Burma News

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Material Information

Title:
Burma News
Alternate Title:
Quarterly paper of the Rangoon Diocesan Association
Rangoon Diocesan Association quarterly paper
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Rangoon Diocesan Association
Church of England ( contributor )
Publisher:
Rangoon Diocesan Association
Publication Date:
Materials:
Paper ( medium )
Measurements:
19.8 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Church of England -- Missions -- Burma -- Periodicals
Church of England -- Diocese of Rangoon (Burma) -- Missions -- Periodicals
Rangoon Diocesan Association -- Periodicals
Burma -- Periodicals
Periodicals
Newspapers -- Burma
Burma News
Missionaries
Missions
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (Great Britain)
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Newspapers
Spatial Coverage:
Asia -- Burma -- Yangon Region -- Yangon
Coordinates:
16.8 x 96.15

Notes

General Note:
Yangon is also known as Rangoon.
General Note:
Burma is also known as Myanmar.
General Note:
The Quarterly paper was published from 1897, no. 1, thorugh 1927, no. 124.
General Note:
The Quarterly paper was superceeded by the Burma news in 1927.
General Note:
"Affiliated to S.P.G." (Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (Great Britain))
General Note:
Some issues also published in London by the Church of England for the Rangoon Diocesan Association.
General Note:
Frequency: Quarterly.

Record Information

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SOAS, University of London
Rights Management:
This item is in the public domain. Please use in accord with Creative Commons license: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA). High resolution digital master available from SOAS, University of London - the Digital Library Project Office.
Resource Identifier:
soas shelf mark - Per 21 / 522061
oclc - 181654682
lccn - 2007255843
System ID:
LOAA000111:00025


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Full Text

1___
RANGOON DIOCESAN
ASSOCIATION.
"V f
c? I
PRO DEO ET ECCLESIA.
QUARTERLY PAPER.
No. 1.
FEBRUARY, 1897.
^tmbon:
HARRISON AND SONS,
PRINTERS IN ORDINARY TO HER MAJESTY,
ST. MARTIN'S LANE, LONDON.
I


^ 1 5EE OF RANGOON.
List of Clergy and English Missionaries.
Bishop:
The Eight Reterend John Miller Strachan, D.D., M.D.
Ret. F. C. P. C: Clarke, Moulmein.
Ret. J. Hackney, S. Barnabas, Rangoon.
Ret. B. Mahon, S. John's College, Rangoon.
Ret. J. H. M. Nooder (returning from furlough).
Ret. T. Rickard, Kemendine, Rangoon.
Ret. J. Shway Hline, Kemendine, Rangoon.
Ret. H. M. Stockings, Shwebo.
Ret. L. L. Sullitan, Mandalay.
Ret. G-. Whitehead, S. John's College, Rangoon.
Mr. E. H. Day, S. John's College, Rangoon.
Mr. P. R. L. Fisher, Shwebo.
Mr. T. F. Jones, Toungoo.
Mr. C. R. Torkington, Thayet Myo.
Miss Edwards (returning from furlough).
Mrs. Littlewood, Shwebo.
Miss Lyster, Moulmein.
Miss Smith, Thayet Myo.
Mrs. Swop, Moulmein.
Miss A. J. Wharton, Rangoon.
S.P.G. Burmese Mission.
Ret. Aquaah, Toungoo.
Ret. H. Kenney, Toungoo.
Ret. Mart way, Thabarper.
Ret. J. Mad Sad Pad, Kasahd*
Ret. T. Pellako, Thelepwan.
S.P.G. Karen Mist


Rev. A. Salmon, Toungoo.
Ret. Shway Nyo, Toungoo.
Rev. Taruuah, Wathoco.
Rev. Ter Der, Toungoo.
Mrs. Kenney {Honorary), Toungoo.
Mrs. Salmon {Honorary), Toungoo.
S.P.G. Tamil Mission.
Rev. T. Ellis (returning from furlough).
Rev. S. Isaiah, S. Gabriel's, Rangoon.
Additional Clergy Society.
Rev. W. B. Caldecott, Insein.
Rev. J. E. Marks, D.D. {Honorary, S.P.G-.), Moulmein.
Rev. A. S. Pendleton, S. Philip's, Rangoon.
Rev. G. S. Seeley, Bussein.
Rev. J. A. Smith, Mandalay Town.
Rev. S. Swabey, Akyab.
*
Government Chaplains.
Rev. H. W. Blandeord, Shwebo.
Rev. W. G. Burroughs, Port Blair.
Yen. Archdeacon C. H. Chard (returning from fur-
lough.)
Rev. J. H. Collins, Rangoon Cathedra*.
Rev. C. P. Cory, Thayet Myo.
Rev. H. G. B. Cowlby (on privilege leave).
R v. J. P. Dyer, Rangoon Cantonments.
Rev. A. H. Finn, Mandalay Cantonment-<.
Bev. J. Low (on privilege leave).
Rev! J. H. Parry, Meiktila.
Rev;C. H. Richards, Dagshai.
. The fBishop's Commissaries in England.
f ' '
Rkv-,Canon Bailey, D.D., Canterbury.
. Rev. Gv'Cecil White, M.A., Nursling Rectory,
Southampton.


THE CHURCH AGENCY, Ld.,
6, Southampton Street, Strand, W.O.
(General Manager, HERBERT LAURENCE, Esq.)
Advertisements inserted in all papers;
replies received (free) and forwarded.
Architectural DesignsThe Agency
undertakes the preparation of designs and
plans for Churches, Mission Buildings,
Parish Halls, etc.; to obtain tenders, and
to superintend their erection.
Books supplied; full discount allowed.
Second-hand Books searched for.
Cassocks and Surplices for Clergy
and Choirs. Cassock, Surplice, and Col-
lege Cap for Boys, 10s 6d.
Church Furniture, and every requisite
for Church, Home, or Personal use ;
selected, packed, or forwarded.
Commissions of every kind executed
promptly and economically.
Educational Appliances of every
kind.
"Glacier" Windows for Church or
Home designed and executed.
Insurance (Accident, Burglary, Fire, Life,
Marine) effected with leading Offices.
Funds and Parcels received
Music DepartmentThe Agency un-
dertakes the selection, purchase, and
erection of Organs, Harmoniums, Piano-
fortes, and other instruments; and the
arrangement and selection of all kinds of
Music for Choirs, Orchestras, and Choral
Societies.
Legal Advice and Assistance obtained
in Ecclesiastical and other causes.
Papers and Periodicals forwarded
promptly.
Passages booked free of charge. Mission
Clergy, Nurses, etc., at special rates.
Passenger Agents to S.P.G., &c.
Photographs of all the Bishops at home
and abroad, and leading Clergy, supplied.
Prie-Dieu for Oratory, &c., 7s. 6d.
Printing and Publishing attended
to promptly.
Reading Cases for Diocesan Parish, and
other Magazines.
Removals arranged and superintended.
Shipping in all its branches. Goods
received and forwarded.
and forwarded to all Parts.
Jhtblicalions.
The Ideal Memento of the late Archbishop Benson.
3d., Is., 2s., 2s. 6d., 10s., 21s., 3 Gs.
Our Mother Church of England.
A Service of Song for Church History and Defence. Words and Music, Is.
The Complete List of Bishops of the Anglican Church,
With dates jof Consecration and Foundation of Sees. Price Id.
Photo of the Bishops at Lambeth Conference, 1888.
With Key. Price Is.
The Children's Altar Booh.
In simple language for Children's use at the Choral Celebration,
t'aper covers, 2d. [for Parochial use, 7s. 6d. 100]; limp cloth, 3d.; boards, 6d.
Prospectus and Form of Application for Membership may be obtained of the Manager, as well
as the Special Terms to Members.
Telegraphic Address: Churchway, London."


1
118, Forest Road,
Dalston, London, N.E.
January, 1897.
TO THE MEMBERS AND FRIENDS OF THE RANGOON
DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION.
Dear Friends,
The appearance of this our first Quarterly Paper marks
a distinct advance in the work of the R.D.A.
As long as our members were very few, it was perhaps sufficient to
supply such as asked for it with the Rangoon Diocesan Quarterly
Paper. This had, however, the disadvantages of arriving late, and
of containing much which was of little interest to those in England,
while it was almost without any news of our work here.
Now that the two streams of effort for the Rangoon Diocese, viz.,
the Winchester Diocesan Association and the R.D.A., have flowed
together, and formed one strong current, the need of some means of
communication is strongly felt. This need will, we trust, be met by
the Quarterly Paper.
It is proposed to send a copy to each subscriber, member of the
Ladies' Working Association, or boxholder in England ; also to each of
the Clergy, and other workers mentioned on the cover. The paper
will thus form a close bond of union between workers here and in
Burma.
We shall be glad if all who receive it will send a donation
owards the expense, so that it does not come on the General Fund ;
and will also use it to gather in new friends and suppox-ters.
So we push off our new venture on the sea of the new year with
the earnest prayer that all our readexs in blessing others may
themselves find rich blessing.
Yours sincerely,
P. H. COOKE,
Editor.
THE RANGOON DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION.
This Association was started in 1892 by Miss Hodgkinson, of Car
Colston, sister of the late Mr. Hodgkinson, Judicial Commissioner of
he Province of Upper Bui-ma, and one of a family ever since closely
onnected with Burma.
Its object is to bind together all who are interested in the work of
he Church in the large Diocese of Rangoon, which includes Upper and
ower Burma, the Shan States, the Nicobar and Andaman Islands.


2
The work in the Diocese includes the Missionary efforts of the
Agents of the Society for the Propagation of the GospelClergy,
Catechists, Teachersamongst Burmans, Karens, Shans, Chinese,
Tamils, Telugus, Andamanese, and Nicobarese; and also the minis-
terial offices of the Clergy of the Additional Clergy Society, and the
Government Chaplains for the English military, civil, and commercial
populations.
The funds raised by the Association are administered by the Bishop
and his financial council, and are used mainly for the Missionary work.
The interest and prayers of the members, it is hoped, will be given
to the work among our fellow-countrymen, as well as to that amongst
the natives.
Members are those who help the Association by annual subscriptions,
or by one or more of the other ways pointed out in this paper.
Any members who may like can enrol themselves as Associates, on
undertaking to pray daily for the Mission Work of the Church,
especially in Burma, and to remember the needs of the Burma Mission
at Holy Communion once a quarter.
The Association made a considerable advance in 1894, when the
Bishop was in England.
At the beginning of 1896, Miss Hodgkinson had to resign on account
of ill-health, and her place was taken by Colonel H. R. Spearman.
About that time an important step was taken by amalgamating with
the Winchester Diocesan Association for Rangoon ; and now another
step forward is marked by the appearance of this pappr.
The General Secretary is anxious to secure more diocesan and local
secretaries, and will be glad of offers from ladies and gentlemen
willing to undertake such work.
PERSONAL NOTES.
The Bishop expects to leave Rangoon on March 6tb, and to arrive in
England early in April, ready-for the Lambeth Conference.
Archdeacon Chard left Liverpool-for Rangoon on January 20 th by
the Shropshire.
The Rev. H. Nodder joined the Shropshire at Marseilles. He is to
i"elieve Mi". Stockings at Shwebo.
Miss Edwards sailed by the Ava from Liverpool on January 30th,
and will take up her old work at Shwebo.
The Rev. T. Ellis leaves Marseilles for Rangoon by the Lancashire
coming on February 16tli
The Rev. H. M. Stockings and the Rev. G. Whitehead will be
home this spring.
The Rev. H. Whitehead, head of the Oxford Mission to Calcutta,
has just returned to work with five new helpers.
The stipends of all the C.M.S. Missionaries who went out last year
are guaranteed by associations, parishes, and individual friends, who
have adopted them as "their own Missionaries."


3
ORGANIZATION
of the
RANGOON DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION,
PRESIDENT:
THE EIGHT REVEREND THE LORD BISHOP OF
RANGOON.
VICE-PRESIDENTS:
The Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Newcastle.
The Rev. M. Lamert, Vicar of Rotliersthorpe, Northampton
(formerly Senior Chaplain, Bengal).
COMMITTEE:
Sir Alexander J. Arbuthnot, Newton House, Newberry,
Rev. Canon Bailey, Canterbury (Commissary).
Rev. Boag, S. Alban's Vicarage, Nottingham.
The Very Rev. Dean of Exeter.
Viscount Newark, Holme-Pierrepoint, Notts.
Rev. Canon Skelton, Hickling Rectory, Melton Mowbray (formerly
Principal of Bishop's College, Calcutta).
Mr. John Steedman, Masters Road, Nottingham.
Rev. J. Stephenson, Boston Vicarage (formerly Senior Chaplain,
Bengal).
Rev. Cecil White, Nursling Rectory, Southampton (Commissary).
GENERAL SECRETARY:
Colonel H. R. Spearman, 8, Grange Road, Ealing, W.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:
Canon Bailey. Miss Hodgkinson.
Rev. G. H. Colbeck. Rev. A. H. Serres.
Rev. P. H Cooke. Rev. G. Cecil White.
The General Secretary.


4
WINCHESTER DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION.
SECRETARY:
Rev. G. Cecil White, Nursling Rectory, Southampton.
LADIES' WORKING ASSOCIATION.
SECRETARIES:
Miss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House, Winclifield.
Miss Shuttlevvorth, Collyers, Petersfiehl.
DISTRICT AND LOCAL SECRETARIES.
BURNLEY, ST. PAUL'S:
Rev. W. Elton, S. Paul's Vicarage, Burnley.
DUMBARTONSHIRE:
Mrs. Jameson, Place of Bonhill, Renton.
LONDON:
Rev. P. H. Cooke, 118, Forest Road, Dalston, N.E.
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE:
Miss Hodgkinson, Car Colston, Bingham.
WORCESTERSHIRE:
Rev. R. C. Bates, S. Peter's, Worcester.
CORRESPONDENTS.
LADIES' WORKING ASSOCIATION:
Miss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House, Winclifield, Hants.
SCHOOL CHILDREN AND PATRONS:
Miss Langton, All Saints' Vicarage, Haggerston, N.E.
NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES:
Miss N. Langton, All Saints' Vicarage, Haggerston, N.E.


5
NEWSPAPERS, ETC., FOR BURMA.
A very simple and practical way of helping in Foreign Mission
work, and one now much in vogue, is the sending out regularly to a
Missionary a weekly paper, or one of the monthlies or quarterlies.
The postage now is only one halfpenny for two ounces. The papers
thus sent are much appreciated, and are often passed from hand to
hand till worn out, and those sent to the Military Chaplains benefit
the soldiers as well.
Several of our readers are already thus helping, and no doubt others
will be glad to do so. Miss N. Langton, of All Saints' Vicarage,
Haggerston, London, N.E., has kindly undertaken to act as corre-
spondent in this connection, and will be glad to hear from all who do
now send out papers and magazines, and from those who wish to
begin to do so. In this way it will be possible to avoid, for instance,
the sending of three copies of the "Guardian" to one station, while
no copy of that paper reaches other stations.
Papers in great request are:-
The Church weekly, monthly, and quarterly papers.
The illustrated weeklies.
Missionary magazines (U.M.C.A., C.M.S., etc.).
General literary papers.
Note.Miss Langton does not undertake to send the papers out,
only to arrange as to whom they shall be sent in cases when the sender
has no wish to send to any particular Missionary.
NEEDLEWORK FOR THE MISSION.
As there is at present no organization to include those ladies not of
the Winchester Diocese who have worked, or who would like to work,
for sales for the RD.A. Fund, Miss G. F. Martin, of the Winchester
Indies' Working Association, Upton Grey House, Winchfield, will be
glad to receive articles for the Annual Sale of that Association, the
proceeds, of course, to go to the Winchester Diocesan Mission House
in Rangoon. "Clothes for poor people find the readiest sale ; there ia
always a large stock of pinafores, and they rather hang fire ; under-
clothing is always asked for."
In Burma clothes for the Europeans are the things most asked for ;
but arrangements for sending out such must be made through tho
local secretaries.
We hope to be able to announce from time to time, the packing of a
box for Burma.


6
HISTORY OF THE DIOCESE OF RANGOON.
The title at the head of this article is very ambitious, but I am not
responsible for it. The Editor chose it; and although absent as I am
from the official archives of the Diocese, and also straitened for time,
on the eve of my return to Burma, I cannot hope to write a History
of the Diocese of Rangoon," yet I gladly put together some reminis-
cences and notes which may come under that heading.
The Diocese of Rangoon can only be said to begin with the coming
of our first Bishop in 1877, but my personal recollection of the Mission
to Burma goes back to a period nine years before thatto 1868. Dr.
Marks could take us back to what are practically the origines of the
Mission in 1859. The first Missionary of the Church of England sent
to Burma, however, was the Rev. A. Sheers, and the Mission owes its
inception to the Rev. C. P. Parish, Government Chaplain of Moulmein,
who collected funds and stirred up the Society for the Propagation of
the Gospel to take Burma into its wide and ever-extending area of
operations.
The Roman Catholics had been at work in the country more or less
for a couple of hundred years previously, and it was already the scene
of the devoted labours of Missionaries of the American Baptist
Communion. A history of the Diocese of Rangoon is, and ought to
be, a great deal more than a history of the S.P.G. Mission to Burma ;
it should contain some interesting chapters on the work of Government
Chaplains who were ministering to soldiers and civilians in that country
from the period of the conclusion of the first Burmese war.
I am afraid, however, that those chapters would not have much to
record beyond the routine of regulation services in Church, visiting in
schools and hospitals, and a little pastoral workall at headquarters
of garrisons and civil stations. Here and there a Chaplain would try
and arouse an interest in the salvation of the souls of the heathen
around, as Mr. Parish did in the way which I have already mentioned,
and as the Rev. T. Warneford and his predecessor did at Port Blair,
where a beginning was made of Mission work unconnected with
S.P.G. amongst the Andamanese. But the European Church remained
as a whole indifferent to the great Mission which the Divine Head of
the Church bequeathed to her when He ascended till His return, even
as it remains indifferent still, with the exception of a devout individual
Churchman here and there. In those days before Burma had its own
Bishop, there were six Government Chaplains for the more important
stations, and some of these were directed by the Bishop of Calcutta
in whose huge diocese we were, to visit small stations in the neigh-
bourhood for a service perhaps once a month, more generally once a
quarter, and in some cases only once in six months. In these smaller
stations, if the Deputy-Commissioner or Assistant Commissioner, or
Police Officer or Doctor, or other official happened to be a good
Churchman and Christian he would, at the request of the Bishop or


i
Chaplain, read the service once on Sundays to the little coterie of
Christian folk who met together on the Lord's Day in the Circuit
House or Court House, or on the verandah of his own residence. But
I am afraid there were very few of these little stations in the jungle
so happy as this ; officers and other residents are always changing, and
without the continuity which either a resident or visiting clergyman
gives, Sunday and week-day, then and now, would differ in very little,
and the clinging atmosphere of heathenism all around would then,
even as it does still, tell, and Englishmen would fall below their own
level, not to mention the ever-rising standard which Holy Scripture
intends us to aim at when it urges us to "grow in grace and in the
knowledge of our Lord and Saviour."
The Bishop of Calcutta came to us once in three years, and his visit
brought new life and aroused new hope and energy in us all, clergy
and laity. Travelling in those days was no easy matter ; there were
very few good roads and no railways. The magnificent Irawadi,
however, and the Salween and Sittang afforded splendid waterways
into the interior for stations within reach of those rivers, and for all
large stations 011 the Irawadi the fine flotilla of the Irawadi Flotilla
Company rendered the journey there easy and pleasant, and, of course,
the Bishop could only visit large centres in the short time at his
disposal for his triennial visitation. It was the labour, in fact, of
visiting his huge Diocese which killed Bishop Milman, and his death
brought to a point the resolution which had for some time previously
been forming to sub-divide the unwieldy Diocese of Calcutta. The
result was the formation of the separate and independent Dioceses of
Lahore and Rangoon in 1877. To provide the endowment of the See
of Rangoon, Government reduced the number of Chaplains and gave
the emoluments of a Senior Chaplaincy, besides providing an episcopal
residence ; the bulk of the endowment, however, was subscribed by the
Diocese of Winchester, which also gave us of its best for our first
Bishop, Jonathan Holt Titcomb. These two Dioceses have in con-
sequence been closely united, and Rangoon has been greatly heljjed in
many ways by Winchester, the union being indicated inthe arms of
our Diocese. The Winchester Mission House, will, I trust, concentrate
upon us the effective help of our great English patron, which has thus
happily and generously put its hand to the plough."
When Bishop Titcomb came to us, Mission work was being carried
on principally at three centres, Rangoon, Moulmein, and Mandalay.
S.P.G. began work in Burma at Moulmein, and it had extended
thence to Rangoon, and subsequently to Toungoo on the one hand,
and to Mandalay on the other, with a succession of small schools on
the Irawadi. Moulmein, Rangoon, and Mandalay mark the course of
the indefatigable labours of the Rev. Dr. Marks, who established at
each of these centres large and prosperous schools for the Burmese,
'fhe Burmese Mission at that time was 011 a scholastic basis, and
there are very few stations in Burma where you will not find several
"Marks's boys," and we may well hope that the many Mission


8
schools established by him will have prepared the way for the final
triumph of the Gospel in Burma. Dr. Marks has been driven by ill-
health into the comparative retirement of tlie Chaplaincy of Moulmein,
a place which must bring back to him crowding memories of happy-
days of hard work in auld lang syne, and thither the affectionate good
wishes of his many friends have followed liirn. 37 years of strenuous
labour are a good "day," and one which has earned for him what we
heartily trust he will still long enjoya quiet and happy eventide.
The Toungoo Mission is almost entirely Karen, and very largely
pastoral instead of scholastic. Its history is curious and instructive.
The American Baptists had made the Karen Hills their own, and the
Church of England had no intention of taking up work there. Their
Mission there was founded by Dr. Mason, an Englishman, who
had emigrated as a youth to America, wheie he joined the Baptist
Communion, having been already baptized in the Church. He met
with marvellous success as a Missionary amongst the Karens, in which
Mrs. Mason was a most efficient helper, and thousands were, by their
labours, brought into the Church of Christ by baptism. In the course
of time, Mrs. Mason developed ideas which the Baptists considered
heretical, and which were certainly eccentric, and they excommunicated
her and (I believe) her husband ; the latter, however, was subsequently
restored. Mrs. Mason remained obdurate, and whole villages stood
by her, and refused to acknowledge any other teacher. She implored
Bishop Cotton, of Calcutta, and his successor, Bishop Milman, to
receive her into the Communion of the Church, u> which, she said, by
the circumstances of her early life and her own personal predilections
she belonged. Bishop Cotton turned a deaf ear to her entreaties, and
so did Bishop Milman, not wishing to interfere in the Baptist sphere
of Missionary operations with the wide field of Burma still untilled.
Mrs. Mason, however, continued her entreaties, and at length Bishop
Milman sent a missionary from Raneroon, the Rev. J. Trew, to the
Karen country to make inquiries. He reported to the Bishop his
view, that if left to themselves, Mrs. Mason's adherents might return
to their allegiance to their Baptist teachers. Consequently, nothing-
was done. But, as time went on, so far from returning to their
former teachers, these converts were going over to the Roman Catholics,
or lapsing into heathenism. All this was again and again brought to
Bishop Milman's notice by Airs. Mason, and the Bishop hesitated no
longer, but received them all into the fold of the Catholic Church, and
they formed the nucleus of the Church of England amongst the
Karens. Bishop Titcomb threw himself very heartily into the work
of organization, which, the diocese being new, was a matter of
immediate and urgent importance. He also, by reading and inter-
course with the Burmese, made himself acquainted with the subject of
Buddhism. Tamil and Chinese work had not been neglected, and
now a Tamil clergyman was spcially ordained to look after the large
number of Tamil Christians amongst the immigrants of that race who
come over to Burma in search of occupation.


y
Tlie episcopate of Bishop Titcomb was too short. He resigned in
]882, owing to the effects of an accident which befel him whilst
climbing a mountain track in the Kai'en hills on a visitation tour
which he was engaged upon amongst that interesting people. He left
the Diocese amidst the regrets of all. His gentle, Christian character
had in the five short years of his episcopate endeared him to all who
were brought into intercourse with him. He was an Evangelical, but
of the broad-minded wing of that school, and a fluent extempore
preacher. He saw Mission Churches built in Moulmein and in
Rangoon, and the Burma Additional Clergy Society established for
the providing of small stations with clergy. The formation of our
Diocese had done much to quicken and stimulate work, and (especially
in the Mission Field) our first Bishop spared neither money, time, nor
strength in promoting advance.
Our present Bishop, the Right Rev. Dr. Straclian, came to the
Diocese in 1882, after years of practical experience of Indian Church
work in its varied forms in the Diocese of Madras. By God's great
goodness he has been spared to us for the past fourteen years, and,
comparing our present Avith the condition of affairs diocesan as I
first knew it in 1868, one is constrained to acknoAvledge that the
Avhole face of the Church is changed. Since 1882 there has been
advance all along the line, notwithstanding many difficulties, and an
ebb here and there. It is easy to perceive that more direct Missionary
Avork is now being done. There are now some tAventy Missionary
Clergy at work, and half of them are Native Clergy Most of these
are under the direction of the admirable men who are the head of the
Karen Mission, the Rev. A. Salmon, and his colleague, the ReA\ H.
Kennev. In that Mission you will'pass through village after village
wholly Christian, with their little bamboo Chapel and School, and in
a few instances with their priest and schoolmaster. There is an
annual Karen Conference, when representatives of the Church in the
hills arrive at the headquarters of the Mission in Toungoo, and the
affairs of the native Church are discussed with the earnestness and
decorum and graA'ity of Convocation itself under the presidency of
Mr. Salmon. Sometimes this Conference is convened at some suitable
place in the hills. The Church is thoroughly organized, the native
Clergy being supported almost entirely by the people themselves.
Work amongst the Burmese is slow. It would seem as if Buddhistic
atheism had paralyzed the religious susceptibility of the people. Then
Ave must remember how interwoven with the life of the people is the
vast and all-perA-ading monastic system, and (shall we not say ?) the
presence of a sort of adumbration of Christ which there is in the
history and character of the Buddha, and Avhich no doubt consoles the
religious sense of the people. But still progress of a substantial kind
is being made. One admirable priest, the Rev. J. Tsan BaAV, died at
the post of duty of cholera last year, and there is a most admirable
Burmese clergyman, the Rev. J. Shway Hline, at work in Rangoon,
which, with its Burmese congregations meeting at S. John's College


10
Chapel, and at S. Gabriel's Church, is now a busy centre of spiritual
labour ; whilst in a suburb-at Keniendinethere is a large training
institution for native Clergy, under the able management of the Rev.
T. Rickard.
I can remember the time when there were but four clergy,
missionary and others, in Rangoon and suburbs, and only two
churches and S. John's College Chapel. There are now ten clergy,
five churches, and a beautiful cathedral. There are now some forty
clergy in the Diocese, and spread all over it is a network of out-stations
supplied by clergy of the Additional Clergy Society, which leaves no
station of any size at all without the ministrations of a clergyman.
And now the Kilburn Sisterhood has taken up our Girls' School work
with every prospect of success. The Winchester Mission House
scheme, which is maturing in Pazundaung, a suburb of Rangoon, is a
hopeful scheme if the Diocese of Winchester heartily take it up, and
make a Winchester Settlement of it.
And I am sure that our Bishop, as he compares past and present,
must be devoutly thankful that he has been permitted to accomplish
so much during these past fourteen years.
Before I conclude I cannot refrain from lifting up my testimony on
one point. It seems to me inexplicable that, whilst our ascetic clergy,
the Cowley Fathers, the Oxford University Brotherhood, that of
Cambridge, and also that of Trinity College, Dublin, have thrown
themselves with much blessed energy and devotion into the Mission
Field of India, where (as I suppose), from Cape Comorin to Peshawar,
you will find neither monk nor monastery, none of them have invaded
Burma, which is one vast scene of Buddhist monks and monasteries.
If anybody can explain how this can be reconciled with sanctified
common sense I should like to hear what the explanation is. I draw
attention to this, not by way of complaint, but merely in the hope
that, if thought about, the strange anomaly may be remedied. I am
quite sure that if any of these societies are merely waiting for our
Bishop to invite them to his Diocese, that they will not have long to
wait, and will find in him a father-in-God who will thoroughly
welcome them and understand them. Do I not know of a certain spot
in his new Cathedral where he has decided shall be his "narrow
home," when the Great "Shepherd and Bishop" of our souls shall
take His weary labourer to Himself ?
C. H. CHARD.
A Service of Intercession for Foreign Missions has been issued
by the Committee of the Conference of Missionary Associations. It
is very suitable for a Parochial Missionary Union, and can be easily
adapted to be used for any special Mission. It has been sanctioned
for use in church by more than one Bishop. It can be obtained of
E. B. Trotter, Esq., 19, Great George Street, Westminster, S.W. Price
Is. 2d. a dozen by post.


11
WINCHESTER DIOCESAN INDIAN MISSION HOUSE
(RANGOON) FUND.
" The Diocese of Winchester has been greatly blessed and prospered
in its efforts to found a new Diocese in India. I trust that the new
Diocese of Rangoon will, for all time, be connected historically and in
Christiaii sympathy with the Diocese of Winchester."
So wrote Bishop Harold Browne to Bishop Titcomb, when the
effort to raise £10,000 in the Diocese of Winchester towards the
endowment of the See of Rangoon had been crowned with success.
The Secretaries of the Fund continued, after the dissolution of the
Committee, to receive donations and subscriptions, which were applied
to various objects, among which may be mentioned the purchase of
the Mission boat, Winchester," the publication of a Burmese hymn-
book, and the establishment of a Medical Mission at Pazundaung.
It was felt, however, desirable that some definite object should be
specially chosen for support by the Diocese of Winchester ; and the
Bishop of Rangoon, having pointed out the need of a Mission House
where a few Clergy could live together and engage in literary, evange -
listic, and educational work, a meeting was held at Farnham Castle in
1888, when the scheme shadowed forth by the Bishop of Rangoon was
adopted. A Committee was appointed by the Bishop of Winchester,
which met on August 11th, 1888, and issued an appeal for a sum of
£600 per annum for the rent of a house and the stipends of three
Missioners. Not meeting with sufficient response, considerable delay
occurred in carrying the scheme into execution; but in 1893 Mr.
A. H. Ellis, B.A., was appointed Winchester Missioner, and sailed for
Rangoon in May of that year. Six months were devoted to his learning
Burmese, and he was ordained Deacon on S. Thomas's Day. He began
work in a hired house, and soon gathered together several Burmese
lads for instruction. The house, however, was not well adapted for
boarders, and Mr. Ellis resigned his appointment last July and
returned home, though not before he had secured an admmable site
for building a Mission House, which is vested in the Bishop of
Rangoon aud his successors in the See. As it is felt that suitable
premises are a prime necessity, the funds at present available are
being devoted to the Building Fund, for which about £300 is still
required. The plans sent home by the Bishop of Rangoon provide
for two large class-rooms, five bedrooms, bathrooms, two sitting-rooms,
and the usual offices, and the cost is estimated at Rs. 15,000. The
amount paid for the land, registration, fencing, &c., was Rs. 4,671.
A sum of £135 has been paid over to the Bishop of Rangoon during
last year, bringing the amount on deposit for the Winchester House
Building Fund up to about Rs. 9,000.
It is much to be hoped that the friends of the Mission in Winchester
will persevere in their efforts, that the scheme may be carried to
completion, and become an effective factor in the spread of Christ's
Kingdom among the Burmese.


12
The Bishop of Rangoon, writing on November 7th on the subject,
says: Three men will be required who should live in community, and
who would be content with scarcely more than the bare necessaries of
life. One, the Warden, would have to learn the Burmese language,
not an interesting, but also not a difficult language. The work would
first of all be scholastic, but the ultimate duty of the Warden would
be .... to provide sound Church literature in the vernaculara
literature at present almost non-existent. The second priest need not
learn the language. His duties would be chiefly among the educated
natives, whom, by lectures, interviews, and other means, he might
influence for Jesus Christ. The third should be a medical man.
Within a mile of the Winchester House site, I have had for years
past a dispensary largely attended. This affords a splendid oppor-
tunity for medical mission work."
The Committee of the Winchester Fund have recently decided,
with the approval of the Bishops of Winchester and Rangoon, that it
should be administered by the R.D.A., on condition that its funds are
devoted to the special purpose in view.
The Bishop of Winchester recently wrote to the Hon. Sec. : "I am
most anxious . that the link should be steadfastly maintained
between our Diocese and the Diocese of Rangoon."
The Bishop's Commissary, Rev. G. Cecil White, Nursling Rectory,
Southampton, acts as Hon. Sec. and Treasurer for Winchester ; while
Miss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House, Winehfield, and Miss Shuttle-
worth, Collyers, Petersfield, are the Hon. Secretaries of the Ladies'
AVorking Association, Winchester Diocese. Any of these will be glad
to receive and acknowledge donations or subscriptions, or to hear from
anv persons interested in the work, and desirous in any way to assist it.
G. C. AY.
WINCHESTER LADIES' WORKING ASSOCIATION.
A meeting was held in the Church House, Winchester, on July 21>
at which the Dean presided, and Archdeacon Chard gave an address.
A Sale of Work was held the same day, and over £47 was realized
for the Winchester House in Rangoon.
We are glad to be able to announce that Mrs. Tringham has kindly
offered to have the sale next summer at her residence at Longcross,
near Chertsey. All members are requested to send in their contribu-
tions of work by May 30 to one of the Honorary Secretaries, Miss G.
F. Martin, Upton Grey House, AAhnchfield, Miss Shuttlewcrth,
Collyers, Petersfield.
The Bishop writes :" It is an incalculable comfort to us, who are
called to labour in the Church out here, to feel that at home we have
so many warm friends who, by their prayers and labours, are helping
us. The thought cheers us in our isolation, and we are heartened to
go on with increased vigour, though surrounded by much that is
depressing. It is particularly cheering to find that Winchester is not
forgetting its foster child, Rangoon."


13
THE CHILDREN'S FUND.
How to Help the S.P.G. Schools in Burma.
The great mine of children's work for Foreign Missions has hitherto
been very superficially worked. It might, however, be made a great
power in the parochial system.
Many Sunday Schools have Missionary Boxes, and an Annual
Missionary Meeting, but the interest is perforce weak and vague.
How can it be made strong, living, and definite'/
Give the children a friend in some Mission School whom they
may think of and pray for as "their boy" or "their girl," whose
school reports they may receive regularly, with whom they may
correspond, whose progress to Baptism, Confirmation, and Christian
work they may watch.
There will then be no difficulty in raising the amount required, and
the lively interest aroused will widen and develop into the true and
full Missionary spirit, not only in the children themselves, but also in
their parents and other adult friends.
All the Mission Schools in Burma are S.P.G. Schools, and in each
are some scholars who are dependent entirely or partly on the Mission.
Few of these as yet have patrons.
We shall be glad to hear of Sunday or Day Schools, and of
individuals, who will supply the funds necessary for the support of
a child, viz., £3 a year for a Karen child at Toungoo ; £5 for a
Burmese child at Moulmein or Mandalay ; £6 for a Burmese child at
Rangoon.
It is not necessary for a School to pledge itself to raise the full
amount the first year, or in any yearonly to do as much as it can,
and on this condition a child will be assigned to it.
The following Sunday Schools are supporting children :
Thorpe, Ashbourne . . per Rev. T. W. Windley.
S. Peter's, Worcester ... Rev. R. C. Bates.
S. Matthew's, Clapton . Rev. G. H. Colbeck.
Thirsk ....... Rev. J. A. Colbeck.
There are, no doubt, others of which we do not know. We shall
be glad to have them on our list, even though they do not send the
money through the Association, but through the S.P.G.
Miss Langton, All Saints' Vicarage, Haggerston, London, N.E., has
kindly undertaken this branch of the work. She will receive from
Burma and send on to patrons the school reports of their proteges, and
accounts of their progress ; and will also receive subscriptions for the
support of children, and pass on the money to the General Secretary
for transmission abroad.


14
Extract from Letter from Rev. A. Salmon.
" We liave in the Karen Mission at Toungoo 84 schoolboys, 14
students, and 32 girls as boarders. A great many of these are orphans,
and everything has to be supplied by us. The most satisfactory plan
is, I have found, for patrons not to have a stated boy or girl, but to
leave it with us to apply the money, on condition that it be applied
only to the support and education of bond fide orphans, and that
every year an account be given of those on whom the money is spent.
I mention this because it has sometimes happened that a kind patron
has hit upon a likely boy or girl who, within a short time, has left the
Schoolgot sick, perhaps, and gone to the hills, not to return till
another year, or run away (though we have fewer and fewer of such
cases every year). Then, naturally, the donor gets disheartened, and
gives up. You see our people are mountaineers, and it takes some
time for the children to get used to life in the plains. At first they
get very homesick after two or three months, and as any child, how-
ever poor and friendless, can get his or her living on the mountains
with little trouble, they are more or less independent. It is only
when we have had them some three or four years that we can begin to
be really independent with them. Then they begin to value the educa-
tion, and to like the life of the plains and school, and we can do
almost anything we like with them ; and in the ease of those learning
English even make them pay tuition fees."
The following Report will show how the scheme works at home :
" S. Peter's Worcester.The Boys' Sunday School undertakes to
send £6 a year towards the maintenance of a boy in Burma. The
Bishop of Rangoon preached here when he was in England, and his
fatherly love for his Diocese awoke much sympathy. Every class has
an S.P.G. Box. These are opened quarterly. At the last opening it
was found that we were 15s. belo\v..the mark, but this sum was raised
by a subscription started immediately in the room, and by the collec-
tion at the'neit (Children's Service. Rev. R. C. Bates hopes to write a
letter shortly to- the boy Saw Taw Der, telling him about S. Peter's
Schools, and then it is hoped that he will be able to send a short
letter to be read to his English friends."
The Quarterly Paper will be supplied to schools supporting children,
and to Working Parties and Parochial Organizations at Id. a copy,
plus postage. Orders should be sent to the Editor. Unused copies
cannot be taken back.
Work among the Machopi settled in the Diocese of Lebombo has
been begun by a Catechist, who has given up a salary of £150 a
year at Johannesburg to work amongst his own people at a salary
of £36 a year.


15
CHILDREN'S PAGE.
We hope, in each issue, to have some account of Burmese children,
either in their native life or in their life at the Mission Schools.
We begin with an account of John Hpo Nyaiu, who is supported
by the children of S. Oswald's Sunday School, Sowerby, Thirsk. It
is taken from a letter from the Rev. F. C. P. C. Clarke, the Missionary
in charge of S. Augustine's, Moulniein, dated last June :
" During the first few months of last year (1895), Hpo Nyain was a
pupil under the Rev. A. H. Ellis, at the Winchester School, in
Rangoon, and when Mr. Ellis was preparing to leave for England he
brought the little boy over here (a distance of 120 miles) to put him
under my charge, telling me that a European lady had promised to
pay for him for six months; also that he thought I might with
discretion baptize him almost immediately. The little boy was
admitted into our school in May, 1895, and was baptized 'John' on
the 15th September following. I had previously gained the mother's
consent to this by letter. John is a native of Tavoy, which is 200
miles from Moulmein, and where his mother, a Buddhist, now lives,
gaining a precarious living by silk wreaving. His father, a carpenter,
died in April, 1895.
"John was born in the year 1885, but on what day of what month
I cannot ascertain ; he is, therefore, now eleven years of age ; he has
one sister and two brothers, all Buddhists. I can honestly say he is
one of the best boys we have in the school; I can go still further, and
say that he is one of the nicest little Burmese boys I have known
during the past four and a half years.
" He is small for his age, but manly almost to a comical degree ;
has a round, cheerful face, and is as merry as the day is long. When
admitted last year he was placed in the lowest class, but has already
worked his way into the third standard. Being a bright and per-
severing boy, I have great hopes of a good future for him. At the
beginning.of, the present year he was admitted into the Church Choir,
but his voice cannot yet be called very sweet.
" I must tell you a little incident that occurred a few months ago.
Miss Lyster and Miss Redpath, two of our Girls' School Teachers,
were living in a small house close to the Mission Compound. Miss
Lyster's Burmese aunt, a Buddhist, came to stay with them. One
evening I called to make enquiries about the lady's faith. The two
teachers told me with some laughter that she was a strict Buddhist,
but they thought she might soon be converted. In explanation of
their amusement, they told me that little John had come down as
usual after school to see them, but, instead of running about, had
sat down on the verandah to have a chat with the newly arrived lady.
After a while they had been surprised to hear that quite a heated
discussion was going on, and, on listening, found that John was trying
to convince the Burmese lady that the Christian religion was infinitely


16
superior to the Buddhist; and she had become interested, and had
actually begun to argue with the little chap.
" I told Miss Lyster that, had I not known John well, I should
have set him down as a little prig ; but she assured me that he had
spoken beautifully, and had made quite an impression for good on her
aunt's heart. He had evidently tried to reproduce the words and
style of our head Burmese Catechist.
" Let us hope and pray that coming events cast their shadows
before them in little John's case, and that he may be spared to
grow up endowed richly with grace from God, and be eventually
the means of bringing many Buddhists to the faith of Christ.
" I have told John what is being done for him by good friends in
England, and that he is now the adopted son of S. Oswald's Sunday
School. He was extremely delighted. His little face beamed with
pleasure and pride, and he promised me faithfully that he would try
and be a good boy and a good son."
LANTERN SLIDES.
It is very desirable to form some sets of slides for use at meetings
oji behalf of Burma. We want gradually to form the following
distinct sets :
I. Work among Burmans, Lower Burma.
II. Do. do. Upper Burma.
III. The Karen Mission.
IV. General Review of the Diocese, including work for
the English
Y. Work among Tamils, Andamanese, etc.
The General Secretary will be thankful for photos from which such
.slides may be made.
NOTICES.
Matter for insertion in No. 2 must be sent in to the Editor by
the end of March.
Secretaries should at the same time state the number of copies they
will require.
The Editor will always be glad of extracts from letters, items of
news, and newspaper cuttings bearing on the work in Burma, and in
the Mission Field at large.
The accounts for 1896 are not yet complete, but will be ready for
our next issue. All moneys not yet sent in should be sent in at once
to the Local or General Secretary.
Collecting Boxes "can be obtained from the General or Local
Secretaries.


17
LETTER FROM THE BISHOP.
[Dear Mr. Editor,
I have to thank you for a copy of the first number of the Quarterly
Paper, which reached me shortly before I left Rangoon. The rolling
billows of the Bay of Biscay are not helpful to composition, but I feel
I must send just a few lines expressive of my gratitude to you and
the many other friends who are coming to our help in such a practical
manner, and to assure you of my desire to help in every way in my
power during my approaching visit to England.
The Hiocese of Rangoon is emphatically a Missionary Diocese. It
is true that a very important duty is to minister to the spiritual needs
of the Europeans and Eurasians residing in Burma. The British
troops are under chaplains provided by Government. There is no
detachment of European troops which is not regularly visited by a
chaplain. In the large stations the civil community is under the
spiritual charge of the Government chaplains ; in smaller stations
we have chaplains belonging to the Additional Clergy Society (founded
by Bishop Titcomb). In four towns the Europeans are sufficiently
numerous to require the entire time of the clergyman. But the
majority are living in small scattered communities, for whom it is
oftentimes most difficult to provide permanent spiritual oversight.
They are of the household of faith ; they have been admitted to the
full privileges f the Church ; and it is our duty to look after these
scattered sheep. We know how hard it is to lead a Christian life,
even with all the blessed surroundings and restraints which are so
helpful in England. Now these are entirely absent in Burma, and we
aieed not wonder if young men forget their religious duties when
week after week there is nothing to remind them of them. It cannot
be a matter of surprise if the ardour of religious life cools, or if the
lessons of early life are forgotten, or if people lapse into indifference
nay, even into immoralitywhen there is a visit from the clergyman
only once in three or in six months, or perhaps when there is no such
visit at all. We are deeply indebted to the Additional Clergy Society
for carrying on this work. The small local communities subscribe
most liberally, and Government makes a grant-in-aid towards the
support of the cliaplains. There is pressing need of three more
clergymen, one to have charge of certain riverine stations in Upper
Burma, such as Sagaing, Nyingyan, Pokkoko, and Monywa, another
to be chaplain on the new railway in Upper Burma, and a third to
be an itinerating chaplain, whose headquarters shall be at Rangoon,
and whose duty it shall be to visit stations under the direction of the
Bishop to give help when and where required.
But, as I said before, this Diocese is emphatically a Missionary
Diocese. "With a population of over eight millions, seven-eighths of
whom are Buddhists, it is the duty and the privilege of the Church to


18
preach the Gospel of Hope instead of the Doctrine of Despair, and to
cause the benign and life-giving rays of the Light of the World to out-
shine the rays of the Light of Asia, The British raj has been substi-
tuted for the cruel and despotic rule of Tliebaw, and the benefits
conferred upon the country during the ten years that have elapsed
since the annexation are simply marvellous. We see this as we look at
the extension of railways, the administration of justice, the suppression
of crime, the widened area of cultivation, the increase in trade, as
shown by the returns of exports and imports, and the advance in
education. I wish I could say the same of the advance in the work of
the Church. There has been progress indeed, but it falls far short of
what might have been expectedof what might have been effected
had we been more faithful to our trust. God works through secondary
agencies. He will not work miracles. He has committed to His
Church the responsibility of propagating our Holy Faith, and the
slowness in the progress made is too often to be ascribed to the
apathy, the indifference, the deadness of the Church of Christ. There
is no denying the fact that Christianity has made but little progress
amongstthe Buddhists of Burma. The Roman Catholics and the Baptists
have long had large staffs at work, and many of these have been both
able and earnest, but the number of converts from Buddhism remains
small. The Church of England entered late, and the supply of men
and means has been so limited that large results cannot be expected.
But, making all allowances for our own defects, we must remember
that the whole tendency of Buddhism is to induce indifference about
the soul's interests. Its teaching tends to emasculate religious earnest-
ness, and to paralyze the moral faculties. As a proof of this I would
point out the entire absence of a sense of duty so generally to be
found amongst the Burmans. This was abundantly shown during the
recent war. It was found they could not be relied upon in emer-
gencies, and that the sentry was as likely as not to sleep when on
duty, or to fly from his post. The attachment of the masses to their
religion is owing chiefly to their respect for the ponghees, or priests.
Buddhism in Burma would die out but for this. Many of these are
deserving of this respect, for they are really trying to live the austere
life prescribed ; and though they are wrong, absolutely wrong, in
their conception of holiness and the way to attain it, still one cannot
withhold admiration for their faithful adherence to the way which
seems to them the right way. But I think there are signs of a growing
tendency on the part of some to relax the severity of the rules of life,
and if this becomes general the decay of Buddhism will inevitably
follow. To one who is acquainted with Hindooism, in its jealousy of
any intrusion into even the precincts of their more sacred temples,
nothing is more striking than the freedom, and even kindly welcome,
given to visitors of all classes and races to the pagodas and monasteries.
This liberality is to be ascribed, I am afraid, to indifference. Now, it
will be easily understood that a religion which requires little, if any,.


19
austerity from all but the monks does not predispose its adherents to
accept the stern and yet benign teaching of the Gospel, and to submit
to its restraints. It is the absence of religious earnestness of any kind
that is the chief obstacle to the advance of the Kingdom of Christ in
Burma. Welcome a thousand times fierce fanaticism rather than
soulless apathy. One cannot stimulate the sensibilities of the dead.
If, however, there are few converts from Buddhism, it is quite
otherwise with the Karens, a hill tribe largely distributed both on the
hills and in the plains. The Roman Catholics and the Baptists have
large and flourishing missions among these people. Our Karen mission
has Toungoo for its headquarters, and is the most successful mission in
the diocese. The minds of heathen Karens are, to a great extent, open
to consider the claims of Christ. They are placed in a receptive
position, and if we had more workers, by the blessing of God thousands
might be brought into the fold of Christ. There is a very flourishing
Mission in Rangoon amongst the Tamils and Telugus, who come over
in large numbers from the Coromandel coast. Many return to their
native country, but there is an increasing number yearly who settle
in Burma. We have 110 missions simply because we have no means,
amongst the Shans, Chins, Kachins, and other large tribes who are
now fellow-subjects of our gracious Empress. The S.P.G. has helped,
and continues to help, us nobly, but it cannot, having regard to the
claims of other Dioceses, increase its grants to us.
I am on my way to England to attend the approaching Lambeth
Conference, and I hope to be able to attend meetings to give informa-
tion. But I am coming home under medical certificate, and I propose
giving myself absolute rest for three-months. I requme this, and shall
be thankful if I am left free from all applications for services during
that period. Thanking you, my dear Sir, and all your fellow-workers,
for your help, and praying for an Easter blessing upon all,
1 remain,
Yours most sincerely,
J. M. RANGOON.
S.S. Shropshire,"
April 3rd, 1897.
SAD NEWS.
Just as we go to press we learn that the Rev. P. R, L. Fisher,
whose ordination as Deacon, 011 20tli December, is mentioned 011
another page, died from epilepsy on May 3rd. The Bishop writes :
" Dear Fisher was a most promising young Missionary. He had zeal
and devotion. Our loss is indeed heavy."
Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to all his relatives and friends.


20
IN MEMORIAMJOHN FAIJRCLOUGH.
On February lltli there passed to his rest one who was held
amongst us in this Diocese of Rangoon in the highest esteem for
meekness, wisdom, and hard, but unobtrusive, work and devotion to
dutythe Rev. John Fairclough, of Moulmein, Missionary Priest of
the Church of England in the Burmese Mission of S.P.G. The
minute of the Diocesan Council of S.P.G., which is subjoined, expresses
but the bare truth.
Mr. Fairclough was educated at S. Augustine's College, Canter-
bury, where the quiet goodness of 11is character, which we in Burma
knew so well, made him popular with all, and respected by college
dons and students alike.
Dr. Marks, at home on sick leave, visited S. Augustine's College
just as Mr. Fairclough was finishing his course. The students were
wont to assemble in the large dining-hall on occasions to hear letters
from the mission field read, giving news of brother Augustinians
throughout the world, and to listen to Missionary addresses. Thither
came Dr. Marks in 1865, suffering much from sciatica, and addressed
the men. As a result nearly everybody wanted to go to Burma as
Missionaries to the Burmese. Mr. Fairciough was accepted, and set
sail on November 8th that same year in a sailing vessel. On boaixl
were two others, captured by the same eloquent and fervid advocacy
of the claims of this truly interesting portion of the mission field
Miss Cooke, who on arrival in Rangoon commenced S. Mary's School,
and Mr. Pawling-*, who went to Moulmein as Head Master of the
Burmese Mission Boys' School.
The subjoined minute gives in very brief detail the story of
Mr. Fairclouglr's life in this diocese. He himself would be the last to
desire a more detailed account: egotism was abhorrent to his disposition.
He was buried at Reading (where he died) on February 15th, the
very day on which his little grandson was being baptized in Toungoo,
his eldest daughter having married the Rev. H. Kenney, of the Karen
Mission in this country. Many kind friends sent beautiful wreaths
and crosses of white flowers and maiden-hair ferns and moss. The
burial service was said at S. Lawrence's Church, and the officiating
clergy were the Revs. J. M. Guilding. T. Flook, and Canon Garry. A
full choir sang the service, and a very large congregation was present.
On the arrival of the body in the church, the hymn Days and
moments quickly flying" was sung, and after the lesson "Peace, per-
fect peace," the service being concluded by the singing of the Nunc
Dimittis. As the body was carried out of the church the Dead March
in Saul" was played. Masonic emblems were displayed on the
chancel screen, and the masonic collar, apron, cuffs, and jewels of the
deceased were placed on a pedestal near the coffin. Six large taper
lights were kept burning during the service in church. It must have
been a great comfort to Mrs. Fairclough to have had her eldest son


(now curate of Halton) with her in the hour of her great sorrow. "We
offer her our very sincere condolences. R.I.P. C. H. C.
From the Minutes of the Diocesan Council of S.P.G.
"The Diocesan Council of S.P.G. desire to place on record on their
minutes their sense of the great loss which the Missionary cause in
this diocese has sustained by the death of the Rev. J. Fairclough, on
the 11th of February last, at Reading, in England.
" Mr. Fairclough was connected with the Church of England
Mission to the Burmese from its early years, having arrived in this
country in the early part of the year 1866, when he gave loyal and
efficient assistance to Dr. Marks in the various forms of Mission work
which were then being attempted in Rangoon. He was ordained
deacon in Calcutta the same year, and was transferred the next year,
after his ordination as priest, to Moulmein, in 1867, to take up the
S.P.G. school in that jilace, which had witnessed the beginning of
Church of England mission work in Burma. He remained at his post
here till 1872, when he was transferred to Rangoon, the Burmese
school in Moulmein being discontinued. In 1875 he succeeded
Dr. Marks at Mandalav, at a time when the king's favour was with-
drawn, and there was little else to do there but keep things in statu
quo, and wait for better times. In 1877 Mr. Fairclough went home
on furlough, and, on returning in 1879, followed the Rev. J. A.
Colbeck in the interesting mission work of a direct and thorough kind
which had been established by the latter at Kemendine, and which
was greatly extended in 1882 by the founding there of a Training
Institute for Burmese and Karen Catechists and Clergy for the whole
of Burma. Mr. Fairclough was at the head of this institute from
1883 to 1886 (when he went on furlough for the second time), and
again from 1887 to 1892, and his deeply religious character, practical
wisdom, conscientious sense of duty, and steady, thorough, methodical,
and unobtrusive application to work, left upon it a deep and indelible
mark. The last years of his life of steadfast, humble service were
spent in the building up of the Church at Moulmein, which, both in
school and in more direct mission operations, had more than answered
the promise of its early years. Here his mature wisdom was widely
felt and appreciated, and in the circumstances of the Mission was
greatly needed for the consolidation of the work which owed so much
to the faith and good works of the Colbeck brothers. In 1888 the
Bishop testified to the esteem in which his lordship held him, by
appointing him to act as officiating Archdeacon and Commissary,
which post he held till March, 1890.
" To the great regret of all, when in the midst of earnest work, and
when the Church in this Diocese was being greatly benefited by his
sound judgment and long experience, Mr. Fairclough was suddenly
laid low, and, after many months of lingering illness, borne with his
usual meekness and Christian submission, this faithful servant' a


22
workman that needeth not to he ashamed'has been called to his
rest. The Diocesan Council, in thus recording the high esteem in
which his life and labour are held by them, and all who are acquainted
with the history of Mission work in the Diocese, desire at the same
time to offer their sincere condolences to Mrs. Fairclough and her
family in their bereavement."
NEWS NOTES.
The Bishop and Mrs. Strachan arrived home on April 7th, and
have been staying with Colonel Spearman. Their address is now
27, Coleheme Road, South Kensington. The Bishop will not be able
to undertake any sermons or meetings during May.
Burma is no longer a province of India, having been raised to the
dignity of a separate Crown Dependency, with its own Lieutenant-
Governor and Legislative Council, which is to be soon formed. Sir
Fred. W. R. Fryer, K.C.S.I., late Commissioner, is the first Lieutenant-
Governor.
The Rev. H. M. Stockings wrote from Shwebo before proceeding
on his well-earned furlough, asking the Diocesan Council for a loan of
Rs. 4,000 to complete the Mission Church of Shwebo, which is not yet
roofed in, the loan to be repaid in monthly instalments of Rs. 100.
The Council, to its great regret, was quite unable to do so. Con-
sequently this much-needed building must remain a reproach to the
Church of England in a land where the Americans are pouring in
money for the support of their Baptist and Methodist communities.
The task of getting the church completed now falls on Rev. J. H, M.
Nodder, who will be grateful for special gifts for the purpose.
We regret to hear that there has been cholera at Thayet Myo, in
the town and along the river. Mr. Torkington had premonitory
symptoms, but escaped by a two days' trip down the river. On his
return he found a Chin convert, whom he had left in charge of the
house, dead, whilst the lately-baptized wife of one of the Christian
masters had been attacked, but was recovering.
The Missionaries in Toungoo have been passing through a time of
great anxiety during the past year, a scliismatical spirit having shown*
itself among a small number of the Karens. We are thankful to be
able to record that a very noticeable movement in favour of loyalty
has now set in.
On December 20tli the Bishop held an ordination in Christ Church,
Cantonments, Rangoon, and ordained Mr. E. H. Day and Mr. P. R. L.
Fisher to the diaconate, and the Rev. Bernard Mahon (son of the
esteemed Dio. Sec. of S.P.G., in the Diocese of Bath and Wells) to
the priesthood. Mr. Day is working in the Burmese Mission in
Shwebo, and Mr. Fisher in the Karen Mission at Toungoo. Mr. Mahon
has charge of the West Rangoon Burmese Mission, and is the chaplain
of S. John's College.


23
The Boys' School buildings of S. Barnabas's S.P.G. Burmese
Mission in the Poozoodoung suburb of Rangoon were destroyed by
lire on February 20th. The Boys' School is now held in the Girls'
School, and the girls are accommodated in the Catechist's house.
J. T. Best, Esq., B.A. (Harrow and Cambridge) arrived by the
Shropshire on the 20th February, and assumed charge of the Principal-
ship of St. John's College, Rangoon.
The Rev. J. Hackney started for England on furlough, with Mrs.
Hackney and their two little children, by the steamship Prome, early
in April for a year and a half. We wish them a good time in the Old
Country, refreshment of mind and heart, and a return to Burma with
a new stock of strength and hope and zeal for good work in the
future.
Father Osborne, S. S. J. E., has been holding short Missions
for Europeans in Rangoon (Cathedral and Cantonment parishes),
Moulmein, and Mandalay. Good congregations everywhere attended,
and we believe much good has been done. Only the want of men
prevents the Order opening a branch in Burma immediately. God
grant the men may be quickly forthcoming !
A valuable box, containing materials for a sale on behalf of the
Mission Girls' Schools in this Diocese was received from the Foreign
Missions Guild at Christ Church, Lancaster Gate, through the
Secretary, Miss H. A. Trotter, 56, Oxford Terrace, Hyde Park, W.,
and in the box were enclosed some very n-elcome gifts of altar linen,
frontals, etc., from the Scattered Working Party."
The Rev. H. M. Stockings and Rev. G. Whitehead are expected heme
in a few days. They have spent' Holy Week and Easter in Jerusalem.
Archdeacon Chard writes of the latter :" Mr. Whitehead leaves
amidst expressions of universal regret. He came out in 1888, and
wherever he has worked, whether as Head of the Mission in Mandalay,
where, with his colleagues, he carried on a large Mission School, and
at the same time itinerated the neighbouring country in a truly
apostolic way, preaching the Gospel, or as Principal of S. John's
College, Rangoon, he has left his mark in solid organized spiritual and
secular work. The Diocesan Boys' Orphanage, which is located at
S. John's College, he has left established on a good working basis, and
with funds in hand sufficient to cover all expenditure up to the end of
the year, while the finances of S. John's College itself are in an equally
satisfactory state."
The S.P.G. have just published a new edition, revised up to date,
of the Id. pamphlet account of the Mission in Burma. It is well
worth getting.
We gratefully acknowledge the gift of some slides, and the loan of
some photographs by Miss Lewis, of Worsley, Manchester, and also
the gift of some photographic groups by Rev. A. Salmon.
From these photos we are having slides prepared.
Who will send us more !


24
SALE OF WORK AND CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
A great Sale of Work in aid of Home and Foreign Missions, will
be held at the Church House, Westminster, 011 November 17th
and 18th. Twenty-three Societies are to have stalls, viz. :
1. Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.
2. Women's Mission Association, S.P.G.
3. Universities' Mission to Central Africa.
4. Oxford Mission to Calcutta.
5. Cambridge Mission to Delhi.
6. Winchester Diocesan Mission to Rangoon.
7. Archbishop's Mission to Assyria.
8. Jerusalem and the East Mission.
9. Diocese of Natal.
10. Indian Work in Natal.
11. Diocese of Bloemfontein.
12. Diocese of Zululand.
13. Diocese of Lebombo.
14. Diocese of Rockhampton.
15. Diocese of Melanesia.
16. S. Peter's Home, Grahamstown.
17. Society of the Sacred Mission.
18. S. Augustine's College, Canterbury.
19. Christ Church Mission, Poplar.
20. S. Peter's, Bethnal Green.
21. S. Michael's, Shoreditch.
22. National Free Home for the Dying.
23. Army Guilds' Home.
Nos. 1, 2, and 6 of these have to do with Burma.
We trust that our friends all over the country will help to make"
the special stall for Rangoon a well-supplied and attractive stall.
Miss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House, Winchfield, will gladly receive-
articles for sale.
WINCHESTER MISSION HOUSE IN RANGOON.
A Sale of Work and Fancy Articles, will be held (D.V.) 011 Thursday,
June 3rd (by kind permission of Mrs. Tringham), at Longcross, near
Chertsey. To open at 2.30.
A meeting will be held during the afternoon, which it is hoped the
Lord Bishop of Rangoon will address.
The Report of the Winchester Branch of the R.D.A., which
devotes its funds to this object, has lately been issued in happy
combination with that of its Ladies' Working Association.


25
It is headed Rangoon, Burma, lest it should fall into the hands of
any who are ignorant of the locality of the see city ; and it is to be
hoped that none of its readers will confuse Burma with Bermuda, as
we are assured has been done by at least one person with reasonable
claims to intelligence.
We note that £135 has been paid to the Bishop of Rangoon in 1896
and added to the fixed deposit at the Chartered Bank. It is hoped
that sufficient funds may be available to enable the building of the
Mission House to be commenced on the Bishop's return to Burma.
The number of associates of the Ladies' Working Association is
returned at 108, and the sale of work realized £44 14s. 2d. A stall
has been secured at the sale of work to be held at the Church House,
Westminster, on November 17th and 18th.
The Secretaries would be very glad to hear from any friends who
might be willing to arrange drawing-room or garden meetings in aid
of the fund, some of which it is hoped that the Bishop of Rangoon
may be able to address.
The Secretaries, whose names and addresses we give, will also be
glad to forward a copy of the Report to any friends who desire one :
Rev. G. Cecil White, Nursling Rectory, Southampton.
Miss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House, Winchfield.
Miss Shuttleworth, Collyers, Petersfield.
NEWSPAPERS FOR THE MISSIONARIES
Only two or three of the Workers in Burma have sent list of papers
they receive, and of the senders. We shall be glad if all will.
To every friend who sends out a paper regularly we are sending
our Diocesan Quarterly.
The Rev. H. Kenney, at Toungoo, will be grateful for any of the
following :
Scotisli Church Guardian .... .... Churchman.
Clergyman's Magazine .... ... Spectator.
English Church Quarterly Review .... TimesWeekly Edition.
Illustrated Church News ........ Any Illustrated Monthly.
Mr. G. W. Heme, Headmaster, All Saints *S.P.G. School, Shwebo,
writes :
" My work is mostly of an educational character, but I also take up
a little Mission work in the form of a Sunday School for European
and Eurasian children, and a Bible Class for Burmese Christian
teachers employed in school, and for Eurasian and English-speaking
Burmese young men employed in the office., and courts in this district.
I have also started a Newspaper Club and Library for the latter, and
further purpose to have magic-lantern entertainments when I go out
into the district.


" I should very much like to receive occasional papers for our club,
and if any kind friend could send us a newspaper or periodical once
in a way, we should be very thankful. The only papers we get are
odd numbers of Church Bells and Church Times," generally two
or three months old on arrival, as we have to beg them from the
Missionaries after they have done with them. Books and Sciipture
prints will also be most acceptable."
SOME ADVANCES IN THE WORK.
The Toungoo Karen Mission was in August last divided by the
Bishop into twothe Rev. A. Salmon's special province being the
country of the Bghai tribe, and the Rev. H. Kenney's the country of
the Pakus.
The Diocesan Council of S.P.G. has given Mr. Salmon a grant of
Rs. 20 a month as a temporary grant for six months for the support of
a catechist schoolmaster among the Red Karens, who are almost en-
tirely heathen. Work has been commenced in seven villages, which
boast of three different dialects between them.
The grant to Mr. Torkington, for Missionary work in connection
with S. Andrew's School at Thayet Nvo, has been increased to
Rs. 100.
Two Chinese Catechists have been employed in Rangoon and placed
under the charge of the Rev. T. Richard for six months, when lie is to
report upon them and their work.
The Nicobar Islands.Work among the Nicobarese has hitherto
been confined to a three months' annual visit by Mr. Solomon, the
Indian Catechist stationed at Port Blair, and by the partial training
of a few boys brought for one or two years to the Andaman Orphanage.
Some of these stand firm to the teaching received. Two are reported
to regularly offer morning and evening prayers, and to refuse to
join in heathen ceremonies. Another has not forgotten his reading,
and has a small library in his well-kept house. He always comes to
service when Mr. Solomon is 011 his island, walking a long distance,
and bringing friends.
The Government have now agreed to transfer what has been
known as the Andaman Orphanage to Car Nicobar, and to build a
house for Mr. Solomon, and school and house for his boys.
Mr. Solomon has now with him two boys who have been at the
orphanage some years. As a permanent resident we may well look
forward to much more satisfactory work, and some far-reaching
results. This advance will be hailed with great satisfaction by all
interested in the Diocese of Rangoon, as tending to do away with
what has been rather a reproach hitherto.


27
HOME ORGANIZATION AND WORK.
A Meeting of the Executive Committee was held on April 6th,
Miss Hodgkinson, Revs. G. C. White, G. H. Colbeck, P. H. Cooke,
and Col. Spearman being present.
It was resolved to organize as far as possible 011 Diocesan lines ; to
ask the Bishops of Dioceses in which we have Diocesan or Local
Secretaries to become Vice-Presidents, and to make the Bishops'
commissaries ex-officio Vice-Presidents.
The Rev. G. W. Minns, Miss G. F. Martin, and Mr. H. F. Clarke
were added to the Committee.
It was decided to arrange a public meeting early in June if
possible.
The Bishop having given his approval to these proposals, the
following arrangements have been made :
Diocesan Secretaries.Miss Hodgkinson becomes Secretary for
Southwell and Lincoln ; Rev. R. C. Bates for Worcester ; Rev. P. H.
Cooke for London.
Mr. H. F. Clarke has undertaken the Work of Diocesan Secretary
for Rochester; Rev. A. N. Haynes for Bath and wells.
RANGOON DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION.
Accounts for 1896.
Subscriptions ancl Donations.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
Rev. A. E. Aucliinleck 0 2 6 Brought forward.... 6 15 0
Sir C. E. Barnard, Rev. Canon Churton.... 0 10 0
K.C.S.I........ 3 0 0 Rev. G. H. Colbeck .... 0 2 6
The Misses Birt 0 2 6 Miss L. Colley 0 3 6
Mrs. Blagg ........ 0 2 6 G. Colley, Esq..... 0 2 0
Miss Blagg .... 0 2 6 Rev. P. H. Cooke .... 0 2 6
Miss E. Blagg 0 2 6 Miss M. E. Copleston 0 2 6
Mrs. H. Blagg 0 5 0 Mrs. F. E. Cunningham 0 2 6
H. Blagg, Esq..... 1 0 0 Rev. R. H. Cuthbert.... 0 2 6
Rev. C. F. Brotherton 0 2 6 Mrs. Cuthbert 0 2 6
Rev. J. P. Boswell .... 0 10 0 Mrs. Dakeyne 0 2 6
Rev. A. W. Bailey .... 0 2 6 Mrs. Dixon ........ 0 5 0
Rev. H. H. Birley .... 1 2 6 Mrs. Droosten 0 2 6
Carried forward.... 6 15 <> Carried forward.... 8 15 6


28
Subscriptions and L
CW s. d.
Brought forward.... 8 15 6
Miss Evans .... 0 5 0
Miss Falconer 0 1 6
Miss Falconer 0 2 6
Mrs. Fielden........ 6 2 0
The Hon. T. F. Free-
mantle 1 1 0
Miss Gascoyne 0 2 6
Mrs. Gibbons 1 0 0
Rev. 0. Glover 0 10 6
Mrs. Glover .... 0 5 0
Mrs. Hargreaves 1 1 6
Mrs. Hodgkinson 0 2 6
Mrs. R. Hodgkinson 0 2
Mrs. R. J. Hodgkinson 0 3 0
Miss L.J. Hodgkinson 0 2 6
Mrs. Hopwood 0 2 6
Rev. E. E. Hounslow 0 2 6
Mrs. Jameson 0 2 6
Miss Jameson 0 2 6
Rev. M. Lamert 0 5 0
Mrs. Lowndes 1 0 0
W. L. Lowndes, Esq. 1 0 0
Miss Marshall 0 2 6
Miss G. F. Martin .... 0 1 6
Miss Molesworth 0 5 0
Rev. J. H. Nodder ... t) 5 0
Rev. J. A. Penny .... 0 2 6
Mrs. J. C. Perreau .... 0 5 0
Mrs. R. A. D. Perreau 0 2 6
Mrs. Pickering Phipps 1 0 0
Mrs. Ross 0 3 6
T. R. J. Ross, Esq..... 0 2 0
Rev. H. A. Serres .... 0 5 0
Miss A. Shears 0 3 0
Mrs. Simpson 0 5 0
Rev. Canon Skelton ... 0 1 0
Mrs. Spearman 0 10 6
Miss Spearman Col. Spearman 6 5 0
1 0 0
Mrs. W. Starkey 0 5 0
Rev. J. Stephenson .... 0 12 6
Mrs. C. Storer 0 2 0
Carried forward.... 22 11 0
Brought forward....
Mrs. Trevenau
Mrs. Wads worth
Mrs. Weathered
Mrs. Westwood
Mrs. Williams
Dr. Wind ley........
Miss Wingtield
Lady Wolseley
Total........
£ s. d.
22 11 0
0 2 6
0 10 G
0 5 0
0 2 0
0 5 0
0 10 6
0 3 6
0 2 6
25 0 0
Collecting Boxes.
Rev. P. H. Cooke .... 0 9
Miss Dymock .... 0 11
Miss Gahbitass ... 0 11
Miss L. J. Hodgkinson 1 7
9
1
4
8
0 13 9i
Mrs. Lowndes
Mrs. J. C. Perreau .... 0 7 0"
Total ....
4 0 71
Sale of Work.
Per Miss L. J. Hodg-
kinson ........ 0 13 0
Offertories.
St. Paul's, Burnley,
per Rev. W. Elton 1 1 3
Boston Church, per
Rev. J. Stephenson 1 5 0
2 6 3
Children's Fund.
Thirsk, per Rev. J. A.
Colbeck ........ 5 0 0
St. Peter's Boys' Sun-
day Scliooi, Wor-
cester, per Rev. R.
C. Bates ........ 6 0 0
11 0 0


GENERAL FUNDBALANCE-SHEET.
£ s. d. ' £ s. d.
By Subscription and Donations .... 25 0 0 To Expenses
,, Collecting Boxes 4 0 <2 Stationary and Postage
Offertories .... 2 6 Q O General Secretary .... 2 6 104
Sale of Work .... 0 13 0 London Secretary .... .... 0 3 0
Children's Fund ........ .... 11 0 0 Remittances London Secretary Rev. F. C. P. Clarke Moulmein (Rs. 84 15 4) Worcester Secretary- Through S. P. G......... Balance in hand ... 5 .... (> .... 29 0 0 10 0 0 0
£42 19 I0i £42 19 io4
H. R. SPEARMAN,
General Secretary.


SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTS OF WINCHESTER DIOCESAN BRANCH.
Full particulars have been issued separately to members of the Branch.
By Balance in hand ........
Subscriptions and Donations
,, Ladies' Association....
Interest ........
£ s. d.
74 Oil
33 16 2
82 17 lOi
1 1 8
£191 16 71,
To Expenses
Ladies' Association ....
Draft to the Bishop ...
Balance in hand
£ s. d.
.. 2 15 9
, 11 16 51-
.. 135 0 0
.. 42 4 5
£191 16 7 h
IMPORTANT NOTICE.
A Public Meeting will be held at the Church House, Westminster, on Thursday, .Tune 10th, at 3 p.m.
List of Speakers and other details will be ready soon,


Full Text

PAGE 1

DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION. J 52 Lovl .PRO DEO ET EOOLESIA. PAPER. No. 1. FEBRUARY, 1897. ... Jcrnbon: R'AR1tlSON :ANp SONS, : PRINTERS IN ORDINARY TO HER. MAJESTY, I ST. MARTIN'S LANE, LONDON.

PAGE 2

. 'o SEE OP RANGOON. LIST OF CLERGY AND ENGLISH MISSIONARIES. f Bishop: THE RIGHT REVEREND JoHN MILLER STRAOHAN, D.D. M.D. S.P.G. Bzmnese Mission. REV. F. c. P. CLARKE, Moulmein. REV. J. HACKNEY, S. Barna,bas, Rangoon. REV. B. MAHON, S. John's College, Rangoon. REv. J. H. M. NooDER {returning from furlough). REv. T. RICK ARD, Kemendine, Rangorm. REV. J. SHWAY HLINE, Rangoon. REV. H. M STOCKINGS, Shwebo. REV. L. L. SuLLIVAN, Mandalay. REV. G. WHITEHEAD, S. J obn's College, Rangoon. MR. E. H. DAY, S. John's College, .Rangoon. MR. P. R. L FISHER, Shwebo. MR. T. F. JONES, Toungoo. MR. C. R. ToRKINGTON, Thayet Myo. Miss EDWARDS (returning from-furlongh). MRS. LITTLEWOOD, Shwebo. Miss LYSTER, Moulmein. Mrss SMITH, Thayet Myo. MRs. SwoP, Moulmein. MisS A. J. WHARTON, Rangoon. REV. AQUAAH, Toungoo. I

PAGE 3

, J REv .A.. SALMON, Toungoo. REV. SHWAY NYo, 'Ioungoo. REv. 'L'ARRUAH, Wathoco. REV. 'IER DER, Toungoo. MRs. KENNEY (Honorary), Toungoo. MRs. SALMON (Honorary), Toungoo S.P.G Tamil Mission. REv. T. ELLIS (returning from furlough). REV. S. IsAIAH, S. Gabriel"s, Rangoon. Additional ,Cle1gy Society. REV. W. B. CALDECOTT, Insein. REV. J. E. MARKS, D.D. (Honorary, S.P.G-.), Moulmein. REV .A.. S. PENDLETON, S. Philip's, Rangoon. REv. G. S. SE-'JJLEY, B 1 1Ssein. REV. J. A. E,MITH, Mandalay Town. S. SWABEY, Akyab. Gove1nment REv. H. VI. .... BLANDFORD, Shwebo. R'Ev. W. G. BuRROUGHS, Port Blair. VEN. ARCHDEACON C. H. CHARD (returning from fur-lough. ) REV. J. H. CoLLINS, Rangoon Oathedra REv. C. P. CoRY, Thayet Myo. REV. H. G. B. CowLBY (on privilege leave). J. P. DYER, Rangoon Cantonments. R.Ev .A.. H. FINN, Mandalay Cantonment-1. REV. J. Low (on privilege leave). -H. PARRY, Meiktila. Eiv:--0. H. RrcHARDs, Dagshai. 1 .'\' -'.;-t. J'l I ... ;.; .... \ .. 1 T_fie,fBish'oj/s Commissw ies in England. : ,,r J : ., : ., D.D., Canterbury. \ .\ WHITE, M .A.., Nursling Rectory, .... ..... ... : .......

PAGE 4

' CH URCH hd.; 6, Southampton Street, Strand, W.C. (General Manager, HERBERT LAURENeE, Esq.) Advertisements ins erte d in a ll papers; replies receiv e d (free) and forwarded. Architectural Designs--The Ag e ncy undertake s th e prep a ration of desiJZ;ns and ulans for Churche s Mission Buildings Parish Halls, etc.; to obtain tender s and to superintend their ere ction Books suppli ed; full di s count allowed. Second-hand Hooks search e d for. Cassocks and Surplices for Clergy and Choirs. C as s o ck, Surplice, and C o l lege Cap for Boys, lOs 6d Church Furniture, and e v e 1 y r e quisit e rfor Church, Home, or Personal U!>e ; s e lected, pac ked, or forwarded. Commissions of every kind executed promptly and economically. Educational Appliances of every kind. "Glacier" Windows for Church or Home d e signed and execute d. Insurance (Accident Burglary, Fire, Life, Marine) effected with leading Offices. Music Department-The Agency un dertakes the selection, purcl:iase, and e rect ion of Orgam, Harmoniums, Piano fortes, and other instruments: and the arra ngem ent and selection of all kinds of Music for Choirs, Orchest ras, and Choral Societies. Legal Advice and Assistance obtained in Ecclesiastic a l and other causes Papers and Periodicals forwarded promptly Passages free of charge. Mission Clergy, Nurses, etc., at special rates. Passenger Agents to S.P.G., &c. Photographs of all the Bishops at home and a broad, and leading Clergy, supplied. Prie-Dieu for Oratory, &c. 7s. 6 d Printjng and Publishing attended to promptly. Readinll; Cases for Parish, and other Mag a zin e s Removals arranged and Shipping in all its branches Goods receiv-ed and forwarded Funds and Parcels received and forwarded to all Parts. :JBublitntions. "Ideal" Memento of the late Archbishop Benson 3 d ., Is., 2 s ., 2s. 6d., !Os., 2ls., 3 Gs. Our Church of England. A Service of Song for Church History and Defence. Words and Music, ls. Complete L1'..3.t of B1'shops of the Angli can Chur.ch, With Foundation of Sees. Price ld. of the Bishops at .Lambeth Conference, 1888. With Key. Price Is. The Children's Altar Book. In simple language for Children's use at the Choral Celebration. I' a per covers, 2d. [for Parochial use, 7 ,q, 6d. lOO]; limp cloth, 3d ; boards, 6
PAGE 5

1 118 FoREST Ro.\.n, DALSTON, L O NDOX, N.E. Januar y 1897. TO THE MEMBERS AND FRIENDS OF THE RANGOON DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION. DEAR FRIENDS, The appearanc e of this om first Quarterly P apeF marks a distinct advance in the work of the R.D.A. As long as our members were very few, it was perhaps sufficient to s upply su ch as asked for it with the Rangoon Diocesan Quarterly P a per. This had, however, the disadv a ntages of arrivillg l a te, and (l f containin g much which was of little interes t to those in England, while it was almost without anv news of our work here. Now that the two streams effort for the Rangoo n Dioce.se, the Winchester Diocesan Association and the R.D.A., have flowed together, and formed one strong current, the need of some means of communication is felt. This need will, we trust, be met by the Quarterly Paper. It is proposed to send a copy to each subscriber, member of the L a dies' \V orking Association, or boxholder in Ellgland ; also to each of the Clergy, and other workers mentioned on the cover. The paper will thus form a close bond of union betwee n worker s here and in Burma We shall be glad if all who receiv e it will send a donation owards the expense, so that it does not come on the General Fund ; and will also use it to gather in new friends and supporters. So we push off our new venture on the sea of the new year witlL the earnest prayer that all our readers in blessing others may themsel ves find rich blessing. Yours sincerely, P. H. COOKE, THE RANGOON DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION. This was started in 1892 by Miss Hodgkinson, of Ca.r of the late Mr. Hodgkinson, Judicial Commi:,sioner of Provmce of Upper Burma, and one of a family ever since closely ected with Burma. Its obje c t is to bind to{)'ether all who are interested in the work of Church in the large Diocese of Rangoon, which includes Upper and Burma the Shan States, the Nicobar and Andaman Islands

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2 The work in the Dioc ese includes the Miss ionary efforts of the Agents of the So c iety for the Propagation of the Go spel-Cle r gy Catechists, Teach ers-amongst Burmans, Karens, Shans, Chinese, Tamils, Telugns, Andamanese, and Nicoba r ese ; and a l so the mini::; terial offices of the Clergy of the Additional C lerg y Society, and the Government C h ap l ain.s for the Englis h military, civil, and commer c i a l populations. The funds rai sed by the Assoc i ation are administere d by the Bishop and his finan c i a l coun c il ; and are u s ed mainly for the Missionary work. The inte r es t and praye r s o f the m embers, i t is h oped, will be given to the work a m ong our f e llo-\v-countrymen as well as t o that amo Hsst the n atives Membe r:;; are those who h e lp the Association by annual subscripti o n s or h y one or more o f the o th e r ways pointed out in this p a per. An.y membe r s who ma.y lik e ca n enro l the mselves as o n underta kin g to pray d a il y f o r the Miss ion Work o f the Ch urc h es peciall y in Burma, and t o remember the n ee d s of the Burma Mission at Holy Communio n once a quarter. The A ss o c iati o n m a d e a considerable advanc e in J 894, when the Bisbop was in Eng l a nd. At the beginning of 1896, Miss Hodgkinson had t o r es i g n on aceo nnt o f ill-health, and h e r place wa,s t aken by Colonel H. R. Soearman About that time a n important step was t a k e n by amalgamating with t he Winchester Diocesan Association f o r Rangoon ; and now a:n oiher step forward i s m arked by the appearance of this papPr. The G enera l Secretary i s anxiou s to sec ure more dioc esa n and loc a l secretaries, and will be ;lad of offers from ladi es and gentlemen willing t o underta ke s u ch work. PERSONAL NOTES. The Bis hop expects to l eave Rangoon off March 6tb, and to arri ve in England early iu April, r ea d y for the Lambeth Confere!1ce. Archdeacon Chard -left Liverpoolfo r Rangoq n on by the Shropshire. The R ev. H. N odd er join ed the Shropshire at Marseilles. H e i s to relieve Mr. Stockings at Shwebo. Miss Edwards sail ed b y the .Ava from Liverpool on January 30tb, and will take up her old w ork at Shwebo. The Rev. T. Ellis leave s M arse ill es for Rangoon b y the L r mcashire coming on F ebruary 16th The Rev. H. M. Stockings and the Rev. G. White he:td w ill be home this spring. The Rev. H. Whitehead, head of the Oxford Miss ion to Calcutta, has just returned to work with five new helpers. The stipends of all the C.M.S. Missionaries who went outJast year are guaranteed by associations, parishes, and individual friends; who have adopted them as "their own Missionaries.':

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3 ORGANIZATION OF THE RANGOON DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION$ PRESIDENT: THE RIGHT REVEREND THE LORD BISHOP OF RANGOON. VICE-PRESIDENTS: THE RIGHT REV. THE LORD BISHOP OF NEWCASTLE. THE REv. M. LAMERT, Vicar of Rothersthorpe, Northampton (formerly Senior Chap l ain, Benga l). COMMITTEE: S ir Alexander J. Arbuthnot, Newton House, Newberry_ Rev Canon Bailey, Canterbury (Qommissary). Rev Boag, S. Alban's Vicarage, Nottingham. Th e Very Rev. Dean of Exeter. Viscount N ewark, HolmePierrepoint, N otts. Rev. Canon Skelton, Hickling Rectory, Melton (form e rly Principal of Bishop's College, Calcutta) Mr. J ohn Steedman, Masters Road, N ottingham. Rev J. Stephenson, BostOn Vicarage (f ormerly Senior Ch ap l a iu Benga l). R ev. Cecil White, Nursling Rectory, Southampton ( Comm i ssa ry). GENERAL SECRETARY: Colonel H. R. Spearman 8 Grange R oad Ealing, w-. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Canon Bailey. Miss Hodgkinson. Rev. G H. Colbeck. Rev. A. H. Serres. Rev. P. H Cooke. Rev. G. Cecil White. The Genera l Secretary.

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vVINCHESTEH DIOCESAN ASSOCIATION. SECRETARY: Rev. G. Ceci l White, Nursling Rectory, Southampton. LADIES' WORKING ASSOCIATION. SECRETARIES: Miss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House, Winc-hfield Miss Shnttle.,., or th, Collyers, Petersfie ld. D I STR I C T AND LOCAL BURNLEY, ST. PAUL' S : Rev. \V. Elton, S. Paul 's Vicarage, Burnle.'". DUMBARTONSHIRE: Mrs. J ameson, P l ace o f Bonhill, Renton. LONDON: Hev. P. H. Cooke, 118, Forest Road, Dalston, N.E. NOTTINGHAMSHIRE: Miss H oJgkinson, Car Col ston, Bingham. WORCESTERSHIRE: R ev. R. C. Bates, S. P eter's Worcester. CORRESPONDEN T S LADIES' WORKING ASSOCIATION: : Mi ss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House, Winchfield, Hants. SCHOOL CHILDREN AND PATRONS: Mis s Langton, A ll Saints' Vicarage, Haggerston, N.E. NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES: Miss N. Langton, All Saints' Vicarage, H agge rston, N .E.

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5 NE"WSPAPERS, ETC., FOR BURMA. A Y Q r y s impl e aud practical way of l1e lping in Foreign Mi::;:;ion work and one n o w much in vogue, i s the sendin g out regularly t o a, M i ssionary a weekly p a per, or one of the m onthlies o r quarterlie 3 The postage n o w is only oue halfp enny for two ounces. The paperfl t hus sent a r e much appreciated, and are often passed from hand t o ha nd till w orn out, and those s ent to the Milit a ry Chaplains benefit the soldiers as w e ll. Severa l uf our r eade r s a r e already thus helpin g and no doubt others will be g lad to do so. Mis s N. Langton, of All Saints' Hagge rston, L ondo n, N.E., h as kindly undertaken to act as co r Te::;p o rrdent in this connection, and will be glad to he a r from all who d o nqw send out papers and magazines, and from those who wish t o begin to do so In this way it will be possible to avo id, for in s t anc e, the sending o f three cop i es of the "Guardian" to o n e station \Yhi n o copy o f tha t paper r eac hes other stations. Paper s in great r eq u es t a r e:-The Church w ee kly, m onthly, and quarterly papers. The illustrated weeklies. M i ss ionary m aga zines (U.M.C.A., C.M.S., etc.). Ge n eral literary pape rs. No'l'E.-Miss Langton does not ui1dertake to send the paper:'! c ut o nly to arrange as to whom they shall b e sent in case s wh e n the send e e has no wi s h t o send to any particular JYiissionary. NEEDLKWORK FOR THE MISSION. As there is a t present no organizati o n to include tho se ladies 11o t of the Winchester Diocese who have worked, or who would like t o work for sa les for the R.D.A. Fund, Miss G. F. Martin, of the Winc h es t et ladies' Working Assoc iation, Upton Grey House, Winchfi e ld, will be g l a d to re c eive articles for the Annual Sale of that Ass o ci a tion t he proce e ds, of cour se, to go to the Winchester Diocesan Mission House in Rangoon. "Clothes for poor people find the readiest sale ; there il:l always a large stock of pinafores, and they rather hang fire ; underc lothing is always ask ed for." In Burma clothes for the Enropeans are the things most fo r ; b ut arrangements for sending out such must be made thro ugh thEt l oca l secretaries. We hope to be able to announce from time to time, the packing o f a.. box or Burma.

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6 HISTORY OF THE DIOCESE OF RANGOON. The title a.t the head of this article is very ambitious, but I am not 1 cspo nsibl e forit. The Editor chose it; and although absent as I am from the official archives of the Dioce se and also for time, on t he eve o f my return to Burma, I cannot hope to write a History of the Diocese of Ra-ngoon," yet I gladly put together so me reminis cences and notes which may come under that heading. T h e Diocese o f Rangoon ca n only be said to b egi n with the coming o f onr first Bish o p in 1 877, but my persona l recolle c tion of the Miss ion to Burma goes back to a period nine years before that---to 1868. Dr. Marks cou ld take us back to what are practica-lly the origines of the Missi(Jll in 1859. The first Missionary Of the Church of England sent to Burma, however, was the Rev. A. Sheers, and the Mission owes its inception to the Rev. C. P. Parish, Government Chaplain of Moulmein, who funds and stirred up the Society for the Propagation of thA G0spe l to take Burma into its wide and ever-extending area of opera tio11s. T h e Roma-n Ca tholics had been at work in the country more or le.ss for a c ouple of hundred years previously, and it was already the scene of t he devotad labours of Miss ionaries o f the America n Baptist Communion. A history of Diocese of Ran goo n is, and ought t< ba, a great deal more tha.n a history o f the S.P.G. Mission to Burma ; it should con t a in some interest in g chapters on the work of Government Chapl a ins who were ministering to so ldiers a.nd civilians in that country from the period of the conc lusion of the first Burmese war. I a.m a fraid, however, that those c hapters wou ld not have much to record beyond the routine of regulation services in Church, visiting in sc ho ols and hospitals, and a little pastoral work-all at headquarters of garri::;ons and c ivil s tations. Here and there a Chapl ai n would try and an interest in the s alvation of the so ul s of the heathen around, as Mr. Parish did in the way which I h ave already mentioned, a ml as the Hev. '1'. ,;v arne ford and his predecessor did a t Port Blair, whe r e a beginning was made of Mission work unconnected with S.P.G. a mong s t the AndamanesP. Bnt the European Church remained as a who le indiff erent to the g r ea t Mission which the Diviue Head cf the Ch nrch to her when He ascended till His r eturn, even as it remains indiffer ent s till, with the exception of a d evout individual Chu r chman here and there. In those days before Burma had its own Bishop, there were six Government Chaplains for the more important stations, and som e of these were directed by the Bishop of Calcutta in whose huge diocese we were, to visit small stations in the bourhood for a se rvice perhaps once a month, more generally once a quarter, and in some cases only once in six months. In these smaller stations, if the Deputy-Commissioner or Assistant Commissioner, or Polic e Officer or Doctor, or other official happened to be a good Churchman and Christian he would, at the request of the Bishop or

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7 Chaplain, read the service on c e on Sundays t o little coterie of Chris ti : : m folk who met together on the Lord's Day in the Circuit Ho'us e or Court House, or on the verandah of his own residence. But I a m afra id there were very few of these little stations in the jungle s o ha.ppy as thi s ; officers and othe r r esidents are always changing, and with o u t the continuity which either a resident or visiting clergyman g ives, S unday and week-d a y, then and now, would differ in very little, an d the cli ng in g atmosphere of h eathenism all around would then, e v e n as it d oes s till, tell, and Englishmen would fall below their own l e v e l, not t o mention the ev er-ris ing standa.rd whic h Holy Scripture inten ds u s to a im at whe n it urg es us to "grow in grace and in the kno wledge of our Lord and Saviour. T h e B i shop o f Cal-:::uttn c ame t o us once in three years and his visit brought n e w lif e and arou se d u e w h o p e and e n e r g y in u s a ll, clerg y and l a ity. Tra velling in da ys was no e a sy mD.tte r ; there were very f ew good r oads and no railways. The magnificent Irawadi, h owe ver, and the Sal ; vee n and Sitta n g afforde d splendid w aterways into t h e inte rior for s t a ti ons within r eac h o f those rive r s aud for all l a r ge s t atio n s o n the Ira w adi the fin e flotilla of t h e Irawadi Flotilla Com pa n y 1e w .le r e d the j ourney the re eas y and pleas ant, and, of cour s e t h e B ishop cou l d only v i sit larg e ceutres in the s h ort time at his dis p osa l for hi s triennia l v is it ation. It was the labour, in fact, o f v i sit in g h i s huge Diocese whi c h kill e d Bi s h o p Milma.n, and hi s death bro u ght to a p o i n t the r esolutio n which had f o r s om e time previously b een for min g t o sub-divide the unwieldy Dio c es e o f Calcutta.. The re snlt was t h e for mati o n o f the s e p arate and independent Dio ces e s of Lah o r e and Ran goo u in 1877. To prov id e the e ndowment of the Se e o f Ra.n goo n, Governmen t r ed u ce d t h e numbe r of Chap l ains and g a v e the of a S e ni o r C h a plaincy, b es id es providing a n epi s c o p a l resi d e nce; t h e bnlk o f the endowme nt, h o w e v e r w a s subscribed by the D i ocese o f Winc he s t er, w hi c h a l s o gave u s of its be s t f o r our fir s t Bi:;hop, J onathan H olt Titcomb. These two Dioceses h a v e in con B eq u e n ce b ee n c l ose l y u n i ted, and R a n g oon h as b een g re atly h e lped in many ways by wiuches t e r, the uni o n b eing indicated inthe arms of o u r Diocese The Winc h ester Miss i o n H o use will, I trus t conc entrate upo n u s the e ff ective help of our great Eng li s h p a tron, whic h h as thus happi l y a n d ge n e rou s l y "put its h and t o the plou g h. v V h e n Bis h o p Titcomh came to u s Missi o n w ork w a s b eing carrie d o n pri ncipally a t three c entres, R a n g oon, Moulmein, a.nd Mandalay. S P G began w ork in Burma at Moulmein, and it h a d extended the n c e to Rangoon, and sucsequently to Toungo o on the one hand, a nd to M andalay on the other, with a succe s sion of small s c hools on the Ira wa.di. M o ulmein, Rang oon, and Manda l a y mark the course of the indefatiga ble labours of the Rev. Dr. M a rks, who established at eac h o f the se centres large and prospero u s schools for the Burmese. The Burmese Mis sion a t that time w as o n a schol a stic basis, and there are ve r y few stations in Burma where you will not find several ''Marks's boy s ,' and we may well hope that the many Mission

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8 schools es btblished by him w : ill have p r ep<'lred the way f u r th e final t1iurnph of the Gospe l in Burma. Dr. Marks has been driven by ill health into the comparative retire m ent o f the Chaplaincy o f Moulmein. a place which must bring b ac k to him cro wding of happy days of hard work in anlrl. l a n g syne, and thither tLe affectionate good wishes o f hi s man.v friends hnv e f o llow el l him. 37 y ears o f strenuous labour a re a good "Jay," and o n e which has earned f o r hitn what we heartily trust h e will still long eJljoy-a q ui e t and happy eventide The Toungoo J\>1issiou i s almost entirely Kare n and very largelr pastoral instead o f scholastic. Its hi s tory is curious and instructive. The Ame ri ca n Baptists had made the Karen Hills their own, and the Church o f England had no intention uf taking up w ork there. Thei1 Mission there w as fouude d by Dr. Mas o n, a n Englishman, who had emigrated as a youth t o Ameri ca, whe1 e h e joined the Baptis t Communion, h av in g been alrea d y baptize d in the Church. H e met with mm-ve llou s s u ccess a,;; a .Missiomuy a m ongst the Kare ns, in which Mrs Mason was a m ost effic i ent h e lp er, and thousands w e r e b y the i r la bours, brought into the Church o f C hrist by baptim1. In the t:omse of time, Mrs. Mason developed idfa s which the Baptists con s i de red heretical, and which w e r e certa.iuly eccelltric, and they excommuni catetl her and (I belif:'ve) her husband ; the latter, how ever, w as snbse<) n e lltl y restored Mrs. :Maso n remained obd urate, and who l e villages :::tootl by h er, and refm;ed to ack11owledge a n y other teac her. S he implo1ed Cotto n, o f Ca l cutta, and hi s s u ccesso r, Bish op Milman, to receive h e r into the Communion of the Churc h, t.o which, she said, b y the circumstances o f h e r ea rl y life a nd h e r own p ers on a l p r edi ltcti on s she belonged B i s h op Cotton turned a deaf ear to h e r entreati es, a n d so did Bishop Milman, not wishing t o interfere in the Baptist sph e r e of Mi3si o n ary op e r ations with the wid e field of Bnrma. still untill ed. Mril. Masoll, however, continued h e r entrea tie s, and a t l ength Bishop l\lilmall sen t a missionary from Ranrroon, the H ev. J. Trew, t o the Karen country t o m a ke inquiries He reported t o the Bish op hi s view, that if l eft to themselves, Mrs. l\iaso11's adherents might rt'turn to their allegiance to thei r Baptist t eac h e r s Consequently, nothing was d o ne. But, as time went on, s o far from returning to their f orme r teac h ers these converts wen go in g over to the Roman Catholi cs, or laps in g into heath e ni s m. All this was again and again brought to Bishop Milman's notice b y Mrs. Mason, and the Bishop h esitated no longer, but received them a ll into the fold o f the Catholic Chur c h, and th".y formed the nucleus o f the Church of Eng land a mongst the Kare ns. Bishop Titcomb threw himself ve ry heartily into the \ vork of organizatiOJl, which, tl:e diocese being new, was a m atter of immediate and urgen t importance. He also, by reading and interc ourse with the Burmese, made himse lf acquainted with the subject of :Buddhism. Tamil and Chinese work had n o t bee n n eg l e c t ed, and now a Tamil clergyman was sp"cially ordained to look after the large number o f Ta.mil Christians a u wngs t the immigrants of that r a c e wh() corue O \'er to Burma in se a r c h of occupation.

PAGE 13

The episcopate of Bishop Titcorub was too short. He resign e d iu J 882 owing to the effects of an accident which befel him whilst climbing a mountain track in the K aren hills on a visitation tour which he w as engaged upon amongst that interesting people. He left the Dio cese amidst the regrets of all. His gentle, Christian character had in the five shor t years o f his episcopate ende a red him to all who were bro"ught into inte rcourse with him. He was an Evangelical, but o f the broad-minded wing o f that s chool, and a fluent extempore preac h er. H e saw Mission Churches built in Moulmein and in Ran goo n, and the Burma Additional Clergy Society established f o r t h e p ro vidiug of small stations with clergy. The formation of our Diocese had done much to quicken and stimulate work, and (especially in the Mi ss ion F ield ) onr first Bi:iihop spared neither money, time, nor ::;tren gth in promoting a u v a nce. Ot:u present Bishop, the Right Rev. Dr. Strachan, c a me to the D i ocese in 1 88 2, after years of practical experience of Indian Church w ork in its varied forms in the Diocese of Madras B y God's great goodness h e has been spared to us for the past f ourteen years, and, compar in g our present with the condition of affairs dioce sa n as I tir s t knew it in 186R, one is constraine d to acknowledge that the whole face o f the Church is changed. Since 1882 there has been advance a ll a l o u g the line, notwithstanding many difficulti es and a n e bb h ere and there It is easy to perceive that more direct Miss ionar y wor k is n ow being d o n e There a re now some twenty Miss ionary C l ergy a t w ork, and half o f them are Native Clergy Mo s t of these ilre u n d e r the direct ion o f the admirable men who are the head of the Kar en Miss i o n, the Rev. A. Salmon, and his colleague, the Rev. H. Keuney. In that Mi ss iou you will' pass through village after vill age wholly Chris tian, with their little bamboo Chapel and School, and in a few instances wi t h their p1iest and s choolm as ter. ThPre is a n a nnual Karen Conference when r_:epresentatives of the Church in the hill s arriv e a t the h eadq u arters of the Mission in Toungoo, and the affairs of the native Church are discuss e d with the earnestness and decorum and gravity o f Convocation itself unde r the presiden cy of Mr. Salmon. Sometimes this Conference is convened a t some suitable place in the hills. The Church is thoroughly organized, the native C l ergy b eing supported almost entirely by the people themselves. Work amongst the Burmese is slow. lt would seem as if Buddhistic atheisru had paralyzed the r e ligious susceptibility c1f the people. The n we must rP.m ember h ow inte rw oven with the life o f the people is the vas t and a ll-p ervading monastic system, and (shall we not say?) the presence of a sort of adumbration of Christ which there is in the history and character of the Buddha, and which no doubt consoles the sense of the people. But still progress of a substantial kincl 1 s being made. One admirable priest, the Rev. J. Tsan Baw, at the of duty of cholera lagt ye ar, and there is a most admirable Bu:mese clergyman, the Rev. J. Shway Hline, at work in Rangoon, w ln ch, with its Burmese congregations meeting at S. J ohu's Colleg e

PAGE 14

10 Chapel, and at S. Gabriel's Church, is now a busy centre of spiritual labour, ; whilst in a suburb-at Kemendine-there is a large training institution for native Clergy, under the able management of the _Rev. T. Rickard. I can remember the time when there were but four clergy, mi:'lsicnary and others, in Rangoon and suburbs, and only two eh urches and S. John's College Chapel. There are now ten clergy, five churches, and a beautiful cathedral. There are now some forty clergy in the Diocese, and spread all over it is a n etwork of out-stations supplied by clergy of the Additional Clergy So ciety, which leaves no station of any size at all without the ministrations of a clergyman. And now the Kilburn Sisterhood has taken up our Girls' School work with every prospect of success. The Winchester Mission House scheme, whic h is maturing in Pazundaung, a suburb of Rangoon, is a hppeful scheme if the Diocese of Winchester heartily take it up, and make a Winchester Settlement of it. And I am sure that our Bishop, as he compares past and present, must be devoutly thankful that he has been permitted to accomplish s o much during these past fourteen years. Before I conclude I cannot refrain from lifting up my testimony on one point. It seems to me inexplicable that, whilst our ascetic clergy, the Cowley Fathers, the Oxford University Brotherhood, that of Cambridge, and also that of Trinity College, Dnblin, have thrown themselves with much blessed energy and devotion into the Mission Field o f Inclia, where (as I suppose), from Cape Comorin to Pesbawar, you will find n either monk nor monastery, none of them have invaded Burma, which is one vast scene of Buddhist monks and monasteries. If anybody eau explain ltow this eau be reconciled with sanctified commou sense I shon.ld like to hear what the explanation is. I draw attention to this, not by way of complaint, but merely in the hope that, if thought about, the strange anomaly may be remedied. I am quite sure that if any of these societies are merely waiting for our Bishop to invite them to his Diocese, that they will not have loug to W8it, and will find in him a father-in-God who will thoroughly welcome them and understand them. Do I not know of a certain spot in his new Cathedral where he has decided shall be his "narrow home, '' when the Great "Shepherd and Bishop" of our souls shall take His weary labourer to Himself ? C. H. CHARD. A S e rvice o f Intercession for Foreign Miss ions has been issued by the Committee of the Conference of Missionary Associations. It is very suitable for a Parochial Missionary Union, and can be easily adapted to be used for any special Mission. It has been sanctioned for use in church by more than one Bishop. It can be obtained of E. B. Trotter, Esq., 19, Great George Street, Westminster, S. \V. Price 1s. 2d. a dozen by post.

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11 WINCHESTER DIOCESAN INDIAN MISSION HOUSE (RANGOON) FUN D. "The Diocese of Winchester has been greatly blessed and prospered in its efl'orts to found a new Diocese in India. I trust that the new Diocese of R.anguon will, for all time, be connected historically and in C hristiali sympathy with the Diocese of Winchester." So wrote Bishop Harold Browrie to Bishop Titcomb, when the effort to mise ,000 in the Dioces e of Winchester towards the endowment of the See of Rangoon hacl b ee n crowned with success The Secretaries of the Fund continued, a.fter the dissolution of the Committee, to receive donations :md subscriptions, which were applied to various objf!ds, among which may be m entioned the purchase of t h e Mission boat, "Winchester," the publicati on of a BurmeRe hymnb ook, and the establishment of a Medical .Mission at Paznndaung. It was felt, however, desirable that some definite object should be specially c h ose n f o r support by the Diocese of Winchester; and the Bishop of Rangoon, having pointe d out the n ee d of a Mis:sion House where a f e w Clergy could live together and eng age in literary, evauge list ic, and ed ucation a l work, a meetin g was held at Farnham Castle in 1888, when the scheme shadowed forth by the Bishop of Rangoon was adopted A Committee was appointed by the Bishop of Winchester, whi ch met o n August llth, 1888, and issued an appeal for a sum of per annum f o r the rent of a house and the stipends of three Missioners. Not meeting with sufficient respome, considerable delay occurred in carrying the sch eme into execution; but in 189:3 Mr. A. H. Ellis, B.A., was appointed Winchester Missioner, and sailed for R:mgoon in May of that year. Six months were devoted to his learning B urm ese a nd he w as ordained Deacon on S. Thomas's Day. He began work in a hired house, and soon gathered tog ether severl'll Burmese l ads for iustruction. The hous e however, was not well adapted for boarders, and Mr. Ellis res igned his a ppointment last July and r eturned h o me, though not before he had secured a.n admirable site for building a Mission House, which is vested in the Bishop of Rangoo n aud his successors in the Se e As it i s fel t that sl}.itable prt::mises are a prime n ecess ity, the funds at present available are being devoted to the Building Fund, for which about is still required. The plalls sent home by the Bishop of Rangoon provid e for two large cla ss -rooms, five bedrooms, bathrooms, two sitting-rooms, and the usua.l offices, and the cost is estimated at Rs. l 5,000. The amount paid for the land, registratio n, fencin g &c., was Rs. 4,671. A sum of ha'l been paid over to the Bishop of Rangoon duriug last year, bringing the amount on deposit for the Winchester House Building Fund up to about Rs. 9,000 It is much to be hoped that the friends of the Mission in Wlll persevere in their efforts, that the scheme may be earned to completion, and become an etfective factor in the spread of Christ's Kingdom among the Burmese.

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TLe Bishop o f Rrwgoou, writing o n November 7th on the s uLj ect, says:" Three men will b e required who should live in community anJ who would be content with scarcely m ore than the bare necessaries of life. One, the Warden, would have to learn the Burmese l angnage not an interesting, but also not a diffi cult l anguage. The work woul d iirst of all b e scbolastic, but the ultimate duty of the Warde n w ould be to prov ide sound Church literature in the vernac ul a 1 -a literature at present a lmo s t n on -existent. The secon d priest lleednot learn the langu age His duties would be chi e fly among the edu ca ted natives, whom, by lectures, interviews, and other means, he might influence f o r J es u s Christ. The third should b e a medica l man. Within a 111ile o f the Winchester House site, I have had for years pas t a disp ensa1y l a rgel y attended. This affords a splendid opp o rtunity for medical mi ss ion \ vork." The Committee o f the Winchester Fund have recently decide d, with the approval of the Bishops of Winchester and Rangoo n, tha t it should be administered l y the R.D.A., on condition tha t it; funds are devoted to the spec i a l purpose in v iew. The Bishop of 'Vinchester recently wrote to the Hon. Sec. : "I am most anxious tha t tbe link should be steadfastly maintaiued b etween our Diocese and the Diocese of Rangoon." The Bis hop 's Commissary, Rev. G. Cecil White, Nursling Rectory, Southampton, acts a s Hon. Sec. and Trr-a surer for Winchester ; while : Miss G. F. Martin, Upton Grey House Winc bfie l d, and Miss Shuttle worth, Co lly ers, Petersfield, are the Hon. Secretaries of the Ladi es V\T or king Association, V\Tinchester Diocese. Any of these will be glad to r ecei v e and acknow l e dge donations or subscriptions, or to hear f'rom a n y perso n s inte r ested in the work, and d esirous in any way t o assist it. G.C.W. WINCHESTER LADIES' WORKING ASSOCIATION. A m eeting was h e ld in the Church House Wincheste r, on July 2 1 at which the Dean presided, and Archdeacon Chard gave an address. A Sale of Work was h eld the same day, and over was realized for the Winchester House in R a ngoon. We are gla,d to b e able to announce tha t Mrs. Tringba m has kindly offe r e d to have the sale next summer at h e r residence at near Chertsey. All members are reques t e d t o send in their contributions o f work b y May 30 t o one of the H ono rary Secretaries, Mills G. F. Martin, U p t o n Grey House Winc hfield, Miss Collye rs, P e t e r sfie ld. The Bishop writes :--"It is an incal.: : ulable comfort to us, who a.re called to labour in the Church out here, to feel that at home we have s o many w arm friends who, by their pmyers and labours, are helping us. The thought cheers us in our isolatio n, and we are heartened t o go on with increased vigour, though surrounded by much that i s d e p ress ing. It is particularly cheering to find tha t Winchester is no t forgetting its foste r child, Rangoon."

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13 THE CHILDREN'S FUNJJ. How 'ro Hl!":LP THE S.P.G. ScnooLs IN BuRMA. The great mine of childre n)s work for F oreign Missions h as hitherto lwe n very superfic i ally worked. It might, h oweve r, be made a gre::tt p o w e r in the parochial sys tem. Ma ny Sunday S c h ools h ave Missionary Boxes, and an Annua l .:'\1issi onary :Meeting, but the interest i s perforc e weak and vagn e How ca11 it be made stron g, living, and d efinite? G i, e the childre n a fri end in so m e Mi s sion Scl10ol wh o m thev m:i.y t hi n k o f and pray for as "their boy" or "their girl," whose sc h?o l 1 eports the y may r ece iv e regularly, wi t h whom they may correspond w ho se progres s t o Baptism, Confirm:ltion, and Christian ork t h ey may watch. There will then be no difficulty in raising the amount required, and th e liv e l y interest a r o u se d will widen and develop into the true and f n ll Missionary spirit, not only in the childre n the m se lv e s but a l so in t h eir parents and other adult friends .All t he Mission Scho o l s in Bnrma a r e S.P.G. Schools, and in each a r e some scholars who are dependent entirely or partly on the Miss ion. F'e\v of these as yet have p a trons. \ V e shall be glad to hear of Sunday or Day Schoo l s, and of in div idu als, who will supply the funds n ecessary for the support of a c h ild, v iz., a year for a Karen child at Toungoo ; f o r a child at Moulmein or Map.dala y ; for a Burmese child at Baug oon. It i s not n ecessary f o r a S c hool to pledge itse lf to raise the full amount the first year, o r in a11y year-only to do as much as it can, a nd o n this condition a child will be assigned to it. The f ollowing Sunday Schools are supporting children:Thorpey Ashbourne S Peter's, Worcester S Matthew's, Clapton Thirsk per R e v. T. W. WINDLEY Rev. R. C. BATES. Rev. G. H. CoLBECK. Rev. J. A. CoLBECK. There are, no doubt, others of which w e do not know. vVe shall lJe g lad to have them on our li s t, even though they do not send the money through the Association, but throug h the S.P.G. Miss Langton, All Saints' Vicarage, H aggersto n, Lond o n, N.E., h as kindl y undertaken this branch of the work. She will receive from Burma and send on t o patrons the school reports of their and < lccounts of their progress ; and will also r ec eive subscriptions for the o f children, and pass on the mone y to the General Secretary f o r tran s mi ss ion abroad.

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14 E.xtmct from L etter from Rev. A. Salmon. We have in the Karen Mission at T ou ngo o 84 schoolboys, 14 ::;tudents, and 32 girls boarders A great many of these are orphans, and everything has to be supplied by us. The most satisfactory plan is, I have found, for patrons not to have a stated boy or girl, but to leave it with us to apply the money, on condition that it be applied only to the support and education of bona fide orphans, and that every year an account be given of those on wh o m the money is spent. I mention this because it has sometimes happe n e d that a kind patron has hit upon a like ly boy or girl who, within a short time, has left the Schoo l-got sick, perhaps, and gone to the hills, not to return till another year, or run away (though we have fewer and fewer of such case s every year). Then, naturally, the donor gets disheartened, and gives up. You see our people are mounta ineers, and it takes som e time for the children to get used to life in the plains. At first they get very home s i ck after two or three months, and as any child, however poor a nd f r i e ndles s can get his or her li ving on the mountains with little trouble, they are more or les s independent. It i s only when we have had the m some three or four years that we can begin to be really independent with them. Then the y begin t o value the <"dnca tion, and to like the lif e of the plains and school, and we can do almos t anything we like with them ; and in the case of those l eaming English even make them pay tuiti on fe es." The followin g R eport will show how the scheme works at home :" S. Peter's Worcester.-The Boys' Sunday School undert:tkes to send a year towards the maintenance o f a boy in Burma. The Bishop of Rangoon preached h ere when ne w as in England, and his f atherly l ove for his Diocese awoke much sympathy. Every class has an S.P.G. Box. These are open e d quarterly. At the bst openiug it was found that we were 1 5s b,el ow tl;te .mark, but this Sll m was raise d by a subscri,.Pti,onstarted immediate l y in the room, and Ly the collec t ion at th, e S ervice ... Rev. R. C. B a tes hopes to write a l ette r s h or.tly 'to the boy Saw Taw Der, t e llin g him about S Pete1"<> S chools, and then it is hoped that he will be able to send a short letter to be r ead to his English frie nds." The Quarterly Paper will be supplied to schoo l s supporting children and to Working Parties and Parochial Organiza tions at Id. a copy, plm; po s tage. Orders should be sent to the Editor. Unused copie d cannot b e t aken back. Work among the Machopi settled in the Diocese of Lebombo has been begun by a Catechist, who has gi ... up a Ralary of a year at J ohannesbnrg to work amongst his own people at a salary of a year.

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15 CHILDREN' S PAGE. We hope, in each issue, to have some account of Burmese childreny e ith e r in their native life or in their life at the Mission Schools. 'Ve begin with an account of Jvhn Hpo Nyaiu, who is supported by the children of S. Oswald's Sunday School, Sowerby, Thirsk. It is taken from a letter from the Hev. F. C. P. C. Clarke, the Missionary in charge of S .Augustine's, Moulmein, dated last June :"During the first few months of last year (1895), Hpo Nyain was a, pupil under the Rev. .A. H. Ellis, at the Winchester School, in Hangoon, and when Mr. Ellis was preparing to leave for England he brought the little boy over here (a distance of 120 miles) to put him under my charge, telling me that a 'European lady had promi:;;ed to p ay for him for six months; also that he thought I might with discretion baptize him almost immediately. The little boy was admitted into our school in May, 1895, and was baptized 'John' on the 15th September following. I had previously gained the mother's c onsent to this by letter. John is a native of Tavoy, which is 200 miles from Moulmein, and where his mother, a Buddhist, now lives, ga ining a precarious living by silk weaving. His father, a carpenter,
PAGE 20

16 superior to the Buddhist ; and she had become interested, and had actually 11egun to argue with the little chap. "I told Miss Lyster that, had I not known John well, I should have set him down as a little prig ; but she assured me that he had spoken beautifully, and had made quite an impression for good on her aunt's heart. He had evidently tried to reproduce the words and style of our head Burmese Catechist. "Let us hope and pray that coming events cast their shadows before them in little John's case, and that h e may be spared to grow up endowed richly with g race from God, and be eventually the means of bringing many Buddhists to the faith of Christ. "I have told John what is being done for him by good friends in England, and that he is now thPadopted son of S. Oswald's Sund.ay School. He was extremely delighted. His little face beamed with pleasure and pride, and he promised me faithfully that he would try and be a good boy and a good son." LANTERN SLIDES. It is very desirable to form some sets of slides for use at meeti11gs on behalf of Bmma. We want gradually to form the following distinct sets :-I. Wnrk among Burmans, Lower Burma. II. Do. do. Upper Burma. lii. The Karen Mission. IV. General Review of the Diocese, includin g work for the English V. Work among Tamils, Andamanese etc The General Secretary will be thankful for photos from which such slides may be made. NOTICES. Matter for insertion in No. 2 must be sent in to the Editor by the end of March. Secretaries should at the same time state the numbe r of copies they will require. The Editor will always be glad of extracts from letters, items of news, and newspaper cuttings bearing on the work in Burma, and in the Mission Field at large. The accounts for 1896 are not yet complete, but will be ready for our next issue. All moneys not yet sent in should be sent in at once to the Local or General Secretary. Coll{'cting Boxes can be obtained from the General or Local Secretaries.

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17 LETTER : E'H0:\1 THE BISHOP. D EA R ::\lR. EDITOR, I ha ve to thaJtk you fo1 a copy of the fir s t number of the Qna.rterly iPap er, \vhi ch reached me shortly bef ore I left Rangoon. The rolling b ill ows o f the Bay of Biscay are nOt h e lpful to composition, but I f eel [ must send just a few line s expressive o f my gratitude to yo u and rth e many other fri ends who axe coming t o our help in such a practical manner, and to a.ssnre you of my desire to help in every way in my pow e r dming my approaching visit to England. The Diocese of Rangoon is emphatica lly a Missionary Di ocese It i s true th
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1 8 preac h the Gospel of Hope instead of t h e Doctrin e of Despair, and t o ca u se the benign and lif e -giving rays of the Light of the World to outshine the rays of the Light of Asia. The Britis h raj has be e n subs tituted for the cruel and despotic rule of Thebaw, and the benefits conferred upon the country during the ten years that have elapsed s inc e the annexation are simply marvl:'ll o u s We see this as we look at the extension of railways, the administration of justice, the s uppre ss i on of c rime, the widened area of cultivation, the inc re ase in trade, as s h own by the returns of exports and imports, and the advance in ed u cat i on I wish I could say the same of the adva nce in the w ork of the C hurch. There has been progress indeed, but it fall s far short of what might have been expected-of what might have been effected h a d w e been more faithful to our trust. God work s through secondary ao-encies He will not work mira d es H e has committed to His. clmrch the responsibility of propagating our Holy Faith, aud the s lownes s in the progress made is too oft e n to be ascribed to the apathy, the indifference, the deadne ss of the Church of Christ. There i s no denying the fact that Christianity has made but little progress a mon gst the Buddhists of Burma. The Roma n Catholics and the Baptists have long had l arge staffs at work, and many of these h ave been both able and ea.rnest, but the number of converts from Bnddhism remains s mall. The Church of England entered late, and the supply o f men and means has been so limite d that large results cannot be expected. But, making all allowances for our own defe c t s w e must remember that the whole tendency of Buddhism is to induce indiff ere n ce about the s oul' s interests. Its teaching tends to emasculate religious earnestness, and to paralyze the moral faculties. As a proof of this I wonld point out the entire absence of a sense of duty so generally to b e fonnd amongst the Burmans. Thi s wa<> abundantly shown during the recent war. It was found they could not be relied upon in emerge ncie s and that the sentry was as likely as not to s l eep when on duty, or to fly from his post. The attachment of the m asses to their religion is owing chiefly to their respect for the ponghees, or priests. Buddhis m in Burma would die out bnt for this. Many of theRe are de serving of this respect, for they are reall y trying to live the austere life prescribed ; and thongh they are wrong, absolutely wrong, in their conception of holiness and the wn.y to attain it, s till ou e cannot withhold admiration for their faithful adherence t o the way which see m s to them the right way. But I think the re a r e s i gns of a growing t ende nc y on the part of some t o relax the se Yerit y of the rules of lif e and if this becomes genera l the decay of Buddhism will inevitabl y f o ll ow. T o one who i s acquainted with Hindooism, in its j ea l o usy of any intrusion into even the precincts o f their more sac r ed temples, nothing is more striking than the freedom and even kindly w e lcome, giYe n to visitors o f all classes and races to the pagodas and m onaste ries. This liberality is to be ascribed, I am a fr a id to indiff ere nce. Now, i t will be easily understood that a religion which requires little, if a n y,

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19 austerity from all but the monks does not predispo s e its adherents t o accept the stern and yet benign teaching of the Gospel, and to submit to its restraints. It is the absence of religious earnestness of any kind that is the chief obstacle to the advance of the Kingdom of Christ in Burma. Welcome a thousand times fierce fanaticism rather than soulless apathy. One cannot stimulate the sensibilities of the dead. If, however, there are few converts from Buddhism, it is quite otherwise with the Karens, a hill tribe largely distributed both on the hills and in the plains. The Roman Catholics and the Baptists have large and flourishing missions among these people. Our Karen mission has Toungoo for its headquarters, and is the most successful mission in the diocese. The minds of heathen Karens are, to a extent, open to consider the claims of Christ. They are placed in a receptive position, and if we had more workers, by the blessing of God thousands might be brought into the fold of Christ. There is a very flourishing Mi s sion in Rangoon amongst the Tamils and Telngus, who come over in l a rge numbers from the Coromandel coast. Many return to their native country, but there is an increasing uumber yearly who settle in Burma. We have no missions simply because we have no means, amongst the Shans, Chins, Kachins, and other large tribes who are now fellow-subjects of our gracious Empress. The S.P.G. has helped, and continues to help, us nobly, but it cannot, having regard to the claims of other Dioceses, increase its grants to us. I am on my way to England to attend the approaching Lambeth Conference, and I hope to be able to attend meetings to give information. But I am coming home under medical certificate, and I propose giving myself absolute rest for three, months. I require this, and shall be thankful if I am left free from all applications for services during that period. Thanking you, my clear Sir, and all your fellow-workers, for your help, and praying for an Easter blesiing upon all, S.S. "Shropshire," April 3rcl, 1897. I remain, Yours most sincerely, J. M. RANGOON. SAD NKWS. J nst as we go to press we learn that the Re,-. P. R. L. Fisher, whose ordination as Deacon, on 20th December, is mentioned on anotlwr page, died from epilepsy on May 3rd. The Bishop writes: "Dear Fisher was a most promising young Missionary. He had zea l and devotion. Our loss is indeed heavy." Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to all hi s relatiYe s and friend s

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20 IN FAIRCLOUGH. On February 11th there passed to his rest one wlw was held amongRt u s in this Diocese of Rangoon in the highes t esteem for meekness, wi sr lom, a,nd hard, but unobtrusive, work and to duty-the Rev. John Fairclough, of Moulmein, Missionary Priest of the Church of Engla,ncl in the Burmese Mission of S.P.G. The minute of the Dioce sa n Council of S.P.G., which is subjoined: expresses but the bare truth. Mr. Fairclough was edu cated at S. Augustine's College, Canter. bury, where the quiet goodness of his character, which we in Burma knew so well, made him popular with all, and res pected by college dons and students alike. Dr. Marks, at home on i'iic k leave, visited S. Augustine's College just as Mr. F a irclough was finishiug his course. The students were wont to a,ssemble in the large dining-hall on occa,sions to hear letters from the mission fiehl read, giving news of brother Augustinians throughout the world, and to listen t o Mi ssionary addresses. Thither came Dr. Marks in 186 5, suffE>ring much from sciatica,, and addressed the men. As a r esult nearly everybody wanted to go to Burma as Missionaries to the Burmese 1\1r. Fairclough wa,s accepted, and s e t sail on Novembe r 8th that sam e year iu ,-., sailing vessel. On bo
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21 (now curate of Haltou) with her in the hour of her great sorrow. We offer her our very sincere condolences. R.l.P. C. H. C F1om the Minutes of the Diocesan Council of S.P. G. "The Diocesan Council of S.P.G. desire to place on record on their minutes their sense of the great loss which the Missionary cause in this diocese ha,s sustained by the death of the Rev. J. Fairclough, on the 11th of February last, at Reading, in England. "Mr. Fairc lough >vas connected with the Church of England Mission to the Burmese from its early years, having arrived in this country in the earl y part of the year 1866, when he gave loyal and e fficient assistan c e to Dr. lVIarks in the various forms of Mission work which were t!1e11 being attempted in Rangoon. He was ordained deacon in Calcutta the same year, and was transferred the next year, after his ordination as priest, to Moulmein, in 1867, to take up the S.P.G. school in that place, which had witnessed the beginning of Church o f England mission work in Burma. He remained at his post here till 187i, when he was transferred to Rangoon, the Burmese school in Moulmein being discontinued. In 1875 he succeeded Dr. at Mandalay, at a time when the king's favour was with drawn, and there was little eh:e to do there but keep things in stat'tt quo, and wait for better times. In 1877 Mr. Fairclough went home on furlough, resting mission work of a direct and thorough kind which had been established by the latter at Kemeudine, and which was greatly extended iu 1882 the founding there of a Training Institute for Burmese aml Karen Catechists aud Clergy for the whole of Burma. Mr. Fairclongh was at the head of this institute from. 1883 to 1886 (when he went on furlough for the second time), and again from 1887 to 1 892, and his deeply religious character, practical wisdom, conscientious sense of duty, and steady, thorough, methodical, and unobtrusive appli cation to work, left upon it a deep and indelible mark. The last years of his life of steadfast, hnmble service were spent in the building up of the Church at Moulmeiu, which, both in schoo l and in more direct mission operations, had more than answered the promise of its early years. Here his mature wisdom was widely felt and appreciated, and in the circumstances of the Mission was greatly needed for the consolidation of the work which owed so much to the faith and good works of the Colbeck brothers. In 1888 the Bishop testified to the esteem in which his lordship held him, by appointing him to act as officiating Archdeacou and Comm i ssary, which post he held till March, 1890. To the great regret of all, when in the midst of earnest work, and when the Church in this Diocese was being greatly benefited by hi s so.'md judgment and long experience, Mr. Fairclough was suddenl y latd low, and, after many months of lingering illness, borne with his usual meekness and Christian snbmit:sion, this servant-' a..

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22 workman tha t needetl1 not to be ashamed '-has been called to his re s t. The Diocesan Council, in thus recording the high esteem in whi c h his life and labour are held by them, and all who are acquainted with the history of Mission work in the Diocese, desire at the same time to offer their sincere condolences to Mns. Fairclough and her family in their bereavement." NEWS NOTES. The Bishop and Mrs. Strachan arrived home on April 7th, and have been staying with Colonel Spearman. Their address is now 27, Coleherne Road, South Kensington. The Bishop will not be able to undertake any sermons or meetings during May. Burma is no longer a province of India, having been raised to the dignity of a separate Crown Dependency, with its own LieutenantGovernor and Legislative Council, which is to be soon formed. Sir Fred. W. R. Fryer, K.C.S.I., late Commissioner, is the first LieutenantGovernor. The Rev. H. M. Stockings wrote from Shwebo before proceeding on his well-earned furlough, asking the Diocesan Council for a loan of Rs. 4,000 to complete the Mission Church of Sbwebo, which is not yet roofed in, the loan to be repaid in monthly instalments of Rs. 100. The Council, to its great regret, was quite unable to do so. Con sequently this much-needed building must remain a reproach to the Church of England in a land where the Americans are pouring in money for the support of their Baptist and Methodist communities. The task of getting the church completed now fal1s on Rev. J. H. M. N odd er, who will be grateful for special gifts for the purpose. We regret to bear that there has been cholera at Thayet Myo, in the town and along the river. Mr. Torkington had premonitory symptoms, but escaped by a two day s trip down the river. On his return he found a Chin convert, whom he had left in charge of the house, dead, whilst the lately-baptized wife of one of the Christian masters had been attacked, but was recovering. The Missionaries in Toun goo have been passing through a time of great anxiety during the past year, a schismatical spirit having shown' its elf among a small number of the Karens. We are thankful to be able to record that a v ery noticeable movement in favour of loyalty has now set in. On December 20th the Bishop held an ordination in Christ Church, Cantonments, Rangoon, and ordained Mr. E. H. Day and Mr. P. R. L. Fisher to the diaconate, and the Rev. Bernard Mahon (son of the Dio. Sec. of S.P.G., in the Diocese of Bath and Wells) to the priesthood. Mr. Day is working in the Burmese Mission in Shwebo, and Mr. Fisher in the Karen Mission at Toungoo. Mr. Mahon has charge of the \V est Rangoon Burmese Mission, and is the chaplain of S. J ohn ; s College.

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23 T he Boys' School buildings of S. Barnabas's S.P.G. Bmmese }lission in the Poozoodoung suburb of Rangoon were destroyed by .tire on February 20th. The Boys' School is now held in the Girls' Sc hool, and the g:rls are accommodated in the Catechist's house. J. T. Best, Esq., B.A. (Harrow and Cambridge) arrived by the on the 20th February, and assumed charge of the Principals hip of St. John's College, Rangoon. The Rev. J. Hackney st..
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2-t S ALE OF w ORK AND CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. A gwat S a le o f Work in aid of H o m e and F o r e ign Mis sion s wiH' b e held at the Church H o u se Westminster, o n NonmLer 17th and 1 8th. Twenty-thre e So c i eties a r e to have s t a ll s viz. :-1. S ociety for the Pro p a g ation of the Gos p el. 2. Women's Miss i o n Associ atio n S.P.G 3. Universities Missi o n t o Central A fric-a. 4. Oxford Miss i o n to Ca l cutta a Cambridg e Mission to D e lhi. 6 Winches t e r Dioc esa n Miss i o n to R an goon 7. Archbishop' s Miss i o n to A ssyria. 8. J erusa lem and the Eas t Miss i ou 9. Dio ce s e of N a tal. 10. India n Work in N a t al. 11. Diocese o f Blo emfonte in. 12. Dioces e of Zulula nd. 13. Dioce se of L e bornbo. 14. Dio c e s e of Rockhampto11. 15. Dioces e of M e l a ne s i a 16. S PetPr's Home Gra h a m s t o w11. 17. of the S acret l Miss i o n. 18 S. Aug ustine's C o lle ge, CanterLur.Y. 19. Chris t Churc h Miss ion, Poplal'. 20. S. Peter's, Bethnal Green. 21. S. Mic h ae l s, Shoreditch. 2:2. N atio n a l Fre e Home for the Dyiug 23. Army Guilds' Home. Nos. 1, 2 and 6 of thes e h a v e to d o with Bunna. \Ve trus t tha t our friends all over the c ountry will h elp t o make the s p e ci a l stall for Rangoo n a wells upplied nnd attractiYe stall. Mis s G F. Martin, Upton Grey House vVin c hfi eld, will g l adly r e c e i ve art i c l es f o r s a l e \YINCHESTER MISSION HOUS E I N RANGOO N A S al e of W ork and Fancy Articles will b e h e ld (D.V.) o n Thursday J nne 3rd (by kind p ermiss ion of Mrs Tringha m ), at L ongcross near Cher tsey. To o p e n at 2.30. A m eeting will be held during the afternoon, whic h it i s l w p e d the L o r d Bi::;hop of R angoo n will address. The Report of the Winches t e r Branc h o f the RD.A., whi c h cle \ O t e s its funds to this objec t, has l ately b e e n i ss n e ll in happ y co mbinatic1n with that of its Ladies' \ iVorking Assoc iati o n.

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2[1 It [:-; h ea d e d Han goon, Burma, l es t it s hould fall in to the ha,nds o f any wh o are ignorant of the l ocality o f the see city ; and it is to be h o p e d that none of its readers will confuse Burma with Bermuda, as we are ass ured has been doue by a t lea s t one p e rs o n with re asonable cla im s to intelligenc e \Y" e note that ;) h as been paid t o the Bishop of R angoon in 1896 : tnd added t o the fixed deposit at the Chartered Bank. It hop e d t hat s utli cient funds may b e avail
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26 "I s hould very mu c h lik e to receive occa::;ional pape r s for our c lub, if any kind friend cou ld send u s a newspare r o r periodical once in a way, we s h o uld be very thankful. The o nly papers we get are odd numbe r s of "Church Bells" and" Church Tim es, '' generally two Or three months old on arrival, as we hav e to be g them from the Miss ionaries afte r they have dou e with them. Bo"ks a nd Sc 1 ipture prints will a lso b e most acce ptable.)' SOME ADV .ANCES IN THE woRK. The Toungoo Karen Mission was in August last divided b y the Bishop into two-the Rev. A. Salmoll'::; s p ec ial prov in ce b eiug the country of the Bghai tribe, and the R ev H. K e nney 's the country of the Pakus The Diocesan Coun c il of S.P.G. h as given Mr. Salm o n a grant of R s 20 a month as a temporary grant for six m ouths for tLe support of a ca techi s t s choolmaster among th e Rell Kare u s who are n.lmost e n tirely heathen. Work has been commenced in seven villages, which boast o f three different dialect s b etween t hem. The grant to J'vlr. Torkington, for Missionary w ork in c o nnection with S. Andre>T's S c hool at Thayet Nyo, has b ee n in c reased to Rs. 100. Two Chinese Catechists have been emplo y ed in Rangoon and plat:ed under the charge of the Rev. T. Richa .rd f o r six m o n : hs, when h e is to r eport upon them and their work. THE NrcoBAR IsLANDS.work among the Nic obarese has hitherto be e n c onfined to a three m onths' annual visit by Mr. Solomon, the Indian Catechist stationed at Port l>lair, and by the p artia l training of a few boys brought for one or two years to the Andaman Orphanage. Som e o f these stand firm to the t eaching re c eived. Two are r eported to regularly offer morning and evening prayers, and to refus e to join in h eathen ceremonies Another has not forgotte n his reading, and has small library in hi s w e ll-k ept hou se He always comes to service when Mr. Solom o n i s on hi s island, walking a lon g distance, a nd bringiug friends. The Government have n o w agreed to tlansfer wha t has bee n known a s the Andaman Orphanage to Car Nicobar, and to build a house f o r Mr. Solomon, and school and hou s e for his boys. Mr. Solomon has now with hil"l1 two boys wh o have been a t the orpha nag e some years. As a perm anent r esident we may well look fonvard to much more sa tisfa ctory work, and some far-reaching results. This advanc e will be hailed with great satisfaction b y all inte rested in the Dio c e s e of Ra .ngoo11, a s t e ndin g to d o away wh a t has been a r eproac h llitherto.

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27 HOME ORGANIZATION AND WORK. A Meeting of the Executive C ommittee was held on April 6th, Mis s Hodgkinson, Hevs. G. C. White, G. H. Colbeck, P. H. Cooke a nd Col. Spearman b e ing present. It was resolved to organize as far as possible on Diocesan lines ; to as k the Bishops of Dioceses in which we have Diocesan or Local S e c retaries to become Vice-Presidents, and to make the Bishops' c ommissaries e x-o.fficio Vice-Presidents. The Rev. G. W. Minus, Miss G. F. Martin, and Mr. H. F. Clarke were added to the Committee. It was decided to arrange a public meeting early in June if n ossible. The Bishop having given his approva l to these proposals, the following arrangements have been made :-Diocesan Secretaries.-Miss Hodgkinson becomes Secretary for Southwell and Lincoln ; Rev. R. C. Bates for Worcester ; Hev. P. H. Cooke for London. Mr. H. F. C larke has undertaken the Work of Diocesan Secretary for Rochester ; Rev. A N. Haynes for Bath and wells. RANGOON DIOCE,SAN ASSOCIATION. ACCOU::\'TS FOR 1896. Snbsci'iptions and .Don atons. s. cl. s. d. Rev. A. E. Anchinleck 0 2 6 Brought forward .... 6 15 0 Sir c. E. Barnard, Rev. Canon Churton .... 0 10 0 K.C.S.I. :3 0 0 Rev. G. H. Colbeck .... 0 2 6 Th e Misses Birt 0 2 ti Miss L. Colley 0 3 6 Mrs. Blagg .... 0 2 6 G. Colley, Esq. 0 2 0 Miss Blagg .... 0 2 6 1 Rev. P. H. Cooke 0 2 6 Miss E. Blagg 0 2 6 Miss M. E. Copleston 0 2 6 Mrs. H. Blagg () f > 0 Mrs. F. E. Cunning ham 0 2 6 H. Blagg, E sq. 1 0 0 Rev. R. H. Cuthbert .... 0 2 6 Rev. C. F. Brotherton 0 2 6 I Mrs. Cuthbert 0 2 6 .Rev. J. P. Boswell 0 10 0 Mrs. Dakeyne 0 2 6 R ev. A. W. Bailey ... 0 2 6 Mrs Dixon .... 0 5 0 Rev. H. H. Rirley .... 1 2 (j Mrs Droosten 0 2 6 -------C arried forward .... 6 15 0 Carried forward .... 8 15 6

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28 und Donatio ns-continued. Brought forward .... Mis i Evans .... Miss Falconer Miss FalcoHer Mrs. Fie ld e n .... The Hon. T. F. Free m a ntle Miss Gasco y n e Mrs. Gibbons R ev 0. Glover Mrs. Glover .... Mrs. Hargreaves Mrs. H o dgkin s on Mrs. R. Hoclgkinson Mrs. R. ,J. Hoclgkinson Miss L. J. Hodgkins on Mrs. Hopwoocl R ev. E. E. Hounslow Mrs. J ameson Miss J ameson Rev. M. LamE!'t Mrs. Lowndes W. L. Lownde s, E s q. Miss Marshall Miss G. F. Martin .... Miss Molesworth R ev J. H. Nodder R ev. J. A. Penm Mrs. J. C. .... Mrs. R A. D. P e n 'ea u Mrs Pickering Phipps Mrs. Ross .... .. .. T. R. J. Ross Esq. Rev. H. A. Serres Mi8s A. Shea1s Mrs. Simpson R.ev. Canon Skelton ... Mrs. Spearma n Miss Spearman C o l. Spearman Mrs. W. Starkey J Stephe11so n .... Mrs C Storer s. cl. 8 15 6 0 5 0 0 l 6 0 2 6 0 2 0 1 l 0 0 2 6 l 0 0 0 10 6 0 5 0 1 l 6 0 2 6 0 2 6 0 3 0 0 2 6 0 2 6 0 2 6 0 2 6 0 2 6 0 ;) 0 l 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 () 0 1 6 0 5 0 0 5 0 0 2 6 0 !) 0 0 2 6 1 0 0 0 3 6 0 2 0 0 [i 0 0 3 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 10 6 0 !"> 0 l 0 0 0 5 () 0 1 2 6 0 2 0 Carried forward.... 2 2 11 0 Brought forw ard .... Mrs Trevenau Mrs \V ads worth Mrs. W eatherell Mrs. Wes twood Mrs. Williams Dr. \Vindley .... Mis s Wingtield Lady W olseley T otn l .... s. 22 ll 0 2 0 10 0 5 0 2 0 5 0 10 0 3 0 2 d 0 & 6 0 0 0 6 6 6 2 5 0 0 CoLLECTING Rev. P. H. Co ok e Miss Dymock BoxEs. Miss G abbitass ... Miss L. J. Hodg kinsou Mrs. L owndes Mrs. J. C Perrea n Total .... 0 9 9 0 11 l 0 11 4 1 7 8 0 13 9 0 7 0 4 0 7! SALE o F vVoRK. Per L. J. Hodg kins on OFFERTORIES. St. Paul's, Burnley, p e r R ev. W. Elton Boston Church, p e r Rev. J. Stephenson 0 13 0 1 1 1 5 0 2 6 3 CHILDREN's Thirsk, p e r Rev. J. A. C ol beck St. Peter's Boys' day School, \Vor cester, per Rev. P.. C Blttes 0 0 ( i 0 0 ll 0 0

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GENERAL FUND-BALANCE-StiE:Bf. By -l z 2 (j 3 0 13 0 ll 0 0 :2 1 9 10-! Tu S tationary and PostageGe n eral Secr etary .. .. L ondo n Se c retar y ... Hemi ttancesLoml o n Secretary R e v F C. P. U la.rk e M o ulm e iu (Rs 84 1 5 4) vVorcester Secretary Thro u g h S. P. G Balance in baud ... s. d 2 (j 10:! 0 3 0 .j 0 0 (j 0 0 2D 1 U U 1 9 1Uk H. R. SPEARMAN, Uenem l 8ecretariJ

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SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTS OF vVINCHESTER DfOCESAN BRANCH. F ull pa1ticulars h ave been issned s epara t ely to membe1s of th e Branch. s. d. s. d. By B a l ance in hand 74 011 T o Expenses 2 1 5 9 Subscriptions and DonatiollS 33 16 2 Ladie s As soc iation ... 11 16 1 u2 Ladi es' Association .. .. 82 17 10l 2 Draft to the Bi s hop .... 13 5 0 0 11 Inte r est 1 1 8 Ba.la.nce in ha.nd 42 4 5 0 191 16 >-1 2 16 7! IMPORTANT NOTICE. A Pnhlic Me eting will h e h e l d at the Churc h House Westminster, o n Thnrsr lay, .Tnne lOth, at 3 p.m. of Speakers c l other detai l s will be ready soon,