Citation
Colonel Draper's answer, to the Spanish arguments, claiming the galeon, and refusing payment of the ransom bills, for preserving Manila from pillage and destruction: In a letter addressed to the Earl of Halifax, His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Southern Department.

Material Information

Title:
Colonel Draper's answer, to the Spanish arguments, claiming the galeon, and refusing payment of the ransom bills, for preserving Manila from pillage and destruction: In a letter addressed to the Earl of Halifax, His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Southern Department.
Creator:
Draper, William, Sir, 1721-1787 ( Author, Primary )
Donor:
Dr. Ifor B. Powell
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Printed for J. Dodsley, in Pall-mall
Publication Date:
Language:
English
French
Physical Description:
43 p ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Draper, William, Sir, 1721-1787 ( LCNAF )
Philippines ( LCSH )
Pilipinas
Filipinas
Manila (Philippines) -- History -- 1521-1812 -- Sources ( LCSH )
Philippines -- History -- 1521-1812 -- Sources ( LCSH )
Temporal Coverage:
17621001 - 17641231
Spatial Coverage:
Asia -- Philippines
Asya -- Pilipinas
Asia -- Filipinas
Coordinates:
13 x 122

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Head pieces; half title within head and tail piece.
Funding:
Funded with resources from SOAS Archives and Special Collections and with the generous support of the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs and the Office of Senator Loren Legarda.
General Note:
VIAF (name authority) : Draper, William, Sir, 1721-1787 : URI http://viaf.org/viaf/15943280

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SOAS, University of London
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SOAS, University of London
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Full Text
Colonel DRAPER's
ANSWER,
TO THE
SPANISH ARGUMENTS.




Colonel DRAPER's
ANSWER,
T O T H E
SPANISH ARGUMENTS,
CLAIMING
The GALEON, and refusing Pay-
ment of the RANSOM BILLS, for
preferving MANILA from Pillage and
Destruction:
In a LETTER addreffed
To the EARL of HALIFAX,
His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State
For the Southern Department.
LONDON:
Printed for J. Dodsley, in Pall-mall.
MDCCLXIV.




T O T H E
EARL of HALIFAX,
His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State
For the Southern Department.
My Lord,
ARMED with that Boldness which
Innocence inspires, and the Con-
sciousness of having done my Duty,
both as an Officer, and a Man of Honour
and Humanity j I prefume again to lay
before your Lordship my Anfwer to the
Spanish Ambassador's Memorial


[ 6 ]
This Reply is something more copi-
ous than the former, which I had the
Honour of prefenting to your Lordship
in March laft : The new Arguments that
have been urged to evade Payment, re-
quiring fresh Reafons to endeavour to
enforce it.
I was in great Hopes, that the good
Faith, Honour, and Punctuality of the
Spanish Nation, would have made this
Publication unnecelfary. But finding,
that they have abfolutely refufed Pay-*
ment of the Ranfom Bills, drawn upon
their Treafury by the Governor of Ma-
nila, and do now claim the Reftitution
of the Galeon, I am constrained, for
the Sake of those brave Men, to whom
I am obliged and indebted for my Suc-
cefs, to assert their Rights, in the best
Manner I am able.
Many


[ 7 1
Many of them, My Lord, from the
too ufual and fanguine Hopes of their
Profeffion, have already anticipated their
fuppofed Profits, and may live to re-
pent their fatal Succefs in a Jail $ unlefs
the powerful Interceffion of the Govern-
ment will refcue them from impend-
ing Mifery or Deftru&ion. They vainly
look pp to me for that Protection, which
in their Names, I again requeft from
your Lordfliip's good Offices.'
I muft add, that the calumnious and
envenomed Attack upon my own Cha-
racter, demands the moft public Jufii-
fication : Being defcribed both at Home
and Abroad, as a Man void of ail Faith,
Principle, or common Honefly; and fo,
indeed, I ffiould be moft defervedly
thought, were I guilty even of the
fmalleft Part of what the Spanijh Me-
morial accufes me. A Dey of Turns,
or Algiers^ would bluffi to make ufe of
1 fo


[ 8 ]
fo black an Inftrument of Perfidy and
Piracy. I owe, therefore, this open Vin-
dication of my Conduft, both to my
Sovereign, and to my Country, whofe
Reprefentatives were pleafed to honour
me with their publick Thanks, the
greateft of all Rewards, and indeed, the
only one 1 have received for my late
Services.Sedmihi faSii fama fat eft.
My Silence, perhaps, may be mifcon-
ftrued; it may be fufpe&ed that I have
facrificed the deluded Partners of my
Expedition, to private and bafe Confi-
derations; (for fomething of a dark and
private Treaty has been whifpered about)
but, I thank Heaven my Behaviour has
been fuch as will bear the Light of
Day; and the all-fearching Eye of
Truth.
The Spaniards have afllgned my
Breach of Faith in the Capitulation, as
one


t 9 ]
one Reafon for their Refufal of Payment:
I cannot, therefore, fervilely ftoop, or
fubmit to the heavy Load of Guilt, with
which they have endeavoured to over-
whelm me. But perhaps, a Second
Gondemar is arrived amongft us:
Yet the Happinefs of the Times, we
have the good Fortune to live in, for-
bids me to carry the Allufion any far-
ther 3 nor have I the Vanity to com-
pare myfelf to the great Raleigh, even
in Miniature 3 a very unjuft and vin-
dictive Accufation, forms the only Part
of the Parallel betwixt us. But as the
execrable Days of James the Firft
can never be renewed under the Reign
of our mod jud, good, and gracious
Sovereign, I will not harbour the lead
Sufpicion that I {hall refemble that
illuftrious Man in his Misfortunes 3
or remain unprotected, or be facrificed
* A famous Spanifh Ambaffador, in the Reign
of James the Firft.
B for


[ 10 ]
for my poor Endeavours to ferve my
King] and Country; to whofe Judg-
ments I moft dutifully and humbly fub-
mit my Caufe.
I have the Honour to be,
My Lord,
With great Refpedt and Efteem,
Your moft obedient, humble Servant,
William Draper.




[ ]
J^BS Chefs de TArmee Angloife, qui fe
rendirent Maitres de Manille, propo-
ferent le cinq ftOBobre 1762, a TArche-
veque, qui tenoit lieu de Gouverneur une
Capitulation, en promettant de garantir
la Ville du Pillage, fi le Gouverneur et
les Magiftrats fignerent les Articles de la
fufdite Capitulation ; a ce qu' ils furent
contraints, fe voyant menaces d' etre
paffes au fil de l'Epee, s'ils refufoient de
s'y conformed
Malgre cette honteufe Capitulation
fignee par la Voie de la Violence et de la
Rigueur le General Draper ordonna,
ou


[ 13 3
THE
SPANISH ARGUMENTS
FOR
REFUSING PAYMENT.
rjT HE Englijh Generals who made them-
felves Matters of Manila propofed,
on the Fifth of OSlober, 1762, a Capitula-
tion to the Archbifhop, whoadled as Gover-
nor by which they promifed to preferve
the City from Pillage, if the Governor
and principal Magiftrates would confent
to, and fign the Articles of, the faid Ca-
pitulation j which they were forced to
do, being threatened to be put to the
Sword, in Cafe of Refufal.
Notwithftanding this fhameful Capitu-
lation, extorted and figned by the Means
of Violence and Rigor, General Draper
* The Spaniards, by failing to Manila, by the
Weft, are a Day later in their Computation of Type
in that Country,
ordered


[ 14 ]
ou permit, que la Ville fut faccagee pen-
dant 40 heures par 4000 Anglois, qui en
tirerent plus d'un Million de Piaftres.
Lafufdite Capitulation doit etre nul-
le, parce qu' elle a ete fignee par force,
et en outre le General Anglois fut le pre-
mier a l'enfraindre, en permettant la Pil-
lage, et par Confequence la feule Capitu-
lation propofee par le Gouverneur, admife
et fignee par l'Admiral Cornijh, et par Ie
General Draper, le Jour 7me du mois
d'Octobre doit etre confideree dans cette
affaire.
L'Article ier accorde aux habitans de
Manille la pacifique Poffeflion de tous
leurs effets, et le 4me, ain'li que le 6e
leur accordent la Liberte de leur Com-
merce fous la Protection du Roi de la
Grande Bretagne.


[i5 1
ordered or fuffered the City to be facked
and pillaged, for forty Hours, by Four
Thoufand Englijh, who plundered it of
more than a Million of Dollars.
Therefore the faid Capitulation ought
to be void, becaufe it was figned by
force > and becaufe General Draper firft
violated and broke the Capitulation, by
permitting the City to be pillaged.
Confequently, that Capitulation only,
which was propofed by the Governor^
accepted of, and figned by Admiral Cor-
nifh and General Draper, upon the Se-
venth of October, ought to be confidered
and refpeCted in this Affair.
The Firft Article of which grants to
the Inhabitants of Manila, the peaceable
and quiet Poflefiions of all their EffeCts;
the Fourth and Sixth grant them the Li-
berty of Commerce, under the Protection
of his Britannick Majefty,
R E F U~


[ i6 ]
REFUTATION.
IT is a known and univerfal Rule of
§
War amongft the moft civilized Na-
tions, that Places taken by Storm, with-
out any Capitulation, are fubjeit to all
the Miferies that the Conquerors may
chufe to infli£t.
Manila, my Lord, was in this horrid
Situation; of Confequence the Lives of
the Inhabitants, with all belonging to
them, were ^entirely at our Mercy. But
Chriftianity, Humanity, the Dignity of
our Nation, and our own Feelings as
Men, induced us not to exert the utmoft
Rigours of the Poffeflion, againft thofe
wretched Suppliants ; although my own
Secretary, Lieutenant Fryar, had been
murdered, as he was carrying a Flag
of Truce to the Town. The Admiral
and I told the Archbilhop and principal
Magiftrates,


[ i7 ]
Magistrates, that we were defirous to
fave fo fine a City from Dedru&ion, of^
dered them to withdraw, confult, and
propofe fach Terms of Compenfation
as might fatisfy the Fleet and Army.*
and exempt them from Pillage, and its
fatal Confequences.
The Propofals they gave in* were the
very fame, which the Spaniards mod
artfully call a Second Capitulation 3 and
were afterwards agreed to, and confirm-
ed by us (with a few ReftriCiions) but at
that time were fo undatable to their def-
perate Situation, that we rejected them
as unfatisfaCtory and inadmiffible. As
Conquerors, we took the Pen, and dic-
tated thofe Terms of the Ranfom which
the Spaniards thought proper to fubmit t03
for they had the Alternative, either to be
paffive under the Horrors of a Pillage, or
compound for their Prefervation 3 they
accepted the latter.
C x The


[ is i
The Objection and Pretence of Force
and Violence may be made ufe of to
evade any military Agreements whatfo-
ever, where the two Parties do not treat
upon an Equality ; for who, in War, will
fubmit to an inconvenient and prejudi-
cial Compact, unlefs from Force ? But
have the Spaniards forgot their own
Hiftories ? Or will they not remember
the juffc Indignation exprefied againft
Francis the Firft, who pleaded the
like Subterfuge of Force and Violence,
to evade the Treaty made after the bat-
tle of Pavia, and his Captivity ?
Should fuch elufive DoClrines prevail,
it will be impoffible, hereafter, for the
Vanquiffied to obtain any Quarter or
Terms whatfoever : The War will be
carried on ufqne ad internecionem ; and if
a Sovereign fhall refufe to confirm the
Conditions ftipulated by his Subjects,
who are in fuch critical Situations, the
Con-


[ 3
Confequences are too horrid to men-
tion.
By the fame fallacious Sophiftry, a
State may objedt to the Payment of the
Ranfoms of Ships taken at Sea, and to
Contributions levied in a Country which
is the Seat of War. But it is always al-
lowed, that in fuch Cafes, a Part mutt:
be facrificed to fave the Whole; and
furely, when by the Laws of War, we
were entitled to the Whole, it was a great
Degree of Moderation to be contented
with a Part.
The Deftrudtion that we could have
occafioned, would have trebled the Lofs
they fuffer by the Payment of the Ran-
fom. The rich Churches and Con-
vents, the King of Spain s own Palace,
with its fuperb and coftly Furniture,
the magnificent Buildings of every Sort,
the Fortifications, Docks, Magazines,
C 2 Founds-


As my own Character, both as an
Officer, and a Man of Honour, is fo 1
wickedly attacked by this unjuft Accu-
sation, I muft beg Leave to ftate the
the whole Affair, in its true Light;
and do appeal for its Veracity to the
Teftimonies of every Officer and Soldier,
who
[ 20 3
Founderies, Cannon, and in ffiort the
Whole might have been entirely ruined,
the Spanijh Empire in Afia fubverted,
and the Fruits of their religious Miffion
loft for ever, together with the Lives
of many Thoufand Inhabitants, who
were fpared by our Humanity. As a
fuitable and grateful Return for this
Lenity, the Spanijh Memorial affirms,
that after the Capitulation was figned.
General Draper ordered, or permitted,
the City to be facked and pillaged for
forty Hours together, by four Thoufand
Englijh, who plundered it of more than
g Million of Dollars.


[ 21 1
who ferved in the Expedition, and to all
of the Marine Department.
We entered Manila by Storm, on the
6th of OSlober 1762, with an Handful
of Troops, whofe Total amounted to
little more than Two Thoufand 3 a
motley Compofition of Seamen, Sol-
diers, Seapoys, Cafres, Lafcars, Topa-
fees, French and German Deferters.
Many of the Houfes had been aban-
doned by the frighted Inhabitants, and
were burft open by the Violence of
Shot, or Explofion of Shells. Some of
thefe were entered and pillaged. But
all military Men know, how difficult
it is to reft rain the Xmpetuolity of Troops
in the firfl Fury of an Affault, efpe-
cially when compofed of fuch a Variety
and Confufion of People, who differed
as much in Sentiments and Language,
as in Drefs and Complexion.
Several


[ 22 ]
Several Hours elapfed, before the prin-
cipal Magiftrates could be brought to
a Conference; during that Interval, the
Inhabitants were undoubtedly great Suf-
ferers. But, my Lord, this Violence
was antecedent to our Settling the Terms
of the Capitulation, and by the Laws
of War, the Place, with ail it's Con-
tents, became the unqueftionable Pro-
perty of the Captors, until a fufficient
Equivalent was given in Lieu of it.
That feveral Robberies were committed,
after the Capitulation was figned, is not
to be denied; for Avarice, Want, and
Rapacity, are ever infatiable: But that
the Place was pillaged for Forty Hours,
and that Pillage authorized and permit-
ted by me, is a mod falfe and infamous
Affertion. The People of Manila, my
Lord, have impofed upon their Court,
by a Reprefentation of Fa£ts, which
never exifted ; and to make fuch a
groundlefs


[ 23 ]
groundlefs Charge the Reafon for fet-
ting afide, and evading a folemn Capi-
tulation, is a Proceeding unheard of
until now, and as void of Decency, as
Common Senfe.
The following Extra&s from the Pub-
lick Orders, given out the very Day we
entered the Town, will fufficiently con-
vince your Lord/hip, of my conftant
Attention to the Prefervation of thofe un-
grateful People ; who have almoft taught
me to believe, that Humanity and
Compaffion are Crimes.
EXTRACTS.


[ H 1
EXTRACTS,
OBober 6th, Manila.
c< The utmoft Order and Regularity to
cc Plundering the Churches and Houfes*
" will be hanged without Mercy.
cc both Day and Night, to prevent all
" Diforders.
" the Officers to aflemble with their
cc Men, and call the Rolls.
" The Adjutants to go round the
" Town, and take an exaCt Account
cc of the Safe-guards, polled for the
" Protection


[ 25 3
" Protection of the Convents, Churches^
" and Houfes."
OSlober ^thJ
" All the Inhabitants of Manila arb
u to be looked upon and treated as His
cc Britannick Majefty's Subjects: They
tc having agreed to pay Four Millions of
cc Dollars, for the Ranfom and Prefet-
" vation of their City and Effects.
cc and Sacrilege, to be buried at Sunfet."
I hope the feregoing Extracts, are
fufficient to vindicate my CharaCter.
Moreover, the ftriCteft Search was made
on board the Squadron by the Admiral's
Orders, and amongft the Troops, to
recover what had been flolen and fe-
creted $ and all the Money, Plate, and
Jewels, fo recovered, were put into the
D Treafury,


E 26 ]
Treafury, and allowed, and accepted of
as Part of the Ranfom.
Now. let us examine the Foundation
of all the Spanijh Pretentions. In the firft
Place, they have mif-ftated the Propor-
tions, and made our Propofals antecedent
to theirs, which is impoflible. For how
could our Fourth Propofition take Notice
of, and confent to theirs, unlefs from a
previous. Knowledge and Perufal of what
they had to offer ? And indeed, the whole
Force of the Spanijh Arguments, de-
pends entirely upon the Second Capitu-
lation, as they are pleafed to term it:
But the Liberty of Commerce, and all
the other Privileges which they there
infift upon, were granted conditionally,
upon their Compliance with the Fourth
Article of our Propofitions. It exprefs-
ly declares, that the Propofals contained
in the Paper, delivered on the Part of
his Excellency the Governor and his
Council, will be liftened to, and con-
firmed


[ 127 ]
firmed to them, upon their Payment
of Four Millions of Dollars 5 the Half
to be paid immediately, the other Half
to be paid in a Time to be agreed upon ;
and Hoftages and Security given for
that Purpofe. It is therefore moll evi-
dent, that they had not the leaft Sha-
dow of Right to any Privileges, until
this Article was raoft punctually ful-
filled.
How it has been fulfilled, has been
but too clearly manifefted, by the Court
of Spain's Refufal to pay the Two
Millions of Dollars, for which we truft-
ed to the Honour and Punctuality of
that Nation. Until that Sum is paid,
it is impoffible even to name the Galeon.
* When Colonel Draper left Manila, all the
Oyidores, (the firft Magiftrates of the Place) were
taken as Hoftages: What has been done with them
fince that Time, he fuppofes Mr, Drake, the De-
puty Governor, will inform the Eajl India Com-
pany, and the Miniftry.
D 2 PO ST-


[ 28.]
POSTSCRIPT.
J T is now pretended that the Spanijh
Governor exceeded his Powers, that
he had no Authority to draw Bills, of
fuch a Nature, upon his Court: But will
not unforefesn Events, demand unfore-
feen Expedients ? In Europe, where the
Diftance will allow of it, it is undoubted-
ly the Duty of every Governor or Com-
mander, to confult his Sovereign (if an
Opportunity offers) before he prefumes
to give his Confent to, or ratify any Agree-
ment that may be prejudicial or dis-
honourable to his Crown. But can fuch
Formalities be required or obferved at the
Diftance of half the Globe ? The Per-
fons


129 ]
fons entrufted with fuch remote Com-
mands, muft be left to their own DiL
eretion ; to the Fertility or Barrennefs of
their own Invention and Refources. A
State may undoubtedly punifh the Man
who is found to have betrayed its Dig-
nity or Interefts; but at all Events, it
muft abide by his Deciflons, how pre-
judicial foever.
We find in Hiftory, that the Romans
havefometimes delivered up to the Enemy
fuch of their Generals, who had made a
fhameful or difadvantageous Peace, with-
out the Confent or Approbation of the
Senate : But that Practice has been uni-
verfally condemned upon the trueft Rea-
fons ; becaufe the Delivery of an Indi-
vidual could never be adequate to the Ad-
vantages they might acquire by the break-
ing of a bad Treaty; or compenfate
their Enemies for the Opportunities and
Advantages they might give up, or lofe,
upon


t 3 1
upon the Faith of fuch an Agree-
ment.
I flatter myfelf that the Spaniards will
not copy that great Nation in its DefeCts,
but imitate its Virtues.
It is alfo aflerted, that the Ranfom
Bills were given and accepted only to
preferve the private Property of the In-
habitants : But I do moft folemnly aver,
my Lord, that the Ranfom was general,
as well as particular. Can Six Hundred
Pieces of Brafs and Iron Ordnance ? can
the Fortifications of the Citadel and
Town of Manila, with thofe of the Citadel
and Port of Cavite> the publick and royal
Magazines, Store houfes, Docks, &c.
be called private Property ? They be-
longed, moft undoubtedly, to his Catho-
lic Majefty, and by the ftern Rules of our
Profeflion, might have been deftroyed,
had the Admiral and I been difpofed to
have carried on the War with that Bar-
barity, of which other Nations have more
i than


[ 3i ]
than once fet us the Example: But we
confidered rather how Englishmen fhoulel
aft, than what our Enemies might have
fuffered. But let us, for a Moment, ad-
mit that the Bills were drawn for the
fake of preferving private Property only :
Even in that Cafe the Spaniards are
bound in Honour to oblige the People of
Manila to pay the Money ; and they afe
now very able to difoharge the Debt?
fince thev have received all the Treafure
of the Philippina Galeon.
Our Court has (hewed them a mdffc
bright and laudable Example, by taking
Care that all the Ranfom Bills, due even
to the Enemy's Privateers, fhould be mod
punctually paid, fince the Conclufion of
the Peace. Surely fuch upright Pro-
ceedings on our Side will infufe the fame
religious Obfervance of good Faith in all
concerned in this Bufinefs, Otherwife
we niuft fay with Grotius, ab Injujlitid
excufari ?iequeunt> qui, cum paBa impro~
benfP


POST-
I do therefore, my Lord, in the Names
of all concerned (the Navy, Army, and
Eafi India Company) implore the Affif-
tance and Protection of the Government,
and its effectual good Offices, to maintain
onr moft juft Rights, and recover the
Part of the Ranfom as yet unpaid.
132 i
bmty tamen retinent, quce, fine padtis ribrt
haberent. They cannot avoid the Iov-
c< of Treaties, and yet keep Poffeffion of
We have an indifputable Right to Ma-
nilai and all its Dependencies, if the
Ranforn Bills are not faithfully paid.


PROPOSALS
MADE TO
"Their Excellencies His Britannick
Majeflys Commanders in Chief
by Sea and Eandy
B Y
His Excellency the Archbifop5
Captai?t General of the Phil-
lipine Iflands, the Royal Audi-
ence^ the City and Commerce of
Manilha.
ARTICLE I.
HP H A T the Effects and Poffeffions
-i- of the Inhabitants {hall be fecured
to them, under the Protection of His
E Britannick


[ 34 3
Britannick Majefty, with the fame Li
berty they have heretofore enjoyed.
Granted.
II,
That the Catholick, Apoftolick, and
Roman Religion, be preferved and main-
tained in its free Exercife and FunCtioris^
by its Paftors and faithful Minifters.
Granted.
III,
That the Families which are retirecf
into the Country, may have free Liberty
to return unmolefted.
Granted,
IV,
That the fame Indemnification and
Liberty may extend to all Perfons of
both Sexes, Inhabitants of this City,
4 without


[ 35 ]
Without any Prejudice or Moleftation to
their interior Commerce.
jThey may carry on all Sort of Com-
merce as Britith Subjects.
V.
Having great Confidence in the Man-
ners and Politenefs of their Excellencies
the Britannick Generals, hope they will
ufe their bed: Endeavours in preferving
Peace and Quietnefs in the City
and Suburbs, chaftizing all People,
who (hall dare to oppofe their fiaperior
Orders.
Granted*
VL
That the Inhabitants of this City may
enjoy the fame Liberty of Commerce as
they have had heretofore, and that they
may have proper Pafiports granted them
for that End.
Anfwered by the \th Article.
E 2 VII. That


[ 36 ]
VII.
That the fame Liberty may be granted
to the Natives of the Country, for bring-
ing in all Manner of Provifions, accord-
ing to their ufual Method, without the
leaft Oppolition or Extortion, paying for
them in the fame Manner as hath been
heretofore praftifed.
Granted.
Note, Any One coming in with Arms,
will be put to Death.
VIII.
That the Ecclefiaftical Government
may be tolerated, and have free Liberty
to- inftrudt the Faithful, efpecially the
Native Inhabitants.
rfhey mujl not attempt to convert any
of our Protejlant Subjedls to the
Popifh Faith.
IX. That


f 37 ]
IX.
That the Authority, as well political
as civil, may ftill remain in the Hands
of the Royal Audience, to the end that
by their Means, a Stop may be put to
all Diforders, and the Infolent and Guilty
be chaftized.
Subject to the Superior Contronl of
our Government.
X.
That the Ufe and Exercife of the
Oeconomical Government of the City,
may remain in its fame Freedom and
Liberty.
Granted. ^
XL That


f 33 ]
XI.
That the Minifters and Royal Offi-
cers, their Perfons and Goods, may
be in full Security, and be maintain-
ed in their Honours, with a Stipend
fufticient for their Support, his Ca-
tholick Majefty being anfwerable for
the fame. Upon thefe Conditions* the
above-mentioned Minifters will be un-
der the Protection of His Britannick
Majefty, in the fame Manner as the
reft of the Inhabitants.
His Catholick Majejiy mujl pay for
their Support.
XII.
That the Inhabitants may have Li-
berty to refide within 01* out of the
City,


[ 39 J
City, as fiial] be moft convenient fop
them.
Still fubjeSl to the Revocation of our
Government^ if they find it ne-
cefiary,
Done in the City of Manilha,
the yth Day of Gc3ober?
1762.
Signed^
Man1 Ant. Arfp' de Manila S. Cornifh.
Gov. y Cap. Gen. de las W. Draper,
Philps.
Francifco Henriquez de Villacourta.
Manuel Galban y Ventura,
Frc C O NV




CONDITIONS
O N
Which the City of Manilha fall
be preferved from Plunder, and
the Inhabitants maintained in
their Religion, Goods, Liber-
ties, and Propertiesy under the
Government and Protection of
His Britannick Majefy.
ARTICLE L
TH E Spanijh Officers of every
Rank, fhall be efteemed as Pri-
foners of War, upon their Parole of
Honour, but {hall have the Liberty of
wearing their Swords: The reft of their
F Troops,


[ 42 3
Troops, of every Degree and Quality,
muft be difarmed, and difpofed of as
we fhall think proper 3 they {hall b
treated with Humanity.
IL
All the Military Stores and Magazines
of every Kind, muft be furrendered
faithfully to our Commiflary, and No-
thing fecjreted, or damaged.
III.
His Excellency the Governor, muft
fend immediate Orders to the Fort of
Gavita, and the other Forts under his
Command, and dependant upon Manila,
to furrender to His Britannick Majefty.
IV.
The Propofitions contained in the
Paper, delivered on the Part of His
Excellency the Governor and his Coun-
& cil.


£ 43 ]
.cil, will be liffened to, and confirmed to
them, upon their Payment of Four Mil-
lions of Dollars, the Half to be paid im-
mediately, the other Half to be paid in, at
a Time to be agreed upon : And Hoftages
and Security given for that Furpofe.
Done in the City of Manilha,
the 6th Day of Gftober,
1762.
Signed,
Man1 Ant. Arfpo' de Manile S. Cornifh.
Gov. y Cap. Gen. de las W. Draper.
Philps.
Francifco Henriquez de Villacourtae
Manuel Galban y Ventura.
Frc0 Leandro de Viana.
FINIS.










Full Text

PAGE 1

2_ '7... 'L.. ,, ); I ;-; : -: CoLONEL D R A PE-R's ANSWER, T 0 1'\H E SPANISH A RG UM ENT S ..

PAGE 3

CoLoNEL DRAPE R'-s A N SW E R, TO, THE SPANISH ARGUMENTS, CLAIMING The GALEON, and refufing Pay--. ment of the RANSOM BILLS, for preferving MANILA from Pillage and Deftruetion : In a LE T T E R addrefl'ed To the EARL of H.AL I FAX, His Principal Secretary of State For the Southern Department L 0 N D o N: Printed for J. Do os L E v, i'n Pall-mall. MDCCLXIV'. ..)

PAGE 4

,:; < I ..r ... 1'"" I .1 r

PAGE 5

TO THE EARL. of HA,LIFAX, His MAJESTY's of State l -For Souther-n Department. & My LORD, f J\ RMED with that Boldnefs which n infpires, and the Con fcioufnefs of having done my Duty., both as an Officer; and a Man of Honour and Humanity.;, I prefume again to lay your Lordlhip my Anf wer to the Spanijh_ :fimbaffador's Memorial. Thi s

PAGE 6

f 6 ) This Reply fomething copi ous thah the former, which I had the 'Honour of preferrting to your Lordiliip in March lafl: : The new that have been urged to evade Payment, refre!h Reafons to endeavour to enforce it. ,. I was in great Hopes, that the good Faith, Honour, ;nd PunCtuality of lhe Spanijh Nation, would made Publication But finding, that they have abfolutely refufed Pay ment of the Ranfom Bills, drawn upon their Treafury by the Goveirror of Ma nila, and do now claim the Refiitut-ioh of, the Ga:leon, I am con1(rained, .-.Io. r the of thofe brave Men, to I obliged and indebted' for my"'Suc to affe .rt their Rights; ln the Manner I am able. Man y

PAGE 7

"[ 7 ] Many of them, Lord, the too ufual and fanguine Hope$ of, theh: alr7ady anticipated their Profits, and may to re: pent fatal Succefs in a Jail .; J:qnle.fs Interceffion the Govern will refcue them from impend, ing Mifery or DefiruClion. vainly ,look ,1;1p to for that which in their Names, I again reque!l: frq,m, your good Offices_, -J. muft adp that the calumnious I ancJ en'\enomed Attack upon my own Charaet'er,' demands the moll: public Jufti fication : Being defcribed both at Home and as .'a Man void of all Faith, I Prir{ciple, or Honefiy; fo, indeed, I .h()uld be moft defervedly I thought, were 1 of tl1e fmalleft Part of what the .span;ijh morial accufes me. A Dey of 'Iunis, or' .dlgiers., would blu.lh to make ufe of .:{ fo

PAGE 8

. [ 8 ] f o black an Infl:rument of Perfidy and Piracy. I therefore, this open Vin diCation of my Conduct, both to my Sovereign, and to my Country, whofe Reprefentatives were pleafed to honour me with their publick Thanks, the greateil: bf all Rewards, and ind' eed, the only one I have received for my late Services.-Sed mihi facti fama fat ejl. My Silence, perhaps, may be mifcon firued ; it may be fufpeCl:ed that I have facrificed the delu.ded Partners o f my Expedition, to private and ;, ; (for fo, mething
PAGE 9

[ 9 ] one for their Refufal -of: Pay m ent : I c.i!lnot, therefore, fervilely ftoop, o r fubm)t to t'he heayy l ioa'd of Guilt, with which they have endeavoured t9 ovctrwhelm me. But perhaps, a Second Gondemar is us : Yet the Happinefs of the Times, we have the good F6i-tun e to live in, for .. bids me to carry the Allufion any far nur h-ave I the Van!ty to compare ';llyfelf tq the great Raleigh, even in' Mliliature; a very unjufl: .and vin-' dictiye Accufation, forms the only Part of the Parallel betwixt us. But as the execrable Days of James the Firft can n ever be r enewed under the Reign of our moft jufr, good, and gracious Sovereign, I will not harbour the' leaft Sufpicion that I hall refemble that illufrrious Man in his Misfortunes ; or remain unprotected, or be facrificed A famous Spanijh Ambaffador, in the Reign of James the Firfr B for

PAGE 10

.( IO ). for my poor Endeavours to ferve my King ; and Country; to whofe Judg ments I moft dutifully and humbly fub-. mit InJ Caufe. l have the Honour to be, My_ LoRD, ':"ith. great Refpetl: and Efteem; Y inoft obedient, humble Servant, \

PAGE 12

[ u ] LES Chefs de l'Armee Angloife, qui rendirent Maitres de Manille, propo ferent le cinq d'Oflobre 1762, a 1' Arche veque, qui tenoit lieu de Gouverneur une Capitulation, en promettant de garantir la Ville du Pillage, fi le Gouverneur et les Magifirats fignerent les Articles de la fufdite ; ace qu' ils furent contraints, fe voyant menaces d' etre au fil de l'Epe.e, s'ils refufoient de s'y conformer. Malgre cette honfeufe Capitulation fignee par la Voie de la Violence et de la. Rigueur le General Dr(lper qrdonna, : o u

PAGE 13

( I 3 ) THE SPANISH ARGUMENTS FOR I R E F U S I N G P A Y M E N T. / THE.Eng/ijhGenerals who made themrelves Mafters o(Manila propofed, on the Fifth ofOClober, 1762, a Capitula tion to the Archbifhop; as Governor; by which they promifed to preferve the Cityr from Pillage, if the Govern or and principal Magiftrates would j to, and fign the Articles of, the faid Capitulation ; w)lich they were forced to do, being threatened to be to the Sword; in Cafe of Refufal. N otwithfianding this fhameful Capitu lation, extorted and fig. ned by the of Violence a nd Rigor, General Draper ;t The Spsniards, by failing to Manila, by the W efi-, are a Day later in their of Time in that Country. ordered

PAGE 14

( 14 ] ot.i permit, que la Ville fut faccagee pen 40 heures par 4000 Anglois, qui en tirerent plus d'un Million de Piafires. La fufdite Capitulation doit etre nulle, parce qu' elle a ete fignee par force, et en outre le General Anglois flit le premier a l'enfraindre, en permettant la Pillage, et par Confequence la feule Capitulation propofee le Gouverneur, admife et fignee .par I' Admiral Cornijh, et le Giner.al Draper, le Jour 7me du mois d'Q_ctobr( doit etre confideree clans <;ette L' Article 1 er accorde aux habitans de Manille la pacifique Poifeffion de tous leurs effets, et le 4 m _e, ain'fi '}Ue le 6e. leur accordent la Libe;rte de leur Corn-/ merce fous la Protection du Roi de la Grande Bretagne. I

PAGE 15

( r 5 ] ordered or fuffered the City to be facke d and pil1aged, for forty Hours, by Fou r Thoufand Englifh, who plundered it o f more than a Million of Dollars the faid Capitulation ought t o be void, becaufe it was fign ed b y force; and becaufe General Df'aper firft violated and broke the Capitulation, by permitting City to be pillaged Confequently, :: that Capitulation only, which was propofed by the accepted of, and figned by Admiral Cor ni/h :J,nd General Draper, upon the Se venth of October_, ought to be confidered and refpeeted i n this Affa i r The Firft Article of grants t b the Inhabitants of Manila, the peaceable and quiet Poffeffions of all their EffeCts ; the Fourth and grant them the L i berty of Commerce, un d er the Protection his Britan nfck_Majefty REFU ..

PAGE 16

[ 16 J R E F U T A T I 0 N. IT is a known and univerfal Rule of \far amongll the mo!l: civilized Na tions that Places taken ... by ..Storm, with out any Capitulation, are fubjeet to the Miferies that the Conquerors may chufe to infliCt. > Manila, my Lord, was i{l this horrid Situation; of Con1equence the Lives of the Inhabitants, with aH belonging t..q were entirely at our Mercy : But Chrifiiani ty, ?umanity; the Dignity oC our Nation, and our own Feelings as Men, induced us not to exert the utmoft Rigours of the Poifeiiloil, againft r thofe wretched althtmgh mytown Secretary, Lieutenant ljad been murdered, as he was carrying a F.iit.g of Tr'uce to the Tow1!l. Tlfe Admk-al and I told the Archbilhop and pr 1ndpal

PAGE 17

t ij' j Magiarates; that we were d,efirotis td fave fo fine City from Deftruetion, otJ. dered them to withdraw; confult, and propofe fuch Terms of Cornpenfation might fatisfy the Fleet and Army, and exempt them frorri and its .fatal The Propofals they gave in, very fame, which: the Spaniards artfully" call a Second Capitulation ; an\J were afterwards to, and eonfirm: _eq us (with a few Reftritl:ions) but that time were fo unfuitable to their clef, perate Situation, that we rejected them unfatisfattory and inadmiffible, .Conquerors, we took the .Pen, and die,;. tated thofe Terms of the Ranfom which the $pdniards to fubmit tQ; for they had the Alternative,. i o b e ,paffive under the Horrors of a o-r for their Prefervation ; the latter. C I

PAGE 18

,I ( I 8 1 The ObjeCl:ion and Pretence of Force and Violence may be made ufe of to evade military Agreements whatfo ever, the two Parties do not treat upon an Equality; for who, in War, will fubmit t-o an and prejudi cial Compa(t, unlefs from Force ? But. have the Spaniards : forgot their own Hifiories ? Or will they not remember the Indignation expreifed againft Frands the Firfi who. pleaded the }ike Subterfuge of Force and to evade the Treaty made after the bat .. tie of Pavia, and his Captivity? .. Should fuch' elufive Doctrines prevail, it will be hereafter, for Van quilhed to obtain any Quarter or Terms wha,tfoevec: The War will be I carried ori ujque ad internecione,m ; and if a lhall to the Conditions ftipulated by his who' are in fuch critical Situadons, the Con..

PAGE 19

[ ] Confequences are too horrid to men ... tion. By the fame Sophifiry, a State may objeCt to the of the of Ships taken at Sea, and to Contributions levied .in a Country, wh,ich, is the Seat of War. But it is alw,!lys allowed, that in fuch Cafes, a Par. t muft be facrificed to fave the Whole; and furely, by the La' ws of War, were entitled to the Whole, it was a Degree of to be conten ted witb a Part. The Deftrutlion that we could have would have trebled the Lofs they fuffer by the Payment of Hie RanI fom. 'Th. e rich j Chorches and Conthe King of Spain's own. Pa'lace, with its fuperb and cofHy Fumi, ture, the magnificent Buildings of evety Sort the Docks, Magazines, C 2 ,; Founde-

PAGE 20

r 20 J I Fourideries, Cannot?, and m ihort the Whole might have been ruined" the Spanijh Empire in ./ijia and the Fruits ; of their religious Mi$on loft for ever, with the Lives of many Thoufand Inhabita-nts, were fpared by our Humani, ty. As a fuitable and grateful Return for this Lenity, the Spanflh Mem,orial affirms, that after the was figned General Draper ordered, or permitted, : the City to be facked and pif1aged fof forty Hours together, by four Thou{and /!-nglijh? who plundered it of more than p. Millio11 of Dollars. I As -!ny own CharaCl:er, both as an Officer, : and a Man of Hondur, is :to wickedly by this unjuft Accu Jation, I rpuft beg Leave to the whole Affair, in its tme Light; do or its V era<:::ity to the pf Officer and Soldier, whq

PAGE 21

I f' f 2f 1 who ferved in the Expedition; and to all of the 'Marine Department. We entered Manila by Storm, o n the. I bth of October 1762, with an Bandful of Troops; whofe Total amo unteQ to little :more than Two Thoufancl ,; a motley c;:ompofition of Seame .n,. diers, Sea.poys, Cafres, Tepa French and German Many of the Houfes had beenaban ... cloned by the frighted Inhabitants, were bqrfi open by the Violence of Shot, or Explofioh of She1ls. of thefe were. entered pillaged. But all military Men know, how difficult itis to refi:rain the Impetuofity of Troops in the; firft Fury of an efpe dally when compofed of fuch a Variety aJ?.d Confufion of People, who differed much in Sentiments and Language, as in Prefs and Complexion. Severaf.

PAGE 22

[ 22 ] Several Hoqrs elapfed, before the Cipal Magiflrates could be brought to a conference; during that Interval, the Inhabitants were undoubtedly great Suf ferer s But, my Lord, this Violence was antecedent to our Settling the Terms of the and by the Laws of '_War,. -the Place, with all it's Contents, became the unquefiionable Pro perty of the Captors, until a fufficient Equivalent was given in Lieu of it. That feveral Robberies were COJ?mitted, ?fter the Capitulation was is .not to be denied; Avarice, Want,. and Rapacity, an t ever infatiable: But that the Place was pillaged for Forty Hours, and that Pillage authorized apd permit ted by me, is a mofi and infamous Aifertion. The People of Manz'la, my Lord, have impofed upon their Court, By a Reprefentation of FaCts, which never exifted ; and to make fuch a ,. g,roundlefs

PAGE 23

[ '23 ] groundlefs Charge the Reafon for fet ting afide, and a Capi tulation, is a unheard of until now, and as void of Decency, as Common Senfe. The following Extracts from the Pub_. lick Orders, given out the very D;1y we entered the Town, will fufficiently co n vince your Lordihip, of my conftant to the Prefervation of thofe un grateful People; who have almoft taught me to believe, that Humanity and Compaffion are Crimes. ) ) > ,,, .... EXTRACTS.

PAGE 24

. E X T R A c T S. OBober 6th, Man/a. cc The and to be cc All Perfons guilty of Robberies, or Plundering the Churches and Houfes!. will be haQged without Mercy. cc 'fhe Guards to fend frequent Patrols cc both Day and Night, to prevent all Diforders. cc The Drummers to beat to Arms, the Officers to aifemble with tQ.eir Men) and call the Rolls. I cc The Adjutants to go round the cc Town, and take an exaft Account of the Safe-guards, pofted for the ProteCtion

PAGE 25

" Protection of the Convents, Churche s; '' and Houfes." 7th; cc All the Inhabitants of Manila are '' to be looked upon and treated as His Britannick Majefty's Subjects : They having agreed to pay Four Millions df cc Dollars, for ,the Ranfom and Prefer' vation of their City and Effe 1treafuty

PAGE 26

. \ r [ '26 1 and allowed, and accepted of as Part of the Ranfom. Now. 1et us eX'a.mine the Foundation .of all the Pretenfi.ons. In the firft Place, they have mif-ftated the Propofi tions, and made ocrr anteceqent to theirs, which .is impoffible. For pow could our Fourth Propafition take Notice of, and to theirs, unlefs from a previous. Knowledg e and Per ufal of what they h _ad tp offer ? iqde eq, the whole of depends entire'ly upon the Second lation, as they are pleafed to term it : But tqe -Liberty ,of and all the other Privileges 'Yhich. they there infift upon, were granted conditionally, up<;:m their Compliance with the Artide of our Propofitions. It Iy 'that the Propofais cbntah\ed in the Paper, delivered on the Part of l).is Excellency the Governor
PAGE 27

r I 27 ] firmed to them, upon Payment of Four Millions of Dollars ; the Half to be paid immediately, the other Half \ o be p aiq in a Time to be agreed upon_; and and Security given for that Purpofe. It is therefo r e moft evident, that they had not the leaft dow of Rig-ht to any Privileges, until this Article was moft punctually ful filled How it has fulfilled, has been but too clearly by the Court of Spain's Refufal to pay the Two Millions 'of Dollars, for which we truO;-ed to Honour and PunCl:uality of that N U ntit that Sum paid, it is impo ffible even to name the Galeon. 1.1' When Colonel Draper left Manila, all the Oyidares, (the firfl: Magifrrates of the Place) were taken as Hofrages: What has 9een done with them Iince that Time, he fuppofes Mr. Drake, the Deputy will inform the ]Jqft'lndfa Company, and the Mini frry. Dz POST''

PAGE 28

P O S T S C R I P T. J T is now pretended that the Sp.anifo Governor exceeded his Powers, that he had no Authority -to draw Bills, of fuch a Nature, upon his Court: But will not unforefeen Events, demand unfore feen Expedients ? In Europe, where the Difiance will allow of it, it is undoubted.,. ly the Duty of every Governor or Commander, to confult his Sovereign (if a,n offers) before he to give his Confent to, or ratify any Agree th3.t may or difh onourable to his Crown. But qn fuch Formalities be rq uired or obferved at the Difiance of half the. Globe ? Per:. .. J .. I.

PAGE 29

[ 29 ] fans entrufied with fuch remote Corn.:. muft be left to their own Dif ..... (.:_ retion ; to the Fertility or of own Invention and Refources. A State may undoubtedly puniih the Man who is found to have betrayed its Dig-, p.jty or Interefts ; but at all Events, it _abide by Decifi6ns, how pre-judicial foever. l We find in Hiftory, that Romans l)avefometimes delivered up to the Enemy (uch of their Generals, who had rpade a ihameful or difadvantageous Peace, with out the Confent or Approbation of the : But that has been un,i..: condemned ppon the trueft Reafpns ; becaufe the Delivery of an Indi--vidual could never to Advantages they i:night acquire by the ing of' a bad Treaty; or compenfatc t}leir Enemies for the Opportunities and fidyantages they u_p, or up ,on

PAGE 30

,... J, r sa: s upon Fait}:i ot, an Agree-. men.t. ) I' flatter that -the Spaniards will not copy that great Natiorv in Befe<:ts, but imitate its Virtues. It is alfo afferted, that the Ranfom ..., \,. J. given and only to I preferve the private Property of 'the ln-habitants : But I do moft folemnly aver, my ;Lord, that the was general, as well as Six Hundred Pieces of Brafs. and Iron Q.rdnance ? can the. F0rtificat i ons of the Citadel and Town of Manila, the and of the and rqyal agazines,-Store-houfes, 'becks, &c. be Prope.rtr ? Tl)ey .. longed, mail: undoubtedly, tQ his Catho- I and by the ftern Rt,1les of our might have been defrroyed, .had the Admiral and I been difpQfed to ., hav:e carried on the W-ar with that Bar-" of which other Nations have more 1 than

PAGE 31

[ 31 ] rh an once fet us the E .xample :. But we confidered r-ather how Elnglz'jhmen ili:oul'd act, th.an w :hat our Enemies might l)ave -fuffered. -But'let us, for a -Moment;)ad.rhit that the 'Erlls -were ( drawn for tlre fake of preferving private Property. of.lly:: Even in that Cafe the Spaniards are bound in Honour to 0blige lhe People of Mahila to pay the Money ; and now very a:b1e to difcharge -the Debt7 fince thev have received all the -Treafure. \ of the phz'fi'ppina -Court has: f):1ewed thein a m 6ft trright 'and laudable Exa mple, by taking 'Care that the due.e:vert -to the En:emy's Privateers, ihouldbe'moft :fince th, e Condufion of the Peace. Surely fuch upright Pro. ceedings on our Side will infufe the fame Obfervance of good Faith in all concerned i n this Bufinefs, Otherwife w e irtuft fay w i t h Grotius, ab Injz!flitid excu.fori nequeunt, 9ui, cztm pael a t'mpro-. bent, I

PAGE 32

bent, !amen retin ent, qurz, fine pactis "nbrt haberent. They c:annot avoid the Jm .. putation of Injufiice, who difapprove cc of Treaties, and yet keep Poffeffion of '' what they could not have been poffeffed of, but by the Means of thofe We have an indifputable Right to Manila, and all its bependendes, if the Ranfom Bills are not faithfully paid. I do therefore, my Lord, in the Names of all concerned (the Navy, Army, and Eafl India Company) implore the Affif tanco and Protection of the Government, and its effeCtual good to maintain onr mofr jufr Rights, and rec_over -the Part of the Ranfom as yet unpaid. POST

PAGE 33

. PROPOSALS M AD E T 0 Their Excellencies His Britannick Majefly's Commanders zn Chief by Sea and Land, BY I\ F:Zis /Excellency the Archbijhop, Captain General pf the Phil lipine Ijlands, the Royal 4udi..(!nce, the City and Commerce .if Manilha. I. r-11'" 'I H A T the EffeCts and Poifeffions of the Inhabitants 1hall be fecured t Q thetn? under the Protection of' His :S Brifannick

PAGE 34

[ 34 J Brz'tannz'ck Majefty, with the fame perty they have heret9fore That the Catholick, Apoftolick.? anq Roman Religion, preferved and rnain-:: in its free and PY f'lithfql Iy.linifters. -Ill. _Tpat the which are retireq fnto the Country, may free _That the fa aqd rnq.y to all Perfons qf both of this City, 4

PAGE 35

. t 35 ] without any Prejudi ce or Moleftatidn td I their interior Commerce. '!'hey may carry on ail Sort of Com.:. merce as Britilh Having great in the hers and Politen efs of their Excellencies the Britannick Geaerals, hope t_hey will ufe their beft Endeavours in preferving Peace and in the City Suburbs, chaftizirtg all People, who lhall dare to oppofe their fuperior GRANTED vt. That the Inhabitants of this City may enJoy the fame Libe'lty of Commerce as they had heretofore, and that tliey h:iay have proper Paffports granted them for /that End .Anfwered by the 4th Article E 2 That

PAGE 36

! VII. fame Liberty may be granted to the Natives of the Country, for bring ing in all Manner of Provifions, accord. ing tq t heir ufual .Met hod, without the Jeafl: Oppo iition or Extortion, paying for _in,the fame Manner as bath been heretofo f e praetifed. GRANTED. Note, An) One com_ing in with Arms, will be put to Death. VIII. That the Ecclefiafl:ioal Government m a y be and have free Liberty to inftruet the Faithful, efpecially the Native Inhabitants. '!'hey mu}! not attempt to convert any of our Prottjlant Subjefls to thi Popijh Fai t b IX. That

PAGE 37

f. 37 '] IX. -That the Authority, as well as c!vil, fii_ll. in the of to the end that by !9-eir a Stop may be put to ?lJ, Diforders, f and Infolent and Guilty chafiized ; 1 the Superior Controzil if our Gowr:nment. X. That the Ufe and Exercife of the Oeconomical Government of the City, may remam m its fame Freedom and Liberty. .. GR4NTED.' ... XI. That

PAGE 38

. Xi. that t h e Minifrers : and tt6yal offi.J :thei-r !f>e:rfens 'and b e -'inftlll-Secmity; and -be mcaintain:.; ed in their wi-t'b-Stipend fufllcie nt for; S 'upport; bis ea. .. t holick Majefiy being anfw era bie fOr the e. U pori thefe Conditions ; the ab ov.e-:m enti o ned Mini.A:ers will be un der the ProteCti o n of His Brita nnic k Majefi y in the fame Manner' as the re fi of the Inhabitan' ts. His C dtholick M a jfjly ntu.fl pay for, thei r S!fPp-()rt. xr i. 'Fhat the I n h a b i t ants-may have Li-> berty to r efide Within or o u t of the Cit y, I t

PAGE 39

I [ 39" .) Gity, as fhall be flloil for them. Still fitbje{! to the Revocation of our Government, tf they find it ne-:-fe.ffaryr Pone t/z the City the 7th lJf1y of Manillia; of Man! Ant. Arfp' de Manile S. Cornith Gov. y Cap. Gen. de la& W.Draper, :J?hilps. Francifco Henriquez Manuel Galban y Ventura ; Leandro de Yiana .J: -. .<,...

PAGE 41

C 0 N D i T I 0 N S ON } Which the City of Manilha )hall be preferved from Plunder, and tbe Inhabitants maintained in tbeir Religion, Goods,:. Liber. ties, and Properties, under tbe Government and ProteElion of His Britannick Majejly. ARTICLE I. T H E Spa11ijh Officers of every Rank, fhall be e.tfeemed as Prif0ners of War, upon their Parole of H onour, out thaH ha:ve the Liberty of wearing their Swords: The of their F Troops,

PAGE 42

, [ 42 J Tmops, of every Degree and muft be and difpofed of 'Ye fuall think ? they pe treated with Humanity. II. All the Military S tores and Magazines of every Kind, muft be furrendered faitbfJlly to Commiffary, and or HI. His Excellency the Governor, tl}Uit fend immediate Orders to the Fort of Cavita, and the other Forts under Command, dependant upon furrender to His Britannz"ck Majefty \ IV The Propofitions contained in the Paper, delivered on the Part of His dle Governor and fiis Coun---, -'

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[ 43 ] :ei'l, will be lifi:ened to, and confirmed them, upon their Payment <:>f Four Mil":" lions of Dollars, the Half to be paid immediately, .the other Half to be paid in, at to be agreed upon: And Hoftages ttnd for that Purpofe. Done z'n the C-ity of Manilha, the 6th Day of 9ct:oher, 1762. Signed, Manl Arfpo' de Manile Gov. y Cap. Gen. de I as Philps. s. Cornia1. W. Draper. Francifco Henriquez de Villacourta. ,. Manuel Galban y V fr