Kishamia

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Kishamia
Series Title:
Yahya Ali Omar Collection
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
Swahili
Creator:
Mansab, Mwenye
Badawi, Ahmad Ahmad ( contributor )
Publication Date:
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Islam
Swahili poetry
Religious beliefs
Religious practice
Uislamu
Kiswahili mashairi
Imani za kidini
Mazoezi ya kidini
Genre:
Poem
Shairi (poetic form)
Spatial Coverage:
Africa -- Kenya -- Lamu -- Lamu
Coordinates:
-2.269444 x 40.902222

Notes

General Note:
First lines of manuscript: Nanda kutamka ya awali bismillahi, na rahmani kiandika ndiyo sahihi
General Note:
Mistari ya kwanza ya hati: Nanda kutamka ya awali bismillahi, na rahmani kiandika ndiyo sahihi
General Note:
Mansab, Mwenye = Mwenye Mansab (Sayyid Mansab bin Abdirrahman)
General Note:
Scribe: Ahmad Ahmad Badawi (Mwenye Baba)
General Note:
Badawi, Ahmad = Ahmad Ahmad Badawi (also known as: Mwenye Baba)
General Note:
Handwritten manuscript of unknown date.
General Note:
Swahili text inscribed in Arabic script
General Note:
Biographical history: This manuscript gives Mwenye Mansab's date of birth as 1223 AH (1808 AD), and that of his death as 1340 (1921); Knappert (1999) gives 1828-1922 AD. Mwenye Mansab was born in Lamu. He was well-known as a man of intense religious devotion who spent his days in Lamu's Rawdha mosque, where he wrote religious poems and translated Arabic religious texts into Swahili poems. He was a respected source of information on questions of religion, known for his ability to respond instantly to queries. Many of his exchanges with questioners are recounted in stories. One concerns his assertion that through good acts people earned themselves houses in heaven ('umejengewa nyumba,' he would tell someone who had acted well). When asked once whether heaven must not be growing awfully crowded with houses, Mwenye Mansab responded that not only did good acts build them, but bad ones tore them down, and in heaven as many houses were being demolished as were being constructed.
General Note:
Archival history: From a photocopy of a manuscript held by a school in the town of Mambrui. Yayha Ali Omar obtained it in the UK from a Kenyan visitor.
General Note:
Relevant publications: Dammann, Ernst. 1940. Dichtungen in der Lamu Mundart des Suaheli. Hamburg, pp. 276-284. Knappert, Jan. 1963. The poem of the robe. Swahili 33 (2): 55-60. Ibid. 1968. Brief Survey of Swahili Literature. London: Centre for African Studies, SOAS, University of London, 26. Ibid. 1987. Four Centuries of Swahili Verse. London: Heinemann, pp. 201-202 and 204-207. Ibid. 1999. A Survey of Swahili Islamic Epic Sagas. Lewiston, New York; Queenston, Ontario; Lampeter, Wales: Edwin Mellen Press; pp. 145-146. Harries, L. 1958. Maulid Barzanji. The Swahili Abridgement of Seyyid Mansab. Afrika und Ubersee, 42: 27-39.
General Note:
Books relevant for source include 'Nur al-Absar' by Muhammad ibn `Ali al-Sabban; As-sharafu al-mu, by Sheikh Yusuf bin Ismail al-Nabahani.
General Note:
Scope and content: The poem narrates a story in which Hussein, the grandson of the prophet Mohammed, extols the prophet's family. Mohammed arrives at the home of Fatuma saying he feels unwell. He asks for a cloak -- 'kishamia' -- in which to wrap himself. Mohammed's grandson Hasan soon approaches Fatima and says that he detects a fine scent, at which Fatima explains the presence of Muhammad. Hasan goes to Mohammed and enters the kishamia; he is followed by Hussein, Ali and Fatima herself. The poet introduces each member of the family with lengthy praise. The angel Jibril asks permission to descend from heaven. He greets Mohammed and enters the cloak. Hussein praises the family, including himself, at length. The scribe says that once they are in the shamia, the prophet reads a Qur'anic aya (33:33) to assert the purity of his family. In fact, however, this aya refers to the wives of the prophet and the importance of their rejecting all sinful behaviour. The scribe names various sources for the poem, including most importantly the Hadith al-Kisaa. In the East African coastal context, this poem relates to debate over whether the Sharifu should be respected as having elevated status. Mwenye Mansab was a Sharifu, as his name indicates: 'mwenye,' the northern form of the southern 'mwinyi,' and 'mansab,' indicating he claims this lineage on both his mother's and his father's side; as is the scribe, Ahmad Ahmad Badawi.
Funding:
Digitised with funding from the Leverhulme Trust.

Record Information

Source Institution:
SOAS, University of London
Holding Location:
Archives and Special Collections
Rights Management:
This item is in the public domain. Please use in accord with Creative Commons license: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA). High resolution digital master available from SOAS, University of London - the Digital Library Project Office.
Resource Identifier:
soas manucript number - MS 380739
System ID:
LOAA000081:00001


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Kishamia

Item Reference: MS 380739a
Collection: Yahya Ali Omar Collection
File Reference: MS 380739
Title: Kishamia
First lines of manuscript: Nanda kutamka ya awali bismillahi, na rahmani kiandika ndiyo sahihi
Authors: Mwenye Mansab (Sayyid Mansab bin Abdirrahman)
Scribe: Ahmad Ahmad Badawi (Mwenye Baba)
AD Date: Unknown
AD date of composition: Unknown
AH Date: Unknown
AH date of composition: Unknown
Extent: 11 small pages
Resource Type: Poem
Poetic Form: Shairi
Format: Handwritten manuscript
Language: Swahili
Script: Arabic
Relevant Dialects:
Subject and keywords: Islam, religious practice, religious belief
People: Mohammed, Fatima, Ali, Hasan, Hussein
Biographical history: This manuscript gives Mwenye Mansab's date of birth as 1223 AH (1808 AD), and that of his death as 1340 (1921); Knappert (1999) gives 1828-1922 AD. Mwenye Mansab was born in Lamu. He was well-known as a man of intense religious devotion who spent his days in Lamu's Rawdha mosque, where he wrote religious poems and translated Arabic religious texts into Swahili poems. He was a respected source of information on questions of religion, known for his ability to respond instantly to queries. Many of his exchanges with questioners are recounted in stories. One concerns his assertion that through good acts people earned themselves houses in heaven ('umejengewa nyumba,' he would tell someone who had acted well). When asked once whether heaven must not be growing awfully crowded with houses, Mwenye Mansab responded that not only did good acts build them, but bad ones tore them down, and in heaven as many houses were being demolished as were being constructed.
Archival history: This is a photocopy of a manuscript held by a school in the town of Mambrui. Yayha Ali Omar obtained it in the UK from a Kenyan visitor.
Physical characteristics: Photocopy of a scribed copy
Electronic reproductions: None
Existence/location of copies: None
Finding aids: None
Relevant publications: Dammann, Ernst. 1940. Dichtungen in der Lamu Mundart des Suaheli. Hamburg, pp. 276-284. Knappert, Jan. 1963. The poem of the robe. Swahili 33 (2): 55-60. Ibid. 1968. Brief Survey of Swahili Literature. London: Centre for African Studies, SOAS, University of London, 26. Ibid. 1987. Four Centuries of Swahili Verse. London: Heinemann, pp. 201-202 and 204-207. Ibid. 1999. A Survey of Swahili Islamic Epic Sagas. Lewiston, New York; Queenston, Ontario; Lampeter, Wales: Edwin Mellen Press; pp. 145-146. Harries, L. 1958. Maulid Barzanji. The Swahili Abridgement of Seyyid Mansab. Afrika und Ubersee, 42: 27-39.
Notes: Books relevant for source include 'Nur al-Absar' by Muhammad ibn `Ali al-Sabban; As-sharafu al-mu, by Sheikh Yusuf bin Ismail al-Nabahani. (Revisit)
Scope and content: The poem narrates a story in which Hussein, the grandson of the prophet Mohammed, extols the prophet's family. Mohammed arrives at the home of Fatuma saying he feels unwell. He asks for a cloak -- 'kishamia' -- in which to wrap himself. Mohammed's grandson Hasan soon approaches Fatima and says that he detects a fine scent, at which Fatima explains the presence of Muhammad. Hasan goes to Mohammed and enters the kishamia; he is followed by Hussein, Ali and Fatima herself. The poet introduces each member of the family with lengthy praise. The angel Jibril asks permission to descend from heaven. He greets Mohammed and enters the cloak. Hussein praises the family, including himself, at length. The scribe says that once they are in the shamia, the prophet reads a Qur'anic aya (33:33) to assert the purity of his family. In fact, however, this aya refers to the wives of the prophet and the importance of their rejecting all sinful behaviour. The scribe names various sources for the poem, including most importantly the Hadith al-Kisaa. In the East African coastal context, this poem relates to debate over whether the Sharifu should be respected as having elevated status. Mwenye Mansab was a Sharifu, as his name indicates: 'mwenye,' the northern form of the southern 'mwinyi,' and 'mansab,' indicating he claims this lineage on both his mother's and his father's side; as is the scribe, Ahmad Ahmad Badawi.
Description 0.
Location: None
Places: Lamu


Full Text