentation of as many threatened languages as possible. ELDP is governed by an international selection panel chaired by Prof Barry Supple; its grants are administered by the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP). Aimed at training the next generation of language documenters, it offers students an array of opportunities: an MA in Language Documentation and Description, a PhD in Field Linguistics, and postdoctoral fellowships at SOAS. We also offer a comprehensive programme of public lectures, seminars and training courses. Prof Peter K. Austin, Mrit Rausing Chair in Field Linguistics, is Director of ELAP. Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR). Established at SOAS in early 2004, this will be one of the prime resources for study and methodology in the field of digital language archiving. David Nathan is Director of ELAR. The mission of HRELP is to: Provide opportunities for fieldworkers, academics, students, collaborative ventures and international organisations to work together with endangered language communities to ensure that everything possible is done to record and encourage linguistic, cultural and human diversity; Award approximately million a year in research grants to high quality projects; Train new generations of linguists to research and develop work that opens up new fields of study; Set up an innovative, comprehensive endangered languages digital archive as a major international resource for scholars, communities and other interested persons; Endeavour to raise as much additional funds as possible to build the scale, scope and effectiveness of our work; Welcome all those able to donate time, money or expertise to help build on the solid base HRELP has established. HRELP speaker s THE LAST SPEAKERS races from the mountains of Taiwan to the swamplands of Siberia, from the shantytowns of South Africa to the reservations of North America, to keep up with linguists, activists, teachers and students confronting this crisis on the frontlines. Nothing less than human heritage, understanding of science, and diversity are at stake. the la st activists, teachers and students confronting understanding of science, u k film p re mi ere Every two weeks, the world loses one language Wed 17th May 5.00pm THE HANS RAUSING ENDANGERED LANGUAGES PROJECT Khalili Theatre SOAS HRELP hosted the UK premiere of The Last Speakers. The poster was designed by Zara Pybus, David Nathan & Tom Castle.

PAGE 4

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 4 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 5 Activities throughout the year This annual report covers the period from September 2005 to August 2006 for the ELDP, ELAP and ELAR programmes. In 2006, ELDP awarded 27 grants for a total of ,333, an amount almost double that awarded in 2005. ELAP had its third intake of students, enrolling fifteen MA students along with four new PhD students (see p16 for further details). There were some changes to staff: Dr Oliver Bond joined as an ESRC post-doctoral researcher in May 2006 to work on cross-linguistic study of negation, and Zara Pybus left as ELAP Administrator and was replaced by Alison Kelly. In August Dr Friederike Lpke began maternity leave, and was replaced by Dr Gail Coelho through a threemonth temporary lectureship. Dr David Bradley, La Trobe University, spent three months at SOAS as Leverhulme Visiting Professor and gave a series of lectures on his research which focuses on South-east Asian languages. ELAP ran two series of seminars and two workshops throughout the year, and hosted the annual HRELP public lecture on 10th February 2006, which was presented by Dr Dietrich Schller, Austrian Phonogramarchiv, with the title Endangered archives of endangered languages. The third in a series of publications entitled Language Documentation and Description was published in December 2005 (see details below), and a fourth volume will appear in early 2007. ELARs premises were completed in September 2005 and the archive was officially opened for activities in October. Equipment for mass data storage was commissioned, and the first deposit was made. Since then, several other materials for deposit have been received from ELDP grantees: Yeshes Vodgsal Acuo (IPF0071), Wayan Arka (IPF0011, two deposits), Nora England (MDP0018), Louis Goldstein (FTG0025), Antoine Guillaume (IPF0007), Birgit Hellwig (IPF0010), Catriona Hyslop (IPF0002), Romero Mendez (FTG0029), Stephen Morey (IPF0081), Knut Olawsky (IPF0001), and Alice Taff (IPF0013), with several more due soon. Other developments during the year included: completion of software design, commissioning of a robot tape library for backup and transport of data offsite, installation of Dobbin specialist software for audio archives that provides quality feedback and automated audio processing, an agreement with Oxford Text Archive that provides data replication as well as a firm additional long-term data repository, formation of an inventory of audio recording and associated equipment for ELAP and ELAR field-workers, and an on-line equipment loan management system. ELAR has also been involved in the wider activities of HRELP; these are described in more detail below. Grantees and training staff at ELDP training, June 2006. The School of Oriental and African Studies is the premier institution in the UK for the study of African and Asian languages and cultures, and has a strong tradition of research, teaching and publication on minority languages. In addition HRELP has developed a varied programme of training in language documentation and support focused on minority and endangered languages. This includes twice yearly workshops which discuss important issues of theory and practice in the field. In 200506 the two workshop topics were Meaning and translation in language documentation and Endangered languages and literacy; both workshops were attended by over 50 participants. The papers discussed at these sessions will be published in Language Documentation and Description Volume 4 which will appear in early 2007. Other smaller specialist workshops on Australian Aboriginal languages and Audio recording, digitisation and archiving were held during the year. We also run a sixday training course for ELDP grantees where fundamental issues and skills in language documentation and support are covered, with special focus on audio and video recording, use of computers to support research, data management and archiving, metadata, and Training for documentation and support at SOAS development of multimedia and practical materials for communities. The course was attended by 16 grantees from all over the world and was taught by ELAR and ELAP staff, as well as outside specialists. We have developed a set of teaching materials for this training course, some of which is available through the HRELP web site. Name Project Title Lea Brown Field Research in Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea Katia Chirkova Documentation of four varieties of Baima Sarah Cutfield Dalbon Oral Histories Project Connie Dickinson Chapalaa Documentation Project Matthew Dryer Field Research in Sandaun Province, Papua New Guinea Valrie Guerin Discovering Mafea: Texts, grammar and lexicon Antoine Guillaume Takana and Reyesano: documentation of two almost extinct languages of Bolivia Joana Jansen Yakima Language Documentation and Grammar Eladio Mateo-Toledo Documentation of the syntax and specialised uses of Qanjobal (Maya) Stephen Morey A comprehensive comparative grammar of the Turung and Singpho langauges of Assam Palash Nath A comprehensive comparative grammar of the Turung and Singpho langauges of Assam Der-Hwa Victoria Rau Digital Archiving Yami Language Documentation Ubiray Rezende Sketch grammar, texts, and dictionary of Enawene-Nawe (Arawak, Brazil) Myfany Turpin Arandic Songs Project: documenting Aboriginal verbal art in Central Australia Rosa Vallejos Kokama-Kokamilla: texts, grammar and lexicon Jean-Christophe Verstraete Documentation of five Paman languages of Cape York Peninsula, Australia Alejandra Vidal Documenting Pilaga Language (Guaycuruan): Bilingual dictionary with grammatical and ethnographic notes Meng-Chien Yang Digital Archiving Yami Language Documentation Attendees of the June 2006 ELDP training course at SOAS Dr Dietrich Schller presenting the annual HRELP public lecture Endangered archives of endangered languages.

PAGE 5

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 6 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 7 Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (ELDP) Distribution by type of grant FTG IGS MDP IPF PPG Number of languages by continent Continent Number of languages Africa Asia Latin America North America Australia Pacific Europe 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Budget amount by location of project Continent Amount Africa Asia Latin America North America Australia Pacific Europe 0 450000 400000 350000 300000 250000 200000 150000 100000 50000 Number of grants by continent Continent Number of grants Africa Asia Latin America North America Australia Pacific Europe 8 7 6 4 2 0 5 3 1 The Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (ELDP) is administered by a team whose office is located in the School of Oriental and African Studies. The selection process for grant applications is overseen by an international panel of experts, chaired by Professor Barry Supple, who represents the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund. The ELDP office supports both the work of the international panel and that of grant holders by administering the application process and managing awarded grants. In the last year, the office has seen a complete change of personnel. Current staff are Kathryn Oatey, Jean Tullett, Karen Remnant and Breon de Soyza (See page 10). Contact details for all the ELDP staff can be found on the ELDP website at http://www. hrelp.org/aboutus/staff/ Deadlines for the next round The timetable for the next rounds of applications is on the website at http://www. hrelp.org/grants/apply/ information/ ELDP round 4 grants awarded 2006 Principal Investigator Host Institution Funding Project Language AFRICA Stuart McGill School of Oriental and African Studies ,010 Western Acipa Sophie Salffner School of Oriental and African Studies ,945 Ukaan, a language of Southern Nigeria Dr Anne Vilain University Stendhal ,857 BabaI, a Bantu language Dr Moges Yigezu Addis Ababa University ,460 Koegu, South Western Ethiopia ASIA Gerardo De Caro School of Oriental and African Studies ,789 Talyshi Burgel Faehndrich University of Hawaii at Manoa ,975 Karilang, Datong & Haliqi Dr Karen Grunow-Harsta University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ,195 Two Magar dialects: Tanahu and Syangja Prof Jinfang Li Central University of Nationalities ,906 Two Gelao Varieties: Zou Lei and A Hou Dr Charles Macdonald CNRS ,280 Palawan-Tagalog AUSTRALIA PACIFIC Dr Linda Barwick University of Sydney ,670 Song traditions of Western Arnhem Land Sarah Cutfield Monash University ,982 Dalabon Oral Histories Project Ryoko Hattori University of Hawaii at Manoa ,473 Pingilapese Carmel OShannessy University of Melbourne ,418 Lajamanu Warlpiri Erich Round Yale University ,731 Kayardild Dr Myfany Turpin University of Queensland ,866 Arandic Songs project Dr Jean-Christophe Verstraete University of Leuven ,750 Five Paman languages, Cape York Peninsula CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA Gabriela Caballero Hernandez University of California ,000 Tarahumara Dr Connie Dickinson Universidad San Francisco de Quito ,000 Chapalaa Dr Veronica Grondona Eastern Michigan University ,387 Wichi Dr Gilles Polian CIESAS-Sureste ,080 Central Tseltal Jorge Gomez Rendon University of Amsterdam ,940 Sia Pedee, Ecuador Rosa Vallejos University of Oregon ,187 Kokama-Kokamilla Marine Vuillermet CNRS ,402 Ese Ejja, Bolivia NORTH AMERICA Dr Marianne Ignace Simon Fraser University ,700 Northern (Massett) Haida Indrek Park Indiana University ,982 Hidatsa Tyler Peterson University of British Columbia ,000 Gitskan Conor Quinn Massachusetts Institute of Technology ,352 Passamaquoddy-Maliseet Number of grants by research location Number of languages by continent Budget amount by location of project Distribution by type of grant Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship Major Documentation Project Individual Graduate Studentship Pilot Project Grant Field Trip Grant

PAGE 6

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 8 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 9 ELDP panel membership The members of the panel and their areas of expertise are: Barry Supple, Chair University of Cambridge Barry Supple studied at the London School of Economics and the University of Cambridge, where he was awarded a PhD for a dissertation on seventeenthcentury trade fluctuations. Between 1955 and 1981 he held academic appointments at the Harvard Business School, McGill University, the University of Sussex and the University of Oxford. He was elected to the Chair of Economic History in Cambridge in 1981 and to the Mastership of St Catharines College in 1983. Barry has been President of the Economic History Society, a Council member of the UK Social Science Research Council, Chairman of its Postgraduate Training Board and its Economic and Social History Committee, and Chairman of the Modern History Section and Foreign Secretary of the British Academy. In 1993 he left Cambridge to be Director of the Leverhulme Trust, from which post he retired in 2001. He has published books and articles on economic growth and performance, American railroads, the coal and insurance industries and general historical and academic issues. Felix K. Ameka Leiden University Felix K. Ameka lectures in the Department of African Languages and Cultures of Leiden University and is also an Associate Researcher of the Language and Cognition Group at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen. He has a wide range of interests and has fieldwork experience in Australia and West Africa. Apart from the description and documentation of languages, he is interested in the cultural, cognitive and human social interactional motivations of grammar and how speakers use grammar. He has conducted field-based research and published extensively on the grammar, semantics, and pragmatics of Ewe, his mother tongue, and on other West African languages such as Akan. He is currently involved in and coordinates the documentation of four of the little studied GhanaTogo-Mountain languages: Likpe, Logba, Nyagbo and Tafi. These languages are massively influenced by surrounding bigger languages like Ewe and Akan. As a trained linguist who has worked on his native language and on other languages, he has a continuing concern about the role of native knowledge in documentary linguistics and how the different types of expertise can be tapped in a collaborative manner to generate optimal records of languages. He is also interested in the challenges that documentary linguistics poses for linguistic training and academic linguistic practices. His other research interests lie in typology and comparative grammar, anthropological linguistics, ethnography of communication, cross-cultural semantics and pragmatics. He is also interested in how the structure and semantics of languages are affected and modulated over time and when they come into contact with other languages. William Foley University of Sydney William Foley is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Sydney, Australia and has a wide range of interests. He has worked in syntactic theory from a lexicalist approach and examined the role of semantics in syntax. He is particularly interested in the usefulness of modern syntactic theories in the description of the Austronesian and Papuan languages of the Pacific, which is his main area of specialisation. Over the last 20 years he has conducted extensive periods of fieldwork in Pacific area languages, specifically in the Papuan languages of the Sepik region of Papua New Guinea, such as Yimas, Watam and Mambuwan, as well as some Austronesian languages such as Palauan, Fijian and Tagalog. This fieldwork is the discipline which guides his continuing development of syntactic theories, so that for him theory and description constantly reinforce each other synergistically. William Foleys other main area of interest, again one forged ultimately out of his interest in fieldwork, is anthropological linguistics. He is strongly committed to a view of linguistics as ultimately a branch of anthropology and believes that language can only really be adequately understood when it is conceived as both a psychological and a social skill. Lenore Grenoble Dartmouth College Lenore Grenoble is currently a Professor at Dartmouth College where she holds a joint appointment in Linguistics and Cognitive Science and the Department of Russian. Her current research interests include the study of discourse phenomena, contact linguistics, language endangerment, and the relationship between language policy, use and attrition, as well as other issues in the documentation and study of endangered minority languages. Her research is focused on the study of indigenous languages of Siberia, where she conducts fieldwork, most specifically on the Tungus languages. More recently she has been involved in collaborative research with polar scientists, anthropologists and other social scientists to investigate the impact of environmental change on the linguistic, social and economic conditions of the peoples of the North. Together with Lindsay Whaley, she has created an openaccess electronic journal Linguistic Discovery devoted to research on lesser-studied languages, which is supported by the Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth College. The journal was designed to enable linguists throughout the world to have free and unlimited access to publish and read linguistic research on lesserstudied and endangered languages. Anju Saxena Uppsala University Anju Saxenas training as a researcher and teacher as well as her subsequent professional career in academia have all been in the discipline of General Linguistics. She was born and raised in Delhi, where she also completed her undergraduate education in linguistics. A never-waning fascination with South Asia as a cornucopia of food for linguistic thought has led to her linguistic research being centred on South Asian languages. She has made linguistic investigations of ancient languages (Sanskrit and Classical Tibetan), but most of her work has been on modern languages (representing three major language families of South Asia), where she has conducted and supervised fieldwork on lesser-known languages in North India (e.g. Kinnauri, Gahri and Tinani). Anthony C Woodbury University of Texas, Austin Anthony Woodbury is interested in linguistic diversity and its preservation. He received his BA and MA in Linguistics at the University of Chicago in 1975 and his PhD in Linguistics at ELDP panel and support staff. Left to right: Lenore Grenoble, Felix Ameka, William Foley, Anthony Woodbury, Jean Tullett, Roberto Zavala, Maureen Gaskin, Peter Austin, Barry Supple and David Nathan.

PAGE 7

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 10 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 11 the University of California at Berkeley in 1981. He has taught in the Linguistics Department at the University of Texas at Austin since 1980, where he is now Professor and Department chair. He has had a career-long research interest in the YupikInuit-Aleut language family, has written on the familys prehistory, on Greenlandic and Aleut syntax, and on a wide range of topics arising from his long association with the Cupik speaking community of Chevak, Alaska, including Cupik prosody, intonation, expressive phonology; morphology and syntax; and oral literature and conversational discourse. He is currently involved in an effort there to establish Cupik in the schools. In recent years, he has become involved in the University of Texas Centre for Indigenous Languages of Latin America, helping bring indigenous graduate students to study linguistics, and cofounding, with Joel Sherzer and Heidi Johnson, the Archive for the Indigenous Languages of Latin America. Roberto Zavala-Mandano CIESAS-Sureste Roberto Zavala is Associate Professor at CIESAS-Sureste, a Mexican interdisciplinary research centre for Social Sciences, located in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas. He got his BA in Linguistics at the National School of Anthropology and History in Mexico, and his MA and PhD in Linguistics at the University of Oregon. He has conducted extensive fieldwork on Mayan, Uto-Aztecan and Mixe-Zoquean languages spoken in Middle-America and has written two grammars: one on Akatek-Maya and another on Olutec-Mixe-Zoquean. He has written several papers on Wastek, Akatek and Olutec. He is currently working on language contact in the southern part of Mesoamerica, and language documentation of Zoque, Olutec and Chol. Peter K Austin SOAS Director, Endangered Languages Academic Programme, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London See under ELAP staff (p20) David Nathan SOAS Director, Endangered Languages Archive, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London See under ELAR staff (p28) The Staff Kathryn Oatey manages the grant funding programme and oversees the development and administration of ELDP activities. Kathryn previously worked for the British Council and the Wellcome Trust, both of which are international charities who have grant awarding programmes in various fields. She has worked in Nepal, India, Ghana, Mozambique, South Africa and Russia. Jean Tullett studied Linguistics as part of her first degree and is the ELDP Research Grants Officer. Jean is the first point of contact for all potential applicants and grant holders. Earlier in her career she worked for the World Council of Churches, an international grant giving charity, and she previously dealt with scholarships for international students at SOAS. Jean is responsible for the financial aspects of all grants and applications, and she implements the reporting procedures. She also supports the ELDP panel members and organises the annual panel meetings. Karen Remnant, who is due to start in October 2006, will deputise for Jean Tullett, and Breon de Soyza currently provides administrative support to the team. Left to right: Anthony Woodbury, Peter Austin, Anju Saxena, Felix Ameka, Lenore Grenoble, William Foley, Jean Tullett, Barry Supple, Maureen Gaskin, Vera Szoelloesi-Brenig, and Roberto Zavala. Four examples of ELDP funded work Nora C. England Documentation of Two Mayan Languages of Guatemala: Uspanteko and Sakapulteko Uspanteko is one of the smallest of the Mayan languages with only about 1,000 speakers. Both Sakapulteko and Uspanteko are strongly threatened by shift to Spanish and, in the case of Uspanteko, to Kichee (another Mayan language). The work on these two languages was coordinated from the beginning with the local Linguistic Communities of the Academy of Mayan Languages which was kept informed throughout of progress, as were other community institutions and leaders. The work was carried out by teams of three people under the supervision of the PI, Nora England. Each team had a coordinator who was a linguist and speaker of a different Mayan language, and two community researchers who were speakers of the language being documented and were specifically trained for this project by the team coordinators and the PI. The final products included over 100 recorded texts in each language (50 of these in Sakapulteko and 32 in Uspanteko were completely glossed), lexical databases of over 8,000 entries in Sakapulteko and over 6,000 in Uspanteko, and grammars of over 700 pages for each language. A full set of the audio recordings, paper and digital copies of the grammar, and a paper copy of the draft dictionary were given to the Linguistic Community, and paper copies of a selection of texts and of the grammar were given to each secondary school in the town. Audio recordings of each text were given to the person who had recorded the text. OKMA (Oxlajuuj Keej Maya Ajtziib), the institution in charge of the research, plans to publish the grammars and dictionaries. The audio files, lexical database, grammars, and transcriptions of the texts have been submitted to ELAR for archiving and will be submitted to AILLA as well. Great Andamanese is a mixed language of ten disparate groups of a tribe that once inhabited the entire region of the Andaman Islands. Professor Anvita Abbi Vanishing Voices of the Great Andamanese The project aims to undertake extensive fieldwork to make audio and video recordings of speakers, collect oral texts including songs, produce an Great Andamanese with Professor Anvita Abbis team. Great Andamanese waist band. illustrated trilingual Hindi/ Great Andamanese/English dictionary, and write a comprehensive grammar and sociolinguistic sketch.

PAGE 8

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 12 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 13 Antoine Guillaume Takana and Reysano: documentation of two almost extinct languages of Bolivia Reyesano was said to be probably extinct without any record apart from a list of only 150 words. This project made it possible to find fluent speakers of Reyesano, to collect a sizeable amount of material, and to produce annotations and analyses of these data in order to allow future users to make sense of it. The analysis of the grammatical structure of Reyesano has revealed interesting features, such as a peculiar hierarchical and inverse-like agreement system and an intriguing headmarking typological profile, two characteristics which are unique within the Tacanan family. The project has also been fruitful for the Reyesano community, in reinforcing efforts being made by some community members in documenting and revitalising their language, and in allowing pedagogical materials to be created, such as a bilingual Reyesano-Spanish dictionary and a pedagogical grammar. The church of the Reyes, one of the most central buildings in the town. Reyes was founded as a Jesuit mission in the 18th century. Photo: Antoine Guillaume. Ricardo Roca (81 years old at the time) and Antoine Guillaume at Ricardos house during a text transcription session. Ricardo was a talented traditional musician. He made possible the organisation of a fiesta where various Reyesano speakers were brought together. Emilia Yumani (73 years old at the time), Mercedes Alvarado (87 years old at the time) and Antoine Guillaume. At the house of one of Mercedes sons, Emilia and Mercedes came together for conversation, a difficult task because Emilia has a very light/soft voice and Mercedes is half deaf. Antoine Guillaume and Marco Mano at Marcos house. Marco had better knowledge than anyone else of the Reyesano lexicon. He could remember many specific Reyesano terms for animals, plants, etc. Manuel Mamani (76 years old at the time) at his house while recording a story. Manuel was one of the best Reyesano story tellers. Alice Taff Aleut conversation corpus The aims of this project have been, first, to record, in video and audio, a major corpus of Unangam Tunuu (Aleut language) conversations among fluent speakers in order to answer the question, How was Unangam Tunuu spoken in 2005? We accomplished our first aim by recording a total of 52.5 hours of spontaneous speech across the region from 66 of the 90-some speakers (73%), a brilliant result achieved by the entire language community. The recordings were made, for the most part, simultaneously on audio CD and video tape. From September 2005, we stopped recording and focused on bilingual annotation and preparing the materials for deposit. The second aim, to make timealigned bilingual annotations of the recordings, has resulted in time-aligned English translation for 16% of the corpus and Unangam Tunuu transcription for 10% of the corpus. Highly labour intensive, this bilingual annotation is ongoing and files will be deposited with archives as they are completed. The third aim has been to teach language community assistants professional recording techniques, linguistics basics, data collection requirements, and Aleut literacy. Twelve assistants received training, assisted in recording sessions, and worked on bilingual annotation. The majority of the annotations were done by 4 of these assistants; before this work only 2 were literate; now all 4 are. All these assistants used Praat phonetics software to listen to and specify time-alignment for their transcriptions. Six fluent speakers assisted with bilingual annotation, giving English translations and pronouncing full forms of the words shortened in rapid speech while younger understanders entered the data into text files. Of these 6 elders, 1 was literate. Now the other 5 have learned to read and spell by watching the computer screen as their words appear in print. Because they have been working with elders in activities that value their ancestral language, understanders are also beginning to speak Unangam Tunuu. In March 2006, Beverly Kashevarof Mierzejek and her father, Andronik Kashevarof senior, create the time-aligned Unangan (Eastern Aleut) transcription and English translation for a conversation previously recorded at their home in St. George Island, Alaska. Photo: Alice Taff. Mary Bourdukofsky, Piama Oleyer, and her mother, Maria Turnpaugh, concentrate on the exacting task of bilingual annotation during a week-long session in Anchorage, Alaska, March 2006. Photo: Alice Taff. Mary Bourdukofsky, Piama Oleyer, and her mother, Maria Turnpaugh, concentrate on Mary Bourdukofsky, Piama Oleyer, and her mother, Maria Turnpaugh, concentrate on

PAGE 9

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 14 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 15

PAGE 10

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 16 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 17 Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP) The Endangered Languages Academic Programme had its third full year of operation, enrolling fifteen MA students along with four new PhD students. The MA students come from a wide variety of backgrounds and have experience as foreign language teachers, English as a foreign language teachers, information technology specialists, translators and school teachers. They come from a range of countries and places within the UK. The four new PhD students are Gerardo De Caro (former ELAP MA student) who is working on ergativity in Talyshi, spoken on the border areas between Iran and Azerbaijan, Stuart McGill who is studying Acipu, a Niger-Congo language spoken in northwest Nigeria, Mary Raymond (former ELAP MA student) who is working on Kubakota, spoken on Ranongga Island in the Solomons, and Sophie Salffner (also a former ELAP MA student) who is carrying out research on Ukaan, a language spoken in four villages in Southern Nigeria. Gerardo De Caro and Sophie Salffner received SOAS scholarships, Mary Raymond is supported by the AHRC and Stuart McGill has an ELAP scholarship. The four new students upgraded from the MPhil to PhD in June 2006 and commenced the fieldwork and data collection phases of their research. There were some staff changes during the year: Oliver Bond came to SOAS in May 2006 as an ESRC post-doctoral fellow. His PhD was awarded by the University of Manchester and his thesis, entitled Aspects of Eleme verbal morphosyntax, discusses Eleme fieldwork data from a functional-typological perspective, with a focus on participant reference (including logophoric reference and applicative morphology) and tense-aspect morphology. Olivers post-doctoral research project, entitled Negative strategies in the Ogonoid languages, aims to contribute to a broader understanding of the properties of negation in language. In August 2006 Zara Pybus left the post of ELAP Administrator to take up a job in the charity sector; she was replaced by Alison Kelly who had previously worked in the Language Centre at SOAS. Dr David Bradley, La Trobe University, spent February-June at ELAP as Leverhulme Visiting Professor and gave a series of seminars on his research on South-east Asian languages, as well as consulting widely with staff and students at SOAS and elsewhere in the UK. In December 2005 ELAP published the 3rd of a series of papers entitled Language Documentation and Description Volume 3. Language Documentation and Description Volume 3 contains the following: Introduction Peter K. Austin Cross-disciplinarity in the documentation work of anthropologists and linguists Thomas Widlok Ethnographically informed language documentation K. David Harrison When our values conflict with theirs: linguists and community empowerment in Melanesia Lise M. Dobrin A musicologists wish list: some issues, practices and practicalities in musical aspects of language documentation Linda Barwick Language documentation and ecology: areas of interaction Gail Coelho Small is beautiful: contributions of fieldbased corpora to different linguistic disciplines, illustrated by Jalonke Friederike Lpke Documenting child language Sonja Eisenbeiss The digital skills of language documentation Robert Munro Personhood and linguistic identity, purism and variation William A. Foley It takes two to tango: linguistic and cultural (co-)variation in digital documentation Anju Saxena Why Rama and not Rama Cay creole? Colette Grinevald Language contact, language endangerment, and the role of the salvation linguist Yaron Matras Ancestral languages and (imagined) creolization Anthony C. Woodbury Other Activities Other activities of ELAP during the year include: A weekly seminar series coordinated by Professor Austin which included the following presentations on endangered languages topics 22nd November 2005 The goe in Goemai the development of modifiers in a Chadic language Birgit Hellwig, SOAS 29th November 2005 Endangered numerals Bernard Comrie, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig 18th October 2005 The native Lepcha orthography Heleen Plaisier, Leiden University 25th October 2005 Adverbs in Lakota Bruce Ingham SOAS 6th December 2005 An unusual typological mode for handling countability in Miraa (North West Amazon) Frank Seifart, Ruhr University, Bochum 21st March 2006 Protocol and the language data life-cycle at ELAR David Nathan, ELAR 9th May 2006 Negative strategies in Eleme Oliver Bond, ELAP 23rd May 2006 Aboriginal Languages in Canada: Past, Present, Future Keren Rice, University of Toronto 13th June 2006 Right(s), Permission(s) and Protocol(s) in Language Documentation: Laves 1931 Noongar Field Notes John Henderson, University of Western Australia A fortnightly series of research seminars for SOAS researchers and PhD students was coordinated by Dr Leora Bar-el and included the following presentations: 21st October 2005 Depositing with ELAR: accepting, accessioning and archiving Robert Munro and David Nathan 27th October 2005 Transitivity in Salish Leora Bar-el 17th November 2005 Semantic aspects of the noun class system in Gjjolay Eegima Serge Sagna 1st December 2005 Ergative Extraction in Yukatek and Lakandon Maya, Henrik Bergqvist 8th February 2006 In/alienable possession Peter Budd 22nd February 2006 Directional verbs in Arop-Lokep and Karnai Mary Raymond 8th March 2006 Patterns of pronominal alignment in Northern Talyshi Gerado De Caro 15th March 2006 Sketch grammars in language documentation and description What? How? Where? Sophie Salffner 11th May 2006 Verb Serialization in Betta Kurumba Gail Coelho 25th May 2006 Sentence connectives and deictic shift in Paasaal narrative Stuart McGill Workshops for specialists and members of the general public: Endangered Languages and Literacy 3rd December 2005 with presentations by: Yonas M. Asfaha, University of Tilburg, The Netherlands Eva Csato, Uppsala University Graham Furniss, Africa Department SOAS Friederike Lpke, ELAP David Nathan, ELAR Uta Papen, University of Lancaster Mary Raymond, ELAP Frank Seifart, RuhrUniversitt Bochum, Germany Justin Watkins, Southeast Asia Department SOAS Language contact and variation in language documentation 11th February 2006 with presentations by: Felix Ameka, Leiden University Leora Bar-el, ELAP Henrik Bergqvist, ELAP David Bradley, La Trobe University and Leverhulme Visiting Professor, SOAS William Foley, University of Sydney Prof Lenore Grenoble, Dartmouth College Robert Munro, ELAR Anthony C Woodbury, University of Texas Both workshops were attended by over 50 people and resulted in lively discussion. Revised versions of the papers presented at these workshops will appear in Language Documentation and Description, Vol 4, to be published in early 2007.

PAGE 11

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 18 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 19 advisory board on languages and linguistics, the Cambridge University Press Linguistics Board, the Board of the journal Indonesia and the Malay World, and the Northcote Trust. He was a member of research grants selection panels for the National Science Foundation and National Endowment of Humanities, the Volkswagen Foundations DoBeS project, and the Northcote Trust. Professor Austin visited and gave presentations at a number of universities in the UK and overseas and took part in several conferences and symposia during this period: 30th September 2005 workshop on Language Contact, University of Manchester 26th October 2005 seminar Language Contact in Australia, Department of Classics and Archaeology, Cambridge University 24th January 2006 seminar Linguistic Ecology of Lombok, eastern Indonesia, Linguistic Circle of Oxford 3rd February 2006 public lecture Survival of Languages, Darwin College, Cambridge University 20th February 2006 UNESCO, Paris 2nd-5th April 2006 co-organiser of Third Oxford-Kobe Linguistics Seminar The Linguistics of Endangered Languages, Kobe, Japan 24-26th May 2006 lecture series Language Documentation, Federico II University, Naples, Italy 2nd-3rd June 2006 UK Austronesian Research Group, St Catherines College, Oxford University 15-16th June 2006 DoBeS training workshop, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands 27-30th June 2006 keynote lecture Hierarchies of clause linkage, International Symposium on the Grammar and Pragmatics of Complex Sentences (Subordination and Coordination), Tomsk Pedagogical University, Tomsk, Russia 10-13th July 2006 advisory committee member, Linguamon House of Languages, Barcelona, Spain Other ELAP staff gave invited seminars and conference papers during the year: Leora Bar-el at the University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, University of Surrey, Manchester University, Linguistics Association of Great Britain Oliver Bond at University of Surrey, African Linguistics Congress Addis Abbaba Ethiopia, Linguistics Association of Great Britain Friederike Lpke at University of Surrey, Lancaster University Gerardo De Caro, Stuart McGill, Mary Raymond and Sophie Salffner attended the Leipzig Spring School on Language Typology and each gave a paper on their research at the associated student conference. Professor Austin gave several press interviews during this period with the BBC. We hosted the UK premiere of a film on endangered languages: In Languages We Live: Voices of the World directed by Janus Billeskov Jansen. The event, on 6th February 2006, was attended by over 60 people and the director participated in a question-answer session before the film showing. A public lecture on 10th February 2006 was presented by Dr Dietrich Schller, Austrian Phonogramarchiv, with the title Endangered archives of endangered languages. The lecture was attended by approximately 70 people. A special workshop was held on 19th May 2006, on Australian Aboriginal Languages with presentations by Peter K. Austin, ELAP, David Nathan, ELAR, and Jean-Christophe Verstraete University of Leuven Training courses for ELDP grantees were run jointly by ELAP and ELAR staff together with invited external presenters on 21-27th June 2006. The course was attended by 16 grantees and covered a range of topics in language documentation, with a focus on sound and video recording, intellectual property rights and ethics, data management, software for language analysis, metadata, archiving and preparation of multimedia and practical materials for communities. Professor Austin served on the Linguistic Society of America (LSA) Committee on Endangered Languages and their Preservation, the HEFCE Research Assessment Exercise Panel for Linguistics, the Arts and Humanities Data Service Publications Austin, Peter K. 2006 Data and language documentation in Jost Gippert, Nikolaus Himmelmann and Ulrike Mosel (eds.) Fundamentals of Language Documentation. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter Austin, Peter K. 2006 Content questions in Sasak, eastern Indonesia: an optimality theoretic syntax account in Holger Warnk and Fritz Schulz (eds.) Papers in south-east Asian languages presented to Bernd Nothofer. Wiesbaden: Harrasowitz Verlag Austin, Peter K. 2006 Article 5040 Languages of the World: Gamilaraay in Keith Brown (ed.) International Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd edition. Oxford: Elsevier Austin, Peter K. 2006 Article 5042 Languages of the World: Jiwarli in Keith Brown (ed.) International Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd edition. Oxford: Elsevier Austin, Peter K. 2006 Article 1711 Countries and Language Australia in Keith Brown (ed.) International Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd edition. Oxford: Elsevier Austin, Peter K. and Lenore Grenoble 2006 Current Trends in Language Documentation in Peter K. Austin (ed.) Language Documentation and Description, Vol 4 SOAS: HRELP Bond, Oliver 2006 A Broader Perspective on Point of View: Logophoricity in Ogonoid languages in John Mugane, John P. Hutchinson and Dee A. Worman (eds.), Selected Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference on African Linguistics: African Languages and Linguistics in Broad Perspective. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project Bond, Oliver 2006 Review of Standard Negation: The Negation of Declarative Verbal Main Clauses in a Typological Perspective. Empirical Approaches to Language Typology 31. Miestamo, Matti. 2005. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. http://linguistlist.org/ issues/17/17-1982.html Coelho, Gail 2006 Gathering plant and animal names in Language Archives Newsletter 7 and http://www. mpi.nl/LAN Coelho, Gail 2006 Language documentation and ecology: Areas of interaction in Peter K. Austin (ed.) Language Documentation and Description 3, pp 63-74. SOAS: HRELP Plant names in Betta Kurumba: Pandlpyriy (Lycopersicum esculentum). Photo: Gail Coelho. The tree (Pterocarpus marsupium). Photo: Gail Coelho.

PAGE 12

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 20 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 21 Academic staff Professor Peter Austin Mrit Rausing Chair in Field Linguistics. Director, Endangered Languages Academic Programme. Peter Austin studied at the Australian National University, completing a BA with first class Honours in Asian Studies (Japanese and Linguistics) in 1974, and a PhD in 1978 on the Diyari language spoken in the far north of South Australia. He taught at the University of Western Australia (1978), held a Harkness Fellowship at UCLA and MIT (1979-80), and in 1981 set up the Department of Linguistics at La Trobe University. In 1989 he was instrumental in establishing Japanese language teaching at La Trobe. In 1996 he was appointed Foundation Professor of Linguistics at the University of Melbourne, and joined SOAS in January 2003. Professor Austins research interests cover descriptive, theoretical and applied linguistics. He has extensive fieldwork experience on Australian Aboriginal languages (northern New South Wales, northern South Australia, and north-west Western Australia) and has co-authored the first fully page-formatted hypertext dictionary on the World Wide Web, a bilingual dictionary of Gamilaraay (Kamilaroi), northern New South Wales, as well as publishing seven bilingual dictionaries of Aboriginal languages. Since ELAP staff 1995 he has been carrying out research on Sasak and Sumbawan, Austronesian languages spoken on Lombok and Sumbawa islands, eastern Indonesia. His theoretical research is mainly on syntax and focuses on Lexical Functional Grammar, morphosyntactic typology, computeraided lexicography and multi-media for endangered languages. He has also published on historical and comparative linguistics, typology, and Aboriginal history and biography. Leora Bar-el Post-doctoral Fellow in Language Documentation and Description. Leora Bar-el received a Combined Honours BA in English Literature and Linguistics from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada in 1996. It was there that she was first introduced to, and became interested in, First Nations languages. Leora moved to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, to pursue graduate work in linguistics and there she began to work on Salish languages. Since 1997 she has been conducting fieldwork with the last remaining speakers of the Skwxwmesh language (Central Salish), an extremely endangered language spoken in British Columbia. In 1998 Leora received an MA degree in Linguistics from the University of British Columbia. Her MA thesis focuses on verbal plurality and adverbial quantification in Skwxwmesh. In the course of her graduate studies, Leora has conducted research on other Salish languages, as well as Plains Cree, an Algonquian language. Her research areas have included: aspect, Aktionsart, reduplication, number, intonation and stress. Being engaged in research that contributes to the documentation of endangered languages has also led to Leoras interest in and research on language revitalisation practices in Canada and communities around the world. Leora completed a PhD in Linguistics in 2005 at the University of British Columbia entitled Aspectual Distinctions in Skwxwmesh which looks at an aspectual classification of predicates, the perfective/ imperfective distinction and an exploration of cross-linguistic variation in these areas. She plans to continue conducting fieldwork on Salish during her post-doctoral research which will focus on the relationship between aspect, transitivity and control in three Central Salish languages. Dr Oliver Bond ESRC Post-doctoral Fellow. Oliver Bonds principal research interests lie in typology, historical linguistics and language documentation, including fieldwork on Eleme (Ogonoid, Benue-Congo), an under-described language spoken in southeast Nigeria. Olivers ESRC research project, entitled Negative strategies in the Ogonoid languages, aims to contribute to a broader understanding of the properties of negation in language. The main objective of the project is to devise a questionnaire to capture information relevant to negative constructions in terms of their morphosyntactic/ prosodic realisation and the grammatical distinctions encoded in pairs of affirmative and negative constructions. More specifically, however, it is conceived of as a device for the eventual collection of cross-linguistic data for the comparison of diachronic paths of negative elements in the languages of the world. Oliver has recently been awarded a PhD from the University of Manchester, where he also studied for a BA and a MA in Linguistics. His PhD thesis, entitled Aspects of Eleme verbal morphosyntax, discusses Eleme fieldwork data from a functional-typological perspective, with a focus on participant reference (including logophoric reference and applicative morphology) and tense-aspect morphology. Dr Gail Coelho Post-doctoral Research Fellow Gail Coelho is working on Betta Kurumba, an understudied South Dravidian language spoken in the Nilgiri Mountains in southern India. She is currently working on a book manuscript which presents a grammar of Betta Kurumba, expanding upon a description of the language provided in her doctoral dissertation. She has also begun working on Betta Kurumba ethnobiology, for which she has collected native names for plants and animals, descriptions of traditional uses of natural resources, and folk stories in which animals and plants are anthropomorphised. In previous research, she has worked on theoretical analyses of reduplication and lexical stress in a Native American language, Thompson River Salish. In addition, her Masters thesis was a study of social variation in certain contact-derived phenomena in a dialect of Indian English spoken in Madras, India. Gail completed her PhD in linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin and a Masters degree in linguistics at the University of Pittsburgh. She also has a Masters degree in English Literature and Linguistics from the University of Bombay. She completed a BA in English Literature at Stella Maris College, University of Madras. Her main research interest is in language documentation, for which she believes that it is particularly important to document a wide range of genres of discourse (stories, songs, riddles, proverbs, etc.) and to document cultural knowledge as it is encoded in language (as, for example, in the study of ethnobiology). Within linguistic theory and description, her interests lie in morphosyntax, phonology, and language contact. Anthony Jukes ELDP Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Anthony Jukes is an ELDPfunded post-doctoral research fellow, working to document and describe Toratn (Ratahan), an endangered language spoken by the older generation in a handful of villages located in southern Minahasa, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Toratn is an isolated member of the Sangiric language family, surrounded by Minahasan languages. Like other languages of the region it is giving way to Manado Malay and the national language Bahasa Indonesia. Its decline is more advanced than most regional languages, with no more than a few hundred fluent speakers, all of advanced age. This project aims to document the language while it is still possible, and also to work with the language community on maintenance strategies. Anthony studied Linguistics and Japanese at the University of Melbourne, completing a BA (Hons) in 1996, after which he began research on

PAGE 13

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 22 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 23 Makassarese, a language with about two million speakers located in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. His MA thesis (1998) describes the phonology and verbal morphology of that language. He then spent some time working as a research assistant on an Australian Research Council funded project on languages of Lombok and Sumbawa, and also studied Indonesian at the SouthEast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI) at the University of Oregon. He returned to the University of Melbourne to continue work on Makassarese, especially the literary genre found in manuscripts written in an obsolete local script. His PhD thesis is a reference grammar focusing on morphosyntax. Dr Friederike Lpke Lecturer in Language Documentation and Description. Friederike Lpke studied African Linguistics, General Linguistics and Phonetics at the University of Cologne, Germany. She spent a year at the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (INALCO) in Paris studying the West African languages Bambara and Fula. In 1999, she completed her MA, which received first class Honours, with a thesis on parts of speech in Bambara. She then took on a PhD scholarship in the Language and Cognition Research Group of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. For her PhD project, she worked on Jalonke (Yalunka), a previously undescribed Mande language of Guinea. Her PhD thesis is a field-based account of verbal argument structure and verb classes in Jalonke. Dr Lpkes theoretical interests range from the syntax-semantics interface, especially in the domain of verbal argument structure and case marking, to morphosyntactic typology, semantic typology and the influence of cognition, culture and contact on language. Her descriptive interests lie in Jalonke and Mande linguistics and more generally in language documentation from a linguistic point of view. One of her concerns in this domain is the use and development of non-verbal stimuli facilitating linguistic analysis in the field and cross-linguistic comparison. She is interested in African history and culture, especially in her geographical area of work, West Africa. Support Staff Alison Kelly Academic Programme Administrator. Alison obtained her BA in French Studies from Southampton University in 2000. The program included a year abroad studying at the University of Nice during 1998. She worked as an administrator for Mourant ECS before taking a course administrator position in the Language Centre at SOAS in 2004. She joined HRELP as the Academic Programme Administrator in 2006. She is currently studying towards the Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice (Higher Education Administration and Management). Alisons main responsibilities include: dealing with enquiries from students and the general public, producing course handbooks and other materials, editing the HRELP web site, minuting meetings, and providing administrative support to the Director. Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR) The Endangered Languages Archive provides digital archiving and associated services for ELDP grantees and others working with endangered languages We aim to provide Security keep electronic endangered language materials safe Preservation store electronic endangered language materials for the long term Discovery help the wider world to find out about materials Protocol respect and implement sensitivities and restrictions Sharing provide access to materials, where appropriate Acknowledgement create citable acknowledgment of research Mobilisation help to create usable language materials for communities Quality and standards give advice for creating materials of high quality and robust standards We also offer auxiliary services including: Training Facilities for digitising media and documents Practical resource development (on a project by project basis) ELAR in 2005-6 ELARs premises were completed in September 2005 and the archive was officially opened for activities in October. Equipment for mass data storage was commissioned, and the first deposit was made. Since then, several other materials for deposit have been received from; Yeshes Vodgsal Acuo (IPF0071), Wayan Arka (IPF0011), Nora England (MDP0018), Louis Goldstein (FTG0025), Antoine Guillaume (IPF0007), Birgit Hellwig (IPF0010), Catriona Hyslop (IPF0002), Romero Mendez (FTG0029), Stephen Morey (IPF0081), Knut Olawsky (IPF0001), and Alice Taff (IPF0013), with several more due soon. Other developments included: completion of software design for a state-of-the-art Open Archives compliant digital archive commissioning of a robot tape library for backup and transport of data offsite installation of Dobbin, specialist software for audio archives that provides quality feedback and automated audio processing an agreement with Oxford Text Archive that provides data replication as well as a firm additional long-term data repository formation of an inventory of audio recording and associated equipment for HRELP field-workers an on-line equipment loan management system Dobbin training session. Left to Right: David Nathan, Tom Castle, Thorsten Juettner (Cube-Tec) and Bernard Howard.

PAGE 14

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 24 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 25 David Nathan assisted the ELDP Panel with assessing grant applications, advising on all matters related to equipment and documentation methodology, and ELAR coordinated the training of ELDP grantees in June 2006 (see p27). Our staff ran sessions ranging from recording techniques and archiving to database technologies. We advised many ELDP grantees and others about equipment and preparing data for archiving, and advised on the selection, purchase and allocation of specialised equipment for ELAP fieldwork students. In February 2006, ELAR ran a one-day workshop on Audio Recording, Digitisation and Archiving, presented by leading audio archivist Dietrich Schller of the Vienna Phonogrammarchiv. It was attended by 21 people who provided extremely positive feedback; in addition, Dr Schller was able to provide invaluable advice to ELAR on audio archiving. ELAR continues active participation in the academic community. David Nathan and Robert Munro gave lectures and presentations at national and international events (see below). David Nathan continued to initiate and develop multimedia projects, including CD lecture presentations by Peter Ladefoged and Dietrich Schller, and pedagogical CDs for Gamilaraay and Karaim. The Dawes Online project, conducted jointly together with the SOAS Library Special Collections, is digitising, transcribing, and making an interactive online version of a manuscript on the Sydney language, one of the key resources for Australian languages. http://www. hrelp.org/dawes. In 2005, a course based around a CD coauthored by David with Michael Christie and Waymamba Gaykamangu won the Australian University Teacher of the Year award (the CD is entitled Yolngu Languages and Culture: Gupapuyngu). Project development work includes continued collaboration in the European project Distributed Access Management for Language Resources (DAM-LR), a partnership between ELAR, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Netherlands), University of Lund (Sweden), and the Institute for Dutch Lexicology Publications by ELAR staff Nathan, D. 2006. A Talking Dictionary of Paakantyi NSW in Laurel Dyson, Max Hendriks & Stephen Grant (eds) Information technology and Indigenous People. Hershey PA: Idea Group.pp 200-204 Nathan, David 2006. Thick interfaces: mobilising language documentation in Jost Gippert, Nikolaus Himmelmann and Ulrike Mosel at Leiden (Netherlands). The DAM-LR and Dawes Online projects have both attracted external funding. ELAR is a participant in the Digital Endangered Languages and Musics Archives Network (DELAMAN) which met in November 2005. Participating archives include ELAR, DoBeS, AILLA, Alaska Native Language Centre, E-MELD, Paradisec, and the Maori Music Archive. ELAR will host the DELAMAN meeting at SOAS from November 2-3, 2006. ELAR has a new Visitors Room where researchers and depositors can use our research facilities. Visitors to date have been Susan Gehr, Bernard Comrie, Frank Seifart, Christy Henshaw, David Bradley, John Henderson, Chaithra Puttaswamy, and Edward Garrett. Poster for the Dawes project designed by David Nathan. (eds.), Essentials of language documentation. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. pp 363-379. Nathan, David and va Csat 2006. Multimedia: A community oriented information and communication technology in Anju Saxena & Lars Borin (eds) Lesser-known languages of South Asia. Status and policies, case studies and applications of information technology. [Trends of Linguistics Series] Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. pp 257-277. Nathan, David 2006. Review of Multilingualism and Electronic Language Management. Walter Daelemans, Theo du Plessis, Cobus Snyman, and Lut Teck (editors). U Antwerp; U Free State; and IHESA, Brussels, Pretoria: Van Schaik (Studies in language policy in South Africa, volume 4). In Computational Linguistics 32.1 (March 2006), pp 143-147 Munro, Robert 2005. The digital skills of language documentation, in Peter K. Austin (ed) Language Documentation and Description Volume 3. London: SOAS Seminars, workshops, training David Nathan and Robert Munro. 2005. Depositing with ELAR: accepting, accessioning and archiving. Departmental Seminar, SOAS October 2005 David Nathan. 2006. Protocol and the language data lifecycle at ELAR. Linguistics Departmental seminar, SOAS March 2006 David Nathan. 2006. The Singing Dictionary: Multimedia for Gamilaraay/ Yuwaalaraay NSW. Presentation at Special Australianist Workshop, May 2006 SOAS ELDP Training course, SOAS June 2006 (co-ordinator David Nathan). (see p 27) Karaim Summer School, Trakai Lithuania, July 2006 (co-organiser David Nathan) Karaim Summer School, Trakai Lithuania, July 06 (co-organiser David Nathan).

PAGE 15

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 26 Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 27 Left to right: Balam (Eladio) Mateo-Toledo, Matthew Dryer, and Stephen Morey practising their video skills. Left to right: David Evans, Stephen Morey, Ubiray Rezende and Balam (Eladio) Mateo-Toledo. Ubiray Rezende (left) showing how to use solar power. Victoria Rau Der-Hwa (right) watches. Left to right: Katia Chirkova, Victoria Rau Der-Hwa, David Harrison and Sarah Cutfield. Professor Peter Austin introducing the training sessions. With Katia Chirkova and Sarah Cutfield. Left to right: Myfany Turpin, Katia Chirkova, Sarah Cutfield and Jean Tullet. General view of training session in the ELAR office at SOAS. Katia Chirkova presenting her work on Baima. June 2006 ELDP training International conferences Broeder, Daan, Peter van de Kamp, David Nathan, Freddy Offenga, Sven Strmqvist, Peter Wittenburg. 2006. Technologies for a Federation of Language Resource Archives 2006. Paper presented at LREC Workshop: Towards a Research Infrastructure for Language Resources, 22nd May 2006, Genoa, Italy Nathan, David and Remco van Veenendaal. 2006. DAM-LR as a Language Archive Federation: strategies and prospects. Paper presented at LREC Workshop: Towards a Research Infrastructure for Language Resources, 22nd May 2006, Genoa, Italy Munro, Robert and David Nathan. 2005. Introducing the ELAR Robert Munro (right) at the DAM-LR meeting, Lund, January 2006. information system architecture. The Third meeting of the Digital Endangered Languages and Music Archive Network (DELAMAN III), Nov 2005, Austin TX Munro, Robert. 2006 Current design issues for digital archives: Architectures supporting value-adding access via a users preferred language(s) and granularity of materials. Paper presented (by David Nathan) at the Georgetown University Roundtable on Linguistics, Georgetown University, March 2006 Nathan, David. 2006. Sound and Unsound Documentation: Questions about the roles of audio in language documentation. Paper presented at the Georgetown University Roundtable on Linguistics, Georgetown University, March 2006

PAGE 16

Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP) Annual Report 28 multimedia CD-ROMs. He was co-author (with Peter Austin) of the webs first hypertext bilingual dictionary (for Gamilaraay/Kamilaroi), and has established several major web sites. Along with building up the archive functions, he is actively involved in other technical and academic areas: he is currently working on CD-ROMs including one for Gamilaraay (New South Wales), and is interested in multimedia interfaces for authoring and presenting language materials, and in the methodology of language documentation. Thomas Castle, Digital Technician Tom studied Three Dimensional Design at Kingston in Surrey, completing a BA (Hons) in 1977. He worked in the theatre as a designer/maker, and technician with experimental groups. Tom developed skills working with video, photography and sound for live performance and events. In 1982 he moved to Hoxton Hall, designing, teaching and providing technical support for community projects, and professional performance companies. In 1990, Tom became a volunteer counsellor and obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Psychodynamic Counselling from Birkbeck. In 1992 he became a freelance technician, touring with contemporary dance groups, Kathak dancers and experimental puppeteers. In 2004, Tom completed an MA in Sonic Arts from Middlesex, experimenting with music, sound and technology. Tom is currently involved in setting up data transfer to the archive, back-up systems and the development of a supportive, ELAR has seen several staffing changes this year. Following his half-time secondment to assist in setup of our infrastructure, Robert Kennedy left in March 2006. In April 2006, Robert Munro completed his twoyear contract, and left having made important contributions to the design of ELARs archive information systems, completed a detailed software model for ELARs data storage and catalogue, and provided a great deal of input into ELAR and HRELPs website, and our training and academic activities. He was succeeded by David Evans. In order to support the expanded activities made possible by HEFCE funding of equipment, a new half-time Digital Technician post was created and is held by Tom Castle. In addition, several ELAP students, including Chaithra Puttaswamy, Louise Ashmore, and Stuart Brown, have worked on an occasional basis in the archive. David Nathan, Director David Nathan has worked with computing applications for endangered (especially Australian Aboriginal) languages for 12 years. He ran the ASEDA archive in Canberra, Australia, and taught courses in computing, linguistics, cognitive science, multimedia development and English at universities in Australia, Japan and the UK. Publications include the textbook Australias Indigenous Languages; papers on lexicography, multimedia, and indigenous people and the Internet; and several ELAR Staff specialist working environment for students and grantees. David Evans, Software Developer David holds a BA in English Literature (1997) and a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (1998) from Cardiff University, in addition to an MSc in Computer Science (2002) at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, where his dissertation was based on using robots as aids to teaching topics in Artificial Intelligence. In 2003 he joined the National Library of Wales as a Web Assistant. This role involved producing online versions of catalogues and exhibitions, including Celtic Voices ( http://www.llgc. org.uk/celticvoices) an exhibition of items in the six Celtic languages (Welsh, Scots Gaelic, Irish, Cornish, Manx and Breton). He joined SOAS in April 2006. Davids responsibilities include maintaining the digital catalogue of the Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR), as well as the database functions of the HRELP website. David is a Member of the British Computer Society, and his interests include artificial intelligence, educational technology and the Semantic Web. Bernard Howard, Technical Officer Bernard Howard started work at SOAS as Phonetics Lab Technician. He provides technical support, assisting staff and students with recording and digitising. He has also helped with equipment support for ELAP fieldwork students and ELAR and ELDP training events.

PAGE 17

This document is the fourth annual report of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (HRELP). It outlines the structure of HRELP and its activities for the year. All photographs by David Nathan except where stated otherwise. HRELP, Linguistics Department, SOAS, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square WC1H OXG Tel: +44(0) 20 7898 4578 Email: elap@soas.ac.uk Web: www.hrelp.org Designed by Tom Castle