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Administration reports

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Administration reports
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Full Text
Administrative reports
FOR THE YEAR

1909.




TABLE OF CONTENTS:

REPORT OK THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1909.

i.General Administration.

Appendix A.Financial Returns.
,, B.Assessment.
,, C.Registrar General's Department,
D.Harbour Office.
E.Observatory.

II.Law and Order.

,, F.Supreme Court.
,, G.Police Magistrates' Court.

G 1.Land Office.
,, H.District Officer, New Territories.
LPolice and Fire Brigade.
J.Prison.

III.Public Health.

5) K.Medical and Sanitary.
L.Botanical and Forestry.

IV.Education.
M.Education.

V.Defence.
N.Volunteer Corps.*

VI.Public Works.
0.Public Works.

VII.Undertakings of Government.

P.Post Office.
Q.Kowloon-Canton Railway.

* Not published.




HONGKONG.



REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1909.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of
His Excellency the Officer Administering the
Government, August 4th, 1910.

No. 231. " ~

Hongkong.

Government House,
Hongkong, 20th July, 1910.

My Lord,

I have the honour to submit for Your Lordship's information the
following general Report on the annual Blue Book for the year 1909.

LFINANCES.
(a.)General Revenue and Expenditure.

The Revenue for the year, exclusive of Extraordinary Revenue and
Widows' and Orphans' Fund andContributions amounted to $6,286,833
or £251,984 more than for the previous year. The Extraordinary
Revenue (Land Sales, Widows' and Orphans' Pension Contributions
and special Light Dues) amounted to $536,134 or $468,776 more
than in 1908, when, however, no collection was made on account of
the last two items. The total revenue from all sources was $6,822,967
or $718,760 more than in the previous year, and $113,971 more
than the Estimate.

There were increases under every head of Ordinary Revenue,
and receipts under the remaining heads were altogether $119,166
less than were anticipated, with a deficit on Land Sales accounting
for $118,403.

The Expenditure for the year was $5,313,386 exclusive of
Public Works Extraordinary; inclusive of that item it was
$6,542,839 or $1,386,639 less than the total expenditure for 1908,
which however included Railway Construction disbursements now
entered in a separate account.

Rate of Exchange-for both years was taken at 1/9. The expen-
diture of the year was less than the Estimate by $238,327, due (inter
alia) to crediting Charge on account of Public Debt with re-
imbursements of interest paid in previous years on account of
Advances for Railway Construction, and to no such charge having
been debited in 1909.

The increase of $113,971 in the Revenue, and the decrease of
$238,327 in Expenditure make a total surplus of $280,128 instead
of an anticipated deficit of $72,170. The above figures exclude
a re-imbiirsement of $354,065 from Railway Account.


The following Table shows the total revenue and expenditure
for the five years'1905-1 909

1905. 1906. 1907. I 1908. I 1909.
Revenue, #...... Expenditure, *.. $ 6,918,404 1 6,951,275 t i $ 7,035,011 6,832,610 $ 6,602,280 5,757,203 $ 6,104,207 6,573,341 $ 6,822,967 6,542,839
Surplus, .........! 202,401 845,077 280,128
Deficit, 82,871 469,134
i

* Railway Account Disbursements and Re-imbursements omitted.

(b.)colonial contribution.

The Colony contributed $1,226,441 (being the statutory contri-
bution of 20 % of the Estimated Revenue for 1909 together with the
ascertained excess of Revenue over the Estimates on account of
1908), towards the cost of the maintenance of Military Forces in the
Colony including Barrack Services and Defence Works.

(c.)Assets and Liabilities.

At the end of the year 1909, the assets of the Colony amounted
$615,438. The total 'liabilities were $264,340 so that the balance
of assets over liabilities amounted to $351,098. The sum to be re-
imbursed by Railway Construction Account was on 31st December
$1,002,071 which added to balance above makes the Balance of Assets
in General Account up to $1,353,169 a sum greater than in Decem-
ber, 1908, by the surplus Revenue in 1909, viz., $280,128.

(d.)Public Debt.

A Loan consisting of Inscribed Stock at interest, £341,799
was incurred in 1893 for Praya Reclamation; Central Market; Water,
Drainage and Sewerage Works, &c., to be paid off on 15th April,
1943.

A second Loan consisting of Inscribed Stock £1,143,933 at 3i
per cent, was raised in 1906 to cover a Loan to the Viceroy of Wuchang
of £1,100,000. The Viceroy in accordance with the terms of the Loan
had up to the end of 1909 repaid £440,000 which was placed to the
credit of a special account for construction of the British Section of
the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

The contributions paid into the Joint Sinking Fund, with
accrued interest from investments thereof, came to £86,980. 2s. 5d.
on the 31st of December, 1909, but the value of the fund, according
to market prices, was £86,577. 7 s. 9d.


II.TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,
AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.)Trade and Shipping.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the
Colony during the year 1909 amounted to 527,280 Vessels of 34,830,845
tons which, compared with that for 1908, shows a decrease in num-
bers of 4,832 vessels, with an increase in tonnage of 215,604 tons.

Of this total, 43,794 vessels of 22,415,125 tons were engaged in
foreign trade, and were distributed as follows :

1909. 1908.

British Ocean-
going ships

represented,... 9"3# in Nos. and 34*5% in tonnage. 33'7#
Foreign Ocean-
going ships

represented,... 9'8 ,, ,, 35'1 33'2
British River
Steamers re-
presented,............13'2 165 19'2

Foreign River
Steamers re-
presented,...... 3*2 ,, ,, 3'3 ,, 3"3

Steam-launches
(under 60
tons) repre-
sented,........................7'2 0'6 0'8

Trading Junks

represented,... 57'3 .lO'O ,, 9'8

100-0 100-0 lOO'O

The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the above
figures.

Of ships of European construction, 4,191 Ocean Steamers, 7
Sailing Ships, 3,576 River Steamers, and 1,580 Steam-launches (i.e.,
steamships not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving
a daily average entry of 25*6, as compared with 26*8 in 1908.

The average tonnage of individual Ocean vessels visiting the
port has slightly decreasedfrom 2,448*6 tons to 2,390*4 tons. That
of British vessels has remained stationary2,594 as against 2,593
while that of Foreign vessels has decreased from 2,309*9 to 2,205*3
tons.


Iii this connection it is interesting to note that during the past
twenty years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the
Colony has risen from 1,182*3 tons to 2,390*4 tons.

The average tonnage of River steamers entered during the year
decreased from 665*5 tons to 620*6 tons, that of British River
steamers from 687 to 640*4 tons, and that of Foreign River steamers
from 565*2 to 538*1 tons.

A comparison between the years 1908 and 1909 is given in the
following table:

Class of Vessels. I 1908. ' 1909, Increase. Decrease.
No. Tonnage. ! No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.
British Ocean- ) going, .........j Foreign Ocean- 1 goig, ......... j British River f Steamers,......j Foreign River j Steamers,......j Steamships un- j der 60 tons ( (foreign { Trade)......... J Junks, Foreign 1 Trade, ......... ) 3,869 4,132 6,246 1,297 4,060 25,833 7,505,870; 4,076 7,397,836, 4,318 4,287,482 j 5,780 733.065 j 1370 i 181,142 | 3,160 2,201,242 |25,0S0 7,735,927 7,857.908 3,701,754 735,682 140,484 2,243,370 207 186 73 230,657 460,072 2,617 42,128 466 900 743 585,728 40,658
Total Foreign j Tr. de, ...... f 45,437 22,306,637 j-13,794 22.415,125 466 735,474 2,109 626,386
Steam-launches I plying in VVa- t ters of Colony, ) Junks, Local | Trade, ........j" 445,724 #40,951 10,460,682 1,848,522 43!>,988 f43,4i)8 10 328,400 f2,087,320 2,517 238,798 5,73(5 132,28
Grand Total, ... 532.112 1 34.015,841 527/280 34,830,845 3,013 974,272 7,845 758,668
Net.......... 215,604 4,832


* Including 16,808 Conservancy and Dust Eoats of 862,256 tons,
t 19,094 of 1,022,676

This table shows an increase in British Ocean Shipping of
207 ships of 230,657 net register tons, or of 5*3 per cent, in numbers
and 3 per cent, in tonnage, which points to a continuance of the
revival of trade noted in my report for 1908. The improvement has
been continuous throughout the year.


British River Steamers liave decreased by 466 ships of 585,728
tons, or 7*4 percent, in numbers and 13 per cent, in tonnage. This
is due to the loss of two large steamers, the "Powan" and Ying-
king which ran for half of 1908 ; to the withdrawal of two smaller
steamers, the "Hoi Sang" and Kwong Fat", and to the laying
up, during three months of 1909, of another small steamer, the
Tak Hing".

Foreign Ocean vessels have increased by 186 ships of 460,072
tons, or 4*5 per cent, in numbers and 6'2 per cent, in tonnage. This
increase is due almost entirely to Japanese shipping, which has
increased by 118 ships of 459,292 tons. Increases are also shown
under the Norwegian and Swedish flagsof 58 ships of 64,400 tons,
and 47 ships of 70,265 tons, respectively. Portuguese and Dutch
flags also show small increases. The principal decreases are under
French and German coloursof 45 ships of 58,133 tons, and 19
ships of 16,848 tons, respectively; small decreases being shown
under Russian, Austrian, and Italian flags. Under the United
States flag there was an increase of 7 ships with a decrease in ton-
nage of 42,211 tons; while there was a similar fall in the average
size of Chinese ships, an increase of 2 ships being accompanied
by a decrease of 3,503 tons.

Foreign River Steamers increased by 73 ships of 2,617 tons, or
5'6 per cent, in numbers and 0'35 per cent, in tonnage, which is
explained by the smaller vessels running more frequently and the
larger less often. Two small River Steamers under Chinese colours
were added to the West River run during the year. These vessels
run only as far as Kong Mun, thus making many more trips than
those running up to Wuchow.

It may not be out of place to draw a comparison here between
these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 1889, 2,591 British
ships of 3,242,953 tons entered the port, against 9,856 ships of
11,437,681 tons in 1909. For Foreign ships the figures are for 1889,
1,144 ships of 1,206,983 tons and in 1909, 5,688 ships of 8,593,590
tons. These figures are those for Ocean and River Steamers,
which were not distinguished in 1889, and Ocean Sailing Ships
(not Junks).

The actual number of individual Ocean vessels of European
construction entering during 1909 was 704 being 336 British and
368 Foreign. The corresponding figures for 1908 were respectively
745, 365, and 380.

These 704 ships aggregated 1,682,845 tons. They entered
4,198 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 7,796,376 tons. Thus


compared with. 1908, 41 less ships entered 207 more times, and gave
a collective tonnage increased by 343,878 tons.

Tims :

Flag. Steamers. No. o£ Time;? entered. Total T onnage.

1908. 1909. 1908. 1909. 1908. 1909.
( Steamer9 358 331 1,923 2,034 3,730,927 3,854,571
British ( Sailing... 7 5 10 7 21,697 17,683
Austrian,......... 9 7 25 24 97,789 94,288
1 . 1 2,903
Chinese, ......... 16 24 229 232 291,416 290,936
Corean, ......... ,,, 1 . 1 . 796
Danish, .......... 6 5 15 16 34,211 31,426
Dutch,............ 15 I7 l 97 105 201,014 207,190
39 32 ; 169 148 289,222 262,459
German, ......... 129 108 1 745 735 1,188,100 1,176,322
Italian,............ 4 2 i 12 11 31,400 28,470
Japanese,......... 93 98 434 493 1,049,540 1,283,330
Norwegian,...... 39 43 181 212 192,278 227,341
Portuguese,...... 5 4 87 94 23,487 36,927
Russian, '......... 7 5 13 9 34,326 19,584
Swedish, ......... 3 5 11 35 18,099 53,726
United f Steamers 13 17 38 42 245,280 211,327
States ^ Sailing... 1 ... 1 ... 809 1
Total,.... 745 704 3,991 4,198 i 1 1 7,452,498:7,796,376 i

Trade.

As pointed out last year, and in many previous years, the
figures which used to appear under this heading were as a whole
never accurate, and, in some cases, actually misleading. However, in
the few items of Import Trade of which substantially accurate details
can be given, the following remarks may prove of interest. These
items are Coal, Kerosene Oil (including all products of Petroleum),
Opium, Morphine, Compounds of Opium, and Sugar.

Goal.I find that 1,126,836 tons were imported into the
Colony during the year. This shows an increase over the imports
of 1908, of 108,083 tons, or 10.6 %. This would appear to be due
to nothing more phenomenal than an increased demand, and to a
general improvement in business and manufactures. It is a curious
fact that although the imports of coal have increased to this extent,
the shipment of bunker coal in the Colony has decreased. This is
due to the fact that an increasing number of vessels, calling at Hong-
kong, prefer to take their bunker coal elsewhere, e.g., Japanese and
most transpacific liners in Japan, Chinese in Cantonwhither a


considerable quantity of coal passes through Hongkong in transit
and many vessels on the home run at Singapore, &c. This may be due
in part to the fear of detention in Hongkong, enhanced by the
prevalence of typhoons of late years.

Kerosene Oil.Decreases are shown in all classes of this
product, viz. :2G,235 tons of Bulk Oil, 3,858 tons of Case Oil, and
9,493 tons of Liquid Fuel. These decreases are only what might
have been expected after the phenomenal increases in 1908, (indeed,
my remarks on the subject foreshadowed them), and do not indicate
any falling off in the trade. Liquid Fuel has increased consider-
ably(32 %) over the figures for 1907the last normal year.

Opium.The imports of Raw Opium show a decrease of 6,087
chests, or 145 per cent, while the exports declined by 3,620 chests,
or 9'7 per cent. During the year 1909, the raw opium trade of the
Colony is described by the following figures :

Stock in hand, 1st January, 1909, 5,808 chests.

Imported during the year, 35,734 ,,

Total.

Boiled by Opium Farmer, ...
Spurious Opium destroyed,
Exported during the year,

Total, ... ,,

Stock remaining on 31st December, 1909,... 4,509 ,,

Of the several varieties of opium exported, Malwa decreased by
348 chests, or 6T per cent., Patna by 1,674 chests, or 7'8 per cent.,
Benares by 1,228 chests, or 12'0 per cent., Persian by 410 chests,
or 13 per cent., while no Turkish opium was either imported or
exported, and Chinese opium has never formed any appreciable part
of the trade of the Colony. It is obvious from the above figures that
the supply does not meet the demand, as 1,300 more chests were
disposed of than were imported. China took 92'4 per cent, of the
exports.

Imports of Compounds of Opium increased, as compared with
1908, by 2,543 lb., or 23*83%, and exports by 1,613 lb, or 19*56%,
Avhile the amount which remained in the Colony for consumption
increased by 930 lb, or 38'1%. Imports of Morphia showed an
increase of 356 lb, or 5*06%. Imports and exports of Cocaine were
recorded for the first time and for the period from April 22nd to
31st December showed 68 lb. imported and 12 lb. exported.

Sugar.The imports of sugar show a considerable increase of
89,766 tons, or 36 per cent. This article is peculiarly liable to sud-
den fluctuations, and the increase may be due to increase of stocks
owing to favourable prices.

The following remarks upon other items in connection with
which there are no official figures may be of interest.

Cotton and Yarn.With scant Yarn supplies all round and consu-
mers both.in the Southern and Northern provinces favoured with bouu-

41,542

TJJu

5.1

35,938


- 8

tifui rice and other crops, the year 1909 opened with bright prospects.
A fairly extensive business was transacted in the beginning but. as
the year advanced the continually increasing price of Cotton con-
siderably enhanced Yarn values and consumption became in the
end slightly reduced. On the whole the year was particularly re-
munerative to importers and Chinese dealers alike, seeing that the
market ruled ever on an upward tendency. On the other hand,
owing to the increasing cost of manufacture, as the result of extra-
ordinarily dear raw material, the Mills fared very badly. The year
closed with stocks light and prices abnormally high.

A new feature in the Yarn Trade of the Colony was the floating
of several limited liability companies with Chinese capital for the
transaction of business in Cotton and Cotton Yarns, which have

given a new life to the trade.

\

Piece Goods.The year was a good one for dealers in piece
goods.. The large orders placed towards the close of 1908 went with
one or two exceptions rapidly into consumption.

Silk.The year opened with but little demand from Europe and
America and the market for the first quarter of the year ruled quiet.
There was a slight activity in the middle of the year, and the year
closed with better prospects in the immediate future.

Matting.Owing to the uncertainty which prevailed in the United
States during the first half of the year as to what new rate of duty
would result from the tariff revision, the trade was much interfered
with. Business done showed a considerable decrease.-

Mats and Carpets.The market was fairly active during the
year, the largest exports being to Europe.

Metals.Prices ruled fairly low with consequent- increase in
business.

Flour.The total reported imports of flour during the year
amounted to 58,583 tons as against 91,312 tons in 1908, a decrease of
35'8/o. The decrease is due to the fact, noted last year, that direct
shipments to coast ports are now made. Another disposing cause
for the decrease is the fact that the Shanghai flour mills, which obtain
their raw material locally, are now successfully competing with
American flour at the coast ports :Foochow, Amoy, Swatow, &c.,
and are even sending through cargoes to Canton.

Rice.In spite of a hopeful outlook last year, Rice has failed
to come back to its previous figure. It has again declined from
721,254 tons to 541,078 tons, or 25 per cent. This is due to a
partial failure of the crops in Cochin China, and to the fact that many
cargoes of rice from Saigon have been sent direct to coast ports,
without touching, much less transhipping, at Hongkong.

The total reported Imports during the year amounted to
4,195,968 tons as against 4,109,856 in 1908, an increase of 0
Exports also show an increase, from 2,102,857 tons to 2,239,731
tons or 6*5%; and Transit Cargo increased from 3,372,993 tons to
3,991,347 tons or 19%, but for the reason given these figures ar
not reliable.


(J -

Em igration and Immigration.

Seventy-seven thousand four hundred and thirty (77,430)
Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1909.
Of these 52,923 were carried in British ships and 24,507 in Foreign
ships. These figures show an increase, compared with those for
1908, of 6,349 (or 8*93 %), which may be accounted for by the
return of the business to normal conditions, and to the resumption of
emigration to Banka and Billiton.

It may be well to note the increasing proportion of Emigrants
carried in Foreign vessels. This appears to be due to the increasing
numbers going to Hawaii, who can only travel in United States ships,
as well as to the resumption of emigration to the Dutch Indies, which
is carried in Dutch vessels.

One hundred and forty-four thousand eight hundred and
twenty-one (144,821) returning emigrants are reported to have been
brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had
emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against
.157,809 in 1908. Of these 109,633 arrived in British ships, and
35,188 in Foreign ships.

(b.) Industries.

(Under European Management.)

Engineering and, Shipbuilding.This is one of the most impor-
tant industries in the Colony. The principal establishments are the
Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., and the Taikoo Dockyard
and Engineering Co., Ld. There are a number of smaller yards,
some under European and others under Chinese management, which
do a large amount of work.

The Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company is an old estab-
lished company. The establishment is equipped with six dry docks,
the largest of which is 700 feet in length with an entrance breadth of
86 feet and a depth over sill of 30 feet; two patent slips and work-
shops fitted with the most modern appliances for every class of con-
structional and general engineering work including locomotives and
railway rolling stock.

The Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Company is a newly
established company. The establishment possesses a dry dock 787
feet in length with breadth of 88 feet and depth over sill of 34 feet 6
inches besides three slipways and engine and boiler shops capable
of dealing with the heaviest classes of engines. Two vessels of over
13,000 tons (gross) each were docked by this company during the
year.

The building yard is laid out with furnaces and plant suitable
for building vessels up to 20,000 tons.

The depression which existed in 1908 in this industry was
continued during the year under review.

Sugar Refining.The year 1909 was a favourable one for the
Sugar Refining Industry of the Colony as there was a good demand in
the China markets throughout that period, and in consequence of a
general advance in sugar all over the world a satisfactory margin of
profit was obtainable.


10 9

As was tlie case in 1908 Beetroot sugar did not find its way into
the China market in any appreciable quantity.

Cotton Spinning.During the earlier part of the year the local
Mill was handicapped owing to the inadequate supply of labour, but
this difficulty was overcome. Further difficulty was experienced in
obtaining the raw material at the beginning of the cotton season as
the crop although large was a late one.

Rope Manufacturing.Business has kept steady and prices have
remained the same throughout the year.

Cement.The conditions under which this industry has been
carried on have been much as in 1908, and there has been a good
demand throughout the year.

Breicing.The Oriental Brewery was at work during the year
and its beer in spite of the strong competition of the imported article
is gradually finding favour with the public. Its'capacity is about
100,000 barrels per annum.

Soap Boiling.Messrs. Blackhead & Co. manage a Soap Factory
at Shaukiwan. It was established in 1890 and is equipped with
modern plant capable of turning out 1,800,000lbs. of soap per month.
The principal manufactures are soft soap, salt water soap, toilet soap,
and tar soap which are locally consumed or exported to North China.

(6.) Industries.

(Under Chinese Management.)

Rattan and Fibre Furniture.The making of rattan chairs
has been an important industry in Hongkong for many years. There
has also been lately a large development in the use of what is called
Sea Grass (Arundo Mitis) and hemp string. The ordinary rattan easy
and garden chairs are used all over the Far East and are exported to
Australia and latterly to South Africa, and sea grass and linen
fibre furniture is exported to India, Copenhagen and America.

Tobacco.There are thirteen or fourteen native factories which
do a small manufacturing business, importing the tobacco leaf from
Pakhoi and the Canton Delta.

Tinned Goods.The manufacture of tinned goods in Hongkong
and parts of the neighbouring province of Kwongtung has acquired
considerable dimensions. The products of the factories are consumed
locally and exported to other parts of China and to countries where
there is a Chinese population.

Samshu.Samshu or Chinese spirit is made from rice, the
fermenting material being a substance composed of rice, bean flour,
red earth and leaves which are stated to be cassia leaves. Various
well-known beverages are prepared by flavouring the spirit with
plums, oranges and other fruits.

The retail price of the ordinary Chinese spirit is under 7 cents
a catty. The most expensive beverage distilled locally and composed
of roses, ordinary spirits and sugar costs 40 cents a catty. Medicated
spirits have a considerable sale among the Chinese. The spirit
principally used is one distilled from millet and obtained from the


11 9

North of China, To this spirit are added various drugs and the.
mixture is used as a tonic.

There are seven Chinese distilleries exclusive of the village
distilleries in the New Territories which have an annual output of
some 300,000 gallons, about one-tenth of which is exported.

Vests mid Socks.There are three small factories for the making
of underwear and socks, and a fourth is shortly to open. This in-
dustry appears by now to be an established one. The first factory
was opened five years ago, has increased the number of machines
and is now beginning to pay its way.

Hides and Leather.There are seven or eight tanneries where an
inferior kind of leather is manufactured. Gall-nuts from Japan
are used in the manufacture. The greater part of the hides
that reach Hongkong from the interior is sent to the Straits Settle-
ments where suitable bark can be procured, to be tanned, and sent
back to Hongkong as leather. There is an occasional export of hides
by local dealers to Italy.

Preserved Ginger.Canton has long been noted for its preserved
ginger. The manufacture has now been transferred to Hongkong
where there are a number of factories, three of which do a large
export business.

Soy.Soy is a sauce made by boiling the beans of the Glycine
hispida, Maxim", adding an equal quantity of wheat or barley and
leaving the mass to ferment. A layer of salt and three times as
much water as beans are afterwards added, and the whole compound
stirred daily for two months when the liquid is pressed and strained.
Seven or eight Chinese, factories are engaged in the manufacture
of soy in Hongkong, and three firms export it to Europe. It is also
exported to America. The wholesale price is about $20 the cask of
700 lb. Business during the year has been dull.

Paper.There is one paper mill capable of turning out 9,000 lb.
of paper in 24 hours. At present only half the machinery is used
and about 100 men are employed. The mill is lighted by electricity.
Most of the paper is exported to China: a little goes to the Straits
Settlements and elsewhere to the South. ^ The rags are collected from
all over South China: the other materials are imported from England.

Vermilion.There are three vermilion factories. Their average
annual output is stated to be about 830 piculs. There is a demand
for the vermilion all over the Far East from Japan to Calcutta. This
business is falling off owing probably to the primitive methods of
manufacture.

Lard.There are seven lard factories in existencethe largest
turning out about 60,000 piculs a year and the remaining six about
12,000. The lard is exported to the Philippines, the Straits Settle-
ments, etc., and to Rangoon. Business during the year showed no
increase.

(c,) Fisheries.

A considerable proportion of the boat-population of Hongkong
supports itself by deepsea fishing, in which pursuit a large number


12 9

of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan,
and many others in the New Territories are largely dependent upon
this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from
Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable
value in Deep Bay.

(d.) Forestry, Agriculture and Botany.

The formation of pine tree plantations in the Harbour Belt
between Lai-clii-kok and Lyemun has been continued to the extent
of 300 acres, and failures in the older plantations in this area, in
the catchment areas of Kowloon and Tytam Reservoirs and in the
felled areas of Mount Kellet and Aberdeen have been made good.
A few seedlings of the Nanmu or Coffin Wood-tree have been
planted on the north side of Mount Victoria, the south side of
Mount Kellet and at Aberdeen. A few Eucalyptus seedlings have
also been planted at the latter place.

Shade trees in Kowloon and Hongkong have been replanted
where necessary. Large quantities of brushwood have been removed
from the plantations in various parts of the Colony and given to the
villagers as payment for work done by them for the Government.
A contract extending over three years has been made whereby 710
acres of old pine tree plantations at Mount Davis, Aberdeen and
Tytam have been sold for felling. Several hundred thousand square
feet of brushwood have been cleared in the neighbourhood of dwell-
ings at Shaukiwan, West Point, the Peak and elsewhere in connection
with the crusade against mosquitoes and malaria.

The crops of vegetables, rice, and fruits in the New Territories
have not been so good as in the previous year.

Lists and samples of local plants and vegetable drugs were
prepared and submitted to the Honourable Dr. Ho Kai who was good
enough to make a prolonged investigation into their uses by Chinese
druggists and herbalists. The lists with Dr. Ho Kai's recommenda-
tions as to which of the plants and drugs were worthy of scientific
investigation were then forwarded to the Director of the Im-
perial Institute, London, for report as to whether any of them
contained medicinal or toxic qualities, or had economic value. The
lists were sent by the Imperial Institute to the Pharmacopeia
Committee of the General Medical Council who reported that there
were not sufficient indications of the extent or employment of in-
dividual plants to justify the inclusion of any of them in the Colonial
Addendum to the British Pharmacopoeia. Professor Dunstan added
that none of the plants seemed likely to yield products of economic
value which are not already known.

Seeds of Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites cordata, Soja hispida and
Perilla ocymoicles, barks of Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites cordata and
Aleurites triloba, as well as several kinds of vegetable oils were also
sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute for a report as to their
commercial value and suitability for the English market,

Work on the Flora of Hongkong, the New Territories and
province has been carried on during the year, and a list with a key
to the species, genera and orders is now nearly complete.


13 9

{e.) Land Grants and General Value of Land.

The net amount received from Sales of Crown Land and pier
rights after deducting expenses of sales was £40,665, a decrease of
$28,693 on the previous year and $155,230 less than the average
amount received for the last 5 years. Of this amount $14,401 wras
received in respect of the sale of various pier sites and extensions
to existing piers, 5,318 was received in respect of sales of land in
the New Territories and the remainder from sales of new lots of
Crown Land and grants of extensions to existing lots in the island of
Hongkong and Old Kowloon. The chief items were received in
respect of sales of building lots in Hollywood Road (Inland Lot
No. 1830) and at Shaukiwan (Shaukiwan Inland Lot No. 418).

There has been little demand for new building sites in the City
but a general improvement in the land market appears to have
.commenced and it is generally reported that better prices, are
obtained than in the previous year.

There has been a considerable number of sales of small building
sites for native dwellings and industries in the New Territories where,
except in the districts easily accessible to the City of Victoria, land
is generally sold at the price of one cent per square foot with an
annual Crown Rent at the rate of £50 or $100 per acre according to
locality. With the opening up of the Territory by the Railway and
the new roads now being constructed, the demand is likely to
i ncrcase.

There has also been a considerable increase in the amount of
waste or uncult ivated lands let on annual or short term leases. This
system lias been adopted to meet the frequent demands of cultivators
in the New Territories who were unable or unwilling to pay a
premium for a long lease.

The whole of the extensive oyster beds in Deep Bay formerly
held on annual permits have now been granted on leases for 21 years
to the occupiers, special stipulations being inserted in the leases for
the proper working of the beds.

111.LEGISLATION.

Forty-six Ordinances were passed during 1909. This number
lias only once been exceeded in the history of the Colony, namely in
1902, when 47 Ordinances were passed. But of the 1902 Ordinances
no less than ten were for the naturalization of certain persons, a matter
which under the Ordinance relating to the Naturalization of Aliens
(No. 44 of 1902) no longer requires legislation in each case. Thirty-
two of the 1909 Ordinances were Amendment Ordinances. The laws
relating to opium were consolidated (No. 23), and the law as to trade
marks was recast (No. 40). Ordinances were also passed to regulate
the construction and management of railways (No. 21) ; to authorize
the construction and maintenance of a harbour of refuge, the
necessity for which was demonstrated by the disastrous typhoon of
1906, at Mong-kok-tsui, in Kowloon, (No. 39) ; to provide for the
periodical inspection of steam boilers and prime movers (No. 32);
and to provide for the collection of duties upon intoxicating liquors
(No. 27).


14 9

IV. EDUCATION,

There are 71 Government and Grant Schools, the most important
of which is Queen's College. Of these 22 are Upper Grade Schools
with a staff competent to give instruction on all subjects of the 7th
Standard, and above. These latter schools have an average attend-
ance of 4,337, and the medium of instruction in all of them with the
exception of live girls' schools, is English. The 40 remaining
schools are all Lower Grade. Tliey comprise one school for British
Indians where English and Urdu are taught ; four Government, and
one Grant Anglo-Chinese Schools ; and 43 Grant "Vernacular Schools.
The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 2,223.
The total average attendance, at both Grades of Srhool, is 6,560.

The revenue derived from school fees is $68,204 (of which
£40,792 is from Queen's College) and is rapidly increasing : this is
mainly to be accounted for by the increasing numbers of Chinese
desirous of an English education.

Hongkong is fortunate in including among its schools two
limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one
for bovs, the other for girls) are under the Government. In 1909
the combined average attendance at them was 80. As might be
expected they have a strong patriotic bias : they are supporters of
the Empire League, aiid the boys' school provides a small but effi-
cient cadet corps.

Higher eductation is represented by the Technical Institute,
wherie instruction is given in the evening in Mathematics,
Machine Drawing, Building Construction, Field Surveying and allied
subjects ; in Chemistry and Physics ; in the English and French
languages, Book-keeping and Shorthand. There is also a Teachers'
Class, at which the junior Chinese masters of Government and Grant
Schools are expected to attend. The Institute is furnished with a
well equipped laboratory. The lecturers are chiefly Civil Servants
recruited from the European staffs of Queen's College and the Public
Works Department. These officers recei ve fees for their services.

A scheme for the foundation of a University is rapidly being
matured, the building fund having been furnished by the generosity
of Mr. H. N. Mody and the endownment fund by private subscription.
It is hoped that the University will be opened with chairs of Medi-
cine, Engineering and Arts by the beginning of 1912.

V.PUBLIC WORKS.

Of the principal works in progress, the Kowloon Waterworks
Reservoir was not finished as anticipated owing to the necessity
of having to cancel the contract and procure fresh tenders for
completion. The trench for the Mongkoktsui Breakwater was also
not quite completed owing to special repairs to the Dredger
St. Enoch caused by the Typhoon in October. The New Government
Offices and Law Courts made fair progress.

The following works were completed :Extension to Public
Works Offices (Annexe); Staff Quarters at Tai Po ; Alterations for
Qu&raiitihe Station at Lai Chi Kok ; Permanent Stairway from Ball
Room at Government House ; Wongneichong and Tai Kok Tsui


15 9

Latrines ; Blake Pier Shelter ; and the following; "were in hand or
under construction :Market at Kowloon Point; Extension to Tai Po
Land Office ; Additional Pupil Teachers' Room at Queen's College.

The work on reconstruction of Gullies and extension of Nullah
Training, Waterloo Road, Kowloon, and Nullah near North Point
was continued ; the former being practically completed. Progress
was made in substitution of iron pipes for defective earthenware
ones. The extension of Argvle Street was in hand and the raising
of Des Vceux (Chatham) Road was completed. In the New Territories
the Kowloon City-Shatin Road was completed and the Castle Peak-
Ping Shan was nearly finished.

The extension of Green Island Lighthouse Pier was completed ;
the new reinforced concrete Pier at Kowloon City was under con-
struction and piles were prepared for the Gunpowder Depot Pier.

The deepening of Causeway Bay was nearly completed. The
Albany Filter Beds Extension was finished and good progress was
made with the large main to extend the Tytam Waterworks westwards.
A section of 3" pipe on the Shaukiwan Water System was replaced
by a 6" pipe.

Much useful work was done under the Miscellaneous Works "
Vote; under the- Votes Forming and Iverbing Streets" and
u Drainage Works Miscellanousthe raising of a considerable
section of sunken sewers in Connaught Road being carried out.

Compensation was paid for scavenging lanes extension, and land
resumed for the new street between Praya East and Queen's Road
was paid for.

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary was
$1,254,450.93 and on works annually Recurrent $409,902.85.

In the sum expended under the former head is included an
amount of $438,099.25 which was paid for the acquisition by Govern-
ment of Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 443 and 1,140 as a site for the
Kowloon-Canton Railway Terminus.

The Typhoon of October caused damage to the extent of over
$50,000 chiefly to roads, telephones and piers.

Good progress has been made on the earthwork of the British Sec-
tion of the Kowloon-Canton Railway and north of Beacon Hill Tunnel
and at the end of the year it was practically completed. South of
this there remained a good deal to be done to complete Cutting
No. 1, the reclamation in Hunghom Bay and the heavy approaches
at the Gascoigne Road Bridge.

The headings of Beacon Hill Tunnel met on the 17th May
and the tunnel is now finished. Those of Taipo Tunnel met on the
28th April and this tunnel is also completed. The other tunnels
were completed during the year.

All bridges with the exception of 2, 3, 4, 8 and certain additions
to existing ones are ready for rails.


1(>

Tlie engines arrived in the Colony early in the current year and
plate-laying was begun.

The general health of the employees has steadily improved
during the year under review. The number of cases necessitating
removal to hospital showed a marked decrease in comparison with
previous years.

The expenditure during the year was $3,365,800 making a
total of $9,617,499.

VI.GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS.
(a.) Hospitals.

Government Hospitals consist ol: the Civil Hospital to which is
attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, ihe Victoria Hospital for
Women and Children, and the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases
Hospital. The Small-pox Hospital Hulk Ilygela was sold during
the year and its place will now be taken by the Kennedy Town
Hospital. There is an Observation Station capable of accommodating
1,500 persons in the event of an outbreak of infectious disease in a
ship arriving in the Harbour.

The Civil Hospital contains 150 beds in 20 wards. 2,384 in-
patients and 16,981 out-patients were treated during 1909. 188
cases of malarial fever were admitted as against 279 in 1908 and
243 in 1907. The Maternity Hospital contains 6 beds for Europeans
and 4 for Asiatics. 98 confinements occurred during the year.
The Victoria Hospital at the Peak contains 41 beds. During 1909
219 patients, were under treatment. Kennedy Town Hospital con-
tains 26 beds. In 1909 2 cases were treated, both Small-pox. On
the Hygeia 10 cases were treated of which 8 were Small-pox.

(70 Lunatic Asylum.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the
Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the
European portion containing 8 beds in separate wards and the
Chinese portion 16 beds. 176 patients of all races were treated
during 1909 and there were 26 deaths.

(c.) The Tung Wall and otlier Chinese Hospitals.

This hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the
voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of
$8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this
institution. Various other services not appertaining to a hospital
are performed by the institution such as the free burial of the poor,
the repatriation of destitutes, and the organisation of charitable relief
in emergencies. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment
are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the
patients or their friends. About half the number are now treated
by Western methods. The Hospital is managed by a Committee of


- 17

Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being sub-
mitted to the Governor for confirmation, and is under the supervision
of a visiting physician who is a member of the Medical Department,
whilst a Chinese house surgeon trained in medicine is a member of
the hospital staff.

The Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals are managed and
controlled by the missionaries resident in Hongkong, agents of the
London Missionary Society. They consist of the Alice Memorial
Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in. 18.93, the
Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in 1904 and the Ho Miu
Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in-patients in 1909
was 1,201 and the expenditure $12,600. The number of labours in
the Maternity Hospital was 198. The Government makes a grant of
$300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives which
a removal of Chinese Plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infec-
tious Diseases Hospital entailed, three District Plague Hospitals are
now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony and a
fourth is being built. They are under the management of the
Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee and receive a grant; of
$2,000 a year from the Government.

Work on the hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula lias
commenced and at the close of the year good progress had been made
with the building. The hospital occupies a site having an area of
3 acres and as designed will ultimately provide accommodation for
210 patients. The buildings in course of erection will contain 70
beds. The collection of subscriptions and the supervision of the
building were undertaken by a special committee under the chair-
manship of the Registrar General, but when completed the hospital
will form part of the Tung Wah Hospital and be under the same
management. This hospital will when opened receive a grant of
$8,500 per annum from the Government.

VII.INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged but not to any
considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the
Po Leung Kuk, the Hongkong College of Medicine, and the City Hall;
and the Chinese Public Dispensaries which receive no pecuniary
assistance from Government.

The Po Leung is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the
suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was
incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Registrar General
and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The
actual management is entrusted to a committee elected annually by
the members of the Society.

The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the
Women and Girls Protection Ordinance and almost all persons
detained by the Registrar General under that Ordinance are sent to
the Po Leung Kuk. During 1909 the number of persons admitted
was 515 and at the close of the year 66 remained under the care of the


18

Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese-
matron and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese
teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution under mission aus-
pices founded for rescue work among the Chinese. It is now housed
in the Belilios Reformatory and receives a small grant from the
Government and also a contribution from the Po Leung Kuk.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The
Government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector
of the College, who has always been a Government official, is President..
The lecturers, who are Government officials or private medical
practitioners, each receive a small honorarium, the funds being
derived from the fees of the students and a Government grant-in-aid
of $2,500. The minimum curriculum of study is five years, and the
preliminary examination has been accepted by the General Medical
Council of Great Britain. 118 students have been enrolled up to date
(January, 1910); and of these 39 have become qualified "licentiates".
Most of the licentiates have settled in the Colony, and are exerting a
most useful influence in the direction of displacing the native medical
methods and popularising Western medical and sanitary knowledge,
while a considerable number of them are employed as resident sur-
geons in the hospitals for Chinese, as medical officers in charge of
the Public Dispensaries, and as assistant medical officers on the rail-
way works. The. work of the College has thus far been carried on
in lecture-rooms and laboratories made available in various hospitals,
&c., in different parts of the City. Steps were being taken to provide
adequate buildings of its own ; but action was suspended when
the University Scheme was proposed. When the University is
established, the College will be merged into its Faculty of Medicine.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Govern-
ment. It contains a theatre, some large rooms -which are used for
balls, meetings, concerts, &c., a museum in which are some very fair
specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which
new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The
building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent ($1,280), the
French Convent (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick
infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and
other charitable institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in
order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose
certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths and with the
services of interpreters who can assist the inmates of houses where a
case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and
ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of in-
fectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies
to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send
them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of
dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are
attended at their houses. There are seven Dispensaries in existence
including one for the boat population on a hulk in Causeway Bay.


19 9

The total cost of maintenance, wliicli is defrayed by voluntary sub-
scriptions, was $34,100. The Dispensaries are conducted by com-
mittees under the chairmanship of the Registrar General.

VIII,-ORIGINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,819 being an
increase of 257 or 2*08 per cent, as compared with 1908. In the
division of these cases into serious and minor offences there is an
increase in the former as compared with the previous year of 103 or
3'17 per cent.

The number of serious offences reported was 103 over the
average of the quinquennial period commencing with the year 1905.
The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 154 as
compared with 1908, and was 1,000 below the average of the quin-
quennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force for 1909 was Europeans
132, Indians 411, Chinese 511, making a total of 1,054 as compared
with 1,046 in 1908 exclusive in each case of the five superior officers
and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for
by the railway, private firms, and other government departments.
Of this force the District Officer, 13 Europeans, 114 Indians and 46
Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

The force of District Watchmen to which the Government con-
tributes $2,000 per annum was well supported by the Chinese during
the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter
of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by
the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was
5,215 as compared with 4,778 in 1908. Of these 1,325 were com-
mitted for criminal offences, against 1,312 in 1908. Of commit-
tals for non-criminal offences there were 35 less under the Prepared
Opium Ordinance and 30 more for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 560, the
average for 1908 being 465 and the highest previous average being
726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according
to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the
latter was '14 as compared with '14, the average percentage for the
last ten years.

Owing however to the large floating population which is con-
stantly moving between the Colony and Canton the percentage of
crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the compara-
tive criminality of the residents of the Colony.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish-
ments per prisoner being 1'38 as compared with 1*27 in 1908 and
1'50 in 1907.'

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are
taught useful trades, including printing, book-binding, washing^


- 20

ion-

carpentry, boot-making, net-making, painting and white-washing,
mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, &c. The profit on the work
done was $43,9-10 as against ^45,420 in 1908.

There was $4,809 received and credited to Government for j
Government work against $5,012 in 1908.

The use of the Belilios Reformatory as an overflow prison having
been discontinued, it became necessary to consider an extension of
Victoria Gaol and it was found possible by pulling down the offices
and stores and re-erecting them in another position with economy
of space, to make room for a ward containing 78 cells with yard
attached. x\ contract for this work was let at the beginning of the
current year.

IX.VITAL STATISTICS,
(ft.) .Population.

The population of the Colonv according to the Census taken in
1901 was 283,975 while at the Census taken in 1900 it was 301,907
exclusive of the New Territories, New Kowloon and the Army and
Navy Establishments. The estimated population at the middle of
the year under review was 428,888 as follows :

Non-Chinese Civil Community, ----- 14,000
I Hongkong, 199,550

ril v> i ) Kowloon, 74,600

Chinese Population, j Floating,Popillatioil> 46;24o

( Mercantile Marine, 2,770

-- 323,160

Army, (average strength), - 4,500

Navy, (average strength), 2,217

----------------------0,71.7

New Territories, (exclusive of Kowloon), - 85,011

Total, - 428,888

(b.) Public Health and Sanitation.

During the year under review considerable progress has been
made in rendering existing domestic buildings rat proof as a pre-
ventive of Plague, 391 ground surfaces of houses have been repaired,
and 1,048 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. In
addition 20 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated.

New buildings (domestic) to the number of 128 were erected
during the year and in these the effect of the present Ordinance is
seen in the increased amount of open space about the houses, which
the law requires. Scavenging lanes which have to be provided in
the rear of new houses also increase the open space about, them and
tend to reduce overcrowding.

The general death rate for the year was 21'68 per 1,000 among
the Chinese community and 12'45 per 1,000 among the Non-Chinese
Community as compared with 28*35 and I4'78 respectively during
1908,


21 9

During the year there were 108 deaths from Plague compared
with 986 in 1908 and and 198 in 1907.

There were 2,514 deaths from Respiratory Diseases amongst the
Chinese, 751 of which were due to Phthisis, a percentage of 10'7 of
the total deaths amongst that community.

Beri-beri caused 545 deathsas against 736 in 1908.

The deaths from Malaria were 420 as against 499 in 1908, and
579 in 1907. Military returns of admissions to hospital for Malaria
show a reduction in the incidence of this disease, as compared with
the year 1908. There were 268 admissions in 1909 being a ratio
per thousand of the Garrison of 59, against 515 in 1908 (115 per
thousand).

Owing to the general improvement in the sanitary condition of
the Colony and to the simplification of the methods of dealing
with Plague cases and Plague-infected houses since the publication
of the final Report of the Indian Plague Commission in 1908, it has
been found possible to reduce the number of Sanitary Inspectors by the
abolition of five special Plague Inspectors whose duties are now per-
formed by the District Inspectors. It has also been possible to effect
a very considerable economy in the matter of the disinfection of
Plague-infected houses, as a cheap pulicide is now used in the place
of the more expensive disinfectants.

(c.) Climate.

The average monthly temperature throughout the year was
72'7 F. as compared with 71'8 P. in 1908 and 72'0 F. during the
ten preceding years. The mean maximum monthly temperature was
attained in August, when it reached 87'5 F., and the mean minimum
monthly temperature was recorded in February, when it was 57'0F.
The highest recorded temperature during the year was 90'8 F. on
the 30th July, and the lowest 48'7 F. on the 8th February.

The total rainfall for the year was 75'72 inches as compared
with an average of 80'79 inches during the ten preceding years.
The wettest month was October with 23'98 inches, the dryest,
December, when no rainfall was recorded. The greatest amount of
rain which fell on any one day was 6'37 inches on the 19th October,
while no rain fell on 220 days of the year. The mean relative
humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 77 per cent., as com-
pared with an average of 77 per cent, during the ten preceding years.
The average daily amount of sunshine was 5'4 hours being 48 per
cent, of the possible duration.

These figures are those recorded at the Observatory, Kowloon,
arid there is a very considerable divergence between that place and
Hongkong (low levels), the Peak district, or Tai Po (New Territories),
both in rainfall, temperature and humidity.

X POSTAL SERVICE.

The total receipts paid into the Treasury in 1909 by the Postal
Department amounted to $657,027.65 from which sum $212,981.07
was transferred to other heads of General Revenue under which fees


___22___

and duties are paid in postage stamps, which are now sold exclu-
sively by the Post, Office, leaving the sum of §44-1,04-6.58 as the
approximate revenue from the Postal Service. The total expen-
diture amounted to $510,729.99. The result of the year's working
shows a deficit of $66,683.41 which is due to the fourth quarterly
payment of the P. & 0. subsidy for the year 1908 being made in 1909
instead of in the year in which it was due ; to increased transit pay-
ments on the basis of the weight of correspondence despatched
during November, 1907, under the Convention of Rome, and to
increase in the volume of correspondence sent by the trans-Siberian
Railway.

This Colony commenced to forward direct closed mails to the
United Kingdom and Germany via Shanghai, Dalny and the trans-
Siberian Railway on 24th April. The parcel post arrangement
between this Colony and China came into operation on 1st October.
The Cash on Delivery Service in connection with parcels exchanged
with the United Kingdom was adopted by this Colony on 1st May.

XI. Ml L1T A11Y UX P EN 1) I T U UK.

(a.) Colonial Contribution.

The Colony contributed $1,226,441 (being the statutory contri-
bution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance
of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack Services and
Defence Works.

(b.) Volunteer Coups.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by
the Colony, was $38,393 compared with $45,554 in 1908. '

XII.GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The assessment made for the year 1909-1910 (1st July to 30th
June), shews a slight decrease in the rateable value of the whole
Colony of 0'60 per cent. In Shaukiwan, the Hongkong Villages,
Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon Villages there is
an increase ranging from 0'44 per cent, to 10 53 per cent., but a
decrease is shewn in the City of Victoria of 2'00 per cent., in the
Hill District of 0'31 per cent., and in Mongkoktsui of 9*73 per cent.
There is a noticeable increase in New Kowloon of $41,543 or 66'66
per cent.

The average rate of exchange (demand on London) which had
been 1/9*6727 to the dollar for 1908 fell to 1/9-0601 for 1909.

The position with regard to subsidiary coins remained unsatis-
factory, and during 1909 the Government withdrew from circulation
silver subsidiary coin amounting to the face value of $779,712 and
cox)per to the face value of $40,646. These coins were shipped to
England where they were melted down and sold as bullion for
£57,757 Is. 4d. and £1,535 0s. Id. respectively. The loss to
revenue by this transaction amounted to $76,863.17. The discount


du] *mg the year on. Hongkong subsidiary com varied between \jo
and 7|% and on Chinese subsidiary coin and 8% Hongkong
copper cents were from 105 to 120 per $1, and Chinese copper
cents from 112 to 123 per $1. Negotiations continued without suc-
cess between this Government and the Chinese Authorities with a
view to decreasing the excess of Chinese subsidiary coin.

In pursuance of the policy of H.M.'s Government, 26 opium divans
were closed on the 1st March, 1909, and compensation amounting to
$11,613 was paid to the divan-keepers. All remaining divan-
keepers both in the Colony and the New Territories were notified
that no licences would be renewed after the 28th February, 1910.
The opium laws of the Colony were consolidated in September last
and were amended so as to give full effect to the recommendations
made by the International Opium Conference, which sat at Shanghai
during February, 1909, and to the policy of H.M.'s Government,
'renders for the lease of a new Opium Farm for 3 years from the 1st
March, 1910, were called for, and the lease was granted to Messrs.
Ho Kom-tong, Ng Li-ling, Lau Chii-pak and Ch'an K'ai-meng, at
an annual rental of $1,183,200. This means a loss to the revenue
of $225,860 during 1910 and of $270,660 during each of the years
1911 and 1912.

The restrictions on the consumption of opium both inside and
outside the Colony are as follow :

(1.) The smoking of opium is restricted in Hongkong pri-
marily by the existence of a Monopoly under which the
sole right of preparing opium for smoking and of sell-
ing the prepared drug is vested in a Monopolist who is
thus enabled to charge a very high price for the drug.
The selling price of prepared opium and dross opium
is $4.50 and $2.00 respectively per Chinese ounce
(--1-Joz.). The Monopolist alone can import prepared
opium.

(2.) Opium Divans (or opium dens as they are called by some)
have been closed, as explained in the preceding para-
graph. Heavy penalties are imposed for the illicit
opening of a clivan. Persons found smoking in a divan
are liable to fine and persons found in, or escaping from,
a divan are under the law presumed to have been
smoking therein.

(3.) Penalties are imposed on any person who administers any
injection or furnishes morphine to any other person
except under prescription from a qualified medical
practitioner.

(4.) The importation for sale or use within the Colony, the
preparation, manufacture and sale of morphine and
compounds of opium are restricted by licence.

Licences are restricted to a few Chemists and Druggists of good
repute who have to pay a royalty to the Monopolist referred to in (1)
of Ten Dollars per tael of morphine and Four Dollars per tael
of compound of opium other than morphine. The price is thereby


enhanced. Under the conditions of these licences morphine and
compounds of opium may not be sold to the general public in
quantities less than of the value of 20 cents. The vendor must supply
the purchaser at the time of sale wit-li a counterfoil certificate.

The possession of morphine and compounds of opium without
such certificate is illegal, and in quantities exceeding 12 official
doses whether covered by certificates or not.

Supervision of the trade in these drugs is ensured by the
compulsory keeping of books by the licensees which are open to
inspection.

Opium, morphine and compounds of opium are declared to be
poisons under the Pharmacy Ordinance. Under the provisions of that.
Ordinance the seller must mark in English and Chinese the bottle
or other package containing any such article with the name of the
article, the word poison and the name and address of the seller.
In addition under the conditions of the licence above referred to,
medicines purporting to be for the cure or relief of the opium
habit, or to be substitutes for opium smoking or taking or for the
morphine habit, and themselves containing opium, morphine or
any compound of opium must bear a label to such effect in Chinese
writing for the information of the purchaser.

The import, for purposes of export, of morphine and compounds
of opium is regulated by licence under conditions for storage in a
bonded warehouse and for the keeping of books, whereby the trade
is supervised.

The export of prepared opium or dross opium by any person
(including the Monopolist of the preparation and sale of prepared
opium) to China, French Indo-China or any country which prohibits
the import of prepared opium or dross opium, is illegal.

The export of prepared opium and dross opium to countries to
which it is lawful to export them, is only allowed under permit.

Similarly the export of morphine and compounds of opium to
countries which prohibit their import, is illegal.

Stringent regulations are in force for regulating the trade in
cocaine, its derivatives and compounds with a view to prevent their
use as substitutes for opium.

In order to replace the revenue lost on opium, a law was passed on
the 17th of last September imposing duties on intoxicating liquors
consumed in the Colony and in this connection the Imports and
Exports Office was reorganized, Lieut. Beckwith, r.n., the Assistant
Harbour Master, being appointed Superintendent. By the close of
the year a sum of $101,844.20 had been realized from the new liquor
duties.

Much progress was made with the collection of an endowment
fund for the proposed Hongkong University. The Government of
Macao made a donation of $8,422 and the Chinese Government one
of $13,608. Messrs. Butterfield & Swire and their allied firms
contributed £40,000 and H.E. Cheung Yan-tsun, Governor General


of the Liang Kuang Province, $200,000, Chinese residents in
Weichow through Mr. Chang Pat-sze $92,764, Chinese residents
in Hongkong $198,000, Chinese residents in Canton $13,971,
Chinese residents in Saigon 10,000, the Hongkong and Shanghai
Bank $50,000, Messrs/ Jardine, Matheson & Co. $25,000, and
Messrs. David Sassoon & Co., Messrs. E. D. Sassoon & Co., the
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China and Messrs. Chater
& Modv £10,000 each. Other sums have been promised. Mr. Ng
Li-hing, a resident in the Colony, has undertaken to transfer
a sum of §50,000 originally intended for the Hongkong College
of Medicine to the University and the Chinese residents of
Saigon have promised a second subscription of $31,000. The
total fund at the close of the year stood at $1,279,164. His Majesty's
Government, as a token of their sympathy with the undertaking,
granted a sum of £300 per annum for the endowment of a scholarship
at the proposed University, and H.M. the King was graciously
pleased to permit the holders of this scholarship to be designated
as King Edward the Seventh Scholars". A site for the University
was selected at the junction of the Pokfulam and Bonham Roads,
and at the beginning of the current year the foundation stone was
laid by Sir Frederick Lugard.

Between the 19th and 20th of October a very severe Typhoon
struck the Colony. Timely warning of the approaching storm was
fortunately given from the Observatory. The damage done to Govern-
ment property cost over $50,000 in repairs. Private property also suf-
fered severely. The Destroyers H.M.S. Handy and H.M.S. J anus were
kindly sent by Commodore (now Rear-Admiral) Lyon to the assistance
of a number of disabled junks which were reported to the S.W. of
the Gap Rock Lighthouse. These towed in 4 disabled junks and dis-
tributed rice and water toother junks which were short of provisions.
A tug hired by Government was also sent out and brought in 52
shipwrecked Chinese and one junk. Later the Destroyers accom-
panied by H.M.S. Cadmus made a further and more extended*
search in consequence of a report that there were other derelict
junks in need of assistance. They returned after a 3 days'
cruise without having found any more vessels. It is presumed
that with a change of wind these would have gained the mainland.
In addition to these rescues the Ocean Steamship Co.'s S.S. Tele-
macJius brought in 11 shipwrecked Chinese and a German steamer,
the S.S. Mathilde, towed in 6 junksa very creditable performance.
Two other steamers brought in 16 men and a junk. The total saved
was 82 men and 11 junks.

In June General Sir J. Machado, k.c.m.g., and Kao Erh Chun,
Portuguese Commissioner and Chinese Commissioner respectively for
the delimitation of the boundaries of Macao, arrived in Hongkong
where they held their deliberations in the house of the Consul General
for Portugal. The Conference closed on the 13th November.

The Victoria Recreation Club, which under the style of the
Victoria Regatta Club held its first regatta in 1849, and is the oldest
athletic club in the Colony, successfully celebrated its sixtieth
anniversary on the 10th of July at its handsome new club house
on an extension, adjoining the Naval Yard, of what was formerly
Murray Pier.


- 26 -

On the 27t.li of November the Club Germania commemorated
its fiftieth anniversary, a large number of the English community,
including His Excellency the Governor, being present.

On the 21st of April Mr. George Murray iiain, who hay been
aptly called the doyen of the Press in the Far East, passed away
after some months of precarious health. Mr. Murray Bain came to
the Colony in 1864 as sub-editor of the China Mail. In 1872 he
became proprietor of the paper with which he was successfully and
honourably identified up to the time of his death.

I have the honour to be,
My Lord,
Your Lordship's most, obedient,
humble servant.

F. H. MAY,
Officer Administering the Government.

The Right Honourable
The Earl of Crewe,

His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies,
c6c., &c.


Appendix A.
FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1909.

Comparative Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure for the period ended 31st December, 1909.

Head of Revenue.

Estimates,
1909.

Light Dues ...

$

0,000.00

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified ... 4,163,682.00

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, ;

and Reimbursements in Aid ..................j 524,714.00

Post Office......

Rent of Government Property, Land and Houses ...... 794,900.00

Actual
Revenue to
31st Dec.,
1909.

82.473-37

Revenue for
same
period of
preceding
Year.

$ i $

79.975-68 j 2,497.69

Miscellaneous Receipts .......................

Total, Exclusive of Land Sales......

Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and Contributions ..

Light Dues, Special Assessment ... ... ... .........

Land Sajes, (Premia on New Leases) ...............

64,400.00

6.053.696.00

4,281,133.11 4,154,968.56 126,164.55

! :
538,905-321 514,789.49! 24,115.83

l

444,046.58 j 412,431.60 ; G1^1^8

I

820,563.63

67,966.34

783,091.80 37.47I-83

89,592.01

6,286,832.85 6,034,849.14

4.12,300.00 414,199.99

90,337-67

273.609.38

6,7 08,996.00

3I.596-42

6,822,966.93

69.358-19

6,104,207.33

90.337-67

778,147.04

21,625.67

21,625.67

37.76i.77

59,387.44

Expenditure.

Governor ..............

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ..

Registrar General's Department..............

Audit Department .. ............ ..

Treasury... ..............

Post Office ..

Harbour Master's Department ............ ..

Observatory ..........................

Miscellaneous Services... ........

Judicial and Legal Departments..............

Police and Prison Departments ... .....

Medical Departments....................

Sanitary Department ....................

Botanical and Forestry Department...........

Education .....

Military Expenditure ... .....

Public Works Department.................

Do. Recurrent .............f.

Do. Extraordinary

Charge on account of Public Debt .........

Pensions.....................

Charitable Services ....................

Estimates,

1909.

s

86,992.00
73,230.00
45,814.00

.j 26,101.00

i

j 65,967.00
44847500
177,191.00
21,452.00
197,069.00
216,483.00
733,051.00
248,197.00
408,882.00
51,061.00
232,139.00
,258,100.00
313,910.00
433,000.00
. 1,042,600.00
j 453.096.00
1231,000.00
17,356.00

Actual
Expenditure

to 31st
Dec., 1909.

6,781,166.00

$

86,763.74
68,194.94
44487-59
22,888.52
62,225.79
510,729.99
188,843.85
22,388.63
242,391.55
210,950.95
734,529.16
218,642.52
352,962.57
42,508.19

219,358.51

>,265,336.56
292,018.35
409,902.85
1,229,452.75
64,889.94
237,035-39
16,336.98

6,542,839.32

Expenditure
for same
period of
preceding
Year.

$

91.73643

69,761.29
43.13741
23.778.99
61,669.76

371.486.17
i63,579-55

21,110.62
374,075.62
208,738.22
683,31777
230,492.43
380,738.19
48,673.20
205,874.74
1,295,723.52
266,477.50
512,336.29
2,343,340.18

284.722.18

203,935-19

44,772.66

1,350.18
556.03

139,243.82
25,264.30
1,278.01

51,211.39

I3483-77

25,540.85

293,241.28

*

4,972.69

1,566.35

890.47

131,684.07

11,849-91

27,775.62
6,165.01

30,38 6.96

219,832.24

28,435-6

1,679,879.87


A 2 -

Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1909.

LIABILITIES.

ASSETS.

Deposits not Available,.
Officers' Remittances,....

Total,.

Total Liabilities, ............

* Balance, ...............

Balance, Bank,................................

Subsidiary Coins, .............................

Crown Agents' Current. A/c., ..............

Advances,......................................

Imprest,.........................................

Suspense House Service,....................

Total,.................... $

86,409.17
405,845.58
27,384.10
50,642.94
44,032.24
1,124.32
615,438.35

Reimbursement clue by Railway Construe!ion Account,

HI st December, 1908, ...'...............................$1,306,130.50

Less Credit Balance on account of 1909...................... 354,065.30

Total on 31st December, 190!)..........$1,002,071.14

l red it Balance as above, ... 351,097.91

Balance of Assets (General Account),.........§ 1,353.109.08

Statement of Funded Public Debt or Loans borrowed for Fixed Periods outstanding- on the
31st December, 1909, and of the Accumulated Sinking Funds at the same date.

Designation of Debt
or Loan. I

Legal
Authority.

Amount
Outstanding

JOINT SINKING FUNDS.

Hongkong 3\ % In-
scribed Stock.

OnlinancesNos. ; £1.485,732.16.;
1 & 2 of 1893 Sterling.
& No. 11 of
1905. i

Amount of Stock, &c.

British Guian.i. 3 %
Cape of G. Mope, 3 /0

3 /o

3"/o
3 /0
/o

Gold Coast,

Do.,
Natal.

New Zealand,
Queensland.
Sierra r.eonc,
South Australia, 3|/~
South Nigeria

(Lagos).
StrailsSeltlements3.J/0
Trinidad. 4 /0

Do., ' 3 /o

Victoria, 3i/0

Western A'tralia, 3"/0

£ *. <1.

2.000. 0. 0

2,000. 0. 0

5,000. 0. 0
10,073.15. 5

200. 0. 0

2,0o0. 0. 0

2,000. 0. 0

4,000. 0. 0

J,200. 0. 0

31,048.19. 8
15,2(10. 0. 0
4,000. 0. 0
5.000. 0. 0
5,000. 0. 0
2,100. 0. 0

£ 90,322.15. 1

£ .v. d.

1,932.17. 3
1,941. 1. 0

4.480.11. 6
9,683. 0. 3

189.19. 5
1,921. 8. 8
1,948. 5.10
3,879.19. 2
1,293.10. 5

29,S43.10. 2
14,291. 8. 5

4.052.12. 0
4,740.15. 0
4,734. 8. 6
2.010. 2.10

S6,9S0. 2. 5

Market Value.

( 80 ) 1.720.
( 80 ) 1,720.
( Sl£) 4,225.
( 96*) 9,696.
( 85 ) 170.
( 80J) 1,730.
( 85 ) 1,700.
(100 ) 4.000.
( 98 ) 1,170.

( 97J)30,350.
( 984)14.972.
(103 ) 4,120.
( 85 ) 4,250.
( 98 ) 4,900.
( 88 ) 1,848.

0. 0

0. 0

0. 0

0. 1

0. 0

0. 0

0. 0

0. 0

0. 0

0. 0
0. 0
0. O
0. 0

Wvchaiuj Loan Account 1909.

Repayments by Viceroy, (advanced for Railway Con- | Loan. ................................................... ......£ 1.100.000

struction), .......................................... £440,000

Balance due to Government,................................... 00''.000

. T'jlok



J OQ. i

Total. ,

..£. 1.100,000

Railway Construction Account 1909.

Amount expended on Railway Construction, ............$9,959,515.92

Total, ........................$9,959,515.92

Advances from Loan P'uncI, £440,000, ...............$4,506,983.02.:

Crown Agents' Advances,................................. 4,2o734-4%4iJfe.i

Drafts on Crown Agents...................................

Reimbursement due to General Account, ............ Iy002|f*

Statement of the Expenditure on works and payments chargeable*

Expenditure on Railway Construction from Special Fund and various Advances ultima,!

Up to 31st December, 1908, .......................$6,378,69L(i>
During 1909,............................................. 3,580,824.?*

14th March, 1910.

M. Thomson,

Treasurer.


Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1910-1911.

1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor a new Valuation has
been made of the whole Colony, Avith the exception of purely Chinese
Villages.

2. The City of Victoria.The Ratable Value has increased from
$8,806,805 to $8,961,905, an addition of $155,100 or 176 per cent.

3. The IHll District.Tlie Ratable Value has increased from
$262,445 to $275,160, an addition of $12,715 or 4 84 per cent.

4. Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, and Quarry Bat).The Ratable Value
has increased from $162,154 to $344,005, an'addition of $181,911
or 11218 per cent.

5. Hongkong Villages.The Ratable Value has decreased from
$125,660 to $117,014, a reduction of $8,646 or 6"88 per cent.

6. Kowloon Point.The Ratable Value lias decreased from
$502,205 to $485,975, a reduction of $16,230 or 3 23 per cent.

7. Yaumati.The Ratable Value has decreased from $256,640 to
$255,530, a reduction of $1,110 or 0'43 per cent.

8. Tlunghom and Ilokun.The Ratable Value has increased from
$301,304 to $301,834, an addition of $530 or 017 per cent.

9. Mongkoktsui.The Ratable Value has increased from
$130,490 to $141,235, an addition of $10,745 or 8"23 per cent.

10. New Kowloon.The Ratable Value has increased from
$103,858 to $109,603, an addition of $5,745 or 553 per cent.

11. Koicloon Villages.The Ratable Value has increased from
$99,341 to $99,858, an addition of $517 or 0'52 per cent.

12. The Whole Colony.The Ratable Value has increased from
$10,750,902 to $11,092,179, an addition of $341,277 or 317 per cent.

13. Interim Valuations.Between the 1st July, 1909, and the
lst June, 1910, 340 Interim Valuations were made as follows :

City of Victoria. Rest of Colony.

No. Ratable Value. No. Ratable Value.

New and/or rebuilt tenements ... 56

Tenements structurally altered 7
replacing Assessments of ......

86,140 157

198,530

34,500

35,140 640

36 154,210

I 143,575 | 10,635

85,500
7,770 72

209,165
25,705

No. and Increase...... 75

$77,730

§183,460

265


B2

14. Vacant Tenements.The number of reported vacant tene-
ments in the City of Victoria inspected under Section 35 of the
Rating Ordinance averaged about 135 monthly as compared with
150 l'ast year.

15. The following Tabular Statement gives a comparison of the
Valuation for 1909-10 and 1910-11 :

District. Valuation 1909-1910. Valuat ion 1910-191 1. Tnurease. Per- centage.
The City of Victoria, ...... $ 8,806,805 8,961,91)5 $ 1 5 5,100 0/ /O 1-76
Hiil District and Hong- kong Villages.......... .550,259 736,239 1,394,035 185,980 3 3 7 9
Kowloon Point and'Kow- loon Village**, ......... 1,393,838 197 0-01

Total,............$ 10,750,902 11,092,179 341,277 3-17

16. Comparative Statement shewing the Ratable Value of the
Colony of Hongkong in each Year from 1900-01 to 1910-11 inclusive.

Year. Ratable Value. Increase as compared with pre- vious Year. Decrease as compared with pre- vious Year. Percentage of Increase or Decrease in Ratable Value as compared with the previous Year.
* % $ %
1900-01, ... 5,856,391 869.557 17*43 Increase.
1901-02, ... 6,889,752 1,033,361 17-61
1902-03, ... 8,166,613 1,276,861 18-53
1903-04, ... 8,788,063 621,450 7-60
1904-05, ... 9,929,171 1,141,108 12-98
1905-06, ... 10,511,163 581,992 5-86
1906-07, ... 10,969.203 458,040 435
1907-08, ... 10,716,173 253,030 2 30 Decrease.
1908-09, ... <0,816 753 100,580 0*93 Increase.
1909-10, ... 10,750,902 65,851 O'G'O Decrease.
1910-13, ... 11,092,179 341,277 3*17 Increase.

17. Staff.Mr. Chan Kwok On and Mr. Tai Tin Shang have
discharged their duties to my satisfaction. The latter has been
promoted to the post of Clerk to Assessor in succession to Mr. Chan
Kwok On who has been transferred to the Supreme Court, as Clerk
and Shroff.

A wtin u Chapman,

A/wrxtfr,


APPENDIX C.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL.

Revenue and Expenditure.

(Tables I and II.)

The revenue from all sources during the year was #104,138.
On the first of July the collection of the revenue from Special Fruit
Licences, Births and Deaths Registration, Laundries and Markets,
was undertaken by the Sanitary Department, and the revenue from
these sources is therefore only about half that obtained last year.
The revenue from Hawkers' Licences though it shews an increase
011 the revenue for 1908 is not yet as high as it was in 1907. The
number of licences issued in the six months ending the 31st March
.1909 was 6,741. In the succeeding six months 3,311 new licences
were issued and 4,158 old licences re-issued.

The expenditure was f43,793 compared with $43,848 in 1908,
and fell short of the estimated expenditure by $2,152.

Protection of Women and Girls.

(Table III.)

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897.

Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.

The number of individuals detained under warrant was 280 as
compared with 226 in 1908. They were all sent direct to the Po
Leung Kuk, and the action taken in respect of them is shewn in
Table III. The number of women whose detention was found to be
unnecessary and who were released after enquiry was 87, or 31 per
cent. The cases of 58 women were still under consideration at the
close of the year. Six girls were sent under warrant to the Eyre
Diocesan Refuge; of these four managed to escape, the remaining
two are still in the Refuge. Two were sent under warrant to the
Italian Convent. One is still there; the other has been restored to
her husband. Both these institutions, which are places of Refuge
under Ordinance No. 4 of 1897 have been visited by me, and the
inmates inspected. The Eyre Diocesan Refuge moved into the
Belilios Reformatory at Causeway Bay in September. The accommo-
dation afforded is very much airier and roomier than what it was in
the old premises at W est Point and in every way more suitable. The
number of inmates at the close of the year was 41.

In addition to those women and girls sent under warrant to the
Po Leung Kuk a number of others are sent there with their consent.
The total number of all classes sent in 1909 was 515. Of these, three
were runaway maidservants.


C2

By the close of the year fourteen girls had been added to the
list of those under bond to report themselves regularly to the Regis-
trar Generala precaution taken to prevent their being forced into
prostitution,but five were subsequently exempted from reporting.
The total oil the list is now '33. One bond under section 34 of the
Ordinance has been forfeited owing to the girl being taken away
from the Colony without permission. As she was returned to the
custody of the Registrar General, the full penalty was not exacted.

All prostitutes are questioned before entering a brothel and the
brothels and restaurants are under constant surveillance to prevent
young girls entering them, and to detect any cases of compulsion.
The women shew considerable reliance on the protection of this office,
and apply for help when they are afraid impediments will be placed
on their movements. The freedom allowed to women under British
Law is well-known in Hongkong, and Chinese women here feel that
they have a distinctly more independent position than they have in
most parts of the neighbouring districts.

The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as miss-
ing in Hongkong during the year was 238 of whom only 37 were
found. The corresponding figures for 1908 were 91 and 39. The
number of boys reported missing was 97 as against 37 in 1907.
The total number of persons reported missing; including reports
from China and Macao, was 399. Of these 50 were reported to have
been found. The corresponding figures for 1908 were 181 and 48.
The large increase in the number of missing children has received
the serious attention of the Government.

The annual report of the Po Leung Kuk Society will be found
in Annexe A to this report.

Emigration.

Emigration Ordinance, No. 1 of 1.889.
(i.)Female Emigration.

(Table IV.)

The number of women and children examined was 11,686 as
compared with 12,108 in 1908 and 15,571 in 1907. There is a
decrease of 1,244 in passengers going to the Straits Settlements; an
increase of 421 in those going to the American Continent and of 335
in those going to Java Ports. The former increase is equivalent
to an increase of 59 per cent. The number of passengers to Java
Ports was only 33 in 1908. The very great increase is due to there
having been twenty-eight steamers running direct from Hongkong
as against ten in 1908; over 50 per cent, of these passengers are
from Kayingchau and instead of travelling as previously from
Swatow to Singapore and thence to the Dutch Indies, they come to
Hongkong and proceed direct. A careful record of the time taken
in examination during the last six months of the year shewed that
the rate of examination was 75 passengers per hour.


Co

112 or '96 per cent, of tlie passengers were detained for enquiries
as against 62 or 51 per cent, in 1908. Of these, 20 cases were still
under consideration at the end of the year. Of the remaining 92,
25 (27 per cent.) were ultimately allowed to leave without any order
being made.

Attention was drawn to alleged malpractices in connection with
female emigration to Siam. At the time no proof could be found of
an organized traffic in women being carried on, but later in the
year sufficient evidence was obtained to warrant action being taken
against some of those concerned in it.

(ii.)Male Emigration.

(Table V.)

The number of assisted emigrants examined was 18,511, as
against 16,735 in 1908. Careful records have been kept in order to
ascertain the time spent in examination. It appears that the average
rate of examination may be taken at 22 emigrants the hour, and that
under the present sj^stem each individual receives seven times the
attention which he did when all classes of male emigrants were
examined indiscriminately. This is apart from the supervision
exercised over them on their arrival in the Colony and during their
residence in the boarding-house. A very watchful eye is kept on
anything in the nature of organized emigration of Chinese labourers
from Hongkong and from the neighouring ports, not only by this
office, but by the various Chinese local societies. Estimates have
been made at various times of the wealth brought back to China by
labourers who have emigrated to the Malay Peninsula or the Dutch
Indies. I find it stated in one of the Chinese Customs reports that
one shipload of 467 labourers returning to Hoihow has brought back
savings to the amount of $29,035, or nearly $65 a head, which may be
accepted as the equivalent of the wages of a farm labourer for ten
months.

The number of emigrants examined shews a slight increase which
is formed of an increase of 5,000 in the emigrants going to the Straits
Settlements set against a decrease of about 3,500 in those going to
the Dutch Indies. The other figures which call for comment in Table
V are the considerable reduction in the number of emigrants who
declined to proceed on their voyage, a slight increase in those rejected
as unfit, and a corresponding decrease in those sent back from
Singapore, who are now almost all men who have fallen ill on the
voyage. There appears to be a larger emigration of men from the
Swatow and Hoihow districts than last year.

In September 100 Chinese labourers passed through Hongkong
on their way to Labuan to work in the coal mines ; they appeared to
be assisted emigrants but had not been told that they would be asked
to sign a contract to work on their arrival. I communicated with
the Secretary for Chinese Affairs at Singapore who made arrange-
ments to safeguard their interests.

Fifteen applications were made by relatives for assistance in
recovering emigrants. In eight, the emigrants returned to China,
and a ninth is expected shortly. In one of the cases, money was


c 4

sent to pay for the cost of the emigrant's return and he was sent
back to Hongkong, but ran away from the steamer on its arrival,
and emigrated again to Borneo. In the remaining six cases the
relatives were content with an interchange of letters.

Forty-two hotel licences and 33 licences for boarding-houses for
assisted emigrants were issued. The latter had accommodation for
1,461 boarders. In 1905 the accommodation was sufficient, for no
more than 250 boarders, and the improvement indicates not that
there is an increase in this class of emigrants, for there is nothing
abnormal in the number who emigrated in 1909, but that their move-
ments are better controlled and their interests better protected.

Regulation of Chinese.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.
(i.)Registration of Householders.

1,622 householders were registered ; 69 of these were first re-
gistrations. 7,606 changes in respect of tenants were registered.

(ii.)District Watchmen.
(Table VI.)

The District Watchmen Committee met nine times ; the average
attendance being between six and seven members. Mr. Olioa Leep-
chee who had been a member of the Committee since 1906, died on
the 23rd October, but the vacancy caused by his death has not yet
been filled. Mr. Wei Yuk and Mr. Fung Wa-chun were reappointed
for a further term of five years.

The balance to the credit of the Fund at the close of the year
was $10,910 as against 812,154 on the 31st December, 1908. On the
revenue side contributions shew a slight increase; under expenditure
there is an increase of £1.000 in wages and salaries. The items that
call for notice are $1,020, being the wages of the special watchmen
engaged to prevent dumping of bodies, #2,706, being part cost of the
extension to the West Point Watchmen's House and £1,716, loss on
exchange.

The strength of the Force is 108 men. There were 20 enlistments
during the year, 16 dismissals or desertions, 1 death and 4 resigna-
tions. One vacancy remains unfilled. The guarantee bond of a
District Watchman, who was convicted of unlawful possession, was
forfeited. In addition to the usual Force, the Committee had in its
pay at the beginning of the year seven special watchmen to prevent
dumping. In view of the reduction in the number of cases, four
were discharged at the end of August.

The number of convictions secured by members of the District
Watchmen Force was 193 as compared with 173 in 1908.

The extension to the District Watchmen's Quarters at. West.
Point was completed in May.


C 5

(iii.)Permits.

317 permits to fire crackers were issued, 187 of these were on
the occasion of a marriage. 30 permits were issued to hold proces-
sions, 34 permits to hold theatricals in temporary buildings, and 42
to hold religious ceremonies. All-night performances are now per-
mitted at two Chinese theatres on Saturdays. No objection has been
raised to them by the neighbours.

Population.

Marriages, Ordinances No. 7 of 1875, No. 15 of 1902 and
No. 6 of 1903.

The number of marriages solemnized during the year was 205
as compared with 158 in 1908. The number contracted at the
Registrar General's Office was 65. In 1908 it was 36.

Births and Deaths,Ordinance No. 7 of 1896.

The registration of births and deaths was transferred to the
Sanitary Department on the 1st July.

Exhumations.

Five permits were issued to exhume human remains for removal
to China or for reburial in the Colony. The issue of these permits
was suspended until statutory authority for their issue was obtained,
and was transferred to the Sanitary Department at the beginning
of July.

Certificates of Identity to Chinese Entering the United
States of America.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

Seven certificates were issued to Chinese British subjects,
resident in Hongkong, to enter the United States.

Registration of Books.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

Thirty-eight books were registered during the year as compared
with 56 in 1908.

Copyright in Works of the Fine Arts.
Ordinance No. 17 of 1901.
None were registered during the year.


C 6

Tung Wah Hospital.
Ordinances No. 1 of 1870 and No. 9 of 1904.
(Tables VII to XIII.)

The New Directors were elected on the 5th December and took
over the charge of the hospital on the 19th. Their names are:

The first three directors on the list are in charge of the fin-
ances of the hospital.

The new plague wards were completed at a cost of $11,738, and
formally opened by His Excellency on the 23rd December. The
purchase of the land on which these wards stand cost $54,697, so
the total cost to the hospital of the improvement is &60,435.
Further accommodation has been provided by the demolition of the
old one-storeyed building used as kitchen and its replacement by
a two-storeyed building designed to provide also quarters for the
accountants and registration clerks. This will permit the account-
ants' old quarters to be thrown into the office and the clerks' quarters
to be used for a waiting room. A contract for carrying out this
work has been made for $4,720; the expenditure on it during the
year was $4,000.

In 1908 a grant was made by the Government of a site on which
to erect a permanent small-pox hospital. Plans were approved and
work was about to commence, when it w^as decided to permit the
treatment of small-pox in the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital
which was built in 1902. This hospital is now being thoroughly
overhauled. The estimated cost of the repairs is $10,000 and
$5,500 have already been spent.

The subscriptions collected to build a new small-pox hospital
amounted to $69,000. Mr. Ho Kom-tong subscribed .153,000, and
the Japanese community in Hongkong £3,100. Now that the newr
hospital is not to be built, the subscribers have decided to place
their subscriptions in the hands of the directors, and have authorised
them, after spending what is necessary on the repairs of the Infectious
Diseases Hospital and on general repairs to the old hospital buildings,
to devote the balance to the erection of a small-pox hospital on the
North side of the harbour.

Alterations have been made in the management of the hospital
dispensary. A contract wras entered into for the year with a firm of
druggists to supply drugs and manage the dispensary, the hospital
merely placing an inspector in charge and abolishing the rest of the
dispensary staff.

Lau Chii-pak, Chairman,
Lo Sut-po,
Chan Shiit-ngam,
Li Sui-kam,
Leung Kin-on,
Pun Wai-siin,
Li Wing-kwong,
Ue To-shang,

Tsui Oi-tong,
Sham Pak-ming,

Lo Tsung-kui,
Wu Ting-sam,
Chan Wan-sau,

Tsang Ping-kwan,

Chan Hau-hing,
Wu Wan-cho.


C 7 -

At the request of the directors the Cemetery at Kailungwan has
been placed under the immediate supervision of one of the Sanitary
Inspectors. This will prevent waste of land and will place the sex-
tons under continuous control.

The statistics of the work done by the hospital show no great
variation from the statistics for 1908. The number of admissions is
10 per cent, less than the number in 1908, and the number under
European treatment shews a corresponding reduction. On the other
hand the num ber of out-patients lias increased from 70,000 in 1907 to
90,000 in 1908 and 113,010 in 1909. The percentage of out-patients
receiving European treatment has risen from 3'1 in 1908 to 4'5
(See Table YII). There were 987 vaccinations performed in the
hospital as against 1,410 in 1908. The hospital vaccinators visited
Shaukiwan, Aberdeen and Yaumati four times and Stanley twice
and vaccinated 225 persons ; a visit to the New Territories proved
fruitless as it was too near the end of the year, and Spring is re-
garded there as vaccination season. The total number of destitutes
sent home was 2,305. Of these 624 were sent at the expense of the
hospital.

The finances of the hospital will call for careful attention on the
part of the directors. The income for the year deducting the
v 69,009 subscribed for the small-pox hospital, amounts to $76,625.
The expenditure exclusive of £10,500 in repayment of loans, and
£20,807 spout on buildings, was 190,908. The hospital ends the
year with a nominal credit balance of 123,419, but is pledged as
mentioned above, by its promise to the subscribers to the small-pox
hospital at Kennedy Town to spend more than this sum on certain
definite objects.

The hospital has been called on twice for assistance to relieve
destitution in China. In the case of the Foochow Typhoon the di-
rectors made a private subscription of £995, and made a loan of $5,000
from the Kwong Sliiu Flood Relief Fund in aid of the sufferers from
the inundations in the Yangtsze Valley.

In addition to the usual tables there are inserted this year
statements shewing the state of the various funds administered by
the hospital and the way in which they are invested.

In September, I was able to report that a contract had been
entered into to build the Kwong Wah Hospital at Yaumati at a cost
of -76,400. The expenditure during the year was $8,294; the
balance to the credit of the Building Fund on the 31st December
was £69,466 and the amount of uncollected subscriptions was $6,560.
The accounts have been audited by Mr. Li Yau-tsun and Mr. Tang
Clii-ngong. By the close of the year the foundations of the Adminis-
tration Block, of Wards No. 1 and No. 2, and of the connecting
corridors, were completed and the footings were being levelled with
cement concrete. The piling of the trenches of the Reception Block
and of Ward No. 3 were nearly finished, and some of the trenches
had been concreted and stone footings were being laid on them.
Further subscriptions to the amount of $47,000 will be required, I
think, to place the finances of the hospital on a sure foundation,


o 8

In October the promoters of the Kwong Wall Hospital together
with a number of the leading Chinese residents of the Ivowloon
Peninsula presented a petition praying for a grant of land on which
to build a small-pox hospital in Kowloon.

Chinese Public Dispensaries and District Plague Hospitals.

(Tables XIV to XVIII.)

The dispensaries continue to be conducted on the lines described
in Mr. Irving's report of the 26th February last. The three dispens-
aries in Victoria and the Harbour Dispensary are managed by a
Committee consisting of the Registrar General as Chairman, the Hon.
Dr. Ho Kai, c.m.g., Vice-Chairman, and seventeen other members.
The constitution and general objects of the Association have to
receive the concurrence and sanction of the Government, and are
described in a minute dated the 20th October, 1909. The three
dispensaries at Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon City are managed
by separate Committees elected by the inhabitants, and in his work
of guiding and controlling them the Registrar G eneral is assisted by
the two Chinese Members of Council and the two Chinese Members
of the Sanitary Board. To enable the Registrar General to keep in
close touch with the Chinese in matters relating to sanitation, Street
Committees have been appointed by the Government and are con-
sulted on matters of importance and encouraged to ask advice.
Attached to each dispensary in Victoria are a licentiate of the Hong-
kong College of Medicine, a clerk with a knowledge of English and
coolies with ambulances and dead-vans to remove patients and dead
bodies. Two lecturers are maintained whose duty it is to preach
against "dumping" of bodies in the streets, to point out the benefits
to be derived from the dispensaries and to explain the object of the
Sanitary laws; handbills are issued in profusion wdienever occasion
demands and photographs are taken of bodies found in the streets
and are posted up in the neighbourhood, and enquiries are made in each
case from the Street Committee. There is a District Plague Hospital
attached to the West Point Dispensary in Victoria, another in Kow-
loon City and a third at Hunghom. A fourth hospital is being built
at Wanchai. The number of rats caught during the year in Victoria
was 59,914, and in the Kowloon Peninsula where rat-catchers have
been engaged by the dispensaries and paid by the Sanitary Depart-
ment the number was 15,751.

In August, a largely attended meeting of members of the boat-
population and of launch-owners, merchants, shop-keepers and
others closely connected with the floating population was held, and
it was resolved to open a harbour dispensary and to raise a fund for
the purpose. A committee of seventeen was elected corresponding
to the existing Street Committees, and a hulk was purchased, fitted
up as a dispensary, and with the consent of the Harbour Master,
moored in Causeway Bay. The dispensary was opened on the 4th
October and 244 new cases were attended up to the close of the year.

Hitherto the Hunghom Dispensary has occupied leased premises,
but a site has now been granted by the Government adjacent to the
Kiiiiyam Temple, plans of a suitable building have been designed,
and a sufficient sum promised in subscriptions to defray the cost.


0 9

The new dispensary at West Point which is attached to the
West Point District Plague Hospital was occupied on the 1st Septem-
ber. Additions to accommodate the ambulance coolies and house
the ambulance and dead-vans, are in contemplation.

The total number of new cases attended by the dispensary
doctors was 30,782, as compared with 24,353 in 1908: the number
of certificates of nature of disease issued was 21 compared with 33:
the number of moribund infants brought to the dispensaries was
316 compared with 228, and of dead bodies of infants 873 compared
with 559. The number of vaccinations performed was 2,148: of
these 1,851 were vaccinations of infants.

In 1908 I received a promise from some Chinese gentlemen
interested in the dispensaries to defray the cost of the land on which
the Central Dispensary in Victoria was built. This promise has now
been fulfilled and the sum of £3,400 has been received from ten sub-
scribers. Their generosity and that of Mr. Ho Kom-tong who erected
the building are commemorated by a suitable inscription.

The expenditure of the dispensaries was:

Victoria (including Harbour) $19,737

Kowloon City : 3,361

Thanks to subscriptions of $6,825 from the Chinese theatres, to
a special donation of £4,000 from a temporary theatre at which per-
formances were held during the first three months of the year and to
the $3,400 subscribed to defray the cost of the land on which the
Central Dispensary is built, the Victoria Dispensaries close the year
with a credit balance of £8,600, and it appears as if they should have
no difficulty in future in meeting their ordinary expenditure.' The
financial position of the other dispensaries with the exception of the
one at Yaumati does not call for comment. The expenditure in the
last named for the year was £6,738 including 626 in repayment of
loans, but the subscriptions for the year only amounted to $5,862.

Tables XVII and XVIII supply all the information required to
judge of the progress being made in the campaign against the aban-
doning of bodies in the street. The state of affairs compared with
that which existed a very short time ago is one which justifies me in
congratulating the leaders of the Chinese Community on the success
of their efforts. That there still remains much to be done is obvious;
it is only in Victoria that the number of bodies abandoned during the
second half year is less than the number for the first six months.
There, out of a total of 111 bodies abandoned, only 42 belong to the
last six months. Of the whole number of abandoned bodies381, 66
were bodies of infants brought to the dispensary and alleged to have
been found in the street. Very possibly a number of these were
brought from the houses where the infants died, but the parents
were afraid to give the address. In connection with the abandoning
of infants' bodies, it is satisfactory to note that 5,704 children
under 5 years of age were treated at the dispensaries as compared
with 2,721 in 1907.

Hunghom
Yaumati

4,134
6,738


C 10

Enquiries liave been received from Singapore regarding the
methods adopted in Hongkong to put a stop to dumping" and a
copy of Mr. Irving's report of the 2(3th February was sent to the
Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

The confidence which the dispensaries are beginning in various
degrees to inspire is very well seen from the statistics given in Table
XVIII which shews the number of infantsalive and deadtaken
to the dispensaries and whether the address from which they came
was reported or not. At the Western Dispensary, the first started,
and the one in which the keenest local interest is taken, the number
of live infants has risen from 207 to 25(3 and the number of dead
bodies dropped from 2C8 to 151, the number of dead bodies from an
unknown address falling from 107 to 20. The East Point Dispens-
ary, which was opened at the same time, is more backward and there
it is a matter of congratulation that although the cases in which the
address is unknown have risen from 4 to 53 the number of dead
bodies has risen at the same time from 52 to 100. At the Central
Dispensary, opened two years after the other two, progress is marked
by a large increase of the cases in which the address is known, the
number of those in which the address is unknown remaining the
same.

The returns kept by the Police shew that in 1905 and the four
succeeding years the number of bodies dumped was 1,008, 1,447,
1,273, 989 and 381. For the purpose of comparison between the
years 1908 and 1909, I take the figures given in my office returns
which, are 1,005 (instead of 989) and 381.

The effect of the crusade against dumping was not apparent
until August, 1908. In the first seven months of 1908 the number
of bodies abandoned was 748, in the last five months 257. In 1909
the corresponding figures were 223 and 158. In Victoria the
number for the year has dropped from 377 in 1908 to 111 in 1909,
in Kowloon from 341 to 80. The Harbour population is the worst
offender and I do not anticipate much improvement until the second
half of 1910. In comparing the figures for the last two years the
absence of any serious epidemic in 1909 must not be lost sight of.

District Plaque HosriTAT.s.

No occasion has arisen to use the plague hospitals at Kowloon
City and Hunghom. The V est Point District Plague Hospital
attached to which is a dispensary was completed at a cost of 1 .'3,046
and occupied on the 1st September. It was formally opened o i the
20th September and the event celebrated by a "tea-party". The
Government has not contributed more than > 600 towards the cost of
the buildings. The balance was raised by the Saiyingpun Street.
Committee. A gap of nearly £1,100 between receipts and ex-
penditure was filled up by an individual subscription of £'470 from
Mr. Tong Wan-teng and by the proceeds of a twenty-five dollar
" whip among Mr. Lau Chli-pak's friends.

The site which was purchased at Wanchai for a plague hospital
was placed in possession of the Committee at the end of June and in
October the Government granted an adjacent area of 62 feet by 40


- .0 11

feet. A Building Committee was formed and the plans have been
designed of buildings to contain a dispensary, a hospital, quarters for
nurses and ambulance coolies, and accommodation for ambulances
and dead vans.

The annual grant of $2,000 to the District Plague Hospitals
was divided as follows: $600 to each of the hospitals in Victoria,
$550 to the hospital at Hunghom, and §250 to the one at Kowloon
City.

Translation Work.

Although it is impossible to indicate exactly the extent of the
translation work done in the department every year the following
statistics may be some guide to it.

Translation f rom Chinese Translation from English
into English. into Chinese.
Petitions 147 Ordinances 5
Letters - 63 Regulations 23
Newspaper articles Government Notices 70
and items of news 54 Minutes 3
Unspecified - 60 Unspecified 18
Total 324 119

In addition to the above, translations made in other departments
are revised, and on numerous occasions translation work, of which
no record has been kept, is done by members of the department other
than the translator.

The assistance proffered by the Hon. Dr. Ho Kai, c.m.g., to
prepare a version in Chinese of all Ordinances in force particularly
affecting the Chinese Community, has been gratefully accepted by
the Government.

Chinese Recreation Ground.

(Table XIX.)

The balance to the credit of the fund at the close of the year
was $6,083. In 1908, $5,000 was given to the Tung Wah Hospital
towards purchasing the site on which the Plague Wards have been
built, but the directors found ultimately that they were unable to
comply with the terms of the gift, and it was repaid accordingly
during the year. The revenue for the year from the rent of stalls
was $1,384 and the expenditure $936.

Charitable Funds.

(Table XX.)

The net income of the Passage Money Fund was $637 and the ex-
penditure 1615. The balance to the credit of the Registrar General's
Charitable Fund is $285.


O 12 ,

Legislation.

Tlie principal Ordinances of 1909 wliicli affected the Chinese
and which are of other than technical interest are:

No. 1 of 1909.The Magistrates and Criminal Law Amend-
ment Ordinance, so far as it relates to the punishment of the stocks
and to the prohibition of spitting in certain places.

No. 26 of 1909 which repeals section 8 of the above Ordinance.
This subject is dealt with in another part of my report.

No. 27 of 1909, the Liquors Ordinance.The introduction of
this Bill caused much alarm, and certain of the original provisions
were strongly opposed on the ground that larger powers of search
were being taken than appeared to be necessary. Amendments were
introduced which satisfied Chinese public opinion. Much work was
thrown on this office during the time the bill was before Council and
after it became law. The Chinese dealers naturally looked to the
Registrar General for explanation of the law, and for assistance in
carrying out its provisions or securing a modification of them. By
degrees they have learnt to dispense with this help and to address
themselves direct to the Superintendent of Imports and Exports.
The dealers quickly accommodated themselves to the new state of
affairs which wras introduced without causing any friction.

No. 32 of 1909.The Steam Boilers and Prime Movers Ordin-
ance, which, will affect a number of Chinese firms.

No. 34- of 1909.The Protection of Women and Girls Amend-
ment Ordinance, which among other provisions makes under certain
conditions the reception or harbouring of unmarried girls under
eighteen years of age an. offence. It is difficult to obtain convictions
under the Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance ; the rescue is
often effected before an offence is committed in the Colony and in
other cases the girl (who would be the best witness) is kept in
ignorance of the offender's intentions regarding her; bat a fear of
placing too much power in the hands of subordinates has prevented,
and in mv opinion justifiably, an extension of the list of offences
with the object of rendering a conviction more certain.

Prosecutions.
(Table XV.)

There were .15 prosecutions under the Emigration Ordinance
and 20 under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance.

InTERPRETATIoN SUB-Del'AltTM ENT.

Five student-interpreters passed the examination for a Third
Class Certificate. Two received appointments in the Police and four
in the Sanitary Department. Six new student-interpreters were
appointed. Of the 38 student-interpreters appointed under the


O 13

present system 7 are still student-interpreters, 16 have Third Class
Certificates and 3 Second Class Certificates. Twelve are no longer
in the Government Service.

Five meetings of the Interpretation Board were held. Twenty-
eight candidates were examined; one Second Class Interpeter
Certificate and eleven Third Class Certificates were awarded.

General.

The appointments of Mr. Fung Wa-chun and Mr. Lau Chii-pak
as members of the Sanitary Board terminated in March. Mr. Lau
was reappointed and Mr. Ho Kom-tong replaced Mr. Fung. On
Mr. Ho's resignation, Mr. Ng Hon-tsz received the appointment.
Mr. Pun Yan-tsiin was appointed a Justice of the Peace.

In May the Chinese became restless under the serious in-
convenience caused in some parts of the town by the length of time
the intermittent supply of water was continued, and in June a
petition on the subject chopped by 101 of the largest business
firms was presented. I issued a notice requesting all complaints
regarding insufficiency of water to be addressed to me, and the
Water Authority deputed an inspector to call every morning at
my office to receive the list of complaints and to investigate them.
This indication that the Government was alive to the inconveniences
suffered did much to allay the agitation. As a consequence of the
notice the department was called on on several occasions to arbitrate
between the tenants of two floors in a Chinese house and to fix the
time during which each party might draw off water.

In August a Society was formed by the leading Chinese for the
suppression of spitting in public places. The Society has a most
influential backing, and there is a genuine attempt to change the
habits of the Chinese in this respect. The Society soon numbered
104 members, handbills have been distributed, notices are being
carried by conspicuously clothed coolies through the streets, a lecturer
lias been engaged and a large number of varnished boards are being
prepared to be fixed permanently to the walls of houses and in
public places.

It was found possible to embody in the contract for the present
Opium Farm certain conditions which had been asked for by the
Chinese five years ago, regulating the powers of search. Although
not actually inserted in the contract the last Farmer had agreed to
observe the conditions.

Section 2 of Ordinance No. 19 of 1909 which directs the stamp-
ing of receipts for all sum over ten dollars, (the limit for unstamped
receipts for the last seven years being twenty-five dollars), was
not opposed in Council, but after passing the Liquors Duties Ordin-
ance the Chinese business world thought this source of revenue
might be dispensed with, and petitioned the Government. The
matter was fully discussed at a conference at Government House;
the estimated revenue and expenditure for the next two years
elaborated and the reasons for the Government's inability to comply
with petitioners1 request explained.


C 14 ~

At the same conference the object of the recent increase in
school-fees was also discussed. The gradual increase in the fees
charged in Government Schools has been accepted always with reluct-
ance by the Chinese and the latest increase resulted in the presentation
of a widely-signed petition on behalf of the poorer classes who endea-
vour to give their children a few years' instruction in English. The
question is now under the consideration of an Education Committee.

A petition was received in November from owners of house-
property in the district in which it is proposed to remove ceilings.
A final decision has not yet been arrived at by the Sanitary Board.

A draft Limited Partnership Bill is now being considered by
the Chinese and has received their support.

Kidnapping of childrenmostly boysboth in Hongkong and
in the adjacent districts of China lias been very prevalent. This
department has had the fortune occasionally to discover kidnapped
children who had been brought to Hongkong and to obtain, through
the Po Leung Kuk, the restoration of children who had been taken
away from the Colony. The traffic in children from Shanghai, re-
ferred to in last year's report, appears to have ceased. There were
only three cases discovered, all in the early part of the year.

Alongside the harmless fortune-tellers, selectors of lucky dates,
palmists and phrenologists who charge a fee for telling a fortune,
there exists a class of men who deal in black magic or make use of
their supposed powers to extract large sums from women. The
Government receives the hearty support of the Chinese in ridding the
Colony of these pests.

Two appeals for the cancellation of banishment orders have been
granted through this office and one refused.

At the request of the District Watchmen Committee children who
are hawking without a licence are on their first offence sent to the
Registrar General who cautions their guardians. This procedure
seems to have proved effective in each case.

There have been numerous labour disputes but none which has
caused much inconvenience. In June the jinricksha coolies succeeded
in getting from the owners of the vehicles a reduction in the hire of
jinrickshas from 55 cents a day for first class and 40 for second, to
47 and 35 cents respectively. The coolies presumed somewhat on
their success and numerous disputes arose between individual owners
and pullers but relations between them are iioav normal.

In July the head coal-coolies succeeded in obtaining an increase
in the customary allowance for baskets and shovels which amounted
to twelve or thirteen dollars on an average cargo of coal. The amount
in. dispute was trifling and I think the head-coolies who had recently
formed a guild wished to test their strength and obtain recognition.

Similarly the Hakka quarry-masters have been organizing
themselves, and much time has been occupied in settling a dispute
to which the Stone-masons Guild, the Quarry Farmer and the quarry-
masters were all parties.


- C 15

In October the painters went on strike. The strike was not a
serious one or of long duration ; it was conducted by the younger
men and the older workmen took advantage of the annual Tomb
Worship to leave the Colony and keep out of the quarrel; the masters
were content to wait for the workmen to reduce their demands. A
rise of 5 cents a day in wagesthe first rise since 1901was
conceded. There was some intimidation and during the strike the
apprentices and the men on yearly contracts did not dare to leave
their masters' premises.

There was a small strike reported to me in one of the docks.
It was soon settled but the interesting point abotu it was that it was
started by the local men without consulting a large Union which
has been lately formed, and the Union officials were opposed to it.
This Union differs considerably from the ordinary Chinese work-
men's guild, and works on very modern lines.

In each of these labour disputes the settlement of which is often
a very tedious affair, I have been much indebted to the Chinese
gentlemen who have readily responded to my request for their co-
operation, without which no satisfactory or permanent settlement
could be effected.

A Chinese leper woman found living at Aberdeen was received
into the Rhenish Mission Leper Asylum at Tung Kun, and the
entrance fee was raised by a private subscription among my Chinese
friends. In future, leper women and children found in Hongkong
will be sent to the Registrar General to arrange for their welfare, if
possible.

An arrangement has been made to assist the Secretary foi*
Chinese Affairs in Singapore in the repatriation of certain classes of
Chinese: the allowances due to those who are to land at Hongkong
will be sent to this office, to prevent the men spending it on the
voyage and arriving here destitute. In November a large number
of dccrepits were repatriated from Tong Kali through the Protect-
orate of Chinese at Penang ; sixteen of these landed in Hongkong
and were sent home.

Reports have been furnished on 24 applications for British-born
Subject Certificates.

The issue of licences to letter-carriers carrying letters between
Hongkong and the adjacent country districts of China which was
instituted in 1902 and transferred from this office to the Post Office
in 1906 has now ceased.

Confucius's birthday was publicly celebrated, and the clay is
every year more widely observed as a holiday. The celebration is a
sign of the growth of a national spirit among the Chinese. Two of
the other signs of the times are public theatrical performances by
amateurs and amateur boxing contests.

There was a suggestion to boycott a line of steamers running to
America, but the alleged grievances were redressed.


C 16

A conference was arranged between the Superintendent of the
Botanical and Forestry Department and some leading Chinese, and
the possibility discussed of reducing the number of grass fires and
the consequent destruction of Government plantations caused by the
burning of joss-paper and the firing of crackers at the Tomb
Worshipping. It was decided to try the effect of issuing posters
and handbills and inserting notices in the Chinese newspapers at
the appropriate season.

On two occasions there appeared to be an attempt to revive the
Japanese boycott, but the attempts did not originate in the Colony
nor did they receive any support from business people.

Business is reported to be good; it is said to have been a particularly
favourable year for dealers in cotton-yarn, rice and flour and an
increased demand for houses in the Chinese business quarters of the
town confirms these reports.

Less small-pox and plague, 23 deaths and 104 deaths respec-
tively among the Chinese population as against 376 and 957 in 1908,
have also made the year a happier one for the Chinese. The
Sanitary Board does not appear to be such a bogey as it was, and it
is a pleasant relief not to hear so much of it as I have had to do of
late years.

The University I find to be a subject of interest and discussion
amongst all classes, and its importance is fully realised by those who
have children at school in Hongkong.

Men with money have many claims on their purses in Hong-
kong. In addition to the $198,000 subscribed to the University,
$69,000 were subscribed for a small-pox hospital at Kennedy Town
and the new District Plague Hospital at West Point was built at a
cost of $10,000 by public subscription. The large hospital at Yau-
mati will soon be expecting funds for maintenance and subscriptions
will liave to be collected to build the Plague Hospital at Wanchai.
In addition to these the Chinese Community maintains the dis-
pensaries at a cost of $28,000, the District Watchmen at a cost of
$25,000 and subscribes $31,000 to maintain the Tung Wah Hospital,
and S9,000 for the Po Leung Kuk.

Staff.

I resumed duty on the 8th April on my return from leave. Mr.
A. E. Wood and Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe acted successively as Assistant
Registrar General until the 30th June, when Mr. Hutchison took up
the duties of the post and received the substantive appointment on
the 30th October.

A new post of Second Assistant Registrar General, the creation
of which was recommended when this department began to supervise
assisted emigration, was formed on the 21st September and Mr. D.
W. Tratman has received the appointment, but is now acting as
Assistant District Officer at Taipo. In the meantime temporary
arrangements have been made for conducting the examination of
assisted emigrants.


0 17

One fiftli grade and one sixth grade writer were transferred to the
Sanitary Department on the 1st July. Owing to much of his wrork
now "being only indirectly Government work the recommendation of
the Retrenchment Committee has been adopted and two-thirds of
the salary of the 5th grade shroff have been paid since the 1st
November from the funds he collects.

A. W. Brewin,

llegtRtrar General.

26th February, 1910.


Table I.

Revonuo for the years 1908 and 1900.

Heads of Revenue.

Details of Revenue.

Ordinance under which
received.

Revenue in
1908.

Revenue in
1909.

Increase.

Decrease.

Licences and Internal
Revenue not other-
wise specified,

Fees of Court or Office,
Payments for Specific
Purposes, and Reim-
bursements-in-aid,

Rent of Govt. Property, /
L^nd and Houses, t

Interest,......

Miscellaneous, -

Chinese Undertakers' Licences, -
Emigration House Licences, -

Forfeitures, ........-

Hawkers' Licences, --------

Marriage Licences, .......

Money Changers' Licences, -
Special Fruit Licences, -------

Births and Deaths Registration, -
Certificates to Chinese entering U. S. A., -
Chinese Gazette Sales, ------

Householders' Registration, -
Re-registration, -

,, Removals, ------

,, Extracts, ------

Contribution from Chinese Dispensaries,
&c., for Clerical Assistance, -
Laundries, -- -- -- -- --
Markets, -- -- -- -- --
Interest accrued on official account, -
Refunds, &o.,........- -

No. 8 of 1887.
No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908,

No. 8 of 1887.
No.7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902,
No. 8 of 1887.
1 of 1903.
7 of 1896.
3 of 1898.

Total,.

No. 3 of 1888.

No. 1 of 1903.

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

* For six months only. Transferred to Sanitary Department,

$ <

460
3,862
1,036
26,958
1,108
3,330
4,947
779
400
24
459
1,203
14
51

1,800
117,788

239

(1)

$ t
480
3,778
150
29,210
1,471
3,480
2,499
403
" 350
21
207
1,553
17
28

73
900
59,471
37
7

(1)

? o.
20 (1)

2,252
363
150

350
3

73
37

J

164,459,99 104,138.88 3,250.02

Deduct Increase,............§

Total Decrease in 1909, $

84
886

2,448
375
50
3

252

900
58,317

231

(1)

63,571.13

3,250.02

60,321.11


- C 19

Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Registrar General's Department
since 1900.

Revenue.

Total. Decrease. Increase.

$ r.
132,729.63
127,566.16
136,888.13
160,351.81
167,083.66
172,947.89
177,284.21
163,261.13
164,459.99
1104,138,88

$ c.

4,406.32

5,163.47

14,023.08
... i

60,321.11

i

9,321.97
23,463.68
' 6,731.85
5,864.23
4,836.82

Expenditure.

Total. Decrcase.l Increase.

$ c. I $ c.
12,219.691,870.46
16,429.62
24,230.33j
26,755.64!
31,339.71

31,761.32
36,947.46
35,630.88
1,198.86 43,848.51
'43,793.61

1,816.58
54,90

4,209.93
7,800.71
2,525.31
4,584.07
421.61
5,186.14

8,217.63

O t, .

o
bed d
ciS (5

8 la


Table III.

Number of Women aud Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Registrar General under Sections 34 and 35 of
Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

Detained Previous to 1st j January, 1909. Detained during 1909. I Total.
Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. 1 Emigrants. I l Total.
11 1 12 62 25 87 99
Permitted to leave under bond,.............................. | 11 ! i i 12 12
i 9 1 1 19 ; 28 28
Restored to relative, .......................................... ... 20 i 12 ; 32 32
1 1 2 13 15 16
10 3 13 17 15 32 45
... 3 1 4 4
6 3 9 9
Awaiting nmrriage or adoption, ........................... ! 3 3 3
1 1 3 3 4
3 i 3 3o j "'20 55 58
26 4 30 168 112 i 280 310

Cases brought forward, 30. Cases dealt with during year, 262. Cases carried forward, 5St


Table IV.

Number of Assisted Emigrants and of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the
Registrar General under "The Chinese Emigration Ordinances, 1889-1908," during the year 1909.

Whither Bound.

Europe, ....................................

Japan,.......................................

Straits Settlements, Malay Peninsula,

Dutch Indies,..............................

Borneo, ....................................

Honolulu, .................................

Pelew Islands, ...........................

Canada, ....................................

United States of America, ............

Mexico, ....................................

South America, ...........................

Mauritius, .................................

Total, 1909,

Total, 1908,

Male
Assisted
Emi-
grants
1909.

16,803
5,923
112

54

22,892

14,294

Women* and Children, 1909. Male Assisted Women and Children 1908.
Women. 1 Girls. Boys. Total. Erni- Grants 1908.
5 7,081 172 2 832 22 2 1 1,920 293 2 8 9,833 487 11,803 2,491 5 11,077 152
20 3 8 56 1 10 7 1 I 11 9 ' 68 2 436 649 21 37 17 95 6 455 714 21 38 27 54 274 444 43 46 13
7,356 884 3,446 11,686 14,294 12,108
8,356 918 2,834 12,108


0 25

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.
Year. Examin- ed. Passed. Qn wil- ling. i Rejected; Rejected at lt.G.O.j by as unfit. Doctor. 1 Sent back from Sin- gapore. TotalRe- jected. Per- centage of Rejec- tion.
1908... 16,735 14,294 1,360 1,081 427 301 3,229 19 3
1909... 18,511 16,803 541 1,167 155 210 2,073 11-2

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1909.

Sent home by Tung Wah Hospital, ........................:..... 79

Sent through the Hospital at expense of Boarding Houses, 1,480
Sent away, ............................................................ 514

2,073

Recruiting Districts.

Canton, ...............................................................4,063

Wuchow, ............................................................3,224

Hoihow,...............................................................3,341

Swatow,...............................................................3,293

Other Places,.........................................................2,882

16,803


0 23
Table VI.

Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure of District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1909.

To Balance, ...........................

Grant by Government, .........

Contributions, .....................

Payments for Special Services,

Iulerest,..............................

Fines,................................

12,154
2,000
24,722
189
383 !
37 I

c.

(1)

Total,,

39,487

12

By Wages and Salaries :

Chief District Watchmen. ......

Assistant Chief District Watch-
men, .........................

District Watchmen,.............

Cooks,...............................

Coolies, ............................

Collec tor, ........ ..................

J nterprcter, ........................

Mfinagcr, ............................

Writer, ..............................

Special District Watchmen to
prevent the dumping of
bodies, .........................

By Miscellaneous:

frown Rent,......................

Water Account,.....................

Premium on Fire Policies,.....

Instructors' Allowance, .........

Uniform and Equipment, ......

Ercction of extension of build-
ins to the District Watch-
men's House at JSaivingpun.

Stationery and Printing,.......

Photographs,.......................

Gratuities and Reward, ........

Furniture, ..........................

Fitiinjrs and Repairs. ...........

Coolie and Conveyance Hire,...

Loss on Exchange, ............

Oil, ..................................

Pension to Art Ptin's Widow, ...

Cost of Telephone, ...............

Sundries............................

$ c.

(1)

2,114

1,572
13,557
482
834

300
30
171

GO

1,020

U\
195
452
1.540

2,706
1G8
6

255
95
291
157
1,716
360
120
483
267

Total Expenditure,.
Balance, .............

Total, ............$

Disposal of Balance :

On Fixed Deposit, ........................$ 8,000.00

At Current Account, .................... 2,910.48

19,640 j 43

8,936

21

28,o 76
10,910

64
48

39,487

12

Total,...........................$10,910.48

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.


0 2i

Table VII.

Number o£ Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the
Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1909.

38 i i ? Ci o i 6
8-2 1X1 O ^ a a Admitted. p OX) y* Cft Jj c a Out-pal ienl. c .2 "So g § t? t ^ -2 £ o QJ
Patients. v-1 S c3 S5 Male, ............ 168 3,100 3,268 2,170 903 195 66,496 2,942 69,438 477 749 2,258
Female, ......... 41 623 664 344 264 56 46,514 2,372 48,b86 510 389 47
Total,.......... 209 1,894 1,829 3,723 3,932 2,514 1,167 251 113,010 5,314 118,324 987 1,138 2,305
Total for 1908, 205 2,118 2,004 4,122 4,327 2,678 1,440 209 87,847 2,803 90,650 2,348 1,226 152


0 25

Table VIII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wah Hospital for the Ki Yau Year (1909).

Receipts.

Balance brought forward from Mo San
Year,.......................................

To rent of Hospital property,...............

To Subscriptions:

1. Annual Subscriptions of Hongs,

2. Subcriptions of various shops, ......

3. collected on Steamers,

4. and Donations,.........

5. Subscribed by chari-
table persons for the purpose of sup-
plying medicine, quilted clothing and
coffins, ....................................

6. Subscriptions from wealthy persons,

7. by Directors, Assistant
Directors and Committee, ............

8. 20% of Subscriptions collected by
the Man Mo Temple, ..................

To Payments for medicine supplied, sale
of kitchen refuse and rent of Mortuary,

Government Grant, .....................

Total Ordinary Receipts,.........

To Subscriptions towards buildiug Small-
pox Hospital, ...........................

Grand Total,...............

Amount.

11,975
1,475
5,835
2,366

2,378
3,500

1,152

2,500

I

0)
$

900
30,329

31,183
6/212
8,000

76,625

69,009

145,634.87

Payments.

By Food of employees, .....................

Salaries, .................................

Sick room expenses, ..................

Drugs,....................................

Expenses for Small-pox Hospital,.
Wages and food of employees at

Infectious Hospital, ............

Stationery, ..............................

Sundries,.................................

Repairs to Infectious Disease

Hospital,...........................

General Repairs, .....................

Re-erection of kitchen block,......

Furniture, ..............................

Insurance, ..............................

Crown Rent, ...........................

Free cemetery, .......................

Coffins, .................................

Burial of bodies from Government

mortuary (Victoria),............

Coffins for bodies from Government

mortuary, ........................

Burial of bodies from Government

mortuary (Kowloon),............

Coffins for bodies from Government
mortuary, ........................

Expenditure on repatriation of
emigrants, ........................

Total Ordinary Expenditure,...
Repayment of loan from Chinese

Recreation Ground Fund,......

Repayment of loan from the Kwong
Shiu Flood Relief Fund,.........

Building of Plague Ward,.

Total,
Balance, ...

Grand Total,

Amount.

6,051 1.4,509 15,011 23,329 j 2,505 i
283 1,440 7,323 ! i
5,500 4,482 4,000 509 932 624 86,504
3,998 4,920
1,066
1,768
602
1,031 13,387

515
100,408
5,000
5,500 10,500 11,307
...
... 122,215.17 23,419.70
... $ 145,634.87

(1) Cents omitted except in totals.


0 25

Table IX.

Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the Tung Wall Hospital at the close of the Ki Yau Year (1909).

Liabilities.

To Loan from Relief Fund,..................

Cheap Sale of Rice Fund,

,, Subscription for Hospital

Extension Fund, ......

Man Mo Temple Fund, ...

San Francisco Relief Fund,

To Further Loan from Man Mo Temple

Fund,............

,, ,, Cheap Sale of
Rice Fund,......

Balance of Assets over Liabilities,

Amount.

$

8,440.60
29,681.33

15,226.69
5,860.49
5,470.17

6,000.00

38,887.02

109,566.31
90,707.66

Total,.

$

200,273.97

Assets.

By

Bv

Bank balance at close of year :

With Ui Lung Bank,...........

With Shing Yuen Bank,........

Cash in hand,.....................

House property (original value). 2
houses in Bonham Strand and
Jervois Street, ........................

1 house in WingLok Street (includ-
ing cost of additions to building),.

10 houses in Aberdeen Street and
Tung Wa Lane (including cost of
additions to buildings), ............

2 houses in Connaught Road and
Des Voeux Road,.....................

7 houses in Queen's Road, West
(including cost of additions to
buildings),..............................

2 houses in Bonham Road, West, ...

3 houses in Bonham JStrand, .........

10 houses in Po Yan Street and New

Street (at present used as Plague
Hospital),..............................

Total,.

Amount.

20,000.00
3,000.00
419.69

23,419.69

10,400.00
8,108.28

14,900.00
17,386.00

30,363.00
26,000.00
15,000.00

54,697.00

176,854.28

200,273.97

Subscriptions not yet paid

From Hongs, ........

From Individuals, ..

M,635.70
1,800.00

$6,435.70


Table X.

Emergency Fund.
Ki Yau Year (1909).

Receipts. Amount. Payments. Amount.
Balance from Mo San Year, To Gift to boatman Chan Tai not yet paid, Interest, -- --------- $ 46,766.99 50.00 4,409.89 Gift to boatman Chan Tai, Balance, -- -- -- -- - $ 50.00 51,176.88
Total, _ 51,226,88 Total, - ' 51,226.88 !
________ j __________________

DISPOSAL OF BALANCE.

Yuen Sh'ing Bank, ---------- $20,000.00

On Ue Bank, ----------- 20,000.00

Ming San Bank, ----------- 10,000.00

Tsun Mi Bank, ----------- 1,000.00

Cash in hand, ----------- 176.88

Total, ----------- $51,176.88

Note.This Fund was formed out of the gift of 30,000 Taels made by H. M. the Emperor of China
towards the relief of the sufferers in the 1906 Typhoon. [See 7522 06 C.S.O.]'


Table XIII.

Cheap Sale of Rice Fund : Ki Yau Year (1909).

Receipt.

To Balance from Mo San Year,.

Total,.

Amount. | 1 Payment. 1 ! Amount. 1 ___________
$ 38,887.02 ! By Loan to Tung Wall Hospital towards purchasing property in New Street, 1 $
38,887.02
.........$ 38,887.02 1 j Totai,...............$ 3:5,8^7.02



0 25

Table XIV.

Work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Old Kowloon and Kowloon City.

1 New Patients visited at their homes, ....
,, ,, seen at the office, .........

Total, .......

2Old Cases (home),...........................

(office),............................

Total, .......

3Certificates of nature of disease issued, Total,
(3a given to persons to leave the Colony),

4Certificates of cause of death issued, ........

5 Patients sent to hospital, ......................

6Patients removed to hospital in ambulance, ,

7Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary, ..

8Dead bodies inspected at the request of the
Sanitary Department or the Police,........

9Plague eases sent out of the colony,...........

10Houses cleansed in presence of clerk, .........

11Compensation claims sent in, .................-

12Applications for coffins,..........................

13Applications for midwives, .....................

14Infants brought to office (alive), ...............

> (dead), ...............

Total, ...........

15Vaccinations at house, ...........................

,, at office, ..........................

Total, ............

Victoria. Old Kowloon. tH* e-1 a 1( o fc o o A o w 1 i ! Total 1908.
Central. t w W West. Total. Harbour. r% o s o fc p M Yaumati. j Total. h 0 H ft fc < tf O
194 376 311 881 15 233 601 834 593 2,323 2,740
4,946 5,862 6,170 16,978 229 2,414 7,667 10,081 1,171 28,459 21,613
o,l 40 6,238 ' 6,481 i 17,859 244 2,647 8,268 10,915 1,764 30,7^2 24,353
6 93 58 157 6 59 171 230 177 570 661
1,200 2,497 2,887 6,584 122 263 1,617 1,880 237 8,823 7,406
1,206 2,590 2,945 6,741 128 322 1,788 2,110 414 9,393 8,067
1 3 8 12 5 3 8 1 21 33
. . 1 1 5 6 11 12 18
22 40 36 98 10 79 216 295 184 587 579
88 118 152 358 8 20 35 55 16 437 542
85 84 105 274 2 9 46 55 331 737
125 122 130 377 ... 84 395 479 28 884 867 1 8 1,002 193
' 19 18 18 50 ... 1 41 23 "42 23 30 122 23
77 100 130 307 ... 4 26 30 11 348 509
3 36 46 I i 102 102 148 99
31 10 256 297 18 18 1 316 228
135 166 151 452 i 65 335 400 21 873 559
166 176 407 749 65 353 418 22 1,189 CO >4
4 35 19 58 ... 15 1 16 2 76 325
366 388 517 1,271 2 158 583 741 58 2,072 2,162
370 423 536 1,329 2 173 584 757 60 2,148 2,487


0 25

Table XV.

Victoria Dispensaries.
Statement of Account.

Receipts.

Balance, .......................................

Government Grant to the West Point

Plague Hospital, ...........................

Donation from Kim Shin Theatre,...
Donation from Tai Ping and Po

Hing Theatres, ..................

Annual subscriptions, Land,.........

Annual subscriptions, Harbour,......

Special subscription to pay the Premium
on I.L. 1,747 Central Dispensary,..,
Balance transferred from West Point

Plague Hospital,.......................

Special subscription to pay off debt of

West Point Plague Hospital, ........

Interest,.........................................

Total,.................

4,000.00

6,825.00
13,734.98
620.22

$ c.

1,393.23

600.00

25,180.20

3,400.00'

980.00

1,120.00
147.06

32,820.49

Expenditure.

c.

Maintenance of Dispensaries, ............

Subvention to Kowloon City Dispensary,

Payment, of Loan from Po Chak Tong,.

Part cost of building the West Point
Plague Hospital, ........................

Boat to be used as Harbour Dispensary
(including repairs), .....................

Balance :

At Current Account, ..................

Cash in hand, ...........................

Advance money to Dispensary Clerks,
Bad coins,..............................

Total,...............

19,737.26
104.44

19,841.70
2,000.00

1,534.09

844.00

24,219.79

8,470.52
62.58
60.00
7.60

8,600.70
32,820.49


0 33

Table XVI.

Kowloon Peninsula Dispensaries.
Statement of Account.

Description. Hung- iiom. Yau- mati. Kow- loon.
Receipts : Balance,............................... & MP 349 4,034 550 ... $ 1,308 5,862 $ 242 2,219 575 250 | 104
Subscriptions, &c., ................ ... Donation from ShainshuipoTcmple, Government Grant,.................. Grant from Dispensaries in Victoria, Total,........ Expenditure : Through Registrar General's Office,; Hv Local Committee, ............... Total............. Balance: At Registrar General's Office,...... With Committee, ..................... Total,............8 Total,...........
4,933.94 1,830 2,304 7,171.39 1,830 4,908 3,392.84 2,148 1,213
4,134.38 6,738.19 3,361.90
520 279 124 308 30
799.56 433.20 30.94
4,933.94 7,171,39 3,392.84

* Cants omitted except in the totals.


Table XVII.

Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Registrar General
to have been abandoned during the year 1909.

Victoria Districts. b i O ! bp o C3 £ QJ
Month. West. Cen- tral. East. Victori Total, o rg 3 a o w ; o '.Z, c 3 >! January, ........................ 1 4 4 9 9 5 1 5 0 19 28 101
February,........................ o 10 5 18 5 11 3 1 20 38 109
March, ........................... 1 6 5 12 7 6 4 1 18 30 93
Ap' il, ............................ 5 2 1 8 11 7 6 0 24 32 119
May,.............................. : 4 4 4 12 9 8 4 2 23 35 100
2 4 4 10 12 3 12 1 28 38 107
July, ............................ ! 3 1 0 4 13 4 1 0 18 22 119
August., ......................... 1 2 5 3 10 10 6 2 0 18 28 51
1 o 3 1 4 11 6 8 0 25 29 69
1 3 i 1 5 10 8 2 1 21 26 63
1 0 | 5 >2 7 14 7 7 1 29 36 45
December, ...................... 1 4 i 4 4 11> 12 9 6 0 27 39 29
Total, ................ 1 26 1 51 i 34 ; 111 123 80 i 60 7 270 381 1,005
Total for 1908,...... 153 121 ! 103 I | 377 | 167 i 311 84 86 628 1.005
Monthly average,... 2*1 42 2*8 ; 9-2 10-2 i 6-6 i i 5 5-0 22*5 31-7 | I


Table XVIII.

Number of Infants and Infants' Bodies brought to the Dispensaries in 1908 and 1909.

Western. Central. Eastern.
Alive. Dead. Total. Alive. Dead. Total. Alive. Dead. Total.

1908.

Address unknown,......... 5 167 172 2 43 45 4 4
Address known,............i 202 101 303 6 56 62 7 48 55
207 268 475 8 99 107 *T 52 59
1909.
Address unknown,.........^ 1 1 20 21 47 47 1 53 54
255 131 386 32 91 123 9 118 122
Total, ............ 256 151 407 32 138 170 10 166 176


Table XIX.

Dr. Chinese Recreation Ground, Receipts and Expenditure, 1909. Or.

Receipts. $ c. Payments. $ c.
To Balance,... 634 (1) By Wages of Watchmen, &c., 555 (1) 1
Rent of Stalls, 1,384 ,, Miscellaneous, 379 Q CO
,, Repayment from Tung Wah Hospital of gift towards purchasing land in New Street, ... 5,000 i ,, Balance,... 6,083 0 1
Total,... ...$ 7,019.11 Total,... 7,019.11

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.


Table XX.

Dr.

Statement of Account of Passage Money FuncL

Or.

Receipts. !

To Balance on Fixed Deposit, ... $3,250 :
,, at Current Account, ... 1,127 j
Cash, ... 75 i

Passage 'Money received, ... ...;

Interest on Endownment Fund,......'

Interest on Current Account, ......1

Refund of cost of repatriating emigrants,
Deposit for repatriation of emigrants,.. J
Miscellaneous.

Total,...

4,452 (1)
1,209
130
37
12
18

5,867.74

Payments.

By Refund of Passage Money,.........

,, Gifts to 48 women on "being married,...
,, Annual Charitable Allowance to six

persons,..................

Subscri ption to Alice Memorial Hospital,
Subscription to Eyre Diocesan Refuge, I
Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants, !
Eyre Diocesan RefugeInterest,

Assistance to R. Wesley, ......

Small gilts to distressed persons,
Petty expenses,
Balance:

Eyre Diocesan Refuge Endow- j
ment Fund, ... ...$3,250 i
Current Account,... 1,197

Cash, ... 44 I

Total...



$ c.

628 (1)
114

192
50
50
82
130
27
70
30

4,491

5,867.74

O

OS

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.


Ta&le XXI.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 1 of 1889, No 2 of 1890,
No. 7 of 1896 and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

HillsPosting without permission, ...........................................................

Fireworks Discharging without permits, ...........................................

ordinance NO. 1 OF 1889.

Pecoving men or boys into or awry from the Colony,....................... ..........

Kee >iug unhVcrise'l hmi-ru i
Nt*:jt cting to eirer n :iues of boarders o: register,............................................

t'eisonating Immigrants, ...... .....................................................................

ordinance N<. 2 of 1890.
Contraventions of, and offences under, (failing to produce proper certificates of

vaccination), .............................................................................

Ordinance No. 7 of 18. 0.

Kailiig to report Death, ............................................................................

Unlawful removal of bodies ........................... ................................ .........

ORDINATE NO. 4 F 1*97.

Abduction of girls under the age of 18 years (>ec. 20)............................ .......

Decoying women and girls into or away from tin: toiony, .......................... .....

Detaining- harbouring or receiving women or girls........................................

Procuration of girls under age to have carnal connection, ...............................

Knowingly deriving profirs from prostitution, letting women out for hire, trading
in them, .............. ...... .............................................................

No. of
Cases.

2

17

Convicted.

Discharged.

M.

F.

M.

2

150

1
1

5

3*

6
1

1

21

Including I committed for trial at the Supreme Court.


0 39

Annexe A.

REPORT OF THE PO LEUNG KUK FOR THE YEAR 1909.

The following twelve gentlemen were elected on the 20th March
to act as Managing Committee for the year 1909 :

The Board has to regret the loss by death of Mr. Pun Yan-tsun
who had been a member since 1906. The vacancy has not been
filled, as the number of members was one in excess of the prescribed
number.

The balance to the credit of the Society on the 31st December
was $20,116 compared with $19,390 at the close of 1908. Of this
sum .v 15,000 are placed on fixed deposit with five Chinese banks.
The actual expenditure for the year was & 10,282 compared with
$8;919 in the previous year. There was an increased expenditure of
$745 on food and the grant to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge was $900
as against $250. The subscriptions collected during the year
amounted to $8,392 as against $9,047 in 1908. The interest on the
money on fixed deposit falls due according to the Chinese calendar,
and this accounts for its being $2,062 compared with only $133 last
year.' The Visiting Justices, Mr. Brver and Mr. Chan Siu-ki, have
paid twelve visits to the Po Leung Kuk. On one occasion only did
they receive a complaint which was reported to the Governor and
duly investigated. Nine meetings of the Permanent Board of Direc-
tion have been held. The average attendance of members^was seven,
and the average number of the Managing Committee present was
between five and six. Among subjects of more general interest that
were discussed was the building of quarters at Causeway Bay in
which to house those girls whom it was impossible for one reason or
another to please after only a short detention. The Board thought
the expenditure would be useless, as any cases where longer detention
was considered necessary were always sent to the Convent or to the
Eyre Diocesan Refuge. The Board was also invited to express
an opinion as to the circumstances which in their opinion justified
a Chinese girl's parents in breaking off a betrothal in a case
where the fiance lias left the country and the prospect of consum-
mating the marriage seems remote, and certain conditions on which
such a betrothal might be cancelled were approved. The appearance
of the women's quarters has been much improved by removing the
netting over the windows fixed there to guard against illicit com-
munication with people outside; to prevent any interference with
the Society's wards a watchman has been engaged to patrol the
street. Arrangements have been made for the matron taking the
children to walk in Blake Gardens once a week. The Eyre Diocesan
Refuge has been visited by two or more members of the Managing

1.Chan Sliut-ngam.

2.Chau Cheuk-fan.

3.Chiu Seung-shang.

4.Choa Leep Chee.

5.Lam Shau-ting.

6.Lau Sing-chai.

7.Leung Ping-nam.

8.Li Yau-tsun.

9.Ma Hang-chau
10Mok Yeuk-lim.

11.Ng Hon-tsz.

12.Tam Hok-po.


- C 40

Committee ten times during the year. The average number of
women and children in the Po Leung ICuk at the end of each month
was 59.

The number in the Po Leung Kuk 011 the 1st January was 54
and during the year 515 more, of whom 124 were children, were
received. The circumstances of their admission and the measures
taken regarding them are indicated in Table A. It will suffice
here to note that 3 managed to get possession of the matron's
key and absconded, 193 were placed in charge of their relatives, 49
were married and 25 adopted. The task of arranging suitable
marriages is a difficult one, and in fact so is the whole work entrusted
to the Managing Committee of settling the future 'of the Society's
wards. Cases of extreme difficulty are considered at the meetings
of the Permanent Board.

The matron and the other members of the staff have worked to
the satisfaction of the Board.

The Po Leung Kuk has been visited regularly by the ladies of
the Church Missionary Society.

On the whole the health of the inmates lias been good. There
have been no cases of dangerous illness and only eight slight cases
of beri-beri. During the year seventeen of the inmates were admitted
into the Tung Wah Hospital.

The usual tables shewing the income and expenditure during
the year and the assets and liabilities of the Society are attached. The
accounts of the Elected Committee have been audited by Mr. Ku Fai-
shan and Mr. Chiu Chau-sam.

A. W. Brewin,

It eg t ra r (it- n era I.

Prt'aidr.h t.

Ho Kai,

Tier- P) evident

24tli February, 1910.


Table XXII.

Number of women and

girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year and the
arrangements made regarding them.

In the Po Leimg I
Kuk on 1st I
January, 1909. \

Admitted during I
the year,......... 1

Total,.....

Remaining in the )
Po Leung Kuk
on the 31st L)e- {
cember, 1909,... J

; -u e J/J
ca
£ a3
eS a
* 0) O
M

0
3 0Q
'5b
o
a) li

s
i £ i
o


£ ~ j

51 '5 £

-3 j C

54

515

27

162

569 189 114 11

a|

a

o
Q

a 8

5 H i i-. -

109

c O

u. _

'53

rG Z

c P
8?

I.N

^ £

£ c
ja 54-1

- r?
? ^

, c ci
n

11

131

148

69

38

20

16

18

j- c

-a c

49

49

11

14

i 3

' "5

: ! S

i I >

1 a

*! *

'i I

J *

23

3 ,515

23

569

69

13

136 j 28

__I__

j

149 i 28

53

54

133

138

si

v .

X o

22

23

27

28

11

14

17

32

25

66

49

69

54

515

569


Table XXII.

Po Leung Kuk.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1909.

Receipts.

"Balance from previous year

On Fixed Deposit, ...
At Current Account, -

Subscriptions

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,
Annual Committee, -
Guilds, -
Man Mo Temple, -
Theatres, -

Interest

On Deposit, -
On Current Account, -

Total,

$ c. $ c.
15,000.00 4,390.69 19,390.69

325.00 325.00 4,046.32 1,947.00 1,750.00 8,393.32

2,062.50 219.86 2,282.36

$ 30,066.37

Expenditure.

Bv the Elected Committee (See Table j

* 0.),

Balance

On Fixed Deposit,
At Current Account, -

$> c.

15,000.00
5,116.37

$ c.
9,950.00

20,116.37

Total,

30,066.37


Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee
from the 1st January to the 31st December, 1909.

Receipts. $ c. Expenditure. $ c. $ c.
Balance from, previous year, - 91.96 Decorations, i 47.00
Food, - 3,330.14
Received from Permanent Board, - 9,950.00 Grant to Miss Eyre's Refuge, 900.00
Insurance, - 321.62
Miscellaneous receipts, | 74.37 Light and Fire, - 1,091.94
1 Miscellaneous, ----- 1,166.74
Premium on bank notes, I 343.66 Passage Money, - 56.20
i Petty Expenditure, - 123.37
Printing, ------ 93.55
Repairs, ------ 321.93
Stationery, ----- 128.64
Telephone, - 100.00 I
Wages, ------ 2,600.87
1 10,282.00
Balance, ------ 177.99
Total, - 10,459.99 Total, - $ 10,459.99


C 44

We, Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan, members of the Board
of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society, do solemnly
and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and
Liabilities of above Society on the 31st of December, 1909, marked "A"
and signed with our names on the 8th March, 1910, is a true state-
ment, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing
the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory
Declarations Act 1835".

fSIr

SfltUi

Declared by the declarants Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan at
Victoria, Hongkong, the 8th March, 1910, through the interpretation
of Tang Tat-hung of Hongkong the said Tang Tat-hung having also
first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted
the contents of this document to the said declarants and that he
would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered
unto them.

Before me,

R. 0. Hutchison,

Justice of Peace

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you well understand
the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and
audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants
Chiu Chiu-sam and Ku Fai-shan and that you will truly and faithfully
interpret the declaration about to be administered to them. '

Tang Tat-hung.

Declared at the Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, this 8th
March, 1910.

Before me,


C 45

Statement A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Ivuk
Incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1909.

Assets. ch Liabilities.
On fixed deposit at the Sui Kat, Ming San, Shing Tak, Tai Fung and Shiu Cheung Banks, At Current Account with Wui Lung and Tseung On Banks, $ c. 15,000.00 5,110.37 Nil
Total, - $20,116.37

This is the Statement A referred to in the Declaration of Ku
Fai-shan and Ohui Chau-sam declared before me this eighth day of
March, 1910.

R. 0. Hutchison,

J nut ire of I'rare.




Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER.

Table of Contents.
Report.

1. Shipping.

2. Trade.

3. Revenue and Expenditure.

4. Steam-launches.

5. Emigration and Immigration.

6. Registry of Shipping.

7. Marine Magistrate's Court.

8. Marine Court.

9. Examination of Masters,
Mates and Engineers.

10. Examination of Pilots.

11. Sunday Working Cargo.

12. New Territories.

13. Commercial Intelligence,

Board of Trade.

Tables.

I. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels entered.
II. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels entered at

each Port.

IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared at

each Port.

V. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VII. Junks entered from China and Macao.
VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao.
IX. Summary of arrivals and departures of all vessels,
X. Licensed Steam-launches entered.
XI. Licensed Sfceam-launclies cleared.
XII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII. Statement of Revenue.

XIV. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary).
XV. Return of Emigration.

XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

XVII. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary).
XVIII. Return of Immigration.
XIX. Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.
XX. Vessels registered.
XXL Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII. Comparison in Number and Tonnage of vessels in Foreign
Trade entered and cleared since 1900.
XXIII. Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.
XXIV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.


- D2 -

Annexes.

A. Report on Mercantile Marine Office.

B. Report on Imports and Exports Office.

G. Report on Marine Surveyor's Office.

Z). Report on Gunpowder Depot.

E. Report on Lighthouses.

1.Shipping.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the
Colony during the year 1909 amounted to 527,280 Vessels of 34,830,845
tons which, compared with that for 1908, shows a decrease in num-
bers of 4,832 vessels, with an increase in tonnage of 215,604 tone.

Of this total, 43,794 vessels of 22,415,125 tons were engaged in
in foreign trade, and were distributed as follows:

1909. 1908.

British Ocean-
going ships
represented,... 9'3% in Nos. and M'5% in tonnage. 337
Foreign Ocean-
going ships
represented,... 9-8 351 33'2
British River
Steamers re-
presented, ...... 13'2 165 19'2
Foreign River
Steamers re-
presented, ...... 3'2 3'3
Steam-launches
(under 60
tons) repre-
sented,............ 7'2 0'6 0-8
Trading Junks
represented,... 57*3 100 9'8
100-0 1000 lOO'O

The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the above
figures.

2. Of ships of European construction, 4,191 Ocean Steamers, 7
Sailing Ships, 3,576 River Steamers, and 1,580 Sleam-launches (i.e.,
steamships not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving,
a daily average entry of 25 6, as compared with 26'8 in 1908.

3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean vessels visiting the
port has slightly decreased from 2,448 6 tons to 2,390'4 tons. That
of British vessels has remained stationary2,594 as against 2,593
while that of Foreign vessels has decreased from 2,309'9 to 2,205'3
tons.

In this connection it is interesting to note that during the past
twenty years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the
Colony has risen from 1,182'3 tons to 2,390*4 tons.


D3

The average tonnage of River steamers entered during the year
decreased from 665'5 tons to 620'6 tons, that of British River
steamers from (587 to 640'4 tons, and that of Foreign River steamers
from 565-2 to 538*1 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1908 and 1909 is given in
the following table :



Class of Vessels. :

19u 0,

British Ocean- /

going..........]

Foreign Ocean- /

...... I

British River |

Steamers....... j

Foreign River f

Steamers....... f

steamships un- ]
der 00 tons (
(Foreign (

Trade)......... 1

Junks, Foreign /
Trade, ......... i

Total Foreign j
Tr.de, ...... ('

Steam-launches j
plying in VVa- >
ters of Colony, (
Junks. Local I
Trade, ........ |

Grand Total. ..

No. | Toi.n iuc. No. Tonnage

3,869! 7.505.870 4.07'5 : 7 73 9-7
1.13:'j 7,397.836 4.3 8j 7,857.908

1 n urease.
No. Tonnairi'.

6,246 4,287,482 5.78
1,297 73 ;.()65 I 370

4.060 I S :. 1 I 3.160

3.70l.7r>!
73o.682

14 0.4?-4

25,833 2 2ul ,24 2 .25.0,80 ; 2.243,370

45,437

446,724

53 2.112

20:
186

22,3 6.037 ;43,794

"I

10,460,682: 43if{)8

* 1.8-18,522

34.615,241



22.41.,125

10 328.400
12,087,320

34.830,84;')

466

2.547
3,013

Net,

230,657
460,072

2,617

Decrease.

No.

Tunnage.

466
... i

900

585,728

40,658

42.128 7 i 3

735,474 2,lo.) 626,386

:,7Si; 132,28 2

238.798 ...

974.272 j7,845 758,668

215,61)4 l,831'

Including 16,808 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 862,256 tons,
f 19,094 ,, of 1,022 676

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean Shipping of
207 ships of 230,657 net register tons, or of 5'3 per cent, in numbers
and 3 per cent, in tonnage, which points to a continuance of the-
re vival of trade noted in my report for 1908. The improvement has
been continuous throughout the year.

British River Steamers have decreased by 466 ships of 585,728
tons, or 7'4 per cent, in numbers and 13 per cent, in tonnage. This
is due to the loss of two large steamers, the "Powan" and. "Ying-
king" which ran for half of 1908 ; to the withdrawal of two smaller
steamers, the "Hoi Sang" and Kwong Fat", and to the laying
up, during three months of 1909, of another small steamer, the Tak
Hing".


D 4

Foreign Ocean vessels liave increased by 186 ships of 460,072
tons, or 4'5 per cent, in numbers and 6'2 per cent, in tonnage. This
increase is due almost entirely to Japanese shipping, which has
increased by 118 ships of 459,292 tons. Increases are also shown
under the Norwegian and Swedish flagsof 58 ships of 64,400 tons,
and 47 ships of 70,265 tons, respectively. Portuguese and Dutch
flags also show small increases. The principal decreases are under
French and German coloursof 45 ships of 5S,133 tons, and 19
ships of 16,848 tons, respectively; small decreases being shown
under Russian, Austrian, and Italian flags. Under the United
States flag there was an increase of 7 ships with a decrease in ton-
nage of 42,211 tons; while there was a similar fall in the average
size of- Chinese ships, an increase of 2 ships being accompanied
by a decrease of 3,503 tons.

Foreign River Steamers increased by 73 ships of 2,617 tons, or
5'6 per cent, in numbers and 0"35 per cent, in tonnage, which is
explained by the smaller vessels running more frequently and the
larger less often. Two small River Steamers under Chinese colours
were added to the West River run during the year. These vessels
run only as far as Kong Mun, thus making many more trips than
those running up to Wuchow.

It may not be out of place to draw a comparison here between
these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 1889, 2,591 British
ships of 3,242,953 tons entered the port, against 9,856 ships of
11,437,681 tons in 1909. For Foreign ships the figures are for 1389,
1,144 ships of 1,206,983 tons and in 1909, 5,63S ships of 8,593,590
tons. These figures are those for Ocean and River Steamers,
which were not distinguished in 1889, and Ocean Sailing Ships
(not Junks).

6. The actual number of individual Ocean vessels of European
construction entering during 1909 was 701 being 336 British and
368 Foreign. The corresponding figures for 1908 were respectively
745, 365, and 380.

These 704 ships aggregated 1,682,845 tons. They entered
4,198 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 7,796,376 tons. Thus
compared with 1908, 41 less ships entered 207 more times, and gave
a collective tonnage increased by 343,878 tons.


Thus:

-D5-

Flag.

Steamers.
1908. 1909.

( Steamers 358

British s ... n

( Sailing... I

Austrian,..................9

Belgian, ..................1

Chinese, ..................16

Corean, .......

Danish, ..........i 6

Dutch,........................15

French,....................39

German, ..................129

Italian,........................4

Japanese,..................93

Norwegian,............39

Portuguese,............5

Russian, ..................7

Swedish, .......j 3

United f Steamers I 13

States ( Sailing... 1

Total,.... 745

331
5
7

24
1
5

17
32
108
2

98
43

4

5
5

17

No. of Times
entered.

1908. 1909.

1,923
10
25
1

229

15
97
169
745
12
434
181
87
13
11
38
1

2,034
7
24

232
1
16
105
148
735
11
493
212
94
9

35
42

Total Tonnage.

1908. 1909.

3,730,927
21,697]
97,789i
2,9031
291,416|

34,211'
201,014]
289,222,
1,188,100
; 31,400
1,049,540
192,278i
23,487:
34.326.
18,099]
245,280,
809!

704 3,991 | 4,198

3,854,571
17,683
94,288

290,936
796
31,426
207,190
262,459
1,176,322
28,470
1,283,330
227,341
36,927
19.584
53,726
211,327

7,452,498,7,796,376


D 6

Ocean Shipping, 1909,Arrivals.

Steamers.

c

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8
9

10
11
12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20
21
22

23

24

25

26
28
29
31

34

35

36

37

38

43

44
48
91

I E
S8

British.

No.

331

Foreign

s i 4 o 00
H V to
cc o | i "rf No. ! 1
> EH H >
78 206.711 206,711 7S 78
142 216,830 433,660 55 no
129 146.S61 440,583 38 114
104 88,361 353,444 45 180
90 42,919 214,595 26 130
48 11,616 69,696 14 84
42 11,087 77,609 15 105 i
56 10,737 85.896 18 144
126 27.122 244,098 20 180
150 32,556 325,560 12 120
66 14.791 162,701 5 55
24 2,412 28,944 3 36
39 3,988 51,844 8 104
14 1,045 14,630 ...
45 3,696 55.440 1 15
48 3,431 54.896 1 16
17 1,418 24,106 4 68
18 1,047 18,846 3 54
57 3,511 66,709 3 57
20 1,424 28,480 60
1 21
22 1,215 26.730 1 22
46 2.310 53,130 2 46
48 2,455 58,920 2 48
... ... 1 25
130 7,061 183,586 o 52
... 1 28
29 1,356 39,324 1 29
... ... 1 31
102 3,813 129,642 1 34
70 2,852 99,820 .*. ...
... 1 36
... 1 37
... ... 1 38
43 1.349 58,007 ...
44 1,352 59,48$ ...
96 2,700 129,600
91 636 57,876 ... | i
2,034 858,662 3,854,571 368 2,157

131,699
129,475
101,866
143,846
99,151
43,230
28,821
37,653
29,024
13,746
5.796
2,287
10,963

3.246
3.087
4,339
2,841 ,
2,832 i
3,471
989
299
1,510
1,397
.646
1,639
1,222
714
217
l,5d6

1,339
1,177
1,468

811,526

Total.

G

EH

131.699
258,950
305,598
575.384
495,755
259,380
201,747
301,224
261,216
137,460
63,750
27,444
142 519

48,690
49,392
73,763
51,138
53.808
69,420
20,769
6,578
34,73 '
33,528
16,150
42.614
34,216
20.706
6,727
52,224

48,201
43,549
55,784

No.

156
126
8
7
4
2
2

25

2
! 1

3,924,122

699

9

156
252
243
284
220
132
147
200
306
270
121
60
143
14
60
64
85
72
114
80
21
44
92
96
25
182
28
58
31
136
70

36

37

38
43
14
96
91

338,410|
346,305 j
248,727 !
232.207 i
142,070 i
5 4,846 1
39,908 i
48,390 I
56,146 j
46,302 !
20.587 j

4.699 1
14,951 ;

1,045 '
6,942 j
G 518 i
5-757
3,88S
^343
4.895
989
1,514

3.820
3,852
646

8.700
1.222
2,070

217
5.349
2,852
1.339
1.177
1,468
1,349
1,352
2,700
636

1,670,188

Sailing Ships.

338,410
692,610
746,191
928.828
710.350
32i>,076
279.35C
387,120
505,314
463,020
226,467
56,388
194363
14,(530
104.130
104,28?
97,86!>
69.981
120.517
97.900
20 769

87,860
92,418
16,150
226,200
34.21C>
60,030
6.727
181S6C
99,820
48.201
43^549
55.781
58,007
59.489
129,600
57,87fi

1 2 3 2 si | 7,631 | 5,026 7,631 10,052 ... ... 1 3 2 3 j 7,631 4 ! 5,026 7,631 10,052
Total Sailing, 5 7 12,657 1 17,683 ... 1 1 5 7 12,657 1 17..683
Grand Total, 336 2.041 871.319 1 3.872.254 363 i i i 2,157 811,526 3,924,122 704 i 4,198 1 682,845 ! 7.796,376

7,778,693


D 7

The 336 British vessels carried 3,592 British Officers and 14
Foreign Officers, the latter consisting of 11 U.S.A., 2 Norwegians
and 1 Dutch. Thus the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in
British vessels was 0'42% comprising 3 Nationalities. A decrease
of O'Oljo with a decrease in number of Officers and ships.

The 368 Foreign vessels carried 2,576 Officers of whom 125 were
British as follows :

1909. 1908.
In Chinese vessels - - 72 69
,, Dutch ,, - 2
French - 3 3
,, Japanese ,, ,, United States vessels - - 46 54
- 4 13
125 141

Thus 4'S/o of the Officers serving in Foreign vessels were of
British Nationality, a decrease of 0'5% with a decrease in number of
ships and Officers.

The Nationality of the Crews in British and Foreign vessels
was as follows:

Vessels.

i British U. S. A. and

British, .
Foreign,.

Total, ...

Crews.

1908. i 1909. 1908. i 1909.

365
380

745

336 123,755 24,158

' I

363 | 1,536 : 1 356

l_

704

25,291 25,524

Europeans.

Asiatics.

1908. 1909. 1908.

417 281 1118,278

1 I

27,446 26,955 |109,818

'i !

1909.

123,132
114,330

27,863 27,236 228,0.96 242,462

Hence in British vessels :
1908. 1909.

And in Foreign vessels
1908. 1909.

16*67 % 15 83 % of the crews \ 1'2 % 0*95 % of the crews

were British.

0-29 % 0*18 % of the crews
were other
Europeans.

83*03 % 83-98 % of the crews
were Asiatics.

were British.

19*7 % 18*89 % of the crews
were other
Europeans.

79*1 % 80-14 % of the crews
were Asiatics.


D8

2.Trade.

10. As pointed out last year, and in many previous years, the
figures wliicli used to appear under this heading were as a whole
never accurate, and, in some cases, actual".y misleading. However, in
the few items of Import Trade of which subsiantially accurate details
can be given, the following remarks may prove of interest. These
items are Coal, Kerosene Oil (including all products of Petroleum),
Opium, Morphine, Compounds of Opium, and Sugar.

Coal.Here I find that 1,120.836 tons were imported into the
Colony during the year. This shows an increase over the imports
of 1908, of 108,083"tons, or 10.6 %. This would appear to be due
to nothing more phenomenal than an increased demand, and to a
general improvement in busine ss and maiiufacturcs. It is a curious
fact that although the imports of cc al have increased to this extent,
the shipment of bunker coal in the Colony has decreased. This is
clue to the fact that an increasing number of vessels, calling at Hong-
kong, prefer to take their bunker coal elsewhere, eg., Japanese and
most transpacific- liners in Japan, Chinese in Cantonwhither a
considerable quantity of coal pisses throu gh Hongkong in transit
and many vessels on the home run at Singapore, &<. This may be due
in part to the fear of detention in Hongkong, enhanced by the
prevalence of typhoons of late years.

Kerosene Oil.Decreases are shown in all classes of this
product, viz. :26,235 tons of Bulk Oil, 3:858 tons of Case Oil, and
9,493 tons of Liquid Fuel. These decreases are only what might
have been expected after the phenomenal increases in 1908; (indeed,
my remarks on the subject foreshadowe d them), and do not indicate
any falling off in the trade. Liquid Fuel has increased consider-
ably(32 X) over the figures for 1907the last normal year.

Opium.The imports of Raw Opium show a decrease of 6,087
chests, or 14 5 per cent, while the exports declined by 3,620 chests,
or 9 7 pur cent. During the year 1909, the raw opium trade of the
Colony is described by the following figures :

Stock in hand, 1st January, 1909, 5,808 chests.

Imported during the year, ... 35,734 ,,

Total, 41,542

Boiled by Opium Farmer, ... 1,044

Spurious Opium destroyed, 51

Exported during the year, 35,938

Total, ... 37 033
Stock remaining on 31st December, 1909,... 4,509 ,,

Of the several varieties of opium exported, Malwa decreased by
348 chests, or 6 1 per cent., Patna by 11)74 chests, rr 7 8 per cent.,
Bewares by 1,228 chests, or 12 6 per cent., Persian by 410 chests,
or lo per cent, while no Turkish opium was either imported cr
exported, and Chinese opium has never formed any appreciable part
of the trade of the Colony. It is obvious from the above figures that
the supply does not meet the demand, as 1,300 more chests were


- D 9

disposed of than were imported. China took 92'4 per cent, of the
exports.

Imports of Compounds of Opium increased, as compared with
1908, by 2,543 lb., or 23 33;*, and exports by 1,613 lb, or 19 56%,
while the amount which remained in the Colony for consumption
increased by 930 lb., or 38'1%. Imports of Morphia showed an
increase of 356 lb, or 5'06%. Imports and exports of Cocaine were
recorded for the first time and for the period from April 22nd to
31st December showed 68 lb. imported and 12 lb. exported.

Sugar.The imports of sugar shows a considerable increase of
89,766 tons, or 36 per cent. This article is peculiarly liable to sud-
den fluctuations, and the increase may be due to increase of stocks
owing to favourable prices.

Besides the above items, I propose to say a few words on the
subject of others, which, from the figures at my disposal, appear to
have experienced considerable increases or decreases during the
past year.

Cotton and Cotton Yarn. The figures show the enormous
increase of 135 per cent.

This increase is not borne out by facts, though a very consider-
able increase has taken place,about 40 to 50 per cent. This is a
good example of the inaccuracy of the returns supplied to me and is
obviously due to the fact that the cotton imported in 1908 was
largely reported as "general", while in 1909 the reports have been
more accurate. The actual increase is due to the great improvement
in the trade, the figures for 1909 being greatly in excess of any of
those for the previous four years.

Flour.The total reported imports of flour during the year
amounted to 58,583 tons as against 91,312 tons in 1908, a decrease of
35 8/o. The decrease is due to the fact, noted last year, that direct
shipments to coast ports are now made. Another disposing cause
for the decrease is the fact that the Shanghai flour mills, which obtain
their raw material locally, are now successfully competing with
American flour at the coast ports :Foochow, Amoy, Swatow, &c,
and are even sending through cargoes to Canton.

Bice.In spite of a hopeful outlook last year, Rice has failed
to come back to its previous figure. It has again declined from
721.254 tons to 541,078 tons, or 25 per cent. This is due to a
partial failure of the crops in Cochin China, and to the fact that many
cargoes of rice from Saigon have been sent direct to coast ports,
without touching, much less transhipping, at Hongkong.

11. The total reported Imports during the year amounted to
4; 195.968 tons as against 4,169,856 in 1908, an increase of 0'6%.
Exports also show an increase, from 2,102,857 tons to 2,239,731
tons or 6'5% ; and Transit Cargo increased from 3,372,993 tons to
3,991,347 tons or 19%, but for the reason given these figures are
not reliable.


The number and tonnage of ships of European construction
carrying cargo for import and in transit compared with the previous
year was as iollows :

1908.

1909.

No.

Steamers, ......

River Steamers.
Sailing Vessels,

Total,......

Tonnage. No.

-I -

Tonnage.

3,980 7,429,9921 4,1911 7,778,693

3,770 2,510,896 3,576

11

22,506

7,761 9,963,394

I

2,218,977
17,683

7,774 10,015,353

Net,.

Increase.

No. Tonnage.

211

211

348,701

Decrease.

No. Tonnage.

194
4

348,701' 198

I 1

13 | 51,959 i

291,919
4,823

296,742


12. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European construction exporting cargo, and
shipping bunker coal, follow :

EXPORTS.

1908. 1909. Increase. ! Decrease.
No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage, j No. j Tonnage. No. j Tonnage.
River Steamers,..................... Sailing Vessels,..................... Total, ..................... 4,001 3,773 9 7,-130,882 2,509,(551 19,726 1 4,186 o,o74 10 7,775,519 j 185 344 637 | ... 2,218,459 i i ... i 199 21,940 1 2,214 1 ... 291,192
7,783 9,960,259 7,770 10,015,918 | 186 j 346,851 199 291,192
Net, ........ ............... ... j 55,6 >9 13

Steamers, ........................... Luver Steamers,..................... Total,..................... Strs. Bunker c. j Bunker Coal. Strs" Coal. i ! Strs. Blinker Coal. j Bunker Strs' | Coal.
4,001 3,773 600,650 56,316 4,IS6 | 562,450 -V71 j 56,537 185 i 221 I 199 38,200
7,774 6J659(j6 7,760 618,987 185 221 199 185 38,200 221
Net,........................... 1 ... 14 37,979


D 12

13. The River Trade in Imports, Exports, and Passengers
carried, compared with that in 1908, is shown in the following:

Passengers.

1,929,436
1,947,209

14. The following shows the Junk Trade of the Colony during
1909 :

Imports.

Foreign Trade, .........12,546 junks measuring ......1,144,264 tons.

Local Trade, ...........21,795 ......1,030,242

Total, ......34,341

.2,174,506

Exports.

Foreign Trade, ......... 12,544 junks measuring ......1,099,106 tons-

Local Trade, ............ 21,703 ......1,057,078

Total,...... 34,247


15. The following Table gives a summary of the Shipping and Trade of the Port for 1909. The latter,
being admittedly inaccurate, is given to the nearest 1,000 tons only :

British Ocean-going, Foreign Ocean-going,...... British River Steamers, ... Foreign River Steamers,... Total,......... No. of Ships. Tons. Passengers. ! Emi- grants. 52,923 24,507
Dis- charged. Shipped. 1,175.000 784.000 212,000 69,"(;0 In Transit. Bunker Coal. Total. Registered Tonnage. Arrived. Departed.
4,076 4,318 5,780 1,370 15,544 3,160 25,090 1.644,Of0 2.181,00-.) 289,000 83,< 00 2,109,000 l,882.0u0 236,000 5,164,000 326,000 i 5.173,000 44,000 i 545,000 13,000 165,000 7,735,927 7,857,908 3,701,754 735,682 20,031,271 140,484 2,243,370 172,506 91,650 805,735 170,316 112,329 92,0X8 819,267 151,891
4,197,000 4,0o0 402,000 2,240,000 3,' 0<> 743 000 3,991,000 619,000 11,047,000 | 5,000 12.000 ; 1,145,000 1,240,207 26,595 53,720 1,175,575 23,347 50,031 77,430
Steam-launches, Foreign ( Trade.................... f Junks, Foreign Trade, .... Total Foreign Trade, ... Steam-launches, Local I Trade,.................... \ Junks. Local Trade,.........
43,794 439.98S | 43.498 4,603,000 3.000 188,001) 191,000 2,986.000 2,000 268.000 3,991,000 I ! 624,000 31,000 12,204,000 36.000 456.000 22,415,125 10,328,400 2,087,320 | 1,320,522 3,282,070 48 415 1,248,953 2,185,502 40,417 77,430
Total, Local Trade, ...... | 483,486 27i\00() 31,000 i 492.000 12,415,720 i 3.330.4S5 2.225.919
Grand Total, .............. .->27,280 i 4,794,000 3,256,000 3,991,000 | 655,000 i 12,696,000 34,830,845 4,651.007 3,474,872 77,430


D 14

3.Revenue and Expenditure.

16. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department
during the year was $462,469.82 as against $357,768.52 collected in
the previous year, showing an increase of: $104,701.30 or 29*23/0 :

190S. 1909. Increase.

Light Dues, ......................... $ 79,975.68 $82,473 37 $ 2,497 69

Light Dues, Special Assessment, ... 90,337.67 90,337.67

Licences and Internal Revenue, 130,594.05 133,391.00 2,796.95

Fees of Court and Office,......... 147,108.19 156,133.38 9,025.19

Miscellaneous Receipts, ......... 90.60 134.40 43.80

Total, .....................$ 357,768.52 $ 462,469.82 $ 104,701.30


The Amount of Light Dues collected was as follows

Class of Vessels.

Ocean Vessels, ......................

Steam Launches, ...................

River Steamers (Night Boats), .
River Launches (Night Boats), .
River Steamers (Day Boats), ....
River Launches (Day Boats), ....

Total, ...................

No. of
Ships. |

Tonnage.

i

4,336
795
2,607
133
914
517

9,302

7,751,473
29,554
1,449,186
7,586
737,397
20,5" 7

9,995,773

Rate
per ton.

Fees
Collected.

I

1 cent.
1

1

3 "

Nil.
Nil.

$ c.
* 77,514.73

295.54

4,642.64

24.46

Special Assessment..

Kate

Fees

per ton. | Collected.

$82,473.37

| $

1 cent. i 76,514.09

1

295.54
7,219.17
39.60
6.097.77
171.50

Total Fees
Colled cd.

$ r.
1 54,028.S2

591.08

1 1,861.81

60.06

6,097.77

171.50

! $90,337.67

$172,81 1.04

Including $1,000.64 arrears of 1908.


D 16

The principal increases are under Light Dues, #2,497.69 ; Light
Dues, Special Assessment in respect of the Mongkoktsui Typhoon
Refuge, $90,337.67; Junk Licences, $3,838.05; Fees for Storage of
Explosives $2,637.73 ; Medical Examination of Emigrants, $7,567.25 ;
Examination of Masters, &c., $237.50 ; and Sunday Cargo Working
Permits, $600. The falling off in lie venue comes under the
headings :

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, $1,052.60 ; Sugar
Certificates and Permits, $550; Fines $430.35; Steam-
launch Licences, &c., $369.7.5; Survey of Steam-
launches, £330; Chinese Passenger Ship Licences,
$270; Sale of Printed Forms, $127 and Registry Fees,
$106.

17. The expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1909 was
£109,672.04 including $3,204 specially expended on Buoys and the
(Vown Agents' charges for December 1908, but not including the
Crown Agents' charges for December 1909. Compared with 1908,
this shows an increase of $6,092.50 or 3'5 per cent.

4.Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, there were 291 Steam-launches (in-
cluding 9 Motor Boats) employed in the Harbour, of these, 137 were
licensed for conveyance of passengers, &c., 136 were privately oAvnecl,
14 were the property of the Government and 4 belonged to the Im-
perial Government in charge of the Military Authorities.

Sixteen Masters' Certificates were suspended for incompetency
or negligence in the performance of their duties, 3 for 6 months, 1
for 3 months, 6 for 2 months, and 6 for 1 month; one Master's
Certificate was cancelled and one Master was cautioned. Three En-
gineers' Certificates were suspended, 1 for 6 months, 1 for 3 months
and 1 for 2 months.

Six hundred and forty-one (641) engagements and five hundred
and seventeen (517) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made
during the year.

As in 1908, seven (7) steam-launches were permitted to carry
Arms, &c., for their protection against pirates. No new permits
were granted .

5.Emigration and Immigration.

19. Seventy-seven thousand four hundred and thirty (77,430)
Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1909.
Of these 52,923 were carried in British ships and 24,507 in Foreign
ships. These figures show an increase, compared with those for
1908, of 6,349 (or 8'93 %), which may be accounted for by the
return of the business to normal conditions, and to the resumption of
emigration to Banka and Billiton.


D 17

It. may be well to note the increasing proportion of Emigrants
carried in Foreign vessels. This appears to be due to the increasing
numbers going to Hawaii, who can only travel in United States ships,
as well as to the resumption of emigration to the Dutch Indies, which
is carried in Dutch vessels.

One hundred and forty-four thousand eight hundred and
twenty-one (144,821) returning emigrants are reported to have been
brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had
emigrated, either from this Colonv or from Coast Ports, as against
1.57,809 in 1908. Of these .109,633 arrived in British ships, and
35,188 in Foreign ships.

6.Registry, &c., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 16 ships were registered under the pro-
visions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 3 Certificates
of Registry were cancelled. 128 Documents, <£c., were dealt with in
connection with the Act, the fees on Avhich amounted to $593 ($699
in 1908).

7.Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. Three hundred and three (303) cases were heard in the Ma-
rine Magisl rate's Court (325 in 1908). Breach of the Harbour Re-
gulations, Disobeying the lawful orders of the Harbour Master,
Neglecting to exhibit lights, Failing to observe the Rules of the
Road, Using the steam-whistles for other purposes than for Naviga-
tion and carrying excess of passengers were the principal offences.

8.Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899.)

22. The following Courts have been held during the year:

On the 10th August, 1909, inquiry into charges of Miscon-
duct on the part of the Master (Alexander Nelson
Seaton), number of whose Certificate of Competency is
1347, Hongkong, and the Mate (William James,
Han Ion), number of whose Certificate of Competency
is 034381, Leith, of the British Steamship Shin On,
Official Number 126987 of Hongkong.

The result was that the Court ordered the Mate's
Certificate to be suspended for two years.

On the 8th, day of October, 1909, inquiry into charges of
Misconduct on the part of the third Engineer (R. II.
Ferguson), number of whose Certificate of Competency
is 33341 of Glasgow, of the British Steamship Persia,
Official number 84164 of Liverpool.

The third Engineer's Certificate was suspended for
one year.


D 18

On the 21th day of November, 1909, inquiry into the
circumstances connected with the Stranding of the
British Steamship Tak lling, Official number 109,874
of Hongkong, William Bishop, number of whose Certi-
ficate of Competency is 017,537, London, was Master.

The Certificated Officers were acquitted from all
blame.

9.Examination of Masters, Mates and Engineers.

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates
examined under Ordinance 10 of 1899, for Cert ificates of Competency,
distinguishing those who passed from those who failed :

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

Grade.

Passed. Failed

Master, ...............................

Master, (Provisional Certificate),.

Master, River Steamers, ..........

First Mate,............................

First Mate, River Steamers,.......

Second Mate, .........................

Total,

First Class Engineer,....
Second Class Engineer,.

Total,

13 3
1
3
10 o
z 10 2
39 i 5
28 8
48 19
76 1 27

For Steamships not exceeding GO tons, under Section 37 of Or-
dinance No. 10 of 1899 :

Candidates. | Passed. Failed.
i 36 4
For Engineer, .. 28 1
Total, ........................... 61 ! 5

10.Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

24. One Examination for Pilot's Certificate was held during the
year. One Licence was issued, and 14 Licences were renewed.


D 19 -

11.Sunday Cargo Working.

25. During the year 262 Permits were issued under the pro-
visions of tliis Ordinance as compared with 282 in 1908. Of these
99 were not used as it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the
Sunday and the foes in such cases "were refunded.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $29 200 as
against $28,000 in .1908.

12New Territories.

Eleventh year of British Administration.

The Outstations attached, to the Harbour Department, six in
number have continued to perform the work allotted to them, and
during the year Licences, Port -Clearances, Permits, &c., have been
issued by them as follows :

1909. 1908.
Cheung Cliau opened 1899 - - 11,002 9,146
Tai O 1 1899 - - 5,143 4,901
Tai Po 1900 - - 6,811 6,271
Deep Bay 1901 - - 2,458 4.882
Sai Kung 1902 - - 2,040 4,628
Long Ket. ,, 1905 - - 4,350 3,580
3.1,804 33,408

The Revenue collected bv this Department from the New Terri-
tories durino- 1909 was $25.102.50 as compared with $22,008.05 in
1908.

13.Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

27. Thirty-nine (39) letters were received during the year from
firms and individuals, principally in Great Britain, asking for in-
formation upon various points in connection with their business,
requesting me to place them in communication with local firms,
or to obtain local agents for the sale of their goods, or submitting
samples or price lists. My replies have 'been as full as the informa-
tion and time at my disposal permitted, and my negotiations have, I
understand, been productive, in many cases, of desired effects.

14.General.

28. During the year the Harbour Department has had the mis-
fortune to lose, by death, two valuable officers, Mr. Botelho, 1st Clerk,
Harbour, Office,' and Mr. Watson, 1st Clerk, Mercantile Marine
Office. The former had been 38 years in the Office, and had
proved himself invaluable.

In September the Imports and Exports Sub-department was
temporarily separated from the Harbour Department, and the staff
largely increased to deal more especially with the Liquor trade in the
Colony. The report of this Sub-Department is annexedAnnexe B.


d 20

On the 1st August two new lights were exhibited in the
Harbour, one Fixed Red on the Gust Rock Buoy, and oneRed with
white sectorflashing on the summit of the hill behind Chin-sal-
tsui Point. This latter was designed to utilise the lenses of the old
Cape Collinson Light, and is of the Oth order.

Arrangements are in progress for the exhibition of another new
light on Kap Sing Island, which it is hoped will be displayed this
year (1910). It will also, be of the Oth order, and will be made
distinctive. A fog signal will possibly be added.

Harbour Officf,
1st March. 1910.

Bash. Tayi.ou, Commander, R.X.,.

Harbour Mauler, dv.


D 21

Table I.NUMBER, TONNAGE, CHEWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED in the COLONY of HONGKONG from EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1909.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

1 Cochin China. Continent of Europe. | j Formosa. j Great Britain, j India and Straits Settlements. Japan. Java and other Islands in ihe Indian Archipelago. 3 & C V Ld Macao. | Ships. 1
49 9 5 160 140 180 49 709
67,426 35,280 11,031 566,611 372,598 508,741 73,209 548,805
2,999 1,023 280 12,099 17,148 14,217 2,956 27,839
115,000 7,000 3,000 166,000 190,000 .235,000 125,000 96,000
7,000 41,000 8,000 589,000 191,000 2 6,53S 272 310,000 3 9,632 254 28,000 1 2,744 99
49 9 6 160 142 183 50 709
67,126 35,280 14,031 566,611 379,136 518,373 75,953 548,805
2,999 1,023 2S0 12,099 17,420 14,471 3,055 27,839
115,000 7,000 3,000 166,000 ; 190,000 235,000 125,000 96,000
7,000 41,000 8,000 589,000 191,000 310,000 28,000
33 140 78 23 1 69 3S4 87 93 135
34,074 501,843 72,300 95,722 152,251 1,110,157 151,701 36,653 22,422 1
1,463 16,155 5,001 2,511 4,031 31,228 4,965 4,401 1,669
50,000 117,000 15,000 14,000 83,000 782,000 125,000 12,000 20,000
2,000 476,000 2,000 101,000 134,000 585,000 89,000 1,000
1 1 2 6 1 1 4
1,246 36 1,146 4,355 5,123 145 1,871
53 10 77 226 226 30 133
34 141 60 23 75 385 88 93 139
35,320 501,879 73,446 95,722 156,606 1,115,280 151,846 36,653 24,293 1
1,516 16,165 5,078 2,511 4,257 31,454 4,995 4,401 1,802
50,000 117,000 15,000 1-1,000 83,000 782,000 125,000 12,000 20,000
2,000 476,000 2,000 101,000 134,000 585,000 89,000 1,000
82 149 83 183 209 564 136 93 844
101,500 J537.123 86,331 662,333 524,849 1,618,898 224,910 36~653 571,227.]
4,462 17,178 r.,281 14,610 ^ 21,179 45,445 7,921 4,401 29.50R
165,0(10 121,000 18,000 180,000 273,000 1,017,000 250,000 12,000 116,000
9,000 1 517,000 1 10,000 2 690,000 325,000 8 895,000 4 117,000 2 1,000 4
1,246 36 1,146 10,893 14,755 2,889 1,871
53 10 77 498 480 129 133
83 150 85 183 217 568 138 93 848
102,746 537,159 87,477 662,333 535,742 1,633,653 227,799 36,653 573,098
4,515 17,188 5,358 14,610 21,677 45,925 8,050 4,401 29,641
165,000 124,OVA IS 000 180,000 273,000 1,017,000 250,000 12,000 116,000
9,000 517,000 10,000 690,000 325,000 895,000 117,000 1,000

6 a

220
12,162
3,(383
4,000

1,964
396

4,079
4,000

263
22,602
2,996
14,000

236
26,277
3,974

499
48.S79
6,970
14,000

263
22,602

3,648 j 2,996

49| 236
1,964 26.277
396 3,974

269 499
14,126 48,879
4,079 j 6,970
4,000 14,000

<=4

3,161
42

7,000

1

3,161
42

7,000
1

3,453
109
1,000
2,000

3,453
109
1,000
2,000
2

6,014
151
1,000
9,000

2

1,146
67

2

1,248
100

4

2,394
167

2

6,614
151

I ,

2,000 1,000
9,00.0

2

1,248
100

4

2,394
167



194

266,730
13,759
86,000
11,000

7

8,105
424

201
274,835
14,183
86,000
11,000
14

12,486
568
9,000

12
13,502
455

26
25,988

I,023
9,000

208
116
14,327'
95,000
11,000

19
21,607
879

227
300,823
15,206
95,000

II,000

HgOi

59
73,232
3,714
179,000
68,000

1

1,418

61

60
74,650
3,775
179,000
68,000
259
206,365
10,068
262,000
79,000

0

5,031
186

264
211,396
10,254
262,000
79,000
318
279,597
13,782
441,000
147,000

6

6,449
247

324
2S6,046
14,029
441,000
147,000

12
19,151
642
1,000
19,000

1

1,145
60

13

20,296
702
5,000
9,000
8

9,052
262
10,000
10,000

9,052
262
10,COO
10,000
20
28,203
904
15,000
29,000

1

1,145
60

21

29,348
964
15,000
29,000

1

1,299
56
3,000

1

2.8S7
62

2

4,186
118

3,000

251
271,961
12,844
417,000
1,000

5,771
. 130
12,000

1

2,686

i 5,000

3,223
70

3

8,994
200
12,000

1

3,460
111
1,000

251
271,961

12,814
417,000
1,000

252
273.260

12,900
420,000
1,000

1

2,887
62

253
276,147

12,962
420,000
1,000

1

3,460
111
1,000

3

9,231
241
13,000

1

1,223
70

4

12,454
311
13,000

1

2,686
30

£ S

3

5,310
187
2,000
,000

3

5,310
187
2,000
6,000
12
23,810
536
8,000
12,000

12
23,810
536
,000
12,000
15
29,120
23
10,000
18,000

58

198,207
3,607
105,000
256,000

15
18,115
924
23,000
4,000

I

58

198.207
3,607

105,000
256,000
79

415.208
12,809

111,000
65.000

1

10,267
454

I

15
18,115
924
23,000
4,000
3

2,732
120
4,000

2,686
30

29,120

723
10,000
5,000 IS,000

425,475

13,263
111,000

65,000

137
613,415

16,416
216,000
321,000

1

10,267

454

138
623,682

16,870
216,000
321,000

3

2,732
120
4,000

18
20,847
1,044
27,000
4,000

1,044
27,000
4,000

4,660
5,342,746
254,526
1.933,000
2,11-9,000

271
379,338
17,140

4,931
5,722,084
271,666
1 933.000
2,109,000
11,394
4,781,594
257,930
2,669,000

I,882,030

5,573
681,023
73,818

16,967
5,462,617
331.748
2,669,000
1,882,000
16,054
10,124,840
512,456
4,602,000
3,991,00.)

5,844
1,060,361
90,958

21,898

II,184,701
603,414

4,602,000
3.991,000


D 22

VESSELS CLEAREDin the COLONY of HONGKONG ior

EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 190!).

Vessels................

Tons, ..................

Crews,.................

£ < <
P5

i Cargoes,
.Shipped, ^ Bunker
( Coal,..

Vessels, .............

Tons, .................

Crews,................

Bunker Coal,.......

f Vessels,..............

I Tons,..................

h { Crews,.................

I L

Shipped, i Bunker

( Car
- ui
Coal,..

. ("Vessels,
j Tons, ...
§ { Crews,..

h I Cargoes,

£ I Shipped, ^ Bunker
" L ( Coal,.,

x;

O
O

f Vessels, ........

Tons, ...........

a j Crews,..........

^ Bunker Coal, .

Vessels, ........

Tons, ..........

{ Crews.................

I

I ( Cargoes,

I Shipped, < Bunker
L I I Coal..,

r f Vessels,

11 It.........,

J Crc\ys..................

- ( Cargoes,

! i Shipped, \ Bunker
L I Coal,..

C Vessels, ........

| Tons, ...........

j Crews,.........

tBunker Coal, ,

Vessels.........

Tons, ...........

Crews...........

Shipped,

Cargoes,
| Bunker
Coal,..

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

M

| A ustralia and j New Zealand. i ! British North Borneo. i Canada. 1 Ccast of China. 1 Ships. _____________________ i Coast of C hina Steamships under 60 ton Coast of China, i Junks. j Cochin China. | Continent of Kurope. | i Formosa. | 1 Great Britain, j . India and Strails Settlements. Japan, Java and other Islands.
25 11 29 3,227 45 5 1 2! 117 105 1S2 16
54,320 19,764 118,350 2,749,829 60,118 13,633 9,141 453,113 296,S34 557,400 23,597
2,251 893 5,049 162,463 ! 2,515 240 192 10,599 13,405 14,S01 899
22,000 3,000 26,000 610,COO 3S,000 1,000 102,000 162,000 53,000 19,000
9,000 2,000 2,000 107,000 12,000 4,000 20,000 20,000 6,000
3 2 22 29 5 13 5
8,009 5,220 38,057 3'\801 11,278 28,930 10,173
115 92 1,000 1,271 4,000 1,128 7,000 300 2,000 493 1,000 223 3,000
28 13 29 3,249 74 5 2 117 110 195 21
62,329 24,984 1J 8,350 2,7S7,SS6 90,919 13,633 9,141 453,113 308,112 586,330 33,770
2,366 985 5/49 103,734 3,673 246 192 10,599 13,705 15,294 1,122
22,000 3,000 26,000 610,000 38,000 1,000 102,000 162,000 63,000 19,000
9,000 3,000 2,000 111,' 00 19,000 4,000 22,000 21,000 9,000
30 7 1,158 7S2 9,499 38 117 18 37 42 248 38
64,802 16,059 1,141,944 38.273 907,672 37,216 41S,957 32,771 162,537 116,697 798,789 81,699
2,876 812 49,360 8,370 113,261 1,713 14,473 740 4,196 3,058 23,543 2,357
17,000 4,000 287,000 707,000 12,000 66,' 00 12,000 36,000 47,000 95,000 39,000
7,000 3,000 63,000 5,000 12,000 32,000 3,000 11,000 47,000 6,000
12 144 529 2,538 32 4 18 116 10
12,939 152,921 17,843 180,901 41,637 6,478 20,951 245,915 17,930
456 9,812 3,886 2S.528 1,268 163 807 5,047 465
2,000 42,000 9,000 2,000 9,000 2,000
30 19 1,302 1,311 12,037 70 117 22 37 60 363 48
64,802 28,998 1,297,865 56,116 1,0!)J,M3 78,853 41S,957 39,249 162,537 137,648 1,044,704 99,629
2,876 1,268 69,172 12,256 141,789 2,981 14,473 903 4,196 3,865 28,590 2,822
17,000 4,000 287,000 707,000 12,000 66,000 12,000 30,000 47,000 95,000 39,0^0
7.000 1 5,000 j 105,000 5,000 21,000 32,000 3,000 13,000 56,000 8,000
55 IS 29 4.3S5 | 9,199 83 122 20 154 147 430; 61
5,127l 1,705 5,049 211,823 8,370 113,261 1,25S 14,719 14,795 16,463' 38$*!
932
39,000 7,000 26,000 897,000 707,000 50,000 07,000 12,000 138,000 209,000 148,000 58,000
16 000 5,000 2,000 170,000 5,000 24,000 32,000 3,000 4,000 31,000 67,000 12,000
3 ! 14 166 529 2,538 61 4 23 128 15
8,009 18,159 190,978 17,843 186,901 72,438 6,478 32,229 274,845 28,103
115 548 11,083 3,880 28,528 2,396 163 1,107 5,540 688
! 3,000 46,000 16,000 6,000 10,000 3,000
58 32 29 4.551 1,311 12,037 14 1 122 21 154 170 - 55S 69
127,131 53.932 118,350 4,085,751 50,116 1*001,573 169,772 432,590 . IS,390 615,650 445,760 1,631,034 133,399 1
5,212 2,253 5.049 222,900 12,256 141,789 6,654 14,719 i i 1,095 14,795 17,570 43,884 39,44
39,000 7,000 26,000 897,000 707,000 50,000 07,000 ; 12,000 138,000 209,000 148,000 68,000 1
j 16,000 8,000 2,000 216,000 5,000 10,000 32,000 1 3,000 4,000 37,000 77,000 16,000

117
52,830
5,185
25,000
7,000

117

52,830 j
5.1S5
25,000'
7,000
117

708
548,010

27,798
71,000
16,000
1

2S4
60

709
648,324

27,858
71,000
15,000
2

1,483
89
2,000

139
24,157
1,796
1,000
141
25,610
1,885
2,000
1,000

710

219
12,111
3,673
3,000

50
2,015
400

269
14.126
4,079
3,000

73,000
15,000
140
24,441
1,856
1,000
850
673,964
29,743
25,000| 73,000
16,000

5,185

22
14,287
6,131
36,000

87
5,404
81:

509
49,691
0,913
30,000

50
2,015
400

269
14,120
4,079
3,000

fTTB 1
30,000

87
5,401
812

509
19,61)1
6,913
36,000

1,(|42

i62
1'

1.Q00

1,000

1,042

193
266,564
13,497
169,000
42,000

8,600
318
1,000
198
275,164
13,815
169,000
43,000
IS
19.921
711
5.000
2,000

4,908
206
1,000
23
24,889
947
6,0C0
3-,000
211
aSS,lS5

14,238
174,000
44,000
10
13,568
524
2,000
221
300,053
14,762
174,000
46,000

d c ~ 2

34
39,505
2,098
14,000
5,000
31

41,760
1,305
3,000
65
81,265
3,403
1-1,000
8,000
220
173,132
7,873
64,000
25,000
67
70,760
2,047
11,000;
287 |
243,892!
10,520,
64,000;
30,000!
251 :

1,001
30

9,971
78,000
30,000
98

112,520
3,952
14,000
352
325,157
13,923
78,000
44,000

1

1,001

30

y 3 ~
< ci ^ 2 £
< 'c rt a S Total.
ci b £ | s< i
m m o in o Jl w ' & >
6 1 4 5 1 75 10 4,802:
15,478 1,340 11,868 14,482 5,810 240,403 14,811 6,515,442:
295 07 259 470 109 4,859 578 263,441
1,000 2,000 3,000 j 1,000 8',000 9,000 i,387,00a
1,000 9,000 1,000 256,000'
4 2 1 123
9,422 4,656 2,965 2o0,155
161 68 52 5,586
1,000 1,000 24,000
10 3 4 5 I 1 76 10 4,925
24,900 5,996 11,868 14,482 5,810 243,368 14,si 1 5,715,597
456 135 259 476 109 4,911 578 269,027
1,000 2,000 3,000 1,000 81,000 9,000 1,387,000
1,000 1,000 1,000 9,000 1,000 280,000
7 83 4 2 77 1 13,187
11,524 91,307 13,620 2,031 410,724 796 4,655,843
413 14,240 414 93 12,949 35 276,625
4,000 52,000 4,000 1,000 81,000 1.599,000
1,000 29,000 1,000 1,000 265,000
7 24 1 2 3,784
11,470 5:5,202 417 11,076 858,984
239 1,307 j 4. 465 58,356
1,000 1 8,000 1,000 89,COO
14 107 4 3 79 1 16,971
22,994 j 11C,5."D 13,620 2,448 421,800 796 5,514,827
652 ^ 414 139 13,414 35 334,981
4,000 52,000 4,000 1,000 81,000 1,599,000
2,000, 37,000 2.000 1,000 314,000
13! 84 4 9 3 152 11 17,989
27,.002! <>-> 707 11 or,<5 os, mo 15,607 10 1.71.985
708 14,307 259 890 202 fMf 540,060
6,000 64,000 7,000 2,000 162,000 9,000 2,986,000
1,000 29,000 1,000 1,000 10,000 1,000 511,000
11 | 26 1 3 3,907
20,892 | 29,858 417 14,041 1,059,139
| 400 1,375 46 517 63,912
2,000 9.000 1,000 113.00d/
21 110 4 9 4 155 | 11 2k8!)0;
47,894 122,r,G5 11,SOS* 28,102 8,258 665,168 1 15,607 1^230,424
1,108 15,682 259 890 248 | 18,325 604,005
o.000 54,000 '1 ' 7,000 2,000 ' 162,000 . 9,000 2,986,000
3,000 38,000 1,000 2,000! i 10,060 /..... 1,000 624,000


Full Text

PAGE 1

ADMINTRTRA rpr,rE R.FJT'ORTH FOR THE YEAR 1909.

PAGE 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS: KKPOH.T OJ\ 'l'l-1 l~ BLUE BOOK FOR 1900. !.-GENERAL ..c\.DmNISTRA'flO.S. Appendix A.-Finaucial Returns. ,, ,, ,, B.-Assessment. 0.-Registrar General's Department. D.-Harbour Office. E.-Observatory. II.-LAW AND OHDETt. F.-Supreme Uourt. G.-Police Magistrates' Court. G 1. Land Office. H.-District Officer, X<:'\\" Territories. 1.-Police a11cl Fire Brigrnfo. J.-Prison. III.-PUBLIC HEALTII. K.-Medical and Sanitary. L.-Botanical and Forestry. IV.-EDUOA'flOS. lvL-Rd11catio11. V.-DEFENCE. N.-Volunteer Corps.* VI.-PUBLIC WORKS. 0.-Public Works. VII.-UNDERTAKINGS OF GOVERNMENT .P.-Post Office. Q.-Kowloon-Canton Railway. Not published.

PAGE 5

HONGKONG. REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1909. f,aid befme the Legi.slative Council by Cornmand of Ili.s Excellency the O;ffice1 A.dinini.steri11g tlw Ocn:ernrnent, Aug'l.t8t 4th, .l91fi. No. 231. J-loNGKONG. ~IY LoRD, GovER:S-MENT HousE, HONGKONG, 20th July, 1910. I have the honour to submit for Your Lordship's information the following general Report on the annual Blue Book for the year 1909. !.-FINANCES. (a.)--GE:S-EIL\L REVENCE A:S-D ExPEl\DITCRE. 'fhe ReYenue for the year, exclusive of Extraordinarv ReYenue and Widows' and Orphans' Flind andContributionsamounted to $G,286,833 or $2/51,984 more than for the previous year. The Extraordinary Revenue (Land Sales, Widows' and Orphans' Pension Contributions and special Light Dues) amounted to $5~i6:,134 or $4G8,776 more than in 1908, when, however, no collection was made on account of the last two items. 'l'he total revenue from all sources was $ll,822,967 or $718,760 more tlmn in the previous )'ear, and $113,()71 more than the Estimate. There were increases under every head of Ordinary Revenue, and receipts under the remaining heads were altogether $119,166 less than were anticipated, with a deficit on Land Sales accounting for $118,403. The Expenditure for the year was $5,:313,386 exclusive of Public Works Extraordinary; inclusive of that item it was $6,542,839 or $1,386,039 less than the total expenditure for 1908, which however included Railwav Construction disbursements now entered in a separate account. .. Hate of Exchange for both years was taken at 1/9. The expenditure of the year was less than the Estimate by $238,327, due (inte'I' alia) to crediting Charge on account of Public Debt with re imbursements of interest paid in previous years on account of Advances for Railway Construction, and to no such charge having been debited in 1909. The increase of $113,971 in the Revenue, and the decrease of $238;327 in Expenditure make a total surplus of $280,128 instead of an anticipated deficit of $72,170. The above figures exclude a re-irnbursement of 1\'l:l5J,Of:i/j from Railway Account.

PAGE 6

') The following Tabh~ 1,ho1n, t.l1e 1otal revenue and expenditure for the five yearR 1905-1909 :--------------------------------. ---.---1 1,, 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. --I $ $ -1---1 Revenue, ...... 16,918,404 i 7,035,01 l 6,602,280 6,104,2 07 6,822,967 Expenditure, .. 6,95l,2i5 6,832,610 5,757,203 6,573,3 41 6,542,889 ____ -------4-69_,_13_4_1 ---~ Surplus, ......... 1 I 202,401 845,077 .. ... ------Deficit, ......... 82,871, Railway Account Disbursements anu Re-imbursements omitted. (h.)--C'IILU\IAL C'O\TRJBUTIO\. The Colony <"ontrihutocl $U12fi,441 (being the statutory contri lmtion of 20 % of the Estimated Revenue for 190\) together with the ascertained excess of: Revenue over the Estimates on account of: 1908), towards the cost of the maintenance of Military Forces in the Colony including Barrack Services and Defence Works. (r.)-ASSETS AND LIABILITIES. At the encl of the year 1909, the assets of the Colony amounted $615,438. The total liabilities were $264,340 so that the balance of assets over liabilities amounted to $351,098. The sum to he rf\ imbursed by Railway Construction Account was on 31st December $1,002,071 which added to balance above makes the Balance of AssetR in General Account up to $1,353,169 a sum greater than in Decem ber, 1908, by the surplus Rewnne in 1909, 1:iz., $280,128. (d.)-PCBLIC DEUT. A Loan consisting of Insrribed Stock at 3 % interest, ,7!)fJ was incurred in 1893 for Praya Reclamation; Central Market; Water, Drainage and Sewerage Works, &c., to be paid off on 15th April, 1943. A second Loan consisting of Inscribed ~tock ,143,933 at 3i per cent. was raised in 1906 to cover a Loan to the Viceroy of W uchang of ,100,000. The Viceroy in accordance with the terms of the Loan had up to the end of 1909 repaid ,000 which was placed to the eredit of a special account for construction of the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway. The contributions paid into the Joint Sinking Fund, with accrued interest from investments thereof, came to ,980. 2s. 5d. on the 31st of December, 1909, but the value of the fund, arcording to market prices, was ,577. 7 s. 9d.

PAGE 7

I --,) lL-TlL\lJE AXD /:,HIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES, AGRICULTURE AND LAND. (a;.)-'l'RADE AND SHIPPING. The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1909 amounted to 527,280 Vessels of 34,830,845 tons which, compared with that for 1908, shows a decrease in num bers of 4,832 vessels, with an increase in tonnage of 215,604 tons. Of this total, 43,794 vessels of 22,415,125 tons were engaged in foreign trade, and were distributed as follows :-1909. 19Q8. British Oceangoing ships represented, ... 9"3% in Nos. and 34 % in tonnage. 33"7% Foreign Oceangomg ships represented, ... 9 35-1 33 British River Steamers represented, ...... 1:1 16G 19 Foreign River Steamers represented, ...... 3 3-3 x Nteam-launches (under 60 tons) represented, ............ 7 ()'6 os Trading Junks represented, ... 57-3 10 9 100 100 100 'l'he movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the aboYe figures. Of ships of European construction, 4,191 Ocean Steamers, 7 Railing Ships, 3,576 River Steamers, and 1,580 Steam-launches (i.e., steamships not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 25, as compared with 26"8 in 1908. 'l'he average tonnage of individual Ocean vessels visiting the port has slightly decreased-from 2,448 tons to 2,390 tons. That of British vessels has remained stationary-2,594 as against 2,593-while that_ of Foreign vessels has decreased from 2,309 to 2,205 tons.

PAGE 8

--1-In this connection it is interesting to note that during the past twenty years the average tonnage of Ocean vessels visiting the Colony has risen from 1,182 tons to 2,390 tons. The average tonnage of River steamers entered during the year decreased from 665 tons to 620 tons, that of British River steamers from 687 to 640'4 tons, and that of Foreign River steamers from 565"2 to 538'1 tons. A comparison between the years 1908 and 1909 is given in the following table :-1908. 1909, Increase. Decrease. Class of Vessels. ----------------No. Tonnage. I No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. ----, ---------------llritish Ocean-I 3,869 7,505,870, 4,076 7,735,92i 20i 230,657 going, ......... j Foreign Ocean-I 4,132 7,397,836 j 4,318 i,R5i,908 ]8fi 460,072 going, f British River I 6,246 4,287,4821 5,780 3,701,754 466 585,728 13teamers; .... f l!"oreign River I 1,297 733,065 i 1,370 735,682 73 2,617 Steamers, ...... f 8teamships un-f I rler 60 tons 4,060 IS:,1-121 3,160 H0,484 i !JOO 40,658 (~'oreign 2,201,2-12 ;25,080 I I 'l'rnde) ......... Junks, Foreign I 2ii,833 2,24:l,fl70 42,118 1m Trade, ......... i I Total Foreign I. -l5 437 22 '}(16 fi37 irn ~91 22.4.L~,125 466 Tr. de, ...... ) ,. I '' 7:15,47+ 2,100 62(i,381i Steam-launches plying in Wa445,72! I 0,460,682 rni,988 I O 328,400 ters of Colony, Ju;;:tlc, ,951 J.848,522 t43,4!J8 t2,087,320 2,547 Grand Total, ... 532,ll~ [ 34,Gl5,841 027,280 34,830,845 3,013 Net ......... 5,736 238,198 ... DH,272 i,84a 215,fill4 4,B31 Inrluding lG,808 Conservancy and Dust Eo:i.t& o[ 8!i2,25fi tons. t 1!1,09+ ,, of 1,022,676 ,, 132,28 758,61i8 This table shows an rncrease rn British Ocean Shipping of 207 ships of 230,657 net register tons, or of 5 per cent. in numbers and 3 per cent. in tonnage, which points to a. continuance of the revival of trade noted in my report for 1908. The improvement has been continuous throughout the year.

PAGE 9

5 British River Steamers have decreased by 466 ships of 585,728 tons, or 7 per cent. in numbers and 13 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the loss of two large steamers, the "Powan" and "Yingking" which ran for half of 1908 ; to the withdrawal of two smaller steamers, the Hoi Sang and Kwong Fat ", and to the laying up, during three months of 190!), of another small steamer, the Tak Hing ". Foreign Ocean vessels have increased by 186 ships of 460,072 tons, or 4 per cent. in numbers and 6 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due almost entirely to Japanese shipping, which has increased by 118 ships of 459,292 tons. Increases are also shown under the Norwegian and Swedish flags-of 58 ships of 64,400 tons, and 47 ships of 70,265 tons, respectively. Portuguese and Dutch flags also show small increases. The principal decreases are under French and German colours-of 45 ships of 58,133 tons, and 19 ships of 16,848 tons, respecti,ely; small decreases being shown under Russian, Austrian, and Italian flags. Under the United States flag there was an increase of 7 ships with a decrease in ton nage of 42,211 tons; "hile there was a similar fall in the average size of Chinese ships, an increase o.f 2 ships heing accompanied by a decrease of 3,503 tons. Foreign River Steamers increased by 73 ships of 2,617 tons, or 5 per cent. in numbers and 0 per cent. in tonnage, which is ex.plained by the smaller vessels running more frequently and the larger less often. 'rwo small River Steamers under Chinese colours were added to the West River run during the year. These vessels run only as far as Kong Mun, thus making many more trips than those running up to Wuchow. It may uot be out of .Place to draw a comparison here between these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 1889, 2,591 British ships of 3,242,953 tons entered the port, against 9,856 ships of 11,437,681 tons in 1909. For Foreign ships the figures are for 1889; 1;144 ships of 1,206,983 tons and in 1909, 5,688 ships of 8,593,590 tons. These figures are those for Ocean and River Steamers, which were not distinguished in 1889, and Orean Sailing Ships (not Junks). The actual number of individual Ocean vessels of European construction entering during 1909 was 704 being 336 British and 368 Foreign. The corresponding figures for 1908 were respectively 745, 365, and 380. These 704 ships aggregated 1,682,845 tons. They entered 4,198 times, and gave a collective tonnage o[ 7, 79G,376 tons. Thus

PAGE 10

(j -compared with 1908, 41 less ships entered 207 more times, and gave a collective tonnage increased by 343,878 tons. Thus:-Steamers. Flag. l 1908. 1909 { Steamers British Sailing .. Austrian, ....... .. Belgian, Chinese, ...... Corean, ........ Danish, ....... Dutch, ........... French, ......... Gern1an, ........ Italian, ........... Japanese, ........ Norwegian, ..... Portuguese, ..... Russian, ........ Swedish ......... United f St('amers States). Sailing ... 358 7 9 1 16 6 15 39 129 4 93 39 5 7 3 13 1 331 5 7 24 1 5 17 32 108 2 98 43 4 5 5 17 ________ ,_ __ __ Total,.... 745 704 No. of Timef! entered. 1908. 1909. 1,923 2,034 10 7 25 24 1 ... 229 232 ... 1 15 16 97 105 16ll 148 745 735 12 11 434 493 181 212 87 94 i 13 9 I 11 35 38 42 I 1 ... 1- 3,991 4,Ul8 Total Tonnage. 1908. 1909. 3,730,927 3,854,571 21,697 17,683 97,789 94,288 2,903 ... 291,416 290,936 ... 796 34,211 31,426 201,014 207,190 289,222 262,459 l,188,10011,176,322 a1,4001 2~,~ yo 1,049,54011,283,330 192,278 227,341 23,487 36,927 34,326\ 19,584 18,0991 53,726 245,280j 211,327 809; ... I I 7,452,498 7,796,376 I I -------------------------------------TRADE. As pointed out last year, and in many previous years, the figures which used to appear under this heading were as a whole never accurate, and, in some cases, actually misleading. However, in the few items 0 Import Trade 0 which substantially accurate details can be given, the following remarks may prove 0 interest. These items are Coal, Kerosene Oil (including all products of Petroleum), Opium, Morphine, Compounds 0 Opium, and Sugar. Coal.-I find that l,12u,83u tons were imported into the Colony during the year. This shows an increase over the imports of 1908, 0 108,083 tons, or 10.6 % This would appear to be due to nothing more phenomenal than an increased demand, and to a general improYement in business and manufactures. It is a curious fact that although the imports of coal have increased to this extent, the shipment of bunker coal in the Colony has decreased. This is due to the fact that an increasing number 0 vessels, calling at Hong kong, prefer to take their bunker coal elsewhere, e.g., Japanese and most transpacific liners in Japan, Chinese in Canton--whither a

PAGE 11

' considerable quantity of coal passes through Hongkong in transitand many vessels on the home run at Singapore, &c. This may be due in part to the :ear of detention in Hongkong, enhanced by the prevalence of typhoons of late years. Kerosene Oil.-Decreases are shown in all classes of this product, viz. : -26,235 tons of Bulk Oil, 3,858 tons of Case Oil, and 9,493 tons of Liquid Fuel. These decreases are only what might have been expected after the phenomenal increases in 1908, (indeed, my remarks on the subject foreshadowed them), and do not indicate any falling off in the trade. Liquid Fuel has increased considerably-(32 % ) over the figures for 1907-the last normal year. Opiwn.-The imports of Raw Opium show a decrease of 6,087 ehests, or 14"5 per cent. while the exports declined by 3,620 chests, or 9 per cent. During the year 1909, the ra-w opium trade of the Colony is described by the following figures:Stock in hand, 1st January, 1909, Imported during the year, Boiled by Opium Fanner, ... t-lpurious Opium dcslroyerl, I~xported during the year, Total. Total, ~toek remaining on :-nst December, HlO!), ... 5,808 chests. 35,734 41,542 l,
PAGE 12

--8 -tiful rice and other crops, the year 1909 opened with bright prospects. A fairly extensive business was transacted in the beginning but. as. the year advanced the continually increasing price of Cotton con siderably enhanced Yarn values and consumption became in the end slightly reduced. On the whole the year was particularly re munerative to importers and Chinese dealers alike, seeing that the market ruled ever on an upward tendency. On the other hand, owing to the increasing cost of manufacture, as the result of extra ordinarily dear raw material, the Mills fared very badly. The year closed with stocks light and prices abnormally high. A new feature in the Yarn Trade of the Colony was the floating of several limited liability companies with Chinese capital for the transaction of business in Cotton and Cotton Yarns, which have given a new life to the trade. I Piece Goods.-The year was a good one for dealers in piece goods.. The large orders placed towards the close of 1908 went with one or two exceptions rapidly into consumption. Silk.-The year opened with bnt little clemand from Europe and .America and the market for the first quarter of the year ruled quiet. There was a slight activity in the middle of the year, and the year closed with better prospects in the immediate future. Matting. -Owing to the uncertainty which prevailed in the United States during the first half of the year as to what new rate of dutv ,rnuld result from the tariff revision, the trade was much interfere~! with. Business done showed a eonsiderable rlecrease: :\fats ancl Carpels.-Thc market was fairly active during the year, the largest exports being to Europe. il!etals.-Prices ruled fairly low with consequent increase in business. Flou1.-The total reported imports of flour during the year amounted to 58,583 tons as against 91,312 tons in 1908, a decrease of 35~0. The decrease is due to the act, noted last year, that direct shipments to coast ports are now made. Another disposing cause for the decrease is the fact that the Shanghai flour mills, which obtain their raw material locally, are now SlJCcessfully competing with American flour at the coast ports :-Foochow, Amoy, Swatow, &c., and are even sending through cargoes to Canton. Rice.-In spite of a hopeful outlook last year, Rice has failed to come back to its previous figure. It has again declined from 721,254 tons to 541,078 tons, or 25 per cent. This is due to a partial failure of the crops in Cochin China, and to the fact that many cargoes of rice from Saigon have been sent direct to coast ports, without touching, much less transhipping, at Hongkong. The total reported Imports during the year amounted to 4,195,968 tons as against 4,169,856 in 1908, an increase of 0o/o. Exports also show an increase, from 2,102,857 tons to 2,239,731 tons or 6,Yo; and Transit Cargo increased from 3,372,993 tons to 3,991,347 tons or 19o/o, but for the reason given these figures ar@ not reliable.

PAGE 13

u --H111igmtion ancl Imm:igralion. Sernnty-seYen thousand four hundred and thirty (77,430) Emigrants left Hongkong for Yarious places during the year 1909. Of these 52,923 were carried in British ships and 24,507 in Foreign ships. These figures show an increase, compared with those for 1908, of 6,349 (or 8 o/o), which may be accounted for by the retum of the business to normal conditions, and to the resumption of emigration to Banka and Billiton. It may be well to note the increasing proportion of Emigrants carried in Foreign vessels. This appears to be due to the increasing numbers going to Hawaii, who can only travel in United States ships, as well as to the resumption of emigration to the Dutch Indies, which is carried in Dutch vessels. One hundred and forty-four thousand eight hundred and twenty-one (144,821) returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 157,809 in 1908. Of these 109,633 arrived in British ships, and 35,188 in Foreign ships. (b.) INDUSTRIES. (Fnder European Management.) Bnyineen'.ng arul Shipbuild-1>ny.--This is one of the most important industries in the Colony. The principal establishments are the 1-iongkong and Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., and the Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Co., Ld. There are a number of smaller yards, some under European and others under Chinese management, which do a large amount of work. The Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company is an old estab lished company. The establishment is equipped with six dry docks, the largest of which is 700 feet in length with an entrance breadth of 86 feet and a depth over sill of 30 feet ; two patent slips and work shops fitted with the most modern appliances for every class of con structional and general engineering work including locomotives and railway rolling stock. The Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Company is a newly established company. The establishment possesses a dry dock 787 feet in length with breadth of 88 feet and depth over sill of 34 feet 6 inches besides three slipways and engine and boiler shops capable of dealing with the heaviest classes of engines. Two vessels ofover 13,000 tons (gross) each were docked b? this company during the year. The building yard is laid out with furnaces and plant suitable for building vessels up to 20,000 tons. The depression which existed in 1908 in this industry was continued during the year under review. Sugar Refining.-The year 1909 was a favourable one for the Sugar Refining Industry of the Colony as there was a good demand in the China markets throughout that period, and in conseque~ce of a general advance in sugar alJ oyer the world a satisfactory margin of profit was obtainable.

PAGE 14

-10-As was the case in 1908 Beetroot sugar did not find its way into the China market in any appreciable quantity. Cotton Spinning.-During the earlier part of the year the local .Mill was handicapped owing to the inadequate supply of labour, but this difficulty was overcome. Further difficulty was experienced in obtaining the raw material at the beginning of the cotton season as the crop although large was a late one. Rope llfanufactming.-Business has kept steady and prices have remained the same throughout, the year. Cement.-The conditions under which this industry has been carried on have been much as in 1908, and there has been a good demand throughout the year. Brew-ing.---The Oriental Brewery was at work du.ring the year and its beer in spite of the strong competition of the imported article is gradually finding favour 11ith the public. Its capacity is about 100,000 barrels per annum. Soap Boili11g.-Messrs. lJlar.:khead & Cu. manage a Soap Factory at Shaukiwan. It 11as established in 189fi and is equipped with modern plant capable of turning out l,800,000lbs. of soap per month. '.l'he principal manufactures are soft soap, salt water soap, toilet soap, and tar soap which are locally consumed or exported to North China. (b.) lNDt:STRIES. ( U nile1 Chinese Jlanuge111e11t.) Rattan and Fibre Fumitwe.-The making of rattan chairs has been an important industry in Hongkong for many years. There has also been lately a large development in the use of what is called Sea Grass (Arundo Mitis) and hemp string. The ordinary rattan eas? and garden chairs are used all over the Far East anJ. are exported to Australia and latterly tu South Africa, aucl sea grass and linen fibre" furniture is exported to India, Copenhagen and America. Tobacco.-There are thirteen or fourteen native factories which do a small munufaeturing business, importing the tobacco leaf from Pakhoi and the Canton Delta. Tinned Goods.--Thc manufacture of tinned goods in Hongkong and parts of the neighbouring province of Kwongtung has acquired considerable dimensions. The products of the factories are consumed locally and exported to other parts of China and to countries where there is a Chinese population. Samshu.-Samshu or Chinese spirit is made from rice, the fermenting material being a substance composed of rice, bean flour, red earth and leaves which are stated to be cassia leaves. Various well-known beverages are prepared by flavouring the spirit with plums, oranges and other fruits. The retail price of the ordinary Chinese spirit is under 7 cents a catty. The most expensive beverage distilled locally and composed of roses, ordinary spirits and sugar costs 40 cents a catty. Medicated spirits have a considerable sale among the Chinese. The spirit principally used is one distilled frnm millet and obtained from the

PAGE 15

-11 -Xorth of China. To this spirit are added various dmgs and the mixture is used as a tonic. Th~re _are seven (fhin~se _distill~ries exclusiYe of the village d1st1llenes m the New Terr1tones wluch have an annual output of some 300,000 gallons, about one-tenth of which is exported. Vests 114id Sorks.-There are three small factories for the makinrr of underwear and sockR, and a fomth is shortly to open. This iI~~dnstry appears by now to be an established one. The first factory was opened five years ago, has increased the number of machiiies ancl is now beginning to pay its way. Hicle.s rind Leathm.-There are seven or eight tanneries where an inferior kind of leather is manufactured. Gall-nuts from Japan are used in the manufacture. The greater part of the hides that reach Hongkong from the interior is sent to the Straits Settle ments where suit,.iil,ble bark can be procured, to be tanned, and sent back to Hongkong as leather. There is an occasional export of hides by local
PAGE 16

12 of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwau, and many others in the New Territories are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West Riw'r. There are oyster beds of rnnsiderabh rnlue in Deep Bay. (d.) FuHESTHY, A.tmICULTVRE A!-ID BoTA~Y. The formation of pine tree plantations in the Harbour Belt between Lai-chi-kok and LYemun has been continu0d to the extent uf 300 acres, and failures ii1 the older plantations in this area, in the catchment areas of Kowloon and Tytam Reserrnirs and in the felled areas of Mount Kellet and Aberdeen haYe been made good. A few seedlings of the Nanmu or Coffin w nod-tree have been planted on the north side of Mount Victoria, the south side of Mount Kellet and at Aberdeen. A few Eucalyptus seedlings have also been planted at the latter place. Shade trees in Kowloon and Hongkong have been replanted where necessary. Large quantities of brushwood have been removed from the plantations in various parts of the Colony and given to the villagers as payment for work done by them for the Government. A contract extending over three years has been marle wlierehy 710 acres of old pine tree plantations at l\fount Davis, Abercl0en and Tytam have been sold for felling. Several hundred thonsaud square feet of brushwood have been cleared in the neighbourhoorl of dwell ings at Shaukiwan, vV est Point, the Peak and elsewhere in connection with the crusade against mosquitoes and malaria. The crops of vegetables, rice, and fruits in tlrn Xew T0rritories have not been so good as in the previous year. Lists and samples of local plants and vegetable drugs \\'Ol'P prepared and submitted to the Honourable Dr-. Ho Kai ,Y110 was good enough to make a prolonged investigation into their uses by Chinese druggists and herbalists. The lists with Dr. Ho Kai's recommenda tions as to which of the plants and drugs were worthy of scientifir investigation were then forwarded to the Director of the Im perial Instit11te, London, for report m; to whether any of them contained medicinal or toxic qualities, or had economic rnlue. The lists were sent by the Imperial Institute to the Pharmaeopceia Committee of the General Medical Council whu reported that there were not sufficient indications of the extent or employment of in dividual plants to justify the inclusion of any of them in the Colonial Addendum to the Brit"ish Pharmacopceia. Professor Dunstan added that none of the plants seemed likely to yieJd products of eeon0111ic nlue which are not already known. Seeds of Aleurites Fordii, AleuriteR cordata, Soja hispicla and Perilla ocymoides, barks of Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites corclata and Aleurites triloha, as well as several kinds of vegetable oils were also sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute for a report as to th0ir c-ommercial value and suitability for the English market-. Work on the Flom of Ho11gko11g, the New Territnril'S and prnYince has been carried on during the year, and a list with a key to the species, genera and orders is now near]); mrnpl01l'.

PAGE 17

lJ ,>-(e.) L\:SI> Ut:.\'.':T~ ,\SO GENE-HAL VALl'E OF LA:SI>. The net amount received from Sales of Crown Land and p1er rip;hts after deducting expem,es of sales was ;ti:40,665, a decrease of $28,Qf);\ on the prcYious year and $155,2:-10 less than the average amount rnceinicl for thP last 5 vearR. Of this amount $14,401 was reeeiYed in respect of t.lw sale ;>f various pier sites and extensions tn existing piers, .-. 5,:H8 was receivecl in respect 0 sales 0 land in the :Ne" Territories and the remainder from Rales 0 new lots of <'rown Land and grants of extensions to existing lots in the island 0 Hongkong ancl Old Kowloon. The chief items were received in respect of sales nl' building lots in Hollywood Road (Inland Lot ~o. 1830) ancl at Rhaukiwan (Shaukiwan Inland Lot No. 418). There has been little demand for new building sites in the City lrnt a gcneral im prnnmwnt in tlw land market appears to have ('(Jllll11enccd an
PAGE 18

-14 -IY.---EDUCA'l'ION. There are il GoYermnent ancl Grant Schools, the most important of which is Queen's College. Of these 22 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction on all subjects of the 7th Standaid, and ab'oYe. These latter sl"l10ols have an average attend ance of 4,337, and the medium of instrnction in all of them. with the exception of fiye girls' Sl'hools, is English. The 4fl remaining schools are all Lower Grade. They comprise one school for British lildiai1s where Englii,;h nucl Crdu are ta11ght; four Gmerumcnt and oiui Grant. Anglo-Chii1ese Schools; nncl ,l::l Graut Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all thesr Lower Grade Sl'hools is 2,~2::L The total a'verage attendance, at both Grades of Srhool, is 6,560. Th:e ieve.riue derived from school fees is $68,20,! (of which $40,792 is from Q11een's College) and is rapidly increasing: this iR mainlj, to he accounted for by the increasing numbers of Chinese desirous of an English education. Ho11gkong is fortunate in iududiug among its schools two l_iil.'lited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are m1
PAGE 19

-1G -Latrines; Blake Pier Shelter; and the follmYing "ere in hand or under construction :-Market at Kowloon Point; Extension to Tai Po Lanrl Office; Additional Pupil Teachers' Room at Queen's College. The work on reconstruction of Gullies and extension 0 Nullah Training, Wate1loo Roacl, Kowloon, and Nullah near North Point "as continued ; the former heing practically completed. Progress was made in substitution of iron pipes -for defective earthenware ones. The extension of Argyle Street was in hand and the raising of Des Vamx (Chatham) Road "as eompleted. In the New Territories the Kowloon City-Shatin Road was completed and the Castle Peak .Ping Shan was nearly finisherl. The extension of Green Island Lighthouse Pier was completed ; the new reinforced concrete Pier at Kowloon City was under con Rtruetion and piles were prepared for the Gunpowder Depot Pier. The deepening of Causeway Bay was nearly completed. The Albany Filter Beds Extension was finished and good progress was made with the large main to extend the Tytam vVaterworks westwards. A section of 3" pipe on the Shaukiwan Water System was replaced by a 6" pipe. Much useful work was dune under the Miscellaneous Works Vote; under the Votes "Forming aml Kerhing Streets" and '' Drainage \\'orks l\fiscellanous ", the raising of a considerable Redion of snnken sewers in Connaught Road heing carried out. Compensation was paid for scavenging lanes extension, and land re,mmed for the new street between Pi-a,a East and Queen's Road wa::; paid for. ., The total amount expen
PAGE 20

rn --The engines a.rri \ell iu the Colony early iu the current year anITA.I.H. Gowrnment Hospitals mnsi:4 u[ t.hu ('jyjj Ho:;pital to \Yl1ieh iH at.tached an isolate
PAGE 21

--17 -Chinese gentlemen annually olel'led, their appoiutmeut being suhmitted to the Governor for l'onfirmation, and is under the supervision of a visiting physician who is a member of the Medical Department, whilst a Chinese honRc surgeon trained in medicine iR a member of the hospital staff. The Alice :Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals are 11umaged auJ ontrolled by the missionaries resident in Hongkong, agents 0 the London }Iissionar.r Soeiety. They consist of the Alit:e }Iemorial Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in 18!)3, the Ali<-c Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in Hl04 and the Ho 1Iin Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in-patien1s in 190!} mis 1,.201 and the expenrliture $12,600. The number 0 labours in the 11uternity Hospital mts 198. The Gon~rnmen1 makes a grant of $:10() per amrnm to these Hospitals. To avoid the C'Omplete seclusion from friends and relatives whieh a removal of Chinese Plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital entailed, three District Plague Hospitals an, now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony and ,L fourth is being built. They are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee a1Hl rc
PAGE 22

18 --Societ\. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Ohinese matro;1 and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese tParher in elementary subjects and in needlework. The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution under mission aus pices founded for rescue work among the Chinese. It is now housed in the Belilios Reformatory and receives a small grant from the Government and also a contribution from the P6 Leung Kuk. The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The Government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, "ho has always been a Government official, iR President. The lecturers, who are Government officials or private medical practitioners, each receive a small honorarium, the funds being derived from the fe('s of the students and a Government grant-in-aid of $2,500. The minimum curriculum of study is fiYe year8, and thepreliminary examination has been accepted by the General l\Iedical Council of Great Britain. 118 students have been enrolled up to clatp (January, 1910); and of these 39 have become qualified "licentiates". Most of the licentiates have settled in the Colony, and are exerting a most useful influence in the direction of displacing the native medical methods and popularising Western medical and sanitary knowledge, while a considerable number of them are employed as resident surgeons in the hospitals for Chinese, as medical officers in charge of the Public Dispensaries, and as assistant medical officers on the rail way works. The. work of the College has thus far been carried on in lecture-rooms and laboratories made available in various hospitals, &c., in different parts of the City. Steps were being taken to provide adequate buildings of its own ; but action was suspended when the University Scheme was proposed. When the University is established, the College will be merged into its Faculty of Medicine. The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from GoYern ment. It contains a theatre, some large rooms which are used or balls, meetings, concerts, &c., a museum in whieh are some very air specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allmv. The building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription. Small grants are also given to the Italian ConYent ($1,280), the French Co11Yent (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and other charitable institutions. The .Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths and with the Rervices of interpreters who can assist the inmates of houses where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of in fectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are seven Dispern,arics in existence inclnding one for tl1e boat population on a hulk in Causeway Bay.

PAGE 23

11) Thu tutal 1ost of tuaintenunce, which is defrayed by voluntary sub"wriJJtions, was $:H,100. The Dispensaries are conducted by com mil"t,ws nnrler 1he l'!iainnanship of the Registrar General. YIIl.--(\l{JMl:NAL A.ND POLICE. The total oE all eui:;eH reported to the Police was 9,819 being an increase of 257 or 2(i8 per cent. as compared with 1908. In the ,livii:;ion of these ('.ases into serious aud minor offences there is an iuc-rease in the former as eomparerl with the previous year of 103 or :1 pl'r ce11t. The number u[ i:;erious offences reported was 103 over the aYerage of the quinquennial period commencing with the year 1905. The number o[ minm offences reported shows an increase of 154 as mmpared with 1908, and was 1,000 below the average of the quinquennial period. The total strength of the Police Force for 1909 was Europeans 132, Indians 411, Chinese 511, making a total of 1,054 as compared with 1,046 in 1908 exclusive in each case of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures ineludc police paid for by thP raihrn.v, privato firms, and other government departments. ()f tliiH force the District, Officer, 1:1 Europeans, 114 Indians and 411 Chinesl~ wPrc Hf:ationecl in the New Territories during the year. Tht' fone oJ District \V atchmen to which the Government contributes $i,ooo per annum was \Yell supported by the Chinese during the yL>ar. These watehmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter ()f the Cit.v. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol. The total num1Jer of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was :,,21;, as compared with 4,778 in 1908. 0 these 1,325 were committed for eriminal offences, against 1,312 in 1908. Of commit tals for non-criminal offences there were ;35 less under the Prepared Opium Orrlinance and 30 more for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws. The daily arnrage of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 560, the average for 1908 bciug 465 and the highest previous average being i2(j in 1 DOL The percentage of prisoners to population, according 1o the dail_v an'rage of the former and the estimated number of the latter was -1 us l'ompared with the average percentage for the lm,t ten :vear:-. (hYiLlg hmrnver tu the large floating population which is con stantly moving hctween t.he Colony and Canton the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the compara tive criminality of the residents of the Colony. The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish ments per prisone1 being l ?,8 as compared with 1 in 1908 and 1 in 1907." Long sentence prisoners serving two years and up,Yards are taught useful trucle.s, i1ll'lnding printing, book-binding, washing;

PAGE 24

--.20 --carpentry, boot-making, uet-nrnking, paint.ing anll white-washing, mat-makincr, tailoriug, oakum-pickiug, &c. The vrofit on the work done was $43,9'1li as against ~;4fi,420 in 1908. There was $01,80\J received and credited to Government for non Government work against $5,012 in mos. The use of the Belilios lleformatory as au overflow prison having been discontinued, it became nec,essary to consider an extension of Victoria Gaol and it ,vas found possible by pulling clow11 the offices and stores and re-erecting them in another position with e('.ouom., of space, to make room for a ward l'nntaining 78 cells with yard attached. A contrad for this work wa:,; let at the heginni11g of the current year. IX.---VITAL STATISTIC'S. (a.) Pol'CUTIO's. The populatiou 0 t.lw Colon., acconliug to 1-he Cou,m:-; taken in 1001 was 283,975 while at the Census taken iu HJ()(j it war,; J01,9!i7 exclusive of the New Territories, New Kowloon and the Army and Navy Establishments. The estimated population at the middle of the year under reYie,v was 428,888 as :follows :-Kon-Chinese Civil Community, I Hongkong, C'h" p 1 Kowloon, 1nese opu at1011, ) FI t. p 1 t oa .mg opu a -1011, 1 Mercantile Marine, Army, (average strength), :Navy, (average strength), -New Territories, (exclusive of Kowloon), Total, 199 550 74'.600 46,240 2,770 4,500 2,217 L'1,\JOO :J23,16O fi,7 Li /'\!5,011 428,888 (b.) PcBLH' I-IL\LTH A\O ~A'
PAGE 25

-21-During the year there were 108 death:-; from Plague comparrnl with D86 in 1908 and and 198 in 1907. There were 2,514 deaths from Respiratory Diseases amongst the Chinese, 751 of which were due to Phthisis, a percentage of 10 of the total deaths amongst that community. Beri-beri caused 545 deaths-as against 736 in 1908. The deaths from Malaria were 420 as against 499 in 1908, an
PAGE 26

--22 ---and duties arc paid in vustage stamp;;, which are uow sold exclu sively by the Post Office, leaving the sum or $4-1-l,046.58 as the approximate revenue from the Postal Service. The total expenditure amounted to ~510,729.99. The result of the year's working shows a deficit of $66,683.4] which is due to the fourth quarterly payment of the P. & 0. 8UbRidy for the year 1908 being made in rnon instead of ii1 the year in ,Yhich it was due; to iuereased transit pay ments on the basis of the weight of eorresponderwe despatched during November, 1907, under the Convention of Rome, and to increase in the volume of correspondence sent by the trans-Siherian Railway. This Colon v commeneecl to forward direct dosed mails to the United Kingdo1;1 and Germany ei8-Rhanghai, Dalny and the trans Siberian Railway on 24th April. The parcel post arrangement between this Colony and China came into operation on 1st October. The Cash on Delivery Service in connection with parcels exchanged with the United Kingdom was adopted b.v this Colony on 1st May. Xl.--}ULI'l'.:\11.Y EXPJ<:);DITUHE. (,1 .. ) l'ol.O\L\J. l\1\''Ill!BuTIO'.\. The Colony cuntributed $l,22l5,441 (being the statutury contri bution of 20"/o of the Revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barr~ck Services and Defence Works. (/1.J VoLl':!iTEEH CoHPt-. The expenditure on the Volunteers, which ii; entirely borne by the Colony, was $38,393 compared with $45,554 in 1908. XII.-GEXEHAL ORSERVATIO~S. The assessment made for the year 1909-1910 (1st July to 30th June), shews a slight decrease in the rateable value of the whole Colony of 0 per cent. In Shaukiwan, the Hongkong villages, Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Hunghom and Ko1Vloon Villages there is an increase ranging from 0 per cent. to 10 per cent., but a decrease is shewn in the City of Victoria o.f 2 ppr cent., in the Hill District of 0 per cent., and in l\fongkoktsui of 9 per cent. There is a noticeable increase in ~ew Kowloon of $41,543 or 66 per cent. The aYerage rate of exehange (demand on London) which had been 1_19 to the dollar for 1908 fell to 1/9 for 1909. The position with regard to subsidiary coins remained unsatis factory, and during 1909 the Government withdrew from circulation Hih-er subsidiary coin amounting to the face value of $779,712 and (opper to the face value of $40,IH,6. These coins were shipped to England where they were melted down and sold as bullion for .,757 ls. 4d. and ,535 Os. ld. respectively. The loss to revenue by this t1ansaetion amounted to $7fi,863.l7. The discount

PAGE 27

)'J ..... _)cluring the year on Hongkong subsidiary coin varied between o/o and 7~o/o, and on Chinese subsidiary coin 4-to/a and So/o. Hongkong copper cents were from 105 to 120 per $1, and Chinese copper <'ents from 112 to 123 per $1. Negotiations continued without sut.cess between this Government and the Chinese Authorities ,vith a \iew to decreasing the exceRs of Chinese suhsidiary coin. Jn pursuance of the poliey of FLM. 's Government, 26 opium diYans were closed on the 1st March, 1909, and compensation amounting to $11,fH3 was paid to the divan-keepers. All remaining dinm keepers both in the Colony and the New Territories were notified that no licences would be renew!ld after the 28th February, 1910. The opium laws of the Colony we.re consolidated in September last and were amended so as to give full effect to the recommendations made by the International Opium Conference, ,vhich sat at Shanghai during February, 1909, and to the policy of H.M.'s Government. Tenders for the lease of a new Opium Farm for 3 years from the l8t :March, 1910, were called for, and the lease was granted to Messrs. Ho Korn-tong, Ng Li-ling, Lau Chi.i.-pak and Ch'an K'ai-meng, at an annual rental of $1,183,200. This means a loss to the revenue of $225,860 during 1910 and of $270,660 during each of the years ] 911 and l!Jl2. The restrictions oil the eonsmn ption of opium both i11side all(l outside 1-lie Colony nrr as follow:/1.) The smoking of opium is restric:tetl in Hongkong pri marily by the existence of a Monopoly under which the sole right of preparing opium for smoking and of selling the prepared drug is vested in a Monopolist who is thus enabled to charg;e a very high price for the clrng. The selling price of prepared opimn and dross opinm is $4.GO and $2.00 respectiYely per Chinese Olllll'C (:=-=-lf oz.). The Monopolist alone can import prepared opium. (2.) Opium 1Jinms (or opium dens as they are eallell by some) have been closed, as explainerl_ in the preceding paragraph. Heavy penalties are imposed for the illicit opening of a divan. Persons found smoking in a divan are liable to fine and persons found in, or escaping from, a divan are under the law presumed to have been smoking therein. (3.) Penalties are imposed on any person who administers any injection or furnishes morphine to any other person except under prescription from a qualified medical practitioner. (-1.) The importation for sale or use within the Colony, the preparation, manufacture and sale of morphine and compounds of opium are restricted_ by licence. Licences are restricted to a few Chemists and Druggists of good repute who have to pay a royalty to the Monopolist referred to in (1) of Ten Dollars per tael of morphine and Four Dollars per tael of l'Ompound of opium other than morphine. The price is thereh?

PAGE 28

-~-l -enhanced. Under the c~nditions of these licence::; morphine aml eompouncls of opium may not be sold to the general public in quantities less than of tlie value of 20 cents. The vendor must supply the purchaser at the time of sale with a counterfoil certificate. The possession of morphine and compounds of opium without such certificate is illegal, and in quantities exceeding 12 official nt fund for the proposed Hongkong University. The Government of Macao made a donation of $8,422 and the Chinese Government one of $13,608. Messrs. Butterfield & 8wire and their allied firms contributed ,000 and H.E. Chenng Yan-tsun, Govemo1 Geni>ral

PAGE 29

of the Liang Kuang Province, $-200,UOU, Chinese residents in \V eichow through Mr. Chang Pat-sze $92, 7G4, Chinese .residents in Hongkong $198,000, Chinese residents in Canton $13,971, Chinese residents in Saigon ,000, the Hongkong and Shanghai Rank $50,000, Messrs. .Ja reline, Matheson & Co. :i25,000, and Messr,:;, David Sassoon & Co., Messrs. E. D. Sassoon & Co., the ChartereJ Bank of India, .Australia and China and Messrs. Ohater & :Mody :Ji:10,000 eaeh. Other sums have been promised. Mr. Ng Li-hing, a resident; in the Colony, has undertaken to transfer a sum of li,:J0,000 originally intended for the Hongkong CoUege nf' Medicine to the University and the Chinese residents 0 Saigon have promised a seconcl subscription of $31,000. The total fond at the dose of the year stood at $1,279,164. His Majesty's Government, as a token of their sympathy with the undertaking, granted a sum 0 per annum for the endowment of a scholarship :it the proposed University, and H.M. the King was graciously pleased to permit the holders 0 this scholarship to be designated as "King Edward the Seventh Scholars". A site for the University was selected at the junction 0 the Pokfulam and Bonham Roads, and at the beginning of the current year the foundation stone was laid by Sir Frederick Lugard. Between the 19th and 20th of October a very severe Typhoon struck the Colony. Timely warning 0 the approaching storm was fortunately given from the Observatory. The damage done t0 Gov13r-n ment property cost over S:50,000 in repairs. Private property also su fered severely. The Destroyers H.M.S. H.a.ndy and H.M.S. Janus were kindly sent by Commodore (now Rear-Admiral) Lyon to the assistance n a number 0 disabled junks which were reported to the S.W. of the Gap Rock Lighthouse. These towed in 4 disabled junks and distributed rice and water to other junks which were short 0 provisions. A tug hired by Government was also sent out and brought in 52 shipwrecked Chinese and one junk. Later the Destroyers accom panied by H.M.S. Cadmus made a farther and more extended' search in consequence 0 a report that there were other derelict junks in need of assistance. They returned ater a 3 days' f'Tnise without having found any more vessels. It is presumed that with a change of wind these would have gained the mainland. In addition to these rescueK the Ocean Steamship Co.'s S.S. Tele rnachus brought in 11 shipwrecked Chinese and a German steamer, the S.8. Mathilde, towed in (i junks-a very creditable performance. Two other steamers brought in 16 men and a junk. The total saved was 82 men and 11 junks. ln June General Sir J. Machado, K.c.M.G., and Kao Erh Chun, Portuguese Commissioner and Chinese Commissioner respectively for the delimitation 0 the boundaries 0 Macao, arrived in Hongkong where they held their deliberations in the house of the Consul General for Portugal. The Conerence closed on the 13th November. The Victoria Recreation Club, which under the style 0 the Victoria Regatta Club held its first regatta in 1849, and is the oldest athletic club in the Colony, successfully celebrated its sixtieth anniversary on the 10th of July at its handsome new club house on an extension, adjoining the Naval Yard, 0 what was formerly Murray Pier.

PAGE 30

-26 --On the i7t,h ;,f Xmember the Club GermaniH nnnmemorated its fiftieth anniversary, a large number of the English C'ommunity, including Hit. Excellenrr the Gmernor, being present. On the ilst of April Mr. George Murray JJaiu, whu has beeH aptly called the doyen of the Press in the Far East, passed awa,after some months of precarious health. Mr. Murray Bain came t;, the Colony in 1864 as sub-editor of the China Mail. In 1872 he became proprietor of the paper with which he was sucressfully an:. I have the honour to be, My Lord, Your Lord.ship't!-most, obe.die.nt, humble ser\'ant, k'. H. MAY, O;/fi.eer Administering the Garer,, men/. H-is Majesty's Principal 1:Jec1eta.1"y of State for th.e Uolonie,;, &c., &e., &c.

PAGE 31

Appendix A. FINANGIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1909. Comparative Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure for the period cnilcd 31st December, 1909. ----------Actual Revenue lo, I Actual Expenditure Estimates, Revenue to same Estimates, Expenditure for same HEAD 01' REVli:NUE. 19oy. 31st Dec., period of Increase. Decrease. EXPE:SOITURE. 1909, to Jl!lt period of Increase. Decrease. 19og. preceding I Dec., 1909. preceding _v .. ,._! Year. -------------------------i Light Dues ... 80,000.00 82.473.37 79,975.68 I 2,497.6g Governor ... ... -... ... 86,992.00 86.763.74 91.736.43 4,972.6g Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ... 73,230.00 68,194.94 69,761.29 1,566.35 Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified ... 4,163,682.00 4,281,133.11 4, I 54,968.56 126,164.55 Registrar General's Department ... ... ... .. ... 45,814.00 44,487.59 43,137.41 1,350.18 Audit Department .. ... i 26,101.00 22,888.52 23,i78.99 890.47 ... ... ... .. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, i 514,789.49 I Treasury ... ... ... ... .. .. .I 65,967.00 62,225.79 61,66g.76 556.03 and Reimbursements in Aid ... ... ... .. .. 524,714.00 538,905.32 24,115.83 ... Post Office 44,8,475.00 510,729.99 371,486.17 139,243.82 i Post Offi
PAGE 32

-A 2 Statement of Assets nnd Liabilities on the 31st December, 1909 LIABILITIES, $ c. ASSETS, I :t c. Deposits not Avuila.Lle, ...................... 263,243.87 1,096.54 1-Balancc, Bank, ................................. 1 86,409.17 Officers' Remittances, .......................... Subsidiary Co.ins, ...................... ........ 40..'5,845 .58 Cro\\'11 Agents' C11rrc11t Ajc., ............... 27,384.10 Total Liabi li tic:-:1, 264,340.41 Advances, ..................................... ,\0,642.94 ~Balance, ............... 3i51,097.04 11nvrcst' ........................... ..... '........ 44,032.24 ~ospense Honse Service, ..................... I ,124.32 Tola!, ............ $ 615,438.3,1 Total, ................... $ 615,438.35 Reimbursement due Ly Hnil,wL:, ('onstrnelion Account, alst December, 1!108, ................................. $l,!3:i6,13!Li0 Lts,; Credit 8,1la11ce 011 account uf 1!109, .... 354,006.HG Total on 31st Dtccmber. HJO!l, ......... $1.002,071.1-t l redit Bttlanct~ as nbil\'c, ... Biil,0!17.fd Balance of Assets (G
PAGE 33

Appendix B. REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1910-1911. 1. By Order of His Excellency the-Governor a new Valuation has been made of the whole Colony, with the exception of purely Chinese Villages. 2. The Oit11 of Vietoria.-The Ratable Value has increased from $8,806,805 to iiiS,961,905, an addition of $155,100 or 1"76 per cent. 3. The Ilil! Distriet.-'l'he Ratable Value has increased from $262,445 to $275,160, an addition of $12,715 or 4 per cent. 4. Shaukiwan, Saiwanho. and Qua.,ry Bay.-The Ratable Value has increased from $162,154 to $344,005, an addition of $181,911 or 112 per cent. 5. Honglrnng Vil!ages.-The Ratable Value has decreased from $125,660 to $117,014, a reduction of $8,646 or 6 per cent. 6. Kowloon Point.-The Ratable Value has decreased from $502,205 to $485,975, a reduction of $16,230 or 3 per cent. 7. Ya,imati.-The Ratable Value has decreased from $256,640 to $255,530, a reduction of $1,110 or 0 per cent. 8. Hunghom and Hokun.-The Ratable Value has increased from $301,304 to $301,834, an addition of $530 or 0 per cent. 9. Mongkoktstti.-The Ratable Value has increased from $130,490 to $141,235, an addition of $10,745 nr 8 per cent. 10. New Kowloon.-The Ratable Yalue has increased from $103,858 to $109,603, an addition of $5,745 or 5-53 per cent. 11. Kowloon Villnges.-The Ratable Value has increased from f99,341 to ,858, an addition of $517 or 0-5~ per cent. 12. The Whole Go!ony.-The Ratable Yalue has increased from Sl0,750,902 to $11,092,170, an addition of $341,277 or 3 per cent. 13. Inte,-in, Vnluations.-Between the 1st July, 1909, and the 1st June, 1910, 340 Interim Valuations were made as follows:Cit1 of_ Victoria. r Rest of Colony. No. _11_~t~le Val~~-! ~-o-.-1-R-ta-bl_e_V_al_u_e.-New andjorrebuilttenemenls .. 56 86,140 157 j 1198,530 'Tenements structurally altered 34,500 36 : 1541210 1 rep]ac;ng Assessments of .... 35,140 640 I 143,575 i 10,635 ments pulled down, or be12 Assessments ca.ncelled, tene.. .. No. &nd Increase ..... 75 85,500 7,770 72 $77,730 265 209,165 25,705 $183,460

PAGE 34

-B2-14. Vacant Tene11wnts.-The number of reported vaeant tene ments in the City of Victoria inspected imder Section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 135 monthly as compared with 150 l'ast year. 15. The following Tabular Statement gives a t"omparison of the Valuation for 1909-10 and 1910-11 :--------------------------Dislrict. Vnl11at.io11 V,dnnti,,n f111rcnse. l'cr-1909-1910. 1910-l!Jl I. CPlllH"):!O. $ $ !,; vl .. /o The City of Victoria, ..... 8,806,80,'.i 8,961/}:).j l ,);), !00 I Hiil Dist.ri1:t a11d Hong ko11g Villagc~, ........ ;j,50,259 73/i,2:}!) I ~5,!l.'lO ;i;;-79 i Kowloon Poi11r iinJ Kow loon Village,, 1,393,8:IH l ,ll~)4,0;}51 l:J7 OOI Total, ............ $ 10, 7 50,902111,092, I i9 ,_3'_4_1_,2_7_7 aI i ------------------------16. Comparative Statement shewing the Ratable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each Year from 1900-01 to 1910-11 inclusive. Increase as Year. RataLle compared Vuluc. wit pre-vious Year. -----$ $ 1900-01, ... .5,856,391 ~69.557 1901-02, ... 6,B89,i52 l ,0:-!3,361 1902-03, ... 8,1136,613 1,276,861 1908-04, ... l-',788,063 621,450 1904-05, ... 9,929,171 1; l -11. 108 1905-06, 10,511,Hi3 581,992 1906-07, ... I0,9fi9.203 458,040 1907-08, ... 10,716,173 ... 1908-09, ... l0,816 i53 100,,580 1909-10, .. 10,750,902 ... 1910-11, ... 11,092,liB 841,277 Decrease ns corn pa reel with previous Year. $ ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 253,030 ... 65,851 ... Pereent ag-e of Increase eose i11 R.nt.ahlrk and Rhroff. :\l!Tlll'II ('IJAPMA:0., .-tJitJ.("."'~"!'.

PAGE 35

APPENDIX C. REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL. REYEXUE AND EXPENDITURE. (Tables I and II.) The revenue from all sources during the year was $104,138. On the first of July the collection of the revenue from Special Fruit Licences, Births and Daaths Registration, Laundries and Markets, was undertaken by the Sanitary Department, and the revenue from these sources is therefore only about half that obtained last year. The revenue from Hawkers' Licences though it shews an increase on the revenue for 1908 is not yet as high as it was in 1907. The number of licences issued in the six months ending the 31st March 1909 was G,741. In the succeeding six months 3,311 new licences were issued and 4,158 old licences re-issued. The expenditure was :f:43,793 compared with $43,848 in 1908, and fell short of th~ estimated expenditure by :f.'2,152. PROTEOTIOX OF \V OMEN AND GIRLS. (Table III.) Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897. Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893. The number of individuals detained under warrant was 280 as comparecl with 226 in 1908. They were all sent direct to the Po Leung Kuk, and the action taken in respect of them is shewn in Table III. The number of women whose detention was found to be unnecessary and who were released after enquiry was 87, or 31 per cent. The cases of 58 women were still under consideration at the dose of the year. Six girls were sent under warrant tothe Eyre Diocesan Refuge; of these four managed to escape, the remaining two are still in the Refuge. Two were sent under warrant to the Italian Convent. One is still there; the other has been restored to her husband. Both these institutions, which are places of Refuge under Ordinance No. 4 of 1897 have been visited by me, and the inmates inspected. The Eyre Diocesan Refuge moved into the Belilios Reformatory at Causeway Bay in September. The accommo dation afforded is very much airier and roomier than what it was in the old premises at West Point and in every way more suitable. The number of inmates at the close of the year was 41. In addition to those women and girls sent under warrant to the Po Leung Kuk a number of others are sent there with their consent. The total number of all classes sent in 1909 was 515. Of these, three were runaway maidservants.

PAGE 36

-02By the close of the year fourteen girls had been added to the list of those under bond to report themselves regularly to the Registrar General-a precaution taken to prevent their being forced into prostitution,-but five were subsequently exempted from reporting. The total on the list is now 33. One bond under section 34 of the Ordinance has been forfeited owing to the girl being taken away from the Colony without permission. As she was returned to the custody of the Registrar General, the foll penalty was not exacted. All prostitutes are questioned before entering a brothel and the brothels and restaurants are under constant surveillance to prevent young girls entering them, and to detect any cases of compulsion. The women shew considerable reliance on the protection of this office, and apply for help when they are afraid impediments will be placed on their movements. The freedom allowed to women under British Law is well-known in Hongkong, and Chinese women here feel that they have a distinctly more independent position than they have in most parts of the neighbouring districts. The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as missing in Hongkong during the year "as 238 of whom only 37 were found. The corresponding figures for 1908 were 91 and 39. The number of boys reported missing was 97 as against 37 in 1907. The total number of persons reported missing, including reports from China and Macao, was 399. Of these 50 were reported to have been found. The corresponding figures for 1908 were 181 and 48. The large increase in the number of missing children has received the serious attention of the Government. The annual report of the Po Leung Kuk Society will be found in Annexe A to this report. EMIGRATION. Emigration Ordinance, Ko. 1 of 1889. (i.)-Female Emigration. (Table IV.) The number of women and children examined was 11,686 as compared with 12,108 in 1908 and 15,571 in 1907. There is a deerease of 1,244 in passengers going to the Straits Settlements; an increase of 421 in those going to the American Continent and of 335 in those going to Java Ports. The former increase is equivalent to an increase of 59 per cent. The number of passengers to Java Ports was only 33 in 1908. The very great increase is due to there having been twenty-eight steamers running direct from Hongkong as against ten in 1908; over 50 per cent. of these passengers are from Kayingchau and instead of travelling as previously from Swatow to Singapore and thence to the Dutch Indies, they come to Hongkong and proceed direct. A careful record of the time taken in examination during the last six months of the year shewed that the rate of examination was 75 passengers per hour.

PAGE 37

0 3 -112 or per cent. of the passengers were detained for enquiries as against 62 or per cent. in 1908. Of these, 20 cases were still under consideration at the end of the year. Of the remaining 92, 25 (27 per cent.) were ultimately allowed to leave without any order being made. Attention was drawn to alleged malpractices in connection with female emigration to Siam. At the time no proof could be found of an organized traffic in women being carried on, but later in the year sufficient evidence was obtained to warrant action being taken against some of those concemed in it. (ii.)-Male Emigration. (Table V.) 'l'he number of assisted emigrants examined was 18,511, as against 16,735 in 1908. Careful records have been kept in order to ascertain the time spent in examination. It appears that the average rate of examination may be taken at 22 emigrants the hour, and that under the present system each individual receives seven times the attention which he did when all classes of male emigrants were examined indiscriminately. This is apart from the supervision exercised over them on their arrival in the Colony and during their residence in the boarding-house. A very watchful eye is kept on anything in the nature of organized emigration of Chinese labourers from Hongkong and from the neighouring ports, not only by this office, but by the various Chinese local societies. Estimates have been made at various times of the wealth brought back to China by labourers who have emigrated to the Malay Peninsula or the Dutch Indies. I find it stated in one of the Chinese Customs reports that one shipload of 467 labourers returning to Hoihow has brought back savings to the amount of $29,035, or nearly $65 a head, which may be accepted as the equivalent of the wages of a farm labourer for ten months. The number of emigrants examined shews a slight increase which is formed of an increase of 5,000 in the emigrants going to the Straits Settlements set against a decrease of about 3,500 in those going to the Dutch Indies. The other figures which call for comment in Table V are the considerable reduction in the number of emigrants who declined to proceed on their voyage, a slight increase in those rejected as unfit, and a corresponding decrease in those sent back from Singapore, who are now almost all men who have fallen ill on the voyage. There appears to be a larger emigration of men from the Swatow and Hoihow districts than last year. In September 100 Chinese labourers passed through Hongkong on their way to Labuan to work in the coal mines ; they appeared to be assisted emigrants but had not been told that they would be asked to sign a contract to work on their arrival. I communicated with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs at Singapore who made arrange ments to safeguard their interests. Fifteen applications were made by relatives for assistance in recovering emigrants. In eight, the emigrants returned to China, and a ninth is expected shortly. In one of the cases, money was

PAGE 38

-04-sent to pay for the cost of the emigrant's return and he was sen1 back to Hongkong, but ran away from the steamer on its arrival, and emigrated again to Borneo. In the remaining six cases the relatives were content with an interchange of letters. Forty-two hotel licences and 33 licenees for boarding-houses for assisted emigrants were issued. The latter had accommodation for 1,461 boarders. In 1905 the accommodation was sufficient for no more than 250 boarders, and the improvement indicates not that there is an increase in this class of emigrants, for there is nothing abnormal in the number who emigrated in 1909, but that their move ments are better controlled and their interests better protected. H,EGULATION OF 0IIINESE. Ordinance Ko. 3 of 1888. (i.)-Registration of Houselwlclei-s. 1,622 householders "-ere registered ; G9 of these were first re gistrations. 7,606 changes in respect of tenants were registered. (ii.)-District Watchmen. (Table VI.) The District Watchmen Committee met nine times; the average attendance being betw-een six and seven members. :Mr. Ohoa Leep chee who had been a member of the Committee since 190n, died on the 23rd October, but the vacancy caused by his death has not yet been filled. Mr. Wei Yuk and Mr. Fung W a-chi.in were reappointed for a further term of five years. The balance to the credit of the Fund at the close of the year was $10,910 as against $12,154 on the 31st December, 1908. On the revenue side contributions shew a slight increase; under expenditure there is an increase of H.000 in wages an(l salaries. The items that call for notice are $1,020, being the wages of the special watchmen engaged to prevent dumping of bodies, :l'2,70G, being part cost of the extension to the West Point V1 atchrnen's House and ~1,716, loss on exchange. The strength of the Force is 108 men. There were 20 enlistments during the year, 16 dismissals or desertions, 1 death and 4 resigna tions. One vacancy remains unfilled. The guarantee bond of a District Watchman, who was convicted of unlawful possession, was forfeited. In addition to the usual Force, the Committee had in its pay at the beginning of the year seven special watchmen to prevent dumping. In view of the reduction in the number of cases, four were discharged at the end of August. 'l'he number of convictions secured bv members of the District Watchmen Force was 193 as compared with 173 in 1908. The extension to the District Watehmen's Quarters at \Vest Point was completed in May.

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-05-(iii.)--Permits. 317 permits to fire crackers were issued, 187 of these were on the occasion of a marriage. 30 permits were issued to hold proces sions, .'34 permits to hold theatricals in temporary buildings, and 42 to hold religious ceremonies. All-night performances are now per mitted at two Chinese theatres on Saturdays. No objection has been raised to them by the neighbours. POPULATION. i\Iarriages,--Ordinances No. 7 of 1875, No. 15 of 1902 and No. 6 of 1903. The number of marriages solemnized
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-06 TuNG w AH HosPrTAr... Ordinances No. 1 of 1870 and No. 9 of H.104. (Tables T'Il to XIII.) The New Directors were elected on the 5th December and took over the charge of the hospital on the 19th. Their names are:-Lau Chii-pak, Chairman, Lo Si.it-p6, Chan Shiit-ngam, Li Sui-kam, Leung Kin-on, Pun W ai-siin, Li Wing-kwong, Ue T6-shang, The first three director,-; on ances of the hospital. Tsui Oi-tong, Sham Pak-ming, Lo Tsung-kui, Wu Ting-sam, Chan W an-sau, Tsang Ping-kwan, Chan Hau-hing, \Yu ,;van-cho. the list are in charge of the finThe new plague wards were completed at a cost of Ul,738, and formally opened by His Excellency on the 23rd December. The purchase of the land on which these wards stand cost :fi54,G97, so the total cost to the hospital of the improvement is iGG,435. Further accommodation has been provided by the demolition of the old one-storeyed building used as kitchen and its replacement by a two-storeyed building designed to provide also quarters for the accountants and registration clerks. This will permit the accountants' old quarters to be thrown into the office and the clerks' quarters to be used for a waiting room. A contract for carrying out this work has been made for $4,720; the expenditure on it during the year was 84,000. In 1908 a grant was made by the Government of a site on which to erect a permanent small-pox hospital. Plans were approved and work was about to commence, when it was decided to permit the treatment of small-pox in the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital which was built in 1902. This hospital is now being thoroughly overhauled. The estimated cost of the repairs is :iil0,000 and $5,500 have already been spent. The subscriptions collected to build a new small-pox hospital amounted to $69,000. Mr. Ho Korn-tong subscribed !i:-3,000, and the Japanese community in Hongkong ::::3,100. Now that the new hospital is not to be built, the subscribers have decided to place their subscriptions in the hands of the directors, and have authorised them, after spending what is necessary on the repairs of the Infectious Diseases Hospital and on general repairs to the old hospital buildings, to devote the balance to the erection of a small-pox hospital on the North side of the harbour. Alterations have been made in the management of the hospital dispensary. A contract was entered into for the year with a firm of druggists to supply drugs and manage the dispensary, the hospital merely placing an inspector in charge and abolishing the rest of the dispensary staff.

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---C 7 -At the request of the Jircctors the Cemetery at Kailungwan has been plased under the immediate supervision of one 0 the Sanitary Inspectors. This will prevent waste of land and will place the sex tons under continuous control. The statistics of the work done by the hospital show no great variation from the statistics for 1008. The number of admissions is 10 per cent. less than the nurn.ber in 1908, and the number under European treatment shews a corresponding reduction. On the other hand the number 0 out-patients has increased from 70,000 in 1907 to 90,000 in Hl08 and 113,010 in 190!J. The percentage of out-patients receiving European treatment has risen from 3 in 1908 to 4-5 (See Tahle VII). There were !)87 vaccinations performed in the hospital as against 1,410 in 1908. The hospital vaccinators visited Shaukiwan, Aberdeen and Yaumati four times and Stanley twice and vaccinated 2:?5 persons; a visit to the New Territories proved fruitless as it y.-as too near the encl 0 the year, and Spring is regarded there as vaccination season. The total number of destitutes sent home was 2)l0f5. Of these (i24 were sent at the expense of the hospital. The finances of the hospital will call for careful attention on the part of the direetors. The income for the year deducting the ::,6!:),009 subscrihetl for the small-pox hospital, amounts to $76,625. The expenditure cxdusirn of ~10,500 in repayment of loans, and :;;20.807 RpPnt on bnildinp:s, mis d)0,008. The hospital ends the year with a nominal credit balance of :i:-2:3,410, but is pledged as mcntionccl above, by its promise to the subscribers to the small-pox hospital at Kennedy Town to spend more than this sum on certain definite objects. The hospital has been called on twice for assistance to relieve destitution in China. In the case of the Foochow Typhoon the di rectors made a private subscription of /()95, and made a loan of $5,000 from the Kwong Shiu Flood Relief Fund in aid of the sufferers from the inundations in the Yangtsze Valley. In addition to the usual tables there are inserted thls year statements shewing the state of the various funds administered by the hospital anrl the way in which they are invested. In September, I was able to rnport that a contract had been entered into to build the Kwong Wah Hospital at Yaumati at a cost of ,-76,400. The expenditure during the year was $'8,294; the balance to the credit of the Building Fund on the 31st December was f69,46G and tbe amount of uncollected subscriptions was !JiG,560. The accounts liarn been audited by l\Ir. Li Yau-tsi:in and Mr. Tang Chi-ngong. Hy the close of the year thf;l foundations of the Administration Block, of wards Ko. 1 and No. 2, and of the connecting corridors, ,rnre completed and the footings were being levelled with cement concrete. The piling of the trenches of the Reception Block and of W anl lfo. 3 were nearly finished, and some of the trenches had been concreted and stone footings were being laid on t}):em. Further subscriptions to the amount of $47,000 will be requh-ed, I think, t.o place thf' finanC'es of the hospital on a sure foundation.

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CS --In October the promoters of the Kwong Wah Hospital together with a number of the leading Chinese residents of the Kowloon Peninsula presented a petition praying for a grant of land on which to build a small-pox hospital in Kowloon. CHINESE PcBuc DISPENBARIES AND DISTRICT PLAGUE HosPITALS. (Tables XIV to XVIII.) The dispensaries continue to be conducted on the lines described in Mr. Irving's report of the 26th February last. The three dispens aries in Victoria and the Harbour Dispensary are managed by a Committee consisting of the Registrar General as Chairman, the Hon. Dr. Ho Kai, c.M.G., Vice-Chairman, and seventeen other members. The constitution and general objects 0 the Association have to receive the concurrence and sanction 0 the Government, and are described in a minute dated the 20th October, 1909. The three dispensaries at Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon City are managed by separate Committees elected by the inhabitants, and in his work 0 guiding and controlling them the Registrar General is assisted by the two Chinese Memben, 0 Council and the two Chinese Members 0 the Sanitary Board. To enable the Registrar General to keep in close touch with the Chinese in matters relating to sanitation, Street Committees have been appointed by the Government and are con sulted on matters of importance and encouraged to ask advice. Attached to each dispensary in Victoria are a licentiate of the Hongkong College 0 Medicine, a clerk with a knowledge 0 English and coolies with ambulances and dead-vans to remove patients and dead bodies. Two lecturers are maintained whose duty it is to preach against "dumping" 0 bodies in the streets, to point out the benefits to be derived from the dispensaries and to explain the object of the Sanitary laws; handbills are issued in profusion whenever occasion demands and photographs are taken 0 bodies found in the streets and are posted up in the neighbourhood, and enquiries are made in each case from the Street Committee-. There is a District Plague Hospital attached to the West Point Dispensary in Victoria, another in Kow loon City and a third at Hunghom. A fourth hospital is being built at W anchai. The number of rats caught during the year in Victoria was 59,914, and in the Kowloon Peninsula where rat-catchers have been engaged by the dispensaries and paid by the Sanitary Department the number was 15,751. In August, a largely attended meeting 0 members of the boat population and of launch-owners, merchants, shop-keepers and others closely connected with the floating population was held, and it was resolved to open a harbour dispensary and to raise a fund for the purpose. A committee 0 seventeen was elected corresponding to the existing Street Committees, and a hulk was purchased, fitted up as a dispensary, and with the consent 0 the Harbour Master, moored in Causeway Day. The dispensary was opened on the 4th October and 244 new cases were attended up to the close of the year. Hitherto the Hunghom Dispensary has occupied leased premises, but 'a site has now been granted by the Government adjacent to the Kun.yam Temple, plans 0 a suitable building have been designed, and a sufficient sum promised in subscriptions to defray the eost.

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CY The new dispensary at West Point which is attached to the West Point District Plague Hospital was occupied on the 1st Septem ber. Additions to accommodate the ambulance coolies and house the ambulance and dead-vans, are in contemplation. The total number of new cases attended by the dispensary doctors was 30,782, as compared with 2'4,353 in 1908: the number of certificates of nature of disease issued was 21 compared with 33: the number of moribund infants brought to the dispensaries was :no compared with 228, and of dead bodies of infants 873 compared with 559. The number of vaccinations performed was 2,148: of these 1,851 were vaccinations of infants. In 1908 I received a promise from some Chinese gentlemen interested in the dispensaries to defray the cost of the land on which the Central Dispensary in Victoria was built. This promise has now been fulfilled and the sum of $3,400 has been received from ten sub scribers. Their generosity and that of Mr. Ho Kom-tong who erected the building are commemorated by a suitable inscription. The expenditure of the dispensaries was:-Victoria (including Harbour) $19,737 Hunghom 4,134 Yaumati 6,738 Kowloon Citr ~1,361 Thanks to subscriptions of $6,825 from the Chinese theatres, to a special donation of :H:4,000 from a temporary theatre at which per formances were held during the first three months of the year and to the $3,400 subscribed to defray the cost of the land on which the Central Dispensary is built, the Victoria Dispensaries close the year with a credit balance of $8,600, and it appears as if they should have no difficulty in future in meeting their ordinary expenditure.The financial position of the other dispensaries with the exception of the one at Yaumati does not call for comment. The expenditure 'in the last named for the year was $6,738 including :-;626 in repayment of loans, but the subscriptions for the year only amounted to t5,862. Tables XVII and XVIII supply all the information required to judge of the progress being made in the campaign against the aban doning of bodies in the street. The state of affairs compared with that which existed a very short time ago is one which justifies me in congratulating the leaders of the Chinese Community on the success of their efforts. That there still remains much to be done is obvious; it is only in Victoria that the number of bodies abandoned during the second half year is less than the number for the first six months. There, out of a total of 111 bodies abandoned, only 42 belong to the last six months. Of the whole number of abandoned bodies-381, 66 were bodies of infants brought to the dispensary and alleged to have been found in the street. Very possibly a number of these were brought from the houses where the infants died, but the parents were afraid to give the address. In connection with the abandoning of infants' bodies, it is satisfactory to note that 5,704 children under 5 years of age were t.reated at the dispensaries as compared with 2,721 in 1907.

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010 -Enquiries have been received from Singapore regarding the methods adopted in Hongkong to put a stop to "clumping" and a copy of Mr. lrving's report of the 2lith Felmrnry was sent to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The confidence which the dispensar1os are beginning in Yarious degrees to inspire is very "'ell seen from the statistics given in Table XVIII which shews the number of infants--alive ancl dead--taken to the dispensaries and whether the achlrcss from which they came was reported or not. At the Wes:crn Dispensary, the first stal'tcd, and the one in which the keenest local interest is taken, the number of live infants has risen from 207 to 25Ci and the number of dead bodies dropped from 2G8 to 151, the number of dead bodies from an unknown address falling from 1G7 to 20. The East, Point Dispens ary, which was opened at the same time, is more backward and there it is a matter of congratulation that although the cases in which the address is unknown haYe risen from ,1 to 5:3 the number of dead bodies has risen at the same time from 52 to lGG. At the Central Dispensary, opened t"o years after the other two, progress is marked by a large increase of the cases in which the addrcs;:; is known, the number of those in which the address is unknown remaining the same. The returns kept by the Police shew that in 1905 and the four succeeding years the number of bodie3 dumped was 1,068, l,4, 1,273, 989 and 381. For the purpose of comparison bet1veen the years 1908 and 1909, I take the figures giYen in my office returns which are 1,005 (instead of 98()) and 381. The effect of the G,:nsade against clumping 1rns not apparent until August, Hl08. Tn the first seven n,on,hs of 1()08 the number of bodies abandoned was 748, in the last five months 257. In 1909 the corresponding figures ,rnrc 223 and 158. In Victoria thP number for the year has Llroppcd from 377 in H)OS to 111 in Hl09, in Kowloon from 341 to 80. The Harbour population is the "orst offender and I do not antieipate much improvement until the second half of 1910. In comparing the figures for the last two years the absence of any serious epidemic in 1900 must not he lost sight of. DISTRICT PLAGUE Hosr1n1.s. );o occasion has arisen to use the plague hospitals at Kowlooll Uity and Hunghom. The \\ est Point District Plague Hospital attached to which is a dispensary was completed at a cost of 'LJ,046 and occupied on the 1st September. It "'as formally opened o 1 the 20th September and the event celebrated by a "tea-party". The Government has not contributed more than 600 towards the cost of the buildings. The balance was raised by the Saiyingpun S:reet Committee. A gap of nearly fl,100 between receipts and expenditure Kas filled up by an individual sub!"cription of l470 from Mr. Tong \\ an-teng and by the proceeds of a twenty-five dollar whip among Mr. Lau Chii-pak's friends. The site which was purchased at '\Vanehai for a plague hospital was placed in possession of the Committee at the encl of June and in October the Government granted an nrljacent area of 62 feet hy 40

PAGE 45

--.c 11 -feet. A Building Committee was formed anJ the plans have been designed of buildings to contain a dispensary, a hospital, quarters for nurses and ambulance coolies, and accnmmodation for ambulances and dead vans. The annual grant of $2,000 to the District Plague Hospitals was divided as follows: $600 to each of the hospitals in Victoria, $550 to the hospital at Hunghom, and $250 to_ the one at Kowloon City. 'l'RANSLAl'ION WORK. Although it is impossible to indicate exactly the extent of the translation work clone in the department every year the following statistics may be some guide to it. Translation .fi'om Chinese into English. Petitions -147 63 Letters Newspaper articles and items of news Unspecified 54 60 Total 324 Tmni;lation .from. English into Chinese. Ordinances 5 Regulations 23 Government Notices -70 Minutes 3 Unspecified 18 119 In addition to the above, tramllations made in other departments are revised, and on numerous occasions translation work, of which no record has been kept,, is done by meinbe1s of the department other than the translator. The assistance proffered by the Hon. Dr. Ho Kai, c.M.G., to prepare a version in Chinese of all Ordinances in force particularly affecting the Chinese Community, has been gratefully accepted by the Government. CHINESE RECREATION GROIJ:\"D. (Table XIX.) The balance to the credit of the fund at the close of the year was $6,083. In 1908, $5,000 was given to the Tung v,; ah Hospital towards purchasing the site on which the Plague Wards have been built, but the directors found ultimately that they were unable to comply with the terms of the gift, and it was repaid accordingly during the year The revenue for the year from the rent of stalls waR U,384 ancl the expenditure 93fi. 0HARITADLE Fmms. (Table XX.) The net income of the Passage Money Fund was $637 and the expenditure tG15. The balance to the credit of the Registrar General's Charitable Fund is $28:3.

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C 12 .-LEGISLATlOK. The principal Onlinances of 1909 which affected the Chinese and which are of other than technical interest are:-No. l of 1909.-The Magistrates and Criminal Law Amend ment Ordinance, so far as it relates to the punishment of the stocks and to the prohibition of spitting in certain places. No. 26 of 1909 which repeals section 8 of the aborn Ordinance. This subject is dealt with in another part of my report. No. 27 of 1909, the Liquors Ordinance.-The introduction of this Bill caused much alarm, and certain of the original provisions were strongly opposed on the ground that larger powers of search were being taken than appeared to be necessary. Amendments were introduced which satisfied Chinese public opinion. Much work was thrown on this office during the time the bill was before Council and after it became law. The Chinese dealers naturally looked to the Registrar General for explanation of the law, and for assistance in carrying out its provisions or securing a modification of them. By degrees they have learnt to dispense with this help and to atlclres8 themselves direct to the Superintendent of Imports and Exports. The dealers quickly accommodated themselves to the new Rtate of affairs which was introduced without causing any friction. No. 32 of 1909.-The Steam Boilers and Prime Movern Ordin ance, which will affect a number of Chinese firms. No. 34 of 1909.-The Protection of Women and
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-0 13 --present system 7 are still student-interpreters, Hi have Third Class Certificates and 3 Second Class Certificates. Twelve are no longer in the Government Service. Five meetings of the Interpretation Board were held. Twenty eight candidateR were examined; one Second Class Interpeter Certificate and eleven Third Class Certificates were awarded. GENERAL. The appointments of Mr. Fung Wa-chiin and Mr. Lau Chii-pak as members of the Sanitarv Board terminated in March. Mr. Lau was reappointed and l\fr. Ho Korn-tong replaced Mr. Fung. On ]\fr. Ho's resignation, Mr. Ng Hon-tsz received the appointment. Mr. Pun Yan-tsiin was appointed a ,Justice of the Peace. In May the Chinese became restless under the serious in convenience caused in some parts of the town by the length of time t.he intermittent supply of water was continued, and in June a petition on the subject chopped by 101 of the largest business firms was presented. I issued a notice requesting all complaints regarding insufficiency of water to be addressed to me, and the Water Authority deputed an inspector to call every morning at my office to receive the list of complaints and to investigate them. This indication that the Government "ms alive to the inconveniences suffered did much to allay the agitation. As a consequence of the notice the department was called on on several occasions to arbitrate bet,,een the tenants of two floors in a Chinese house and to fix the time during which each party might draw off water. In August a Society was formed by the leading Chinese for the suppression of spitting in public places. The Society has a most influential backing, and there is a genu.ine attempt to change the habits of the Chinese in this respect. The Society soon numbered 104 members, handbills have been distributed, notices are being c-ctrried by conspicuously clothed coolies through the streets, a lecturer has been engaged and a large number of varnished boards are being prepared to be fixed permanently to the walls of houses and in public places. It was found possible to embody in the contract for the present Opium Farm certain conditions which had been asked for by the Chinese five years ago, regulating t.he powers of search. Although not actually inserted in the contract the last Fanner had agreed to observe the conditions. Section 2 of Ordinance No. 19 of 1909 which directs the stamp ing of receipts for all sum over ten dollars, (the limit for unstamped receipts for the last seven years being twenty-five dollars), was not opposed in Council, but after passing the Liquors Duties Ordin ance the Chinese business world thought this source of revenue might be dispensed with, and petitioned the Government. The matter was fully discussed at a conference at Government House; the estimated revenue and expenditure for the next two years elaborated and the reasons for the Government's inability to complv with petitioners' request explained.

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014 At the same conference the object of the recent increase in school-fees was also discussed. The gradual increase in the fees charged in Government Schools has been accepted always with reluct ance by the Chinese and the latest increase resulted in the presentation oI a widely-signed petition on behalf of the poorer classes who endea vour to give their children a few years' instruction in English. The question is now under the consideration of an Education Committee. A petition was received in November from owners of house property in the district in which it is proposed to remove ceilings. A final decision has not yet been arrived at by the Sanitary Board. A draft Limited Partnership Bill is now being considered by the Chinese and has received their support. Kidnapping of children-mostly boys-both in Hongkong and in the adjacent districts of China has been very prevalent. This department has had the fortune occasionally to discover kidnapped children who had been brought to Hongkong and to obtain, through the Po Leung Kuk, the restoration of children who had been taken away from the Colony. The traffic in ehildren from Shanghai, re ferred to in last year's report, appears to have ceased. There were only three cases discovered, all in the early part of the year. Alongside the harmless fortune-tellers, selectors of lucky dates, palmists and phrenologists who charge a fee for telling a fortune, there exists a class of men who deal in black magic or make use of their supposed powers to extract large sums from women. The Government receives the hearty support of the Chinese in ridding the Colony of these pests. Two appeals for the cancellation of banishment orders have been granted through this office and one refused. At the request of the District "\Vatchmen Committee children who are hawking without a licence are on their first offence sent to the Registrar General who cautions their guardians. This procedure seems to have proved effective in each case. There have been numerous labour disputes but none which haR caused much inconvenience. In June the .i inricksha coolies succeeded in getting from the owners of the vehicles a reduction in the hire of jinrickshas from 55 cents a day for first class and 40 for second, to 47 and 35 cents respectively. The coolies presumed somewhat on their success and numerous disputes arose between individual owners and pullers but relations between them are now nonnal. In July the head coal-coolies succeeded in obtaining an increase in the customarv allowance for baskets and shovels which amounted to twelve or thi;teen dollars on an average cargo of coal. The amount in, dispute was trifling and I think tl10 head-coolies who had recently formed a guild wished to test their strength and obtain recognition. Similarly the Hakka quarry-masters have been organizing themselves, and much time has been occupied in settling a dispute to which the Stone-masons Guild, the Quarry Farmer and the quarrymasters were all parties.

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ln October the painters went on strike. The strike was not a ~erious one or of long duration; it was conducted by the younger men and the older workmen took advantage 0 the annual Tomb Worship to le:we the Colony and keep out of the quarrel; the masterr; \\"ere co11tent to wait for the workmen to reduce their demands. A. rise of 5 cents a day in wages-the first rise since 1901-was <'onceded. There was some intimidation and during the strike the apprentices and the men on yearly contr3:cts did not dare to leave their masters' premises. There was a small strike reported to me in one of the docks. It was soon settled but the interesting point abotu it was that it was started by the local men without consulting a large Union which has been lately formed, and the Union officials were opposed to it. This Union differs considerably from the ordinary Chinese work men's guild, and works on Yery modern lines. ln each of these labour disputes the settlement of which is often a very tedious affair, I have been much indebted to the Chinese gentlemen who have readily responded to my request for their co operation, without which no satisfactory or permanent settlement <'ould be effected. A Chinese leper woman found living at Aberdeen was received into the Rhenish Mission Leper Asylum at Tung Kun, and the entrance fee was raised by a private subscription among my Chinese friends. Jn future, leper women and children found in Hongkong will be sent to the Registrar General to arrange for their welfare, if possible. An arrangement has been made to assist the Secretary for Chinese Affairs in Singapore in the repatriation of certain classes of Chinese: the allowances due to those who are to land at Hongkong will be sent to this office, to preYent the men spencling it on the voyage and arriving here destitute. In November a large number of dccrepits "ere repatriated from Tong Kah through the Protect orate of Chinese at P0nang; sixteen of these landed in Hongkong :ind were sent home. Reports have been furnished on 24 applications for British-born ISnbject Certificates. The issue of licences to letter-caniers carrying letters between Hongkong and the adjacent country districts of China which was instituted in 1902 and transfe1Ted from this office to the Post Office in 190fi has now ceased. Confucius's birthday was publicly celebrated, and the day is every year more widely observed as a holiday. The celebration is a sign of the growth of a national spirit among the Chinese. Two of the other signs of the times are public theatrical performances by amateurs and amateur boxing contests. There was a suggestion to boycott a line of steamers runnin rY to America, but the alleged grievances were redressed. 0

PAGE 50

-C 16 A conference was arranged between the Duperiutendent 0 the Botanical and Forestry Department and some leading Chinese, and the possibility discussed of reducing t,lw number 0 grass fires and the consequent destruction of Government plantations caused by the burning of joss-paper and the firing of f'rackers at the Tomb Worshipping. It was decided to try the effect 0 issuing tJOsters and handbills and inserting notices in the Chinese newspapers at the appropriate season. On two occasions there appeared to be an attempt to revive the Japanese boycott, but the attempts did not originate in the Colony nor did they receive any support from business people. Business is reported to be good; it is said to have been a particularly favourable year for dealers in cotton-yarn, rice and flour and an increased demand for houses in the Chinese business quarters of the town ennfirms these reports. Less small-pox and plague, 2;i deaths and 104 deaths respee tiYely among the Chinese population as against 37U and 957 in 1908, have also made the year a happier one for the Chinese. The Sanitary Board does not appear to be such a bogey as it was, and it is a pleasant relief not to hear so much 0 it as I lrnve had to do of late years. The University I find to be a subject 0 interest and discussion amongst all classes, and its importance is fully realised by those who have children at school in Hongkong. l\:Ien with money have many clainis on their purses in Hong kong. In addition to the ~,198,000 subscribed to the University, $69,000 ,Yere subscribed for a small-pox hospital at Kennedy Town and the new District Plague Hospital at West Point was built at a cost of $10,000 by public subscription. The large hospital at Yau mati will soon be expecting funds for maintenance and subscriptions will haYe to be eollectecl to build the Plague Hospital at \Vanchai. ln addition to these the Chinese Oommunitv maintaius tho clii-; pensaries at a cost of $28,000, the District \Vatchmen at. a cost of :S:25,000 and subscribes $31,000 to maintain the Tung Wah Hospital, aml $0,000 for the Po Leung Kuk. STAFF. I resumed duty on the 8th April on my return from leave. Mr. A. E. Wood and Mr. E. D. 0. Wolfe acted successively as Assistant Registrar General until the 30th ,June, when Mr. Hutchison took up the duties 0 the post and received the substantive appointment on the 30th October. A new post of Second Assistant Registrar General, the creation of which was recommended when this department began to supervise assisted emigration, was formed on the 21st September and Mr. D. W. Tratman has received the appointment, but is now acting as Assistant District Officer at Taipo. In the meantime temporary arrangements have been made for conducting the examination of assisted emigrants.

PAGE 51

-C 17 One fifth grade and one sixth grade writer were transferred to the Sanitary Department on the 1st July. Owing to much of his work now being only indirectly Government work the recommendation of the Retrenchment Committee has been adopted and two-thirds of the salary of the 5th grade shroff haYe been paid since the 1st :November from the funds he collects. 26th Febrnal'y, 1910. .A. W. BnEWIN, lle9iRt1a1 General.

PAGE 52

Heads of Revenue. ( Licences and Internal I Revenue not otherwise specified, I l ( Fees of Court or Office, I Payments for Specific~ Purposes, and Reim-1 bursements-in-aid, I I l Rent of Govt. Property, f La,nd and Houses, l Interest, Miscellaneous, --1 Table I. Rcvonuo for the years 1908 and 1909. Details of Revenue. -hinese Undertakers' Licences, -migration House Licences, --< orfeitures, --awkers' Licences, --arriage Licences, oney Changers' Licences, -pecial Fruit Licences, --irths and Deaths Registration, -C E F H M M s B C C H -ertificates to Chinese entering U. S. A., hinese Gazette Sales, -. ouseholders' Registration, Re-registration, Removals, --" Extracts, --Ordinance under which received. No. 8 of 1887. No. lofl889&No.4ofl908. ...... No. 8 of 1887. No.7ofl875&No.15of1902. -No. 8 of 1887. 1 of 1903. 7 of 1896. 3 of 1898. ...... -~o. 3 of 1888 ontribution C I M I from Chinese Dispensaries, &c., for Clerical Assistance, ---,aundries, ------, -...... arkets, -----No. 1 of 1903. nterest accrued on official account, ---Hefunrls, &<'., -Revenue in Revenue in 1908. 1909. $ c. $ c. 460 (1) I 480 (1) 3,862 i 3,778 1,036 150 26,9!i8 l 29,210 1,108 1,471 I 3,330 I 3,480 4,947 2,499 779 403 400 ; 350 2-1 I 21 I 4ii9 I 207 1,203 1,553 14 I 17 iil 28 ; ... 73 1,800 900 117,788 ii9,471 ... 37 7 Total, .. I 239 ... $ 164,459,99 i 104,138.88 Deduct Increase, ............ $ 1 l) Cents omitt,ed except in the totals. For six months only. Transferred to Sanitary Department, 'rotal Decrea,se in 1909, $ Increase. i Decrease. I $ I'. (1) $ c. 20 ... (1) 84 886 2,252 ... 363 ... lliO ... 2,448 375 50 3 Q ... 252 350 ... 3 ... 22 7::1 ... 900 ... 58,317 37 ... '>' ~-H 3,250.02 63,571.13 3,250.02 60,321.11

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--019Table II. Revenue und Expenditure of the Reoistmr General's Department i:;j IICC 1900. o Revenue. I? t! Expenditure. ..., = Year. ~ie ___ _._ r f8,~ Total. Decrease.1 focreaoe. Total. j Dccrcase,j In~rease. g 7---;-$ c. I $ c. $ c. 1.---:::-;-; ---1900, 132,729.63 4,406.321 ... 12,2l9.69.l,8i0.46i ... 9 1901, 127,5f:i6.16 5,163.47 ... 16,429.621 ... 4,209.93 12 1902, 136,888.13 .. 9,321.97 24,230.33; .. i ,800.71 17-70 1903, 160,851.81 ... 28,463.68 26,755.64: ... 2,52,5.Sl 16 1904, 16i,083.66 ... I 6,781.85 31,339.711 ... 4,584.07 IR 1905, 1i2,947.s9 ... I 5,864.23 31,161.a2J' ... 421.51 18 1906, 111,2s4.21 ... I 4,s36.s2 36,947.4<:i ... 5,186.14 2os4 1907, 16ll,261.l314,023.08, ... 35,630.88,l,816.58 ... 21 1908, 164,459.99 ... I 1,198.86 4:l,848.51 ... s,211.Ga 26 1909, 1104,138,88160,321.ll ... '43,793.61! 54.90 ... 42 I f i l ------------------------------------'--

PAGE 54

Table III. Number of Women auc.l Girls detained in a PlaC'e of Refuge by the Registrar General nuder Seer.ions 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them. DETAINED PREVIOUS TO 1ST JANUARY, 1909. DETAINED DORING 1909. I I Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants.! Total. Total. -------------------------------------_____ ,_ ____ --------Permitted to leave,.............................................. 11 1 Permitted to leave under bond, .................. Rclltoret! to husband, ......................................... i Restored to relative, ......................................... Sent. to native place,.......................................... l Married, .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ..... l O 3 A1loptcd, ........................................................ Sent to Refuge or Convent, ............................... .. Awaiting marriage or :uloption, .......................... 12 1 13 62 11 9 !?O 2 Ii 3 6 25 l 19 ]2 13 15 1 3 3 Absconded,...................................................... l l 3 1 87 12 28 32 15 :32 4 9 3 3 55 99 12 28 32 16 45 4 9 :\ 58 Under consideration, ... .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... 3 .. : 3 35 I 20 11 ,----------1 ___ ,------------1----! 26 4 \ so I6i-< 112 2so :no Cases brought forward, 30. Cases dealt with during year, 252. Cases carried forward, 5!-;, a N! 0

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Table IV. ---Number of Assisted Emigrants and of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Registrar General under "The Chinese Emigration Ordinances, 1889-1908," during the year 1909. Whither Bou11
PAGE 56

C22 Table V. Number of Assisted Emigrants. I ~---------H-E-JE-cc_T_E_o_. ------~ Year. Examin-1 Passed. Sent Pc,r-ed. UnwilRc:J.ected!RcJected back TotalRc-cent.age ling. at h.Gfi~] D br from Sinjected. of llejecas un 1 oc or. gaporc. tion. i 1908 ... 16,735 14,29-! 1,360 1,081 1 ::.: I 3fil 3,22!) 19 S I 1909 ... 18,511 16,803 [ 5-!l 1,1671 210 2,0;8 11 -------~----------Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1909. Sent home by Tung Wah Hospital, ........................ : .... Sent through the Hospital at expense of Boarding Houses, Sent away, ...................................... .................... Recruiting Districts. 79 1,480 514 2,073 Canton, ................................... ........................... 4,063 \Vuchow, ............................................................ 3,224 Hoihow, ..................... .......................................... 3,341 Swatow, ...... ........................................................ 3,29:{ Other Places, ...................................... .................. 2,882 16,80?,

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-023Table VI. Statement of the Reninue and Expenditure of District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1909. To Balance, ................................ ,, Grant by Government, .............. ,, Contributions, ......................... .. ,, Payments for Specht! Services, ...... 1 : ,, Julerest, .................................... ,, Fines, ....................................... \ I I / / / 12,154 2,000 24,722 189 388 37 c. (1) I Total, ............ $-' Pi12 Disposal of Balance :-By Wages and Salaries :-$ c. (I) 2,1141 Chief District Wat,chmen. Assistant Chfof District ',Vatch1 men, ......................... 1 1,572 District Watchmen,...... ..... 13,567 Coo~s, ............................... 1 432 Coolws, ...... ........ .... ... ...... 3114 Coiled.or, .......................... f 300 I nt.erpreter, ........................ \ 30 1 M\V,'1'_11.1tag1;cr, ............................ ~. 1~6 e ., I Special District Writchmen to i prevent the dumping of : bodies, .............. ... ... ... .. 1,020 I By J\'Iiscellaueous :-! 1 c rown Rent, ....................... I \\'atcr Account, ..................... ; Premium on Fire Policies, ..... 1 Instructors' Allowance, ......... : Unifol'm a.nd Equipment, ...... r :Erection of extension of build-; in\!." t,o the Distl'ic~ ~n.tch 1 men's House nt :-a1ymgpun, ::itationer.v and Printing, .... Photographs, ...................... Gratuities and Reward ........ FurniLure, ............... : ........... [ F'itlin~s nnd Repnil'~, ........... : Coolie and Conveyance Hire, ... : Loss on Ks:cba.nge, ........... Oil .................................. Pension to A1'1. Pun's Wit1ow, .. Co~t of Telephone, .............. Sun<'lrieR. ......................... Hi 195 452 !l(j l ,54!) 2,706 168 6 255 95 291 157 I,i!G B60 l:!O 48B 267 Toi.al Exeudiuire, ........ Balance, .................... Tot.al, ............ $ I On Fixed Deposit, ........................ $ 8,000.00 2,910.48 At Cur1ent Account, .................. .. Total, ........................... $10,!:110.48 (1) Cents omitted except in the totals. $ c. i 19,640 1 43 8,936 28,.';76 10,910 39,487 21 64 4!j 12

PAGE 58

Patients. :Male, Female, ......... Total, ......... ---168 41 --C 24 Table VII. Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the. Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1909. Admitted. Out-patientl'l. --------------.... ,i ..; a:, = ;; s:: ~SQ) I C)Q) ,,I ;:::., E .:: -:: E oa5 Ii =f :-< ------------------I ... .. 3,100 3,268 2,170 903 195 I 66,496 2,942 69,438 .. ... 623 664 344 264 56 46,514 2,372 48,886 477 749 2,258 510 389 1 47 --:--1-__ I __ 209 1,894 1,829 3,723 3,932 2,514 1,167 251 1113,010 5,314 118,324 98j 1,138 2,305 ----------------------------------------Total for 1908, 205 2,118 2,004 4,12214,327 2,678 I 1,440 209 87,84 7 2,803190,650 2,348 I ,226 152

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-C 25 Table VIII. Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wah Hospital for the Ki Yau Year (1909). ----------------.----------;------------------------,------------------Receipts. Amount. Payments. Amount. ----------------------1,------,..--1...-------------------------------~ (4 $ $ (1) Balance brought forwwd from Mo San Year, ...................................... To rent of Hospital property, .............. To Subscriptions:-I. Annual Subscriptions of Hongs, .... 2. Subcdptions of various shops, .... 3. collected on Steamers, 4. and Donations, ........ 5. ,, Subscribed by charitable persons for the purpose of sup plying medicine, quilted clothing and coffins, ................................... 6. Subscriptionsfrom wealthy_persons, 7. ,, by Directors, Assistant Directors anrl Committee, ........... 8. 20 % of Subscriptions collected l,y the Man Mo Terri pie, ................. To Payments for medicine supplied, sale ofkitchei1 refuse and rent of Mortuary, ,, Government Grant, .................... Total Ordinary Receipts, ....... .. To Subscriptions towards building Smallpox Hospital, .......................... 11,9.75 i 1,475 I 5,835 !2,366 2,3i8 3,,5()0 I i 1,152 I I 2,500 I i I I I $ By F.ood of employ_ees, ..... .... ............ ~,05J 9.00 ,. Salaries, .. ......... ... ... .. .. ... .... l.4-,509 30,329 31,183 6,212 8,000 i6,625 69,009 ,, Sick room expenses, .. .. .. ......... 15,0l_l ,, Drugs, .. . .. .. 28,329 ,, Expenses for Sn:1allspox Hoe.p.ital,. 2,@.5 ,, Wages and food of employees at "' _Infectious Hospital, .......... .. ,, ~tat1onery, ............................. ,, Sundries, ................................ .-" Repairs to Infe,ct.ious Disease Hospital, .......................... ,, General Repairs, .................... ,, Re-erection of kitchen block, .... .. ,, Furnit.ure, ....................... -...... ,, Insurance, ............................. ,, -Crown Rent, ........... .............. ,, Free cemetery 1 .. .. .. .. ......... ,, Coffins, ............................... .. ,, Burial of bodies from Government mortuary (Vi(ltoria), .......... .. ,, Coffins for bodies from Government i mortuary, ........................ : ,, Burial of bodies from Government mortuary (Kowloon), ........... ,, Coffins for bodies from Go,,ernment, mortuary, ....................... ,, Expenditure on repatriation of emigrants, ....................... Total Ordinary Expenditure, .. ,, Repayment of loan from -Chinese Recreation Ground Fund, ...... ,, Repayment of loan from the Kwong Shiu Flood Relief Fund, ........ ,, Building of Plague Ward, ........... Total, ............................. ,, Balance, ................................ 283 1,440 7,323 5,500 4,4-82 4,000 509 932 624 3,998 4i920 1,066 1,768 602 1,031 5,000 5,500 86,504 13,38i 515 100,408 10,500 II,30i 122,215.17 23,419.70 -----------------1-----1-------1----------------~-------Grand Total, .............. $ 145,634.87 Grand Total, ....... .. 145,634.Si ( 1) Cents omitted except in totals.

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-026 Table IX. Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the Tung Wah Hospital at the close of the Ki Yau Year (1909). LIABILITIES. To Loan from Relief Fund, ............. ,, ,, Cheap Sale of Rice Fund, ,, ,, Subscription for Hospital Extension Fund, ..... ,, ,, Man Mo Temple Fund, .. ,, ,, San Francisco Relief Fund, To Further Loan from Man Mo Temple AMOUNT. $ 8,440.60 29,681.33 15,226.69 5,860.49 5,4i0.l 7 $ ASSETS. AMOUNT. ... -------$ ---By Bank balance at close of year:-With Ui LungBank, .............. With Hhing Yuen Bank, ...... .... Cash in hand, ........................ By House property (origiual value). 2 houses in Bonham Strand und 20,000.00 3,000.00 419.69 23,419.69 Fund, .. .. .. .. 6,000.00 Jervois Street, ....................... 10,400.00 ,, ,, Chen.p Sale of Rice Fund, ...... 38,887.02 ... ,, l house in Wing-Lok Street (includ ing cost of additions to building),. ,, 10 houses in Aberdeen Street and Tung Wa Lane (including cost of 8,108.28 Balance of Assets over Liabilities, Total, ............. .. -----109,566.31 90,707.66 $ \200,273.97 I ntlditions to buildings), ........... ,, 2 houses in Connaught Road and Des V ceux Road, ................... .. ,, 7 houses in Queen's Road, West 14,900.00 17,386.00 (including cost of additiona to buildings),.............................. 30,363.00 ,, 2 houses in Bonham Road, West., .. 26,000.00 ,, 3 houses in Bonham ~trand, .. .. I 5,000.00 ,, 10 houses in Po Yan Street and New St.reet (at present used as Plague I Hospital), .. .. .. ... .. . .. ... 54,697.00 1----t 176,854.28 Total, .............. $ I 200,273.97 Subscriptions not yet paid :-From Hongs, ............................................. $-1,635.70 From Indidduals, ............ ,..... .... .. ...... ......... 1,800.00 $6,435.70

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RECEIPTS. Table X. Emergency Fund. Ki Yaii Year (1909). AMOUNT. PAYMENTS. 46,7~(H)9 I Gift to boatman Chan Tai, 50.00 I I AMOUNT. 1--$-50.00 j I Balance from Mo San Year, To Gift to hoatman Chan Tai not yet paid, Interest, -4,409.89 T1alanee. -------i 51,176.88 Total, Yuen Sh'ing Bank, On Ue Bank, Ming San Bank, Tsiin Mi Bank, Cash in hand, Total, 51,22G,88 DISPOSAL OF 1L\L\l\CE. Total, I 1 51,22G.88 $20,000.00 20,000.00 10,000.00 1,000.00 176.88 $51,176.88 Note.-This Fund was formed out 0 the gift uf30,000 Tnds made by H. M. the Emperor of China towards the relief of the sufferers in the 1906 Typhoon. [See 7522 '06 C.S.O.]

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Table XIII. Cheap Sale of Rice Fund: Ki Yau Year (l90D). R~:CEIP'l'. Al\!Ol"NT. I PAYMENT. $ To Ra.!am from Mo 8a11 Year, ............ 38,88i.O'.! By Loan to Tnng Wah Hospital towards purchasing property in New Street, Total, ............... $ 1-~'iS7.02 -, Totai, ............... $ I I AllOl"NT. I_ I $ 38,887.02 3:l,8~i.02 Q-0

PAGE 63

-031Table XIV. Work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Old Kowloon and Kowloon City. ---------~---------------------------------VICTORIA. OLD KOWLOON. ,_. -,: f, ;: 8 o:: '" ,-i O P:: :; ,-i S A >-1 f, f-"' -,: r,:i (!> .. -,: k z < z w c< z p f, f, I 0 1 -New Patients visited nt their homes, 194 376 311 881 I 15 2331 601 834 2.:123 2,740 ,, ,, seen at the office, ............... 4,946 5,8(i2 6,170 16,97S 22!:i 2,414 7,667 10,081 1,171 28,459 21,613 Total, ............ 5,140 6,238; 6,481 17,859 2.J4 I 2,6471 8,268110,915 1,764 :30,7~2 24,353 2-OldCases(home),.. .............................. 6 93 58 157 61 091 1711 230 1771 570 661 ,, ,, (office), .................. ............. 1,200 2,49i 2,887 6,584 122 263 1,617 l ,il80 237 i 8,823 7,406 Total, .......... 1,206 2,590 2,94-5 6,741 1281 322 l, 788 2,110 414 i 9,393 8,06i 3-Certifica tes of nature of llisease i~rned, Total, l 3 8 I 2 5 3 8 I : 21 33 (3A-,, given to persons to leave the Colony), 1 1 5 6 11 12 18 4-Certificates of cause of death issued, ......... 22 40 36 98 10 79 216 295 1841 587 579 5-Patients sent to hospital, ........ .. ............ 88 118 152 358 8 20 35 55 16 i 437 542 6-Patieuts removed to hoBpital in ambulance, 8-'i I ~924 1103 .. ,;~ 2 3 ~14 7 2 8 9 4 394~ 4 ~195 .. .,o I :l31 737 7-Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary, ... 125 v ,:,r:, 884 867 8-Dead bodies inspectcd at the request of the I Sanitary Department or the Police,......... ... 1 9-Plague cases sent out of t.he colony,............ 1 301 8 10-Houses cleansed in presence of clerk, ......... 19 18 Ii) 50 i 41 42 1:22 1,002 I I-Compensation claims sent in, .................. f 23 2:3 23 193 12-Applications for coffins, ........................... 1 i7 100 130 307 4 26 30 1 I, 348 509 13-Applications for midwives, ..................... i 7 3 36 46 ... ... : 102 102 ... / 148 99 :---1 _________ 1 __ 1 ____ ---i----H-Infants brought to office (ali,e), ............... 31 1~ 256 2~7 ... I ... 18 11 316 ~28, ,, ,, ,, (dead), ............... 135 166 151 4.,2 ... 60 33i:l 400 21 873 059 I Total, ............ 166 176 407 749 ... I 65 353 418 221 1,189 787 15-Vaccinations at house, ........................... 4 35 19 58 I 15 1 16 21 76 325 ,, atotfic1t, ........................... 366 388 517 1,271 2 1 158 583 741 58 2,072 2,162 Total, ... .. ... .. .. 370 423 536 1,329 21 173 5841 757 I 60 j 2,148 --;::i:8'7

PAGE 64

RECEIPTS. Balance, ...................................... Government Grant to the West Point Plague Hospital, ................. Donation from Kim Shin Theatre, ... Donation from Tai Ping and Po Hing Theatres, ................. Annual subscriptions, Lund, ......... Annual sub1criptions, Harbour, .... Special subscription t.o pay the Premium on I.L. 1,747 Central Dispensary, ... Balance transferred from West Point Plague Hospital, ....................... Special subscription to pay off debt of West Point Plague Hospital, ....... Jnt.erest., ......................................... Tota.I, ......... $ c. 4,000.00 6,825.00 13,734.98 620.22 032 Table XV. Victoria Dispensaries. Statement of Account. EXPENDITURE. $ c. s c. 1,393.23 600.00 Maintenance of Dispensaries, ..... ...... 19,737.26 Sn bven tion to Kowloon City Dispensary, I 04.44 25,180.20 3,400.00' 980.00 1,120.00 147.06 Payment of Loan from Po Cbak Tong,. Part C'ost of building the West Point Plague Hospital, ....................... Boat to be used as Harbour Dispensary (including repairs), .................... BALANCE:At Current Account, ................. Cash in hand, .......................... Advance money to Dispensary Clerks, Bad coins, ................................ 8,4i0 .52 62.58 60.00 i.60 $ c. 19,841.70 2,000.00 1,534.09 844.00 24,219.79 $132,820.49 Total, ................. 8,600.70 $ 32,820.49

PAGE 65

C 33 Table XVI. Kowloon Peninsula Dispensaries. 8taternent of Account. ---------I -HuNG-DERCRIPTION. IHHI. Yxui llfATI. i KowLOON. -----------:----$ I $ RECEIPTS:-Balance, ........................ .. .. i Subscription~, &c., .................. i Donatiou from SbamshnipoTcmple,: Government Grant, .................. Grant from Dispensaries in Victoria,j 349 '1,034 5.50 'i< I 1,308 i 5,862 Total, ............ $ I ~:~;3~-=-4 7,171.39 i ---ExPENDITUHE :Throug!J Registrnr Gencrnl'~ Office i i i 1,8:io 1,8~0 B.v Local Committee, .............. I 2,304 4,908 I ----Tntal, ............ 8 4,134.38 6,738.19 BALANCE:At Hegi~trar General's Office, .... .. 520 124 i With Committee, ................... .. 279 308 j ---I Totnl, ............ 8 799.56 433.201 4,"33.9{ 7, 171,391 Total, ........... --~ Co11tB omit.led except in the totak 242 2,219 575 250 104 3,392.84 2,148 1,213 3,361.90 30 30.94 3,392.84

PAGE 66

Table XVII. Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Registrar General to have been abandoned during the year 1909. Y ICTORIA DISTRICTS. i j b!i I ..: I Q) ~ ... .,, :l = _s a:> (1l :---= !,.!,I-= s E--;::: Month. ~1 0 : ~c/J -~ ';_j Cen-..0 ="' ~.g West. F.ast.. ,., .., tral. :;:H d 0 0 0 > Q;) .. 0 t:c ..,.. z H ..... e::,i -oo = .., dO -= 0 ...,Cl) c'.B~ r-4 ---------------------------------------------Jann,iry, ........................ I 4 4 9 9 5 I 5 0 19 28 101 J<'ehru,,ry, ........................ 3 10 5 18 5 11 3 l 20 38 109 March, .... .. ... ... .. .. .. ... .. .... l 6 5 12 7 6 j 4 l 18 30 93 A P' ii, ............................ 5 2 l 8 11 I 7 6 0 24 32 119 May, .............................. ; 4 4 4 12 9 8 4 2 23 35 100 June, .............................. ; 2 4 4 10 12 3 12 1 28 38 107 Julv, ............................ 3 1 0 4 13 4 1 0 18 22 ll9 Au.~n~t., ......................... 1 2 5 3 10 10 6 2 0 18 28 ,51 September, ..................... j O 3 I 1 4 11 6 8 0 25 29 69 ~t"tolier, ......................... J l :~ 1 10! 8 2 I 21 26 63 1'ovl"111her, ...................... 0 I u .1 1 14 1 7 7 l 29 36 45 Decemlier, ...................... : 4 4 4 ]:? 12 j 9 6 0 27 3:l 29 Total, ................ 1 26 J 51 I 3!: Ill 1231 80 i 60 71 270, 381 1,005 Total for 1908,. ..... 153 !~/~: 377 i 167 -~,-~-'-36 _l~I 1.005 Monthly avernge,... 2 4 2 : 9 I 10 6-6 I JO 22 31

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Table XVIII. Number of Infants and Infants' Bodies brought to the Dispensaries in 1008 and 1909. WESTERN, 1 CENTRAL. EASTERN, _____________________ A_li_ve. I Dead. I Total. I Alive:..J D~ad. I Total. Alive. I Dead. I Total. 1908. Address unknown, ........ _.j 5 167 172 2 43 45 4 4 Address known, ............ 1 202 101 303 6 56 62 7 48 55 I I I I I Total, ............ j 207 I 268 475 I 8 I 99 I 107 I ., I 52 I 5 I 9 1909, I Address unknown, ........ I 20 21 47 47 53 54 Address known, ........... 255 131 386 32 91 123 9 118 122 ___ T_o_ta_i,_ .. __ ._ .. .. .. __ 2.:i_~s~l __ 1s_1_L~o;~ l __ s_2_i _1_a_s--'---1-io_!,____10_____,l __ 16_6__,_, __ 1_16

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Table XIX: Dr. Chinese Recreation Ground, Receipts and Expenditure, 1909. C1. ---------------------------------Receipts. $ c. Payments. $ c. To Balance,... 634 (1) By Wages of Watchmen, &c., 555 (1) ,, Rent of Stalls, 1,384 ,, Miscellaneous, 379 Q c,:, c::, ,, Repayment from Tung Wah Hospital of ,, Balance, ... gift towards purchasing land in i NewStreet, ... ... [ 5,000 6,083 Total, ... ... $ 7,019.11 Total, ... : .. $ 7,019.11 (1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

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Table XX. Dr. Statement of Account of Passage :Money Fund. Receipts. $ c. To Balance on Fixed Deposit, ... $3,250, at Current Account,... 1,127 i Cash, ... 75: Passage Money received, ---j Interest on Endownment Fund, ,, Interest on Current Account, .. .. : ., Refundofcostofrepatriatingemigrants, 1 ,, Deposit for repatriation of emigrant.A, .. _i MiRcellaneou1:1, Total, ... ... $ 4,452 (1) 1,20!) 130 37 12 18 7 5,867.74 Payments. By Refund of Passage :M:oney, ,, Gifts to 48 women on being married, ... ,, Annual Charitable Allowance to six persons, ... Subscription toAlice:MemorialI-Ios:g,.ital, ,, Subscription to Eyre Diocesan Refuge, ,, Gifts inaidofrepatriationof emigrants, I ,, Eyre Diocesan Refuge-Interest. 1 ,, AssiRtance to R. '\Vesley, Small gifts to distres,;ecl persons. ,, Petty expenseR, .. Balance : -Eyre Diocesan Refuge Endow-ment Fund, .. $3,250 Current Account,... 1 ,l!J7 Cmih, 44 Total, ... ... $ (1) Cents omitted except in t.Jrn totals. Cr. ----------. $ c. 628 (1) 114 192 50 50 82 130 a 27 c,a 7U _-.;i :~o 4,4!)1 5,867.74'

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T&rbla XXI. Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 1 of 1889, No 2 of 1890, No. 7 of 1896 and No. 4 of 1897. 0FFENCFl. I No. OF CASES. I-------CONVICTED. I I M. F. I DISCHARGED. M, F. ---------------------------------1----:1------------0hD1NAl!iCE No. 3 OF 1888. llillR-Po~ting without. perruis~iun, .......................................................... l<'freworks-Uischarging without pc-rmits, ......... .. ............................... I 1RDINANCE No, 1 OF 188\1. l?eco.~ in!!' rn~n or lmy~ ii.1to u! aw,;Y from lhe Colony, ................................ Kt:e_,IU!f nnlwn,sed l.m1"u11"n House~.... ......... .... .......................... i-:"_:.,:l, cti1~g 10 e11.' er n ,med of lm:irders o;i l'
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0 39 Annexe A. REPORT OF THE PO LEUNG KUK FOR THE YEAR 1909. '1.'he following twelve gentlemen were elected on the 20th March to act as Managing Committee for the year 1909 :-1.-Chan Shiit-ngam. 7.-Leung Ping-nam. 2.-Chau Cheuk-fan. 8.-Li Yau-tsiin. 3.-Chiu Seung-shang. 9.-M:a Hang-chau. 4.-Choa Leep Chee. 10.-l\fok Yeuk-lim. 5.-Lam Shau-ting. 11.-Ng Hon-tsz. 6.-Lau Sing-chai. 12.-Tam Hok-po. The Board has to regret the loss by death of Mr. Pun Yan-tsiiu who had been a member since 1906. The vacancy has not been filled, as the number of members was one in excess of the prescribed number. The balance to the credit of the Society on the 31st December was $20,116 compared with $19,390 at the close of 1908. Of this sum '15,000 are placed on fixed deposit with five Chinese banks. The actual expenditure for the year was $10,282 compared with $'8,9 i9 in the previous _year. There was an increased expenditure of $7 4;3 on food ancl the grant to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge was $:900 as against .. The subscriptions collected during the year amounteLl to :28,.:392 as ag:iinst $9,0:17 in 1908. The interest on the mo:rny 0:1 fixed (leposit falls due according to the Chinese calendar, and this accoun!s for its being $2,062 compared with only $133 last year., The Visiting Justices, Mr. Bryer and .Mr. Chau Siu-ki, have paid twelve visits to tho Po Leung Kuk. On one occasion only did they receive a complaint which was reported to the Governor and duly investigated. :N"ine meetings of the Permanent Board of Direc tion have been held. The average attendance of memberswas seven, and the average number of the Managing Committee present was between five and six. Among subjeets of more general interest that were diBcussed was the building of quarters at Causeway Bay in which to house those girls whom it was impossible for one reason or another to ~lease after only a short detention. The Board thought the expenditure would be useless, as any cases where longer detentio11 was considered necessary were always sent to the Convent or to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge. The Doard was also invited to express an opini m as to the circumstances which in their opinion justified a Chinese girl's parents in breaking off a betrothal in a case where the fiance has left the country and the prospect of consummating the marriage seems remote, and certain conditions on which such a betrothal might be cancelled were approved. The appearance of the women's quartera has been much improved by removing the netti!1g _over ~he windows fixed there to guard against illicit commumcat1011 with people outside; t,o prevent any interference with the Society's wards a watchman has been eng~ged to patrol thP street. Arrangements have been made for the matron takinothP children to walk in Blake Gardens once a week. The Eyre Di;~esan Refuge has been visited by two or more members of tho l\fanaging

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---040 Committee ten times during the year. The average number of women and children in the Po Leung Kuk at the end of each month was 59. The number iu the Po Leung Kuk oa the 1st January was 54 and during the year 515 more, of whom 124 were children, were received. The circumstances of their admission and the measures taken regarding them are indicated in Table A. It will suffice here to note that 3 managed to get possession of the matron's key and absconded, 193 were placed in charge of their relatives, 49 were married and 25 adopted. The task of arranging suitabl~ marriages is a difficult one, and in fact so is the whole work entrusted to the Managing Committee of settling the future of the Society's wards. Oases of extreme difficulty are consiclered at the meetings of the Permanent Board. The matron and the ot.her members of the staff have "orked to the satisfaction of the Board. The Po Leung Kuk has been visited regularly by the ladies of the Uhureh :Missionary Soeiety. On the whole the health of tlrn inmates has been good. There luwe been no ease.~ of daagerolls illness and only eight slight cases of beri-beri. During the year seventeen of the inmate:, were admitted into the Tung \Vah Hospital. The usual tables shewing the income and expenditure during the year and the asset.sand liabilities of the Societ\ arn attached. The aoc~unts of the Elected Committoe have been au~litecl by l\Ir. Ku Fai:;;han and Mr. Chin Chau-sam. 24th Fe/nw.lr!J, .1910. -'"-; W. BrtEWIN, Ho KAI, Hr[li~d, fl,-11,rali Pn.,itlnd. Fi,01 1,-,,~id,,t.

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Table A. Number of women and girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year and the arrangements made regarding them. llernaining in the l' Po Leung Kuk 691 38 on the 31st Oe-1 cember, 1909, ... 20 7 -s 69 E-'; Q "" ..... 54 515 560

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Table B. Po, LEUNG KuK. Rtatement of Reeeipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1909. --------------------------------------RECEIPTS. $ C, I $ c. EXPENDITURE. I n alanre from previous year-By the Elected Committee (Sec Table : I On Fixed Deposit, -15,000.00 0.), ----At Current Account, ---4,390.69 i ----rn,:100.rm Balances 'u bscri pti ons-On Fixed Deposit, ---Yne Lan Celcbmtions, West Point, :125.00 At Current Account, -Annual Committee, ---:125.00 i Guilds, ---4,046.32 }fan Mo Temple, --1,947.00 Theatres, ---1,750.00 8,3~!.132 nterest-On Deposit, --2,062.50 On Current Acrount, 219.86 I --2,282.36 Total, -$ 30,066.37 Total, -----~ $ 15,00 5,11 c. o.oo I 6 ')"", I '-' I i $ C, 9,950.00 20,116.37 $ 30,066.37 Q

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Table c. Statelll_;ent showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from the 1st January to the 31st December, 1909. RECEIPTS. Balance from previous year, Received from Permanent Board, Miscellaneous receipts, Premium on bank notes, Total, -$ c. I EXPENDITURE. 91.96 Decorations, Food, 9,950.00 Grant to :Miss Eyre's Refuge, Insurance, 7 4.37 Light and Fire, Miscellaneous, 343.60 Passage Money, Petty Expenditure, Printing, --$ 10,459.99 Repairs, Stationery, Telephone, Wages, Balance, Total, -$ c. 47.00 3,330.14 900.00 321.62 1,091.94 1,166.74 56.20 123.37 93.55 321.93 128.64 100.00 2,600.87 $ $ c. 10,282.00 177.99 10,459.99

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-C 44 -We, Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan, members of the Board 0 Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society, do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st of December, 1909, nutrked ''A" and signed with our names on the 8t,h March, 1910, is a true state ment, and we make this solmm declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declarations Act 1835 ". Declared by the declarants Chiu Chau-sam and Ku Fai-shan at Yietoria, Hongkong, the 8th March, HllO, through the interpretation of Tang Tat-hung of Hongkong the said Tang Tat-hung having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted t.he eontents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to he administered unto them. Before me, R. 0. HUTCHISON, Justice of Peace You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you well understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants Chiu Chiu-sam and Ku Fai-shan and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to them. TA~U TAT-HUKG. Declared at the Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, this 8th March, 1910. Before me,

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-C 45 -Statement "A'' of Assets and Liabilities 0 the Po Leung Kuk lneorporated Society on the 31st December, 1909. ----------------------------------On fixed deposit at the Sui Kat, ::\Jing San, Shing Tak, Tai Fung and Shiu Cheung Banks, At Current Account with vVui Lung and Tseung On Banks, Total, -ASSETS. $ c. li:i,000.00 :3,llG.37 $20,116.37 i LIABILITIES. XiL This is the Statement "A" referred to in the Declaration of Ku Fai-shan and Chui Chau-sam declared before me this eighth day of March, 1910. R. 0. Ht:TCl!l80X, ./11:.fi,( ,f /'('((.("{',

PAGE 79

Appendix D. REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER. 'l'ABI.E OF CONTENTS. REPORT. 1. Shipping. 9. Examination of Masters, 2. Trade. Mates and Engineers. 3. Revenue and Expenditure. 10. Examination of Pilots. 4. Steam-launches. 5. Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping. 7. Marine Magistrate's Court. 8. Marine Court. 11. Sunday Working Cargo. 12. New Territories. 13. Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade. TABLES. I. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared. III. Number, Tonnage, CrewR and Cargoes of vessels entered at each Port. IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of vessels cleared at. each Port. V. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. VI. Kumho, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared. VIL Junks entered from China and ~Iacao. VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao. IX. Summary of arrivals and departures of all vessels, X. Licensed Steam-launches entered. XL Licensed Steam-launches cleared. XII. Number of Boat Licences issued. XIII. Statement of Revenue. XIV. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Otli.cer (Summary). XV. Return of Emigration. XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants. X.VIT. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hnugkong from places out of China (Summary). XVIII. Return of Immigration. XL{. Roturn of 1hle and Female Emigrants returned. XX. Vessels registered. XS.I. Vessels struck off the Register. XXII. Comp1rism1 in Number and Tonnage of vessels in Foreign Traclo entered and cleared since 1900. XXIII. Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. XXIV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

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ANNEXI,S. A.. Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B. Report on Imports and Exports Office. 0. Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D. Report 011 Gun powder Depot. E. Report 011 Lighthouses. 1.-Shippin g. The total of the Shipping entering and -clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1909 amounted to 527,280 Vessels of 34,830,845 tons which, compared with that for 1908, shows a decrease in numbers of 4,832 vessels, with an increase in tonnage of 215,604 tons. Of this total, 43,794 vessels of 22,415,125 tons were engaged in in foreign trade, and were distributed as follows:-British Oceangoing ships represented, ... Foreign Ocean going ships represented, ... British River Steamers represented, ..... Foreign River Steamers represented, ..... Steam-launches (under 60 tons) repre9"3% 9 13 :1 sented,............ 7 Trading Junks represented,... 57 100 1909. 1908. in Nos. and :W5% in tonnage. ;):n'/, 35 ;~3-2 1W5 19-2 3 ., ... .-, .1 0 os 10 9'8 100 100 --------The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the abon figures. 2. Of ships of European construction, 4,l!H Ocean ::Steamer,;, i Sailing Ships, 3,57G River Steamers, and 1,580 8team-launches ('i.e., steamships not exceeding 60 tons) entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 25, as compared with 2G in 1908. 3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean vessels visiting the port has slightly decnased -from 2,448 6 tons to 2,390 tons. That of British vess;iL, has r.:imained stationary-2,594 as against 2,593-while that of Foreign vessels has decreased from 2,309 to 2,205 tons. In this connection it is interesting to note t'iat durin~ the past. twenty years the average tonnage of O..:ean. vessels visiting the Colony has risen from 1,182;~ tons to 2,390 tons.

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:b3 The average tonnage of H.iYer steamers entered dur{ng the year decreased from fiG:"i tons to 620fi tons, that of British River steamers from (i87 to ti40 tons, and that of Foreign River steamers from 565 to 538 tons. 4. A comparison between the years 1908 and 1909 1s given m the following table :------. ( ins~ of Vessel,. ;9118. ---'-----1!)11!1. lllcrcn:~---' Decr::~-.1'-u. I To11n:1_!.!t'. ::,,.:n. ,_Tuu11~~e J._ :So. Tornla!.."l". ,i ~o. Tunnagc. ---------: l : Brititih Ocean-/ .'l .. o. 09 !, -"(i u-11 l -,, 'l ,. .,,1' .,~ll 6"" g'Oillg ......... f .'"11 1,:).,l,f'II -!11.1! 1,.--, ... ,, .._]~'l.,1 ~~0,,()r,7: ... l"onign Ocean-I 4.1:l~ I 7,:l!J,.ttlli 4,B H 7,x,,,.!HJS :! ~oing, ...... I British River / i;, l-J.(i Steamers ....... Forei-n Rivt'r i Steamers, ...... f 1 297 :'teamships nn-1 der 60 tons 4.060 ~11,-.:;,,l~:! ii.78 ;:-r:.ott.~, I 370 I H: .11 J.lli(J 1 (~'oreigu ( :-!.iUI ,7,iI i35.GSi ,H 2,617 HlUH 466 !)00 Trade).... ..... I I .Ju~ks, Foreign 1 Zo,833 2 >111 >4 l!' oso' ., "4"! o 4' J>s: i I 585,728 41J,(i,i8 1rade, ......... I --~--~ ,,. :_ ,.,, I___ ., _, I 'I ']''-'.11.:il i1:0reigu .', 45,437 22,;l tUJ:l7 .i4:!,7!1-l II 2:!.n .-,,12:, I! 461, 7:!5,-174 ~.1011 6Z!i,381i r.,, c ...... St.e,1.111-launcheH / i --------plying in Wa-. t 44;;,;u I0,41ill.6S2, 1:J,i,1188 10 :Hti,4110 .,,i3n 132,282 ters of Colony. J ,Junks. Local / Trade, ........ f 010,Val "l.848,fi2~ t-J,3,-! t:!,IJ87,1l20 2.,H7 2:l~.,!18 ... I_ Granrl Total. .. 5~2.11~ HVil,;.241 ,,2128,,I 34.83\l.8-li, 3.0rn !17-1,27;! J,,845 I i I -----------N.et, ............ ;--2Iu::,: I -----I 71i8,61iK lneludi11g lli,808 Cu11scrvauey and Dust P.onlb o[ 8li2,25(i tons. t 19,0IH of 1,022 076 ,, 5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean Shipping 0 :W7 ships of 230,657 net register tons, or of 5 per cent. in munbers and 3 per cent. in tonnage, which points to a continuance of the revival of trade noted in my report for 1908. The improYcment has been continuous throughout the year. British River Steamers have decreased by 4(j(j ships of 585,728 tons, or 7 per cent. in numbers and 13 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the loss of two large steamers, the "Powan" and Yingking" which ran for half of 1908; to the withdraw..11 of two smaller steamers, the "Hoi Sang" and Kwong Fat", and to the laying up, during three months of 1909, of another small steamer, the "Tak Hing''.

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-D4Foreign Ocean vessels have increased by 186 Hhips of 460,072 tons, or 4 per cent. in numbers and G per cent. in tonnage. This inC'rease is due almost entirel., to Japanese shipping, whic:i has increased by 118 ships of 459,292 tons. Increases are also s:10wn under the Norwegian and Swedish flags-of 58 ships of G4,400 tons, and 47 ships of 70,265 tons, respectively. Portuguese and Dutch flags also show small increases. The principal decreases are under French and German colours-of 45 ships of 5S,133 tons, and 19 ships of Hi,848 tons, respeetively; small decreases being shown under Russian, Austrian, and Italian flags. Under the United States flag there was an inc-rease of 7 ships with a decrease in ton nage of 42,211 tons; while there was a similar fall in the average size ofChinese ships, an increase of 2 ships being accompanied b? a decrease of 3,503 tons. Foreign River Steamers increased by 73 ships of 2,617 tons, or 5 per cent. in numbers and 0 per cent. in tonnage, which is e~plained by the smaller vessels running more frequently and the larger less often. Two small River Steamers under Chinese colours were added to the "-est River run during the year. These vessels run only as far as Kong Mun, thus making many more trips than those running up to Wuchow. It may not be out of place to dmw a comparison hsre between these figures and those of twenty years ago. In 188!), 2,5!)1 British ships of 3,242,953 tons entered the port, against !),85G ships of 11,437,681 tons in 1909. For Foreign ships the figures arc for 133!), 1,144 ships of 1,206,983 tons and in 1909, 5,633 ships of 8,5!)3,590 tons. These figures are those for Ocean and RiYer Steamer.3, which were not distinguished in 1889, and Ocean Sailing Ships (not Junks~. 6. The actual number of individual Ocean vessels of LLiropean construction entering during 19W was 701 baing 336 British and 368 Foreign. The C'orresponding figures for 1908 were respactively 7 45, 365, and 380. These 704 ships aggregated l,G8i,815 tons. They entered ..J.,198 times, and gave a collective tonnage of 7,7!)6,37G ton'>. Thus compared with 1908, 41 less ships entered 207 more times, a:id gave a collective tonnage increased by 343,878 tons.

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-D5Thus:---Steamers. Flag. ---~ I 1908. 1909. { Steamc!'s 358 331 British Sailing ... 7 5 Austrian, ........ 9 7 Belgian, ......... 1 ... Chinese, ......... 16 24 Corean, ... 1 Danish, \ 6 5 Dutch, ........... .' 15 17 I French, .......... 39 32 Gennan, ......... 129 108 Italian, ............ 4 2 Japanese, ......... 93 98 Norwegian, ...... 39 43 Portuguese, ...... 5 4 Hussian, ......... 7 5 Rwedi~h, .; ....... 1 3 5 United f Stramers I 13 17 Stntc~) Sailing ... i 1 ... -----Total, .... 1 745 704 I -----No. of Time. Total Tonnage. entered. 1908. 1,923 10 25 1 229 ... 15 97 169 745 12 434 181 87 13 11 :38 1 3,991 I I I i i i ----------HIO I 9. 1908. I 1909. 2,03 2 7 413,730,92713,854,571 21,697 1 17,683 4 97,789 94,288 ... 232 1 16 105 148 735 11 493 212 94 9 a5 42 .. 2,903 291,416 290,936 796 34,211 :H,426 201,0141 207,190 289,222, 2112,459 1,188,lOOjl,176,322 31,400j 28,470 jl,049,540il ,283,330 I 192,278: 227,341 I 2a,48T 36,921 I 34,326, 19.584 I 18,0991 53,726 245,280, 211,327 j 809; 4,Hl8 --, ,--,7,452,49817, 796,Bi6 i

PAGE 84

-D6OCEAN SHIPPING, 1909,-ARRTV ALS. STEAMERS. Rriti.,h. Foreign. I -~ ------.,-------;---------,--' .g -' {j -1I --,,; I I : It I~ t ~' E'of I~ 0 No "' 1 No. I\ [ ] i :'fo. !I .1 ; .. ~I -1 > (:. 1-(:. _I __ _:: __ .... __ ... -1 I-:--7~206.ill --:~: i8 ; 78 131,699, l~l.6~91!561 i 338,41?; 338,410 2 71 142 216;1130 4H3,660 55 I 110 129,-175) 208.\l.,O 126 2n-I 346,30~ I 692,610 3 43 129 146.861 440,583 38 1 1u 101,866, 30.\n9S 81 2431 248,7:!7 1 746.ISl 4 26 104 88,361 353,4H 4<> I 1so 143,8461 ,;15,381 11 2s4 I' 2a2,2oi 1 92s:s2s 5 18 90 42,919 2U,5!l5 26 1 130 !l9,l5l 495,755 H 220 142,070: 710.H50 6 j S 48 I 11,616 69,696 H i 8-l 1 43,230 j :259,380 I 22 J:,2 iit,f:46' 32\1,076 7 6 42 ll,Of,7 77,609 15 105 I 28,821 201,747 21 H7 3fJ,908 l 279:356 8 7 56 10,737 85,896 lH 144 37,6531 301,224 25 200 48,390 387,120 9 H 126 27.1~2 244,098 20 180 29,024 261,216 3-ll ', 306 i:i6,l46: 505314 10 15 150 32,556 325,,j60 12 120 IH,7!6 I I 37,460 27 270 46,302 \ 463:020 11 6 66 H.791 162,701 5 5;; n.796 i 63,750 II 121 20,687 j 226,467 12 2 2 2,412 28.944 3 36 2,287 27,44-1 5 60 4,699 56,388 13 3 39 3,988 51,BH 8 104 10,963 142 519 II 143 14,951 194363 H I H 1,045 14,630 ... ... ... ... I H 1,045 H,630 15 3 45 3,696 55,440 I 15 3.2t6 48,690 4 60 6,942 !OU30 1 16 3 48 3,4s1 54,896 1 16 3;os1 49,392 4 64 a 518 1oi,2ss 17 I 17 1,418 24,106 4 68 4,3:i9; 73,76~ 5 85 5,i57 9i,81il' 18 I 18 1,0-17 18,846 3 54 2,841 i 51,138 -! i2 3,88~ G9,981 19 3 57 3,511 66,709 3 57 2,832. 53,808 6 IH G,343 120.5li 20 1 20 1,424 28,480 3 60 3,-171 69,121) 4 ; 80 4.8!1,; 97,9011 21 ... I II 21 989 20,769 I 21 989 20 769 22 1 22 1,215 26. 7302 1 22 299 6,578 2 44 lJ,14 33,308 23 2 46 2.310 53;130 46 1,:,10 34,,3 92 3,820 87,860 24 2 48 2,455 58,920 2 48 1,397 33,528 4 96 3.852 92,UB 25 ... ... .. l 25 :G4fi 16, I 50 l 25 646 I/i,150 26 5 130 7,061 183,586 2 52 1,639 42.614 7 I 82 8,700 226,200 28 ... .. ... ... 1 2'3 1,222 34,216 I 28 1.222 34,211; 29 l 29 1,356 39,324 I 29 71-l 20.706 2 I 58 2,070 60,030 31 ... ... ... 1 31 211 6,121 4 1 I 31 211 6.12i 34 3 102 8.813 129,642 1 34 1,536 52,224 136 5.349 I8I.S6u 31i 2 70 2.852 99,820 ,.. ... ... 2 '. 70 2,852 99,820 36 .. ... ... I 3fi l,3:l9 48,201 I 36 1.33!1 48,201 37 ... ... ... ... 1 37 1,177 43,54!) l 37 i:177 43,549 38 ... ... ... 1 38 1,468 55,784 I 38 1,468 55,781 43 I 43 1.349 58,007 ... ... I 4~ 1,349 58,007 44 1 H l,3ii2 59,48:1 ... ... ... I -14 l,352 5nJS8 48 2 96 2,700 129,600 ... ... ... ... 2 96 2,700 129,600 91 1 91 636 57,876 1 ... ... ... : l 91 63G 57,87fi ____ ---1---i------1--I---------i------j J a31 2,034 SnS,662 3,834,571136812,157 811,526 3,924,122169914,191 1,6.0,iss 7,778,693 Total. SAILING SHIPS, ~11----------~i---------1!~ 1336 2,041 871,319 3,872,254 36312,1"7 811,5261 1 s a / 1 631 7 li31 I ... 1 ... I s / s / 7,631 7,631 2 ~__:_1_5:026 ~:052 -----... ... 2 4 __ 5,_0_26_, 1--1_0_.0_52 -------1~--7! 12,6.H ---[ ___ __ i i 3,924,122 [704 4, l[JS I l ,682.8451 7. 796,3i6 I : I 5 7 1'.::,657 17,683 I 17,683

PAGE 85

:-:. .o 1...,,,, The 336 British vessels carried 3,592 British Oflicers and 14 Foreign Ofiicers, the latter consisting of 11 U.S.A., 2 l\onvegians and l Dutch. Thus the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British vessels was 0o/o comprising 3 Nationalities. A decrease of OOlo/o with a decrease in number of Officers and ships. The 368 Foreign vessels carried 2,576 Officers of whom 125 were British as follows :-1909. 1908. In Chinese vessels 72 69 ,, Dutch 2 French ;3 3 Japanese 46 54 United States vessels 4 13 125 141 Thus 4"8o/o of the Officers serving in Foreign vessels were of British Nationality, a decrease of.0o/o with a decrease in number of ships and Officers. The Nationality of the Crews in British and Foreign vessels was as follows :-------------------------------.British, VESSELS. HmT1s11 CREWS. i 'u. s. A. AXD. El'ROP~:ANS. I ASIATICS. 1908. 1 1909.: -1~~~8. 1 1909. 1908. 1909. 1 1908. 1909. ----i----,--365 3;;6 ,23,755 ,1581 41 i 281 ;118,27i; 128,132 i 1 I Foreign,. 380 368 j 1,536 ,' I 356 2i,446 i26,955 jI09,Hl8,114,330 I I I -!--,-:--1-1-,-~"~~__:--I 745 704 125,29 I 125,52' 127,863 ,'' "" 1228,0961"' 462 Hence in Brit.ish Yessels :-1908. 0 % 83 % 1909. 15 83 % of the crews were B-ritish. 0 % of the crews were other E1uopeans_. 83 % of the News were Asiatics. Aud in Foreign Yessels: -1908. 1909. l % 0 % of the crews we1e British. 19i % 18 % of the crew;; were other Europeans. 79 % 80 % of the crews were Asiatics.

PAGE 86

-D82.-Trade. 10. As pointed out last year, and in many prcY:ou:-; years, t~,e figures which used io appear um1er Lis heac'.ing ,rnre as a wlwle never accu:-ate, and, in soE1e cases, aetuaLy n::isJ.eaLling. Hmvever, in the few items of Import Trade of which rnbs1antially accurate details can be given, the follmring rcn,arks may prove 0f interrst. These items are Coal, Kerosene Oil (induc1ing all procluc!s of Petroleum), Opium, Morphine, Compounds of Opium, ancl. Sugat". Ooa.l.-Here I find that l,12G,83G tons were imported into the Colony during the year. This shows an increase over the imports of 1008, of 108,083 tons, or 10.G 1t. This ,rnulcl appear to be due to nothing more phenomenal than an inercasJd demand, and to a general irnproYement in husinrss and n,a11ufortures. It is a curicus fact that alth0ugh tlre inpmts o.f C( al haYc increased to t!,is extent, the shipment oI bunker coal in tlrn Cokny has decreased.. This is due to the fact that aa increasing number of vessels, calling at Hong kong, prefer to take their bunker coal dsoxl10ro, c g, Japanese and most transpacific liners in Japan, (faincs,::i in Canton-whither a considerable quant.ity of coal p1ss.Js tluou ~h Ho:1,~lrn:1g in transit and many Yessels on the hon)c nm at, Si11g:1porc. &(,. This may be due in part to the foar of tletention in Hongkong, enLancecl by the prevalence of typhoons of late years. Kcmsenc Oil.--Decreases arc shown in all classes 0 this product, i1iz. :-2G,2:35 tons of Du1k Oil, 3,85S tons of Case Oil. and. 9,493 tons of Liquid Fuel. These clccrrnscs are only what n~ight have been e-,,;pectecl after the phenomenal increases in 1008, (indeed, my remarks on t~ie t-ubjoct foroslu1Llo:.c cl thelll), and do not indicate any falling o'.'f in tl1e trafo. Liquid hd has increased consicler auly-(32 X,) over the figures for l\}J7 -the last n-::mnal year. Opiwn.--The in1por~s or Haw Opin1n show a decrease of 6,087 ches1s, or 14 5 p,!r cont. while the o:---ports de~lincd by 3,G20 chests, or 9-7 pl,r cent. Durin,g the ycnr lDOQ, the raw opium trade of the Colony is clescri bed by the following figures : Stock in hand, 1st January, 100!), Imported
PAGE 87

--D9 disposed of than were imported. China took 92 per cent. of the exports. Impor~s of Co:nprrnnds of Opimn increased, as comp.-ired with 1308, by 2,5J3 lb., or 2:J 8.J;i,, and exports by l,Cil3 lb., or 10 5G%, while the amount which remained in the Colony for consumption increased by 9:30 lb., or 38 o/o. Impor1s of Morphia showed an increase of :.-l5G lb., or 5Go/o. Imports and exports of Cocaine were recorded for the first time and for the period from April 22nd to 31st December showed GS lb. imported and 12 lb. exported. Sugar.-The imports of sugar shmvs a considerable increase of 89, 7GG tons, or 3G per cent. This article_ is peculiarly liable to sud den fluctuations, and the increase may be due to increase of stocks owing to favourable pri"cos. Besides the above items, I propose to say a few words on the subject of others, which, from the figures at my disposal, appear to have experienced considerable increases or decreases during the past year. Cotton ancl Cotton Ymn.-The figures show the enormous increase of 135 per cent. This increase is not borne out by facts, though a very consider able incrC'ase has taken place,-ahout to 50 per cent. This is a good example of the inaccuracy of the returns supplied to me and is obviously duo to the fact that tl1e cotton imported in 1908 was largely reportecl as "general", while in 1909 the report.shave been more accurate. The actual increase is due to the great improvement in the trade, the figures for rnoa being greatly in excess of any of those for the previous four years. Flow.-The total reported imports of flour dnring the year amounted to 58,583 tons as against Dl,312 tons in HJ08, a decrease of 25 8~~-The decrease is clue to the fact, noted last year, that direct shipments to coast ports are now made. Another disposing cause for the decrease is I.he fact that the Shanghai flour mills, which obtain their raw material locally, are now successfully competing with American flour at, the coast ports :-Foochow, Amoy, Swatow, &c., and are even sending through cargoes to Canton. Rice.-ln spite of a hopeful outlook last year, Rice has failed to come back to its previous figure. It has again declined from 721,254 tm~s to 541,078 tons, or 25 per cent. This is due to a partial failure of the crops in Cochin China, and to the fact that many cargoes of rice from S.1igon have been sent direct to coast ports, without touching, much iess transhipping, at Hongkong. ll. The total reported Imports during the year amounted to 4, Hl5.9G8 tons as against 4,1G9,85G in mos, an increase of oG'Yo. Exports also show an increase, from 2,102,857 tons to 2,230,731 tons or 6-5o/o ; and Transit Cargo increased from 3,372,993 tons to 3,991,347 tons or 1!)1,,, but for the reason given these figures are not reliable.

PAGE 88

The number and tonnage of ships of European construction carrying cargo for import and in transit compared with the previous year was as follows :1008. 1!)09. biCitEASll. DllCllllASE. i i I No. !Tonnage.! No. I; Tonnage. No. :Tonnage. No. !Tonnage. --------1--1-----. ._ Steamers, ...... \ 3,98017,429,99214,1911 7,778,693 211 \---:-8,701--.. -. -1 RiverSteamers,: 3,770 2,510,896 3,5761 2,218;977 ... I 194 291,919 SailingVessels,! 11 22,506 71 17,683 4 4,823 ----___ i ___ -----!-------1 Total,...... 7,761 9,963,394 7,774 10,015,353 211 348 7011 198 296 742 I i _'_I___ i 131 51,959 i I Net, ...........

PAGE 89

12. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European construction exporting cargo, and shipping bunker coal, follow:-EXPORTS. 1908. 1909. IncreaHe. Decrease. No. I Tonnage. 1'.o. 1. Tonnage. ) No. \ Tonnri.ge. St,nmer~, ........................... 4,001 i,~30,882 4,1~6 7,77,'i,519 1H5 : 344 637 No. Tonnage. 199 291,192 Hi1erSteumers, .................. 3,773 2,509,651 1 i.l,57412,218,459 ... Sail111g Vessels,..................... 9 19,i:26 I 10 21,940 l 2,'.114 Total, ..................... 7;7SJ19,9~i i,7701~~~1 3clli,851 [199~i-;;-------------------~~=-~~ .................. -.. -.-1~;;1~ --... --Strs. Bunker I Strs. I Bunker Strs. I B1mker I I Bunker --__ c_o_a!:_ l ___ _c_o_a_L __ ____ I Coa_L_:_s_tr_s_. _!. _c_~_ .. a_l_. -Rtenmers, ........................... 4,001 6:JO,f50 4, I t--6 I 562,4-~0 18,5 .. I 38,200 hin,r St<.:amers, ..................... 3,iia l6,31G ::,:;71 i 56,537 ... I 199 j -----------------------618,987 1 t-5 i 221 l!J9 I8u 38,200 221 Tota.I, ..................... 1 i,7741 6.;6,9G6 7,760 I ----------------'------'----'--------------------Net, .......................... 14 37,979 ----------------------------------------------------' I t, .... ,._.

PAGE 90

-D 12 --13. The River Trade in Imports, Exports, and Passengern carried, compared with that in 1908, is shown in the following:----------------~------~--~~------Year. Imports. Exports. Passengers. ---1 1908, ......... 362,i69 287,847 I l,9:29,4::l6 1909, ................. 371,280 280,908 I 1,947,209 14. The following shows the Junk Trade of the Colony during 1909 :-IMPORTS. Foreign Trade, ......... 12,546 junks measuring ...... 1, 144,264 tons. Local Trade, ........... 21,795 ,, ,, ...... 1,030,242 Tomi, ...... 34,341 EXPORTS. Foreign Trade, ......... 12,544 junks measuring Local Trade, ............ 21,i03 ,. ,, Total, .... 34,24 i ...... 2,174,506 ...... 1,099,106 tons ...... 1,05i ,078 ...... 2,156,184

PAGE 91

15. The following Table gives a summary of the Shipping and Trade of the Port for 1909. The latter. being admittedly inaccurate, is given to the nearest 1,000 tons only:-----------------------------------------------No. of Ships. TONS. Passengers. 1 i Emi-DisRhip1,cd. In BnnkPr Coal. Tot:\!. HTegonis1t1eargecd. ,_A_r_r-iv_e_d-.--D-e-pa_r_t_e_d_. /I grants. charged. Transit. British Ocean-going, ~6-l,GH,~ -~75.0Jli" ~9,0l;O---236,000 5,164,000 7,735,927 172,506 112,32!! I 52,923 ~'oreign Ocean-going, ...... 4,:'!18 2.U'.l,OOJ 7M.OOU l,~82,0uu 326,000 i 5,17:l,OUO 7,8ii7,908 91,fiiiO 92,0.~8 I 24,507 British River Steamers, ... 5,780 28\1,i)OO 212,0UO ... I 44,000 545,000 3,701,75! 805,735 819,267 i Foreign River Steamers,... 1,370 83, LIO 1;9,,,(,(1 ... 13,000 16ii,OOO 735,682 170,316 lol,891 / ... Total, ......... --l;,5H !,Hli,000. 2,240,000 -;;91,000 1-619,000 i:J;o47,000 20,0.~l,271 l,2,207 l,175~57n I-77,430 I Stram-launches, Foreign ( Trade, ................... l Junks, Foreign Trade, ... Total Foreign Trade, st;~::i~~~-~.~~~~: .. } Junks. Local Trade, ....... .. 11,1 0,1 ... 5,000 12,000 H0,~84 26,595 23,:l47 I .. 3,160 25,090 4,IJIJ(J 40:.!,000 ----,-----, ~43000 ... 1' ... ,1,145,000 2,243,370 63,720 50,031 .. 43,704 4,603,000 :!,91'W,OOO 3,991,000 624,000 ,12,2D-1,UOO 1 22,415,125 1,320,r,22 1,248,953 77,430 439,98S 43,498 2,000 31,000 I 3(i.0Gll 10,328,400 :J,282,0iO 2,ll'i~,,502 188,0oo :w,;.ooo 4.,1;,000 2,087,320 48 415 W,-117 3,000 Total, Lc,cal Trade, ...... 483,48G l!l!,0011 21,1,ouo ... j ,ll,000 : 4\12,000 : 12,415,720 I 3,:J30.4Sii 222fi.tll!l 1--~~--~27,280 4,79~ 3,2-5~ 3,991,0UU 655,000 j12,691i,OOO 34,8:l0,8451 4,6.;J,01)7 H,47-1,87:.! I 7i,430

PAGE 92

-D143.-Revenue and Expenditure. 16. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $462,469.82 as against $357,768.52 collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $104,701.30 or 29::i/0 :-190S. I.i,:rht Dues, ..................... $ 79,975.tiS Light Dues, Special Assessment, Licences and Internal Revenue, Jllfl,ii94.0!i Fees of Court and Office,......... 14 i, 1 OR. 19 Miscellaneous Receipts, ......... 90.60 1909. $ 82,473 37 90,337.67 133,891.110 Io6,rn3.38 134.40 Inc1ea8e. S 2,497 69 90,337.67 2,796.9/i 9,025.19 43.80 Total, .............. $ 35i,768.52 S 4fi2,46!l.82 S 104,701.30

PAGE 93

The Amount of Light Dues collected was as follows :-Class of Vessels. Ocean Vessels, Steam Launches, Rirnr Steamers (Night Boats), River Launches (Night Bmtts), Hivc.,r Steamers (Day Boats), Rher Launches (Day Boat8), No. of Ships. 4,336 795 2,607 133 914 517 Tonnage. 7,751,473 29,554 1,449,186 7,586 737,397 20,5-:-7 Rate per ton. l cent. .l :l 1. :1 L'Vif. Nil. Fee~ Collected. $ c. "'i7,;3).J.7;J 29-5.54 .J,642.f:H 24.46 Special Assessment. Rate Fees per ton. Collected. l cn!I. 1 2 ,, ('. i(;,;'jl 4.tH.i 2fl'3.54 7,2Hl.17 39.60 I I ,, ; 6,097. ii Total Fee~ Cnll1f'.tCd. .. r J ,54,021-i.~2 ,5111.08 I l,~61.81 GO.Oli G,097.77 II :i ,, 171.50 171..i0 ---------:---------1--------1------I $82,473.37 I $90,337.67 !$172,811.04 Total, ., ................... ,.. 9,302 9,995,773 --------Inclnrling $1,000,64 arrears of I 90H. tj" f-'CR

PAGE 94

b i6 The principal increases are under Light DueR. :!;:2,-197.69; Light Dues, Special Assessment in respect of the Mongkuktsui Typhoon Hefnge, $90,337.1>7; Junk Licences, $3,8::18.05; Fees for Storage of Explosives $2,637.73; Meclieal Examination of Emigrants, $7,567.25; Examination of 'Masters, &e., $237.50; and Sunday Cargo Working Permits, $600. The falling off in neveuue comes under the headings:-Engagement and Di:sclrnrge of Seamen, $1,052.60; Sugar Certificates and Permits, $G50; Fines $430.35; Steamlaunch Lieeuces, &c., $3G9.75; Survey of Steam launches, ~330; Chinese Passenge.J. Ship Licences. $270; Sale of Printed Forms, $127; and Registry Fees, $106. 17. The expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1()()0 waA SI G!l,G72.0-1 including $3,204 speciall.v expended on Hno_n; and the ( 'ni,Yn Agents' eharges for December 1008, hut not including the ('rmn1 Agents' charges for .December lOO!l. l'ompare1l "ith 1008. this shows an increaHe of $0,092.50 or ::i-5 per c-ent. 4.-Steam-la unohes. 18. On the 31st December, there were 2()1 Steam-launches (in C'luding 9 Motor Boats) employed in the Harbour, of these, 1;37 were licensed for conveyance of passengers, &c., 1;35 were privately owned, 14 were the property of the Government and 4 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of the Military AuthoritieR. Sixteen .Masters' Certificates were suspended for incompetency or negligence in the performance of their duties, 3 for (i months, 1 for 3 months, 6 for 2 months, and 6 for l month; one Master's Certificate was cancelled and one Master was cautioned. Three Engineers' Certificates were suspended, 1 for (i months, l for ;3 months and 1 for 2 monthR. Six hundred and forty-one (641) engagements and five lnmdted and seventeen (517) discharges of :Masters and Engineers were made during the year. As in 1908, seven (7) steam-launches were permitted to carry Arms, &c., for their proteetion against pirates. No new permits were granted. 5.-Emigration and Immigration. 19. Seventy-seven thousand four hundred and thirty (77,430) Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1909. 0 these 52,923 were carried in British ships and 24,507 in Foreign ships. These figures show an increase, compared with those for 1908, of 6,349 (or 8:1 'li,J, whieh may he accounted for by the return of the business to normal conditions, and to the resumption of emigration to Banka and Billiton.

PAGE 95

D 17 -It may be well to note the increasing proportion of Emigrants <'arried in Foreign vessels. This appears to be due to the increasing numhers going to Hawaii, \vho can only traYel in United States ships, as well as to the resumption of emigration to the Dutch Indies, which is carriecl in Dutch Yessels. Oue hundre(l and forty-four thousaud eight hundred and twenty-one (H4,821) returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the se,eral places to which they had emigh1,ted, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against lfi7,809 in 1908. Of these 109,63::1 arriYed in British ships, and .3!>,188 in Foreign ships. 6.-Registry, &c., of Shipping. 20. J luring the year, Hi ships were registered under the pro visions of the Imperial :Merchant Shipping Act, and ;3 Certificates oJ Registry ,,rre mncellecl. 128 Documents, &c., were dealt with in eomiection "ith the Act, the foes 011 whieh amounted to $59:1 ($699 in H)OR). 7.-Marine l\fagistrate's Court. 21. Three lmmlred and three (:303) cases were heard in the Ma rine i\fagis1 rate's Court (:125 in 1908). Breach of the Harbour Re gulatio118, Disobeying the lawful orders of the Harbour }faster, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Failing to observe the Rules of the Road, Using the steam-whistles for other purposes than for Nmiga tion and <'arrying cx<'ess of passengers \Yere the principal offen<'es. 8.-Marine Court. (U'11<1e1 Ser.lion .l9 o.f 01dinance 10 of 1899.) 22. The following Courts have been held during the year:-On the 10th August, HJ09, inquiry into charges of :i\Iiscon duct on the part of the :i\faster (Alexander Nelson Seaton), number of whose Certificate of Competency is 1347, Hongkong, and the :Mate ( William James __ Hanlon), number of \Yhose Certificate of Competency is 034381, Leith, of the British Steamship Shiu On, Official Number 126987 of Hongkong. The result was that the Court ordered the :i\Iate's Certificate to be suspended for two years. On the 8th, clay of October, 1909, inquiry into <'lrnrges of Misconduct on the part of the third Engineer (R. H. Ferguson), number of whose Certificate of Competency is 33341 of Glasgow, of the British Steamship Per8ia., Offit'.ial number 84164 of Liverpool. Tlie third Engineer's Certificate was suspended for one year.

PAGE 96

---D J8 --On the 24th day of November, 1909, inquiry into the circumstances conneeted :-( Under Boa1d of Tmde Re[flllation.~.) Grade. Passed. Failed. Master, .......................................... ...... 13 Master, (Pro\'isional Certificate),.................. I Master, River Steamers, .. ..................... .... 3 First llate, .. ... .... ..... .... ..... ......... ..... .... .... 10 First Mate, River Ste::mcrs, ........................ 2 Second :\'late, ......... ......... ......... ......... ...... 10 2 Total, ........................... 39 5 t----------First Class Engine.er, ................................ Second Class Engineer, ............................. Total, 28 48 i6 8 19 27 For Steamships not exceeding (i() to11s, under Section 37 of Or dinance Ko. 10 of 1899 :--Candidates. Passe
PAGE 97

D 1!) --11.-Sunday Cargo Working 2i3. ]_Ju r_iug-tl~e year 202 Permits _were issued under the prov1sw11::; ul tlu:,; Onlinanee as compal'ecl w1th 282 in HJ08. Of these 99 "ere 1101, nsetl as i1 was found nnnecessary to ,York <'arao on the Snnday ancl the fpes in snch cases ,rnre rcfnncled. ,..., The l{eveune rollec-tecl nudn 111 il-i l1eacl amounted to $29,200 as against $28,000 in 1008. 12.-New Territories. Ele,enth year of British .Administration. The Outstations attaehed to the Harbour Department, six in number lrnYe continued 1n pel'form the work allotted to them, and during the year Lice11ces, Port Clearances, Permits, &e., have been issuccl by thorn as follows:Cheung Chau opened Tai 0 Tai Po Deep Bay Sai Kung Long Ket 1899 1899 1900 1901 l902 1!)05 1909. ll,002 5,143 6,811 2,458 2,040 -J,350 ::11,804 1908. !J,14G 4,901 G,271 4,882 4,628 .'3,580 3:1,408 The Revenue collected hy this Department from the New Terri tories during Hl09 was $25,102.50 aR compared with $22,008.05 in 1908. 13.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade. 27. Thirty-nine (39) letters were receiYecl during the :year from firms and indiYiduals, principally in Great Britain, asking for in formation upon various points in connection with their business, requesting me to place them in communication with local firms, or to obtain local agents for the sale of their goods, or submitting s~mples or price lists. My replies have "been as full as the informa tion and time at my disposal permitted, and my negotiations haYe, I understand, been productive, in many cases, of desired effects. 14.-General. 28. During the year the Harbour Department has had the mis fortune to lose, by death, two valuable officers, Mr. Botelho, 1st Clerk, Harbour, Office, and Mr. Watson, 1st Clerk, Mercantile Marine Office. The former had been 38 years in the Office, and had proved himself invaluable. In September the Imports and Exports Sub-department was temporarily separated from the Harbour Department, and the staff largely increased to deal more especially with the Liquor trade in the Colony. The report of this ~uh-Department is annexed-Annexe B.

PAGE 98

--D 20 ----On the 1st .Augiu:.t two llew light~ werP exhibited in tlil' Harbour, one Fixed Heel on the Cnst Ifork Buoy, nnd oue-HPd with whitf! se
PAGE 99

-D 21-Table I.-Nl'MBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED in the COLONY of H0NGKO~G from EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1909. r ( vcssels, ............... I~ I Tons, ................. .. ] r~ Crews, ................ .. ~I I .:. ar j Discharged, :S: L 8 t ( Transit, i 1 F::::l.. .. ::::::::::::::. .?: l Crews, ...... .. (Vcsscle, .. l f Tons,. .. .. I~ {Crews,.... .. .... I"' l~ \ D1schargecl, l be.) Tr:rnsH, ..... rl j / ;:::'.r' ............. .. { Crewe, .. ............. I .~ I j Discharged, ;::: lo~/ Transit, .... .. ~I:;; (Vessels,, ............. ,. .... j I l { '; { Tons, ................. .. I~ l C,ews, ................ .. I (Vessels,, .............. ..:i I Tons, .................. Ii 1 :,;;~-;~~~~;~:-~:: L L 5 & ) Transit, ..... ( (Vessels, ............. .. I! T'>ns, .................. -1--= ..... -.-....... ~-i:3 { Crews, ................. I i I t J Discbarge ~oo--f-~-a~ J s~ :5 I ; ------,-------------------------------------------------------1 I ::12 H,1 30 2,!134 49 9 ii 160 140 180 4!J 709 .. 2 11 .. 1941 5!J 12 1 2 l 3 33 15 4,GGU 71,t38 :!U,:J7!J 108,G,;s I 2,353,21G 67,426 35,280 J.J,0al 5G6,lill 372,5!)3 U0S,741 73,20!) 541:1,S0U 3,4~5 3,1611 266,7H0 n,2:12 19,151 1,29\J 0,77i 2,686 6,310 198,207 18,116 5,342,746 2,245 1,022 6,200 IH,210 2,!Hm 1 ,023 2so 12,onn 1;,143 141211 2,9su 21,639 s1 42 rn,11rn. a,114 642 5G 1ao / :io 1s1 a,001 924 2s4,ri2n s2,ooo sa,ooo 2G,ooo 435,ooo 115,ooo 1,ooo s,ooo 1su,ooo rnu,ooo _23::;,ooo 125,000 !l6,ooo 2,ooo aa,ooo 11u,ooo 5,ooo 3,ooo 12,000 I 2,000 100,000 2a,ooo 1.938,ooo 18,000 30,000 32 30 il,638 23,3i9 108,61i5 2,245 1,022 5,2U0 S2,0(10 36,0011 26.00U 18,000 33 16 30,000 68,659 20,741 1,091 2,901 99S ~;,ooo 40,000 1,000 13,000 1G 68,659 20,741 1,091 2,901 998 24,000 40,000 I ,000 13,000 81 31 HO,~!_!~,!_~~ ..JQ~,Tfi6 6,UG 2.200 0,'.!8;i 106,000 7(i,000 2i,000 31,000 81 30,000 81 100,1:,6 5,285 511,000 25'1 :l43,G4G 15,838 3,18d 2,696, 8(i2 lG0,108 43;),000 511,000 g2G i51 7,:i12 7,000 -t!J G7,.126 2,9!)9 115,000 7,000 33 0,000 s,ooo oso,ooo I rnr,ooo a10,ooo IGO 6,538 '.!72 142 9,632 254 183 28,000 2,744 99 n0 3fi/280 14,031 5GG,Gll 379,13G 618,373 75,953 1,023 280 12,099 17,420 14,471 3,055 I 7,000 3,000 1613,000 HI0,U00 233,000 125,000 41,000 8,000 589,000 191,000 310,000 28,000 140 78 GO as; 87 93 7,000 3,48S 3,161 87 42 709 548,806 '27,8:H) 96,000 ... ~.000 7,000, 135 220 263 ll,000 8,105 424 201 68,000 I 9,000 l,HS 1,145 61 GO 60 13 2H,835 74,li50 20,296 14,183 3,i7Ii 702 86,000 179,000 5,000 11,000 68,000 19,000 2Ii9 II 6,000 2r,6,ouo i 4,ooo 2,H 9,ooo I 2,887 3,223 fj2' 70 I l 3 i 58 i JG 4,IS6 8,994 2,686 6,3!01198,207:18,11:i 118 200 HO 187 3,li0i !'.124 3,000 12,000 2,000 I 105,000 23,000 u,ooo u,ooo I 256,ooo 4,ooo 2,)1 79 271 379,:~H8 17,140 4,931 5,722,(184 I 933.000 2,109,000 11,394 St1G,04fl 37,492 630,008 44,637 8,200 85,562 34.074 501,843 72,300 !J5,i22 152,261 1,110,157 151,701 36,653 22,422 12,162 22,602 3,45:-l l,HG 12,4S6 206,H65 U,0.12 \ 271,961 23,810 415,208 2,7:l2 4,781,594 157,000 310,000 159 560 388,000 4,1i33 l,.!63 16,136 5,001 2,511 4,031 31,228 4,965 4,401 50,000 117,000 15,000 14,000 83,000 7132,000 126,000 12,000 2,000 476,000 2,000 101,000 134,000 686,000 89,000 1,000 175,969 18,GU 414,219 I,246 31i 1,1-16 G,123 226 145 80 6,206 4,0~6 57,231, 10 226 1,086 1,311 12,04:i 34 141 60 2:l 75 385 88 93 1,669 3,683 2,996 20,000 4,000 H,000 230 ... I 1,871 1,96 26,277 133 3fJ6 3,9H l39 269 499 l,032,Ul2 56,116 1,050,227 3,'i,320 6Cil,879 73,446 95,722 li>G,600 1,115,280 161,846 S6,653 24,293 14,126 48,879 50,SJ3 12,256 142,798 t,.ilG 16,165 6,0i8 2,.'ill 4,257 31,464 4,995 4,401 1,802 4,079 6,970 388,000 150,000 117,000 15,000 1~,000 8H,000 782,000 125,000 12,000 20,000 4,000 U,000 109 1,000 2,000 67 568 10,068 262 12,844 9,000 262,000 10,0001417,000 79,000 10,000, 1,000 12 1,218 Ul,502 5,031 100 455 166 2G 264 251 I II 1,000 3,453 2,394 25,988 211.396 9,0:)2 271,961 3,4.60 109 167 1,0?3 10,254 262 12,SH 111 1,000 fJ,000 262,000 10,M0 417,000 1,000 f,36 12,809 120 257,930 8,000 Ill ,000 4,000 2,669,000 12,000 6u,000 j I I' 10,267 434 12 80 a I 1,882,0J0 5,573 681,023 73,8!8 lCi,9(i7 :?3,510 42ti,475 2,732 5,462,617 536 13,263 I::!0 331.748 8,000 111,000 4,000 2,6li9,000 157,000 SI0,000 2,000 470,000 2,000 101,000 134,000 585,000 89,000 1,000 2,000 7\1,000 10,000 1,000 12,000 65,000 1,882,000 7,512 82 I,!9 83 183 I 209 561 136 93 844 220 ~-631 .. 2 208 318 20 252 3 IG 1371 18 16,0M 3,860 751 a,2_Q9,~o9 37,492 188.!J07 8,200 636,~08 l.QJ.,~~Q_...!i,_123 86,331 -~?.'.\~il?_!,?24,.849 I,~18,89 224,~10 36~653 L71,221-12,162 22,602 la,485 6,614 1,!i&,~_lt!: 27!1,697 28,203 273,260 9,2!11 2,666 29,120 613,415 20,847 10,124,S-lO sr,,r,G2 ur,2 rr,1.s ,;,,,i' H,Glo; 21,nu ,s,w, ;,021 4,401 29,aos :i.GJ\ 2.oDG\ s,1 Lili 67 14,32,' 1,1,,s2 \104\ n,noo 2.11 30 723 16.4lr.\ 1,oHI ,12,Jr,G /j[J2,000 821,000 368,000 lCi.i,'W0 12,000 18,000 180,000 273,000 L,017,000 250,000 12,000 \ 116,000 4,000 14,000 2,ooo 11,000 95,000 441,!l00 ll:'i,000 420,000 13,000 10,000 l 216,000 27,000 l 4,002,000 !l,000 517,000 10,000 GfJ0,000 B25,000 S!)fi,000 117,000 1,000 ... \ 9,000 11,000 B7000 29,000 1,000 .. l fi,000 18,000 321,000 4,000 3,991,00J 413 560 4,ii33 5I9,fil5 18,624. 414,219 1,24G 36 1,146 10,893 14,755 2,889 22,044 4,056 67,236 53 10 77 498 480 129 4,273 1,311 12,010 83 150 85 183 217 568 138 93 3,728,874 66,116 1,050,227 102,746 037,159 87,477 662,333 53G,742 L,633,653 227,799 36,653 2H\951 12,2:iG 142,798 4,515 17,188 5,358 14,610 21,G77 45,925 8,050 4,401 491 236 1,871 l,D6-l 2G,277 133 396 3,974 ... 848 2691 499 2 ( 573,098 14,12G 48,879 3,485; 6,614 29,641 4,0791 G,~70 87: 151 19 1,248 21,607 tl,H9 1,145 2,887 3,223 JOO 879 247 60 62 70 227 21 253 2,394 300,823 286,046 29,348 276,IH 12,454 10,267 .15; 188 l6 o,844 1,060,361 fJ0,90S 21,fl9~ TG,cioo 27,000 ii92,000 HSS,000 IGi'i,000 124,0\,l IS 000 180,000 273,000 1,017,00U 250,000 12,000 I i 167 15,206 14-,029 964 12,962 311 95,000 441,000 15,000 420,000 13,000 30,000 82 I 000 9 000 -------=~:---..!....._J.:.:::::J___:::=L~_l___:::_J_~:r5~l7~,o:oo~I~O,~OO~OJ 690,000 325,000 895,000 117,000 1,000 116,000 4,000 l!,000 2,000 1 1,000 ... I ... ... 9,000 __ _c_ __ ..J..._ _____ .,___...:..._ __ .,___ 11,000 I u1,ooo 29,000 1,000 15 2,686 29,120 30 I 723 ... 110,000 5,000 J S,000 623,682 20,847 11,184,701 16,870 1,044 G03,4H 21G,000 27,000 4,G02,000 321,000 ,000 3,991,000

PAGE 100

-D 22-TableII.-NU}lBER,TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED in the COLONY of HONGKO:-iG or EACH COU:-iTltY, rn the, YEAR l90!!. ---------------------COUNTnIES TO WUWH DEPARTED. --------------------i .c: ~-: I;: i:::: -_g-------: CO c., CD ] I o I~ .e-2 -.e ,_ .. ~s ;g_~~ i~g ~-~i :;~ ~] E5 ;::; -~c;,'"~~-~ g ]~ t. .,; ~f6 CD .~ ~-~"' 1-;;ti :: c:3 1-.. ~ i::: ~::":;: c.. c-:~ '-"Cl oo.. OE,.. ci..!t! ....... !] C) &~ rn~t !~ ]~ j11 i~ : 13 ---.s .. 'fOTAL. ( Vessels, ---1--------1---------___ I ______ -----,--------,----------------------------I 231 111 29 s,2n, 45 a 2: 111 103 1s2 JG ... I 108 ... 1 1n.1 :14 75 10 Tons, ........... ; 54-,320 ,19,764 118,350 2 749 8291 60,IIS l l,633 9,141 ,IHI 296,834 557,400 :W,597 &48,010 I, 42 26G,:iG4 3a,ii05 15,4i8 1,340 ll,SGSIH,-18:2, ii,810 240,-103 14,811 C I I I 4,802 6,515,4-12: cc Crews,..... 2,251' 893 5,0-1-\J 1G2,4U:~, 2,5tr> 2-Hi 192, 10,599 13,405 1-t,SOl 899 2i,708 62 l:J,-1fl7 ?,1;93 295 m 2:i!J 47tl 109 4,859 578 l C:ugoes, 22,000 3,000 26,000 GIO!"OO' 38,000 I/JOO 11102,000 162,000 53,000 !9,000 71,000 16!1,000 1-1-:0001 1,000 2,000 ... 3,000 1,000 8',000 9,000 Shippccl, Uunkcr 1 1 263,441 1,387,000, Coal,... 0,000 2,000 2,000 IOi,000 i 12,000 4,000 ~0,000 20,000 6,000 16,000 I, 00 -12,000 5.000 1,000 I !l,000 1,000 256,000 -ii rvcssels, 22 29 13 s1: TJ j I Tons, ........ B ,.,, I ';, I Cmvs, ....... i::: L Bunker Co.tl, I (Vcs"1s, .. '.;! I Tons, ....... I;:;< C1ews, .. ..... =-' I ( Ciugoes,. l l Shipped,) Bu~~'\~~ .. r rvcs.:;cls, .... l~ITons, ............. J < Crews, ................. I I l Co1gocs, ; Shipped, Buriker l Co.11, ... I E-< rvcssels, ..... $ j )Tons, ......... "' { { o:: I I Crews, ......... 0 z l Dunker Con.I, I (Vessels, ... I T-,ns, ...... I i 1 :::l~::tl:jii~;:~~;;,I ~\-csscls, 1 01_1 ::1 I f : ,. ,~ \ C1ews, .-.-.......... .... ~1 l Cargocs1 .;:._ Shipped, Bu11kcr .-l Con.l, ... ( V cssels, ... j _J Tons, f--0 / Cc -.:::. I w,,, ...... :--4 %. .... f:,009 5,220 115 92 22,000 3,000 26,000 9,00IJ 3,000 2,000 30 64,802 lG,050 2,8i6 7,000 30 812 4,000 12,939 456 2,0)0 19 6-f,802 28,998 2,SiG l,2G8 1 i,000 4,000. i.000 1 i:i,000 I IS J 5,1271,705 39,000 7,000 lf'i 000 B 14 s,009 i1s,1u~ 1151 5-1-8 I 2U I .-I 5,0491 26,000'1 2,000 i 88,0:ii 1,271 4,000 3,249 2,78i ,SSG 163,734 GI0,000 lll.1 00 I,l.jS 7S2 9,499 l,H-1,9-1:-l H8,2i3 007,G72 49,3(;0 8,370 113,261 287,000 G3,000 5,COO 1-14 70i ,000 2,53S 152,921 17,843 186,901 3,88G 42.000 1,:J02 1,311 l,297,SG5 i5G,ll6 2S,528 12,037 1,0:1-:,~;a fi!J,!i2 12,256 141,i89 28i,OOO 10,1,000 4.88;i 897,000 170,000 l(;G 70:-2 5,000 i07,00(J !1,-1!)!) 707,000 2,i,38 l!l0,~Ji8 17.843 1S6,!101 11,083 :1,88G :?S.523 ..... LBunker Con.I, ........ I :J.000 I li,000 (Vessels .............. i ,;8 B2 2!) i 4.5:; I I.. I j Ions, ...... i 127,131 53.%2 118'.i!,10' 4,0/l:i,i,;J :'>6,116 _g { C,ew.,, ............... "I ,;,2.12 2.2.;:i ,.o,rn 222,!lOG 12,20G I J' Cargoes,.: 39,000 i,0:)0 20,060 sn,ooo I ::-ihippcd, I Unukcl' l Coal, ... 1 16,00U I 8,000 2,000 21G,000 U,000 l,Bll 12,(J)Ji 1-11,78!.l iOi,000 3'\801 1,1,s i,000 11,278 300 2,000 28,930 10,173 284 l 8,GOO 41,H;O I V,-122 4,65G 2,9t.i5 2v0,11i;J ... 1 493 1,0001 2:rn 3,000 21 GO j HIS _1.30.; I r 1.000 ;1,000 JG! GS 1.000 1,000 10 112 5,U86 24,000 74 90,919 3,673 38,000 19,000 38 ... 117 110 13,Gas 9,HI -153,113 308,1121 13,701i 24G l,OCO 117 191 10,5fJ9 102,000 162,000 4,000 22,000 18 37 42 S86,:::1 lU,2!.14 UlJ,000 21,000 2-IB 33, 7i0 1,122 19,000 9,000 38 117 709 G48,324 27,858 71,000 lfi,000 21D 4:?2 3i,21G 41S,!)5i 32,171 1G2,i"i37 116,6!)7 798,769 Bt,G99 :'i2,830 1,483 11,111 14-,287 1,713 H,473 i-:1.0 4,196 3,058 ,543 2,357 6,165 S!l B,673 6,131 12,0GO G6/ 00 12,000 3G,OOO 47,000 !)5,000 39,000 25,000 2,000 3,000 3G,OCO 12,000 32,000 3,000 32 4t,G37 1,2GB 9,000 70 II i G,478 IG3 22 37 11,000 47,000 G,000 7,000 IS 20,951 8071 2,000 GO lib 2-:1.5,!)15 5,0-:1.7 9,000 363 10 li,!)30 4.65 2,000 48 117 l,7!16 1,000 50 2,0\ti ,OG 87 5,40-1 812 141 26:1 50!) 78,853 418,957 30,249 162,537 137,64-8 l,OH,704 99,629 52,830 1 25,Ci-10 14,12G 49,f'i!)l 2,!l!H J.J,4i3 !)03 4,196 3,8G5 28,590 2,822 U,185 l,8Sii l,Oi!J 6,9-13 12,000 21,000 6G,OOO 12,000 32,000 3,000, 12:? 3G,OOO ]!ii 47,000 IR,000 147 !)5,00{1 uG,000 4,10: I 39,000 25,000 I 8,000 7,000 ot 117 2,000 3,000 %,000 1,000 710 2H) 422 1,25S 14.719 932 14,~,;~, .r-i6;4J1' ,. '98;'811" 9,200 5',cl'o.. ~,-,oo, '~;u,o '6,1s1 I 50,000 67,000 12,000 J3R,OOO 209,000 148,000 68,000 26,(-00 73,000 3,000 3G,OOO 2,000 32,000 3,000 4,000 31,000 67,000 12,000 7,000 15,000 61 72,438 2,3\16 IG,OO l-l-,i05 li,570 43,88,J 3\1,H 5,180 29,743 ~,Oi9 G,913 r;o,ooo Gi,ooo (1,000 rns,ooo 20~,000 Hs,ooo os,ooo 25,oo:-i 1 1s,ooo B,ooo 116,000 -10,000 3',000 I ",000 4,000 37,000 77,000 16,000 7,000: IG,000 : I 76 10 4,!)2;') 275,lG-I IB,81:i I G9,000 43,000 c;.;j 8l.2G.; j R,-10:l 1 2-1,!JOO 5,9'.lfi ll,8G8 1-1,482' 5,810 243,368 14,Sll 5,715,597 269,0~7 456 13:i 2.'iV 476 109 4,911 578 .L IS 19.!121 711 !i,000 2,000 4,!Hi8 2(J(l 1,000 ~:J 1-1,000 3,000 220 1,000 2,000 1,000 l,l.100 83 173,13211,GOl 11.524 !Jl,%7 i,8i3 i 30 -1-13 14,240 6-1,0001 4,000 ,12,000 I 25,000 i 1,000 20,000 G7 I 24 I 70,7GO I I 2,G47 i 11,000 I 287 11,470 ~5,202 ,:;9 1,307 l ,000 8,000 1-1-I 101 24.889 2-l:l,892: l,GOI 22,g9,1 i llG,li1m !H 7 ll\520, 3fJ G52 i 15,5'7 5,0CO :l,000 ~I I G,,ooo i 3G,000' :!5-1 4-,000 ?~,000 2,000 ,37,000 l:J i .q nn-l 1, .) ~n".' 62 14,238 !l,971 l 1. 30 708 114,307 17-1,000 78,000 1,000 44,000 30,000 10 13,568 112,020 52:l 3,052 2,000 14,000 221 :-',52 ::::~ 1:::::~ 11 I 2li ,20,892 120,858 I 400 1,375 I ,,ooo 9,ooo I 1' 2J 110 259 3,000 1,000 81,000 9,000 1,387,000 1,000 9,000 1,000 280,00(> 77 IB,620 2,f131 410,724 414 93 12,949 4,000 1,000 81,000 1,000 1,000 417 46 1,000 l 1,076 465 79 79G 30 13,187 4,655,8~3 276,625l,59n,ooo 265,000 3,184 808,98-i-58,a56 89,COO 16,971 13,GZO ~,-148 421,800 796 5,51l,827 414 13!1 13,4-14 35 33!,981 4,000 1,000 81,000 1,599,000 2.000 1,000 3-14.000 152 11 <)Q 11'1) :;1 J7 89U -202 Vr;Tar ~1'1a 7,000 2,000 162,000 9,000 1 ,ooo 1,o:::io 417 46 1,000 j 10,000 1,000 14,041 517 4 155 II 17,989 f.i401(1GG-2,086,000 611,000 3,!107 l,05!l,lll!J 63,Hl2 I la.UUI) 2 !JG: 1,042 300,053 325,157 I I 1,601 -17,8!14 j 122,,,os 11,8!i8 '.!S,!02 $,'.?58 i 6A5,l!i8 '15,607 )1'~:-J0,42-1 ao 1,108!15,682 2.1:1' 8!10 1 1 62 14,762 13,!12:l li-1,000 78,000 11000 4.G.r)On H,000 ... ii,000 1 54-,000 I ... 13,ooo i:is,ooo 1 248 j l 8,~21i i Ja' fiO-f,OOS ... 11,000 ., ooo 162,00019,ooo 2,D86,ooo 1 ;~oo{ ,'.'.',ooo 1.000 624,ooo

PAGE 101

-D 23-Table III.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS aml CARGOES of VESSEL8 ENTERED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR. J 909. 1 ( Vessels, .................... I I I '!'ons, l Crews, ... 1 ~;~~~~;~~~.-::: Cargoes, Transit, ........ !Vessels, .................... Cl.) I ..l I tJ i i Tons, ....................... s I l Crews, . ......... I ( Vessels, ..................... II '!'ons, ........................ : I l Crews, .. ; : : : Cargoes, i. l ( Transit, ........ ( ( Vessels, .................... I i I '!'ons, ....................... ;; I il:::i~~: Transit, ........ ( Vessels, .................... I I~ l:::., ( Vessels, .................... I ..; I Tons, ....................... g i Crews, ....................... r l ""1 =t j Vessels, .................... .; Tons, ....................... J Crews, ....................... I I I Discharged, .. ;;a. Cargoes, ) \ I Transit, ........ (\ V esse~s, ................... .. ...:i < ""1 ..a I i i Tons, ...................... .. 1~ I .. ; \..C1m,s, ...................... .. ( Vessels, ................... .. ..; I Tons, ....................... ,
PAGE 102

-D 24Table IV.-T0T1;L NU:MBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED. at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKO~G in the YEAR 1909. NA}IES OF !'ORTS. ------~------------------------~--c-----~--1 "' "" 0 .::l >, s ...: 0 OJ "" 0 OJ bo , ci s ;.:;; C) 0 r::., p 'i:i p "" cl ~ -~ "" ..c:: ...., "" Ul C/2 E-< E-< TOTAL. ---------1----------------------r I Vessels. "" ................ '~ I g Tons, ....................... 0 Cre1rs, ................. i .. I E I ) Cargoes, ...... > :cih1pped, .-L I Bunker Coal, :r: I ,(Vessels, ................ .... UJ 3 Tons, ...................... .. l 1 Crews, .................... LBunkcr Coal, ............. I IV essels, .................... ..:; I Tons, ...................... : .. .. I i i :::::,: ; ;:,:: :::: L l l Bunker Coal,. 1 1\'essels, ................... I gJ I Tons, ........................ I ~ Crews, ..................... .. E'-< I ( Cargoes, ..... I ; Shipped, ) L / Bunker Coal, I ... rvessels, ...................... / j / Tons, ......................... .. f=d < I: / Crews, .................... ... J L Uunker Coal, ............. I 1Vessels, ..................... I~ I Tons, ......................... .. I / Crews, .. ) ... ...... .. I Shipped, l L / Bunker Coal,. e-.: (Vessels, ........... ::.,:,. I Tons, .. .......... :.i ... }f. 1 Crews, ................... ::i ...., L IJnnker Coal, .... 1Yessels, ..................... ..:; I Tons, .......................... ~~Crews, ....................... I ; I J. Cargoes, .... .. Shipped, L L / !Junker Coal,. JG 4G-l 88 s 324 54 24 788 142 32'4 64. 2-l 24 1,053 212 I,000 7 297 74 31 1,350 286 1,000 7 297 74 31 788 1,350 1-12 28G ... 11,000 I ... I 70 10 2 72 15 3 142 25 2 72 3 142 25 419 21,034 3,815 10,000 97 3 -l,319 2 901 1 I am 3 25,353 2 4.716 10,000 3,815 1-0,000 97 3 4,!!19 2 901 5;5 B 25,353 2 4,716 10/00 Li4 2 6 7,282 37 331 1,36:l 15 49 5,000 :lo 1 1,017 23 206 -l 174 2 7 8,299 37 354 1,568 15 53 5,000 6 7,282 87 331 .. 1,362 15 49 5,000 20 1 1,017 23 206 4 174 2 8,299 /17 1,568 5,000 4,802 4,802 5,515,'142 5,ol-'i,442 163,441 2C3,44 l l,fl87,(,00 1,387,000 256,000 2;,6,000 123 12'3 200,155 ii,586 24,(100 4,925 5,715,597 269,027 1,387,000 280,000 12,565 4,G:25,572 271,07-i 1,583,( 00 255,000 3.IH8 852,929 57,100 89,('00 IG,213 5,478,501 328,174 l ,G83,00<1 344,000 17 367 !O,Ui,014 634,515 2,9i0,000 511,000 624,000 200,153 5,586 24,000 4,925 ii, 7 I 5,li9i 2G9,02; 1,387,000 280,000 131,187 4,655,843 276,625 1,ii9fl,OOO 25,,,000 3,78 858,984 58,35(i SB,000 16,971 5,514,827 334,981 1,599,000 3!4.,000 17,989 10, 171,28i, 540,0GG 2,986,000 624,000

PAGE 103

--D 25-Table V.-----NUNIBER, TONNAGE and CRKWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1909. ----------~---------------------------------------------ENTERED. NATION.AUTY ~-----OF Wl'l'H CARGOES. IN BALLAST, TOTAL. VESSELS. Vessels, I Tons. Crews. Ves~els. Tons. ()rews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. I Brit.ish, ........................ 4,660 5,342,746 2,54,526 271 379,338 17,140 4,931 5,722,084 271,666 American, ................... 38 208,185 7,367 4 3,142 182 42 211,327 7,549 Austrian, .................... 24 94,288 1,.-512 ...... ..... ..... 2! 94,288 1,512 'Belgian, ....................... ..... ...... ..... ..... ..... Corean, ........................ I W6 41 ...... ...... ..... l 796 41 Chinese, 456 322,153 30,645 30 27,676 1,282 486 349,829 31,927 1440,496 Chinese Junks, ............. 7,775 658,610 88,558 4,769 61,210 12,544 1,099,106 149,768 Danish, ........................ 12 30,846 458 4 580 129 16 31,426 587 Dutch, 90 189,874 5,639 15 17,316 630 105 207,190 6,269 French, ........................ 442 547,512 19,632 4 3,493 161 446 551,005 19,793 1Germa11, ...................... 657 1,076,i65 41,801 78 99,857 3,760 735 1,176,322 45,561 Italian, ........................ 11 28,470 1,127 ...... ...... 11 28,470 1,127 .Japanese, ..................... 485 1,270,286 35,968 8 13,044 362 493 1,283,330 36,H30 Norwegiar.., 164 178,298 5,6B8 48 49,043 1,452 212 227,341 i,O!:JO Portuguese, ............ 227 58,336 6,032 l 299 33 228 511 t:;!!5 6.!)65, _.__..... l{ussian, ...................... 6 14,095 432 3 5,489 165 9 19,584 597 ,Swedish, ...................... 115 53,726 1,197 ...... ...... ...... 35 53,i26 1,197 '\, .. :Stea hips under 60 } to trading to ports 971 49,654 11,883 outsi the Colony, 609 20,588 4,452 1,580 70,242 16,33,5 I ',_ ''--"TOTAL 1909, ...... 'l,6,054 10,124,340 512,456 5,844 1,060,361 90,958 21,898 II, 184,701 603,414 ',_ TOTAL ~908, ... 1--:.7> ro,.zoi,970 503,811 5,993 1,012,416 86,257 22,740 11,16!,386 590,068 ',

PAGE 104

-D 24Table IV.-T0T.AL NUMBER, TOi'i'NAGE, CREWS n11d CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED. at E.ACH PORT in the COLONY of I-IOXGKOi'i'G in the YEAR 1909. r I Vessels, ..................... I~ I Tons, ....................... 0 Cre11s, .................... I I J Cargoes, ...... > Shipped, I .-L ( Bunker Coal, I / c'. ( Vessels, .................. .. I j / Tons, ..................... 1 1 Crews ..................... LDunkcr Coal, I ( V cssels, ................... .. ..; I Tc,ns, .......................... I 1 ::;::: ;~:;;: : L l I Bunker Corr!,. 1 1\'essels, .................. .. I gJ I Tons, ......................... 11 I~ ~1 Crews, ... ;~!~;.;~~~: .. ::::::: I > Shipped. ) _. L I Bunker Coal, I i;; rvcssels, ...................... / j / Tons, ......................... .. "'1 { I: / Crews, ....................... I L llnnker Coal, ............ .. I 1Vessels, ..................... I~ I T~~s_' ......................... .. I E / C1e,,s, ..... ....... I Shipped, ) l L / Bunker Coal,. Crews, ............ :..;,;,_:;i.: .. I lShipped, j Caroes, .2 .. ( Bunker Cmn;; i;; rvessels, ................... ,.: ,::;j I Tons, ..................... '. .. f-< :H i:Q / Crews, ...................... z ,.... l llnnker Coal, ............. .. 1Yesscls, .................... .. ..; I Tons, ......................... .. Cre,Ys, ~ ................. I I J Cargoes, ..... Shipped, l l. / !Junker Coal,. d "' ..:::i Q ~D 0 "' "' ..c: Q JG 24 !G+ 1,0ii3 88 212 1,000 s 7 32-1 297 5+ 7 24 31 788 1,350 142 286 1,000 ,'r 46! \ 1,053 88 I 212 .. \ 1,000 8 7 324 297 64 74 2J 31 788 1,350 142' 28G ... 11,000 I ... >, "' ;:q "" <1) '-' >=:i s 0 fo <= "' ::c 70 10 2 72 l:'i 3 l+Z 25 7(\ 10 2 72 15 3 142 25 OJ to ] bD 0 0 .'" ...:: (f] .;:_~~~~------------NA:IIES OF !'ORT~. ---------------~-419 21,034 3,815 10,000 97 3 4,319 2 901 11 ,;rn 3 25,353 2 Ul6 10,000 21,034 3,815 l-0,000 97 3 4,319 2 901 ];i4 7,?82 l,3fi3 5,000 :lli 1,017 20G 174 8,29:; 1,568 i,,000 7,282 l,36~ 5,000 20 1,017 206 5;5 174 B 25,353 8,299 2 4,716 1,568 2 37 15 2 37 15 37 15 2 37 ];j 10,COO 5,000 ... / / / / ... 6 331 49 23 4 7 354 53 il -331 49 I 23 4 i I 71 'J' I. B5yr ,{,3' TOTAL. 4,802 4,802 5,515,1142 5,,il.'5,442 ~r.3,441 2C3,44 l 1,fl87,(,00 1,387,000 25G,OOO 2t,6,000 123 12'3 200,155 200,15i ii,586 5,586 24,(100 24,000 4,925 4,925 5,715.597 5,715,597 2G0,0:27 2fi9,027 1,387,000 l,flS'i,000 280,000 280,000 12,5115 131,187 4,625,572 4,655,843 271,07 276,623 1,583,( 00 l ,59!l,OOO 255.000 25,i,OOO 3 648 3,78-l 852,929 858,984 57,100 58,35(i 89,f'OO S(J,000 lfl,213 1 G,97 I G,HS,501 5,514,827 328,174 3~4,98 l l ,G83,00!1 1,599,000 3H,OOO 3H,OOO l7,3Gi 17,989 IO,lH,014 10, 171,28,, 531,515 540,0G(i 2,970,000 ''""7 511,000 511 00 / 3,771 / 3,907 l ,05B.08v ';/ 1,059, 13(1 0J-t.G8G 63,H42 113,0()0 113,000 21,13:l 21,896 11,194,0HS 11,230,424 597.201 GO.Jc,008 2,970,000 2,986,000 G24,000 624,000

PAGE 105

-D 25 Table V.-----NU.MBER, TONNAGE and CRKWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1909. ENTERED. NATIONALITY -----------OF WITH CARGOES. IN BALLAST. TOTAL. VESSELS. Vessels, I Tons. Crews. Ves,els. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. I BrHisL, ........................ ,1,660 5,342,746 254,526 271 3'i9,fl38 I 7, l 40 4,931 5,722,084 271,666 American, 38 208,185 7,367 4 3,142 182 42 211,327 7,549 Austrian, ................... 24 S4,288 J ,;3] 2 ..... ..... 2t 94,288 1,512 :Belgian, .... ................. ..... ...... ...... ..... ..... ...... ..... Corean, ........................ 1 796 41 ...... ...... ..... I 796 41 Chinese, ...................... 456 322,153 30,645 30 27,676 1,282 486 349,829 31,927 \ 440,4S6 Chinese Junks, i,7i5 G58,610 88,558 ,1,769 61,210 12,544 1,099,106 149,768 Danish, ........................ 12 20,846 458 4 580 129 16 31,426 587 Dutct1, ........................ 90 189,874 5,639 15 17,316 G30 105 207,190 6,269 French, ........................ 442 547,512 19,632 4 3,493 161 446 551,005 19,793 1Germau, 657 l,076,465 41,801 78 99,857 3,760 735 1,176,322 45,561 Italian, ........................ II 28,470 1,127 ...... ..... ..... 11 28,470 I, 127 .Japanese, ..................... 485 1,270,286 35,968 8 13,044 362 493 1,283,330 36,830 Norwegiai:, 164 178,29'3 .5,638 48 49,043 1,452 212 227,341 7,0YO Portuguese, 227 58,336 6,032 I 299 33 228 58 635 6 065 __ ... Iiussian, ...................... 6 14,095 432 3 5,489 165 9 19,584 597 ',.;Swedish, ...................... 35 53,726 1,197 ...... ...... ..... 35 53,726 I, 19i :Steatil
PAGE 106

-D 2G -Table VI.-NUMBEH, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1909. N ATIONALITY OF VESSELS. British, American, .................. Anstrian, ..................... Belgian, ...................... Core:in, 0 0 I O o O I O O 0 0 0 I O O O O O o' Chinese, ...................... Chinese Junks, ............. Dauisb, Dntch, ........................ French, ... ............. German, ..... Italian, ....... Japanese, ..... Nor,vcgian, .. ............. : .. 1 ; I I l'ortugnese, '\ I ; Russian, ..... ................ : I Swedish, ..... I i i l\'o Flag, ..... I i I ~teamships tons .tradin ont,ide the llllder 60 l [ g to ports ,,.,lm,y, 1 I I TOTAL, ...... -------~------WITH CARGOES. Vessels./ Tons. Crews. 4,802 -'5,515,442 263,441 39 222,333 i,849 24 94,288 1,564 l i96 35 4i3 339,7i 1 32,004 9,921 951,959 119,392 12 30,846 423 82 li9,0::!6 5,302 I 435 I 538,154 19, 1 i 4 534 941,035 36,884 11 28,470 1,151 373 !,Ol4,3i7 28,564 14-;' 159,38] 6,206 "" .,: -~--.-. 93 3G,684 4,393 i 15,602 494 :H 52,737 l, 157 1,001 50,38'1 12,0,13 17,989 10, 171,28: 540,066 CLEARED. IN BALLAST. TOTAL. ---------Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. I Tons. I Crews. I j i I I 123 200,155 5,586 I 4,925 5,il.5,597 269,027 I 4 2,986 155 43 22.5,319 8,004 I I I 24 94,288 l,56i i96 35 .. I 8,881 I 13 40i 486 348,6521 32,411 2,62,5 192,305 29,340 12,.i46 1,14-!,2G4 148,732 4 580 161 16 31,426 584 23 28,164 1,001 105 207,19P 6,303 7 I 6,281 294 442 544,435 19,468 i I 206 i 242 371 10,910 i40 1,183,4061 47,i94 I I I I II 28,4i0 1,151 ...... l ..... i I 120 1,990 5,418 I 493 1,278,367 33,972 -64 i G 7,020 4,56i :?11 226,401 10,77~ i 134 21,708 l,608 227 ,-58,392 6,001 2 3,982 112 9 l9,.51:l4 606 I I ...... 3,1 ,'i2,7;3i 1,L37 I 0 858 91 3 8G8 91 t) i i .'i79 19,8,-58 4,292 1,580 10,2d 16,:J35 I I I I 3,907 1,059,139 63,942 I 21,896 u ,,,o .,ro.!,008 I

PAGE 107

Table VII. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passenger.~ and Cargoes oj'Junhs ENTERED 11,t P11rts in the C11lun,1J of Hon.ifl:on_q. from Port.~ on the Coast of China {tnd J1Jaeao, in the Year HlOV. East Coast, .. San On District, West River, &c., I _____________ I VesTons. Crews. Passen-12~1oes YesII T .lie i-1,~s;e-:-Ves-1 I sels. ---gers isc iargsel ons. rews.1 "C el ed. Tons. 8 o rs. s ~-, 1,491 125,121 15,299 56i 93,935 ~gof 63,iSl c,9:25 -~G 1,981,-l-88-,9-o-s122,2:24 CARGO, BALLAST. Tons. TOTAL. 'Crew,;. I 'assen-1 C_argoes i D1scharc-
PAGE 108

Table VIII. Total .N11mber, Tom;n,qe, Crervs, Pnssen,qers and Cargoes of Junhs CLEARED at Pol't.~ in the Colo11:11 of Ho11plwn_q, for .Ports on the Coast of China and Jlfacao, in tlte Year 1909. ----------------------------------------------CARGO. BALLAST. I I Cargoes y p V ,1-----,---1-1 ; ---; Cargoes VesTons. Crews. PassenShipped. esTons. Crews. assenesTons. 1 Crews. 1 asseni Shipped. Sels rre1s sels !rets. 1 sels ,,.~r0 -----__ _______ "' ___ ___ 1_'o_n_s._, __ __ ------__ ___ l_c_-_._l ____ 1~~-"-_1_1_'0_~~~-East Coast,... l,fi28 141,501 17,25911 477 110,850 ~80 52,890 -5,082 2,008 194,391 :!2,:14111 San On Dis-trict, West I I : River,&c., 7,491743,26291,08:Jj 30,251 582,1261 2,097131,804 22,908 9,588 875,066,113,9[)11 -1!l,:l34 :,8:2,1:W WestCoast, ... 380 22,909 4,9191 17 14,170 61 2,207 538 441 25,1161 5,4,,7 ;34 14,li0 Macao,......... 422 44,287 6,1311 27 35,887 87 5,404 812 509 49,691: G,94:l 46: Total, Hl09, ... 1 9,921 9-5~ ,959 IJ9,;,92i 30,772 743,033 2,G251~9:2,30~ 29,3401----i-l-2-,-6 1, 144,2G3_:l Total,1908, ... 9,7401876,669 107,059! 26,523 596,623 3,137 214,893 31,974 19,889 -12,877 l,09l,5G21139,03;/ 4G,412 i"if!f-i.fi:2:1 140 19,083 17 I 19 19,259 617 l l O.R.'iO [,!,, X

PAGE 109

FOJtEJl;:s; Tr:AJIE. Britioli Rbips entered with C:irgoei, ................. Do. do. in Bnllnft, ................... .. D :!!I Table IX. SLM .'II ARY. _:; 0. (Jl, '\rESSKJ .. ~. ,6(j() 27 i 1 1909. T1)X.'i. il.042,7 379,,338 l I_ No 01, \ 7ESSEL~. I 1901'. I !-----1----2i51,,i2G : 4,8 J:l : 5,548,748 351,788 26B,5~;l 14,6ii8 TC1ta.l, ............. .. 17,140 I 239 :===-4_,_9-:=n= ===~=, 7=:!=:? ,_o8_4_ ----2 7 1,666 j __ 5,_o5_3_! __ 5_,s_'i_J 5_,_4s_t5_:-268, rn 1 British Ships cleared with Cargoc~, ............. .. Do. do. in Ballast, ................... .. !,802 12:l I 5,5 I 5,442 :W0,155 Total, ............... 4.925 5,715,597 Foreign Shipo entered with Cargoes, ............... : 2,648 Do. do. in Ballast, ..................... ; 195 I 4,073 a:rn 219,9:39 : 2G3,Hl I 4,876 1' 5,530,lLi .-5,586 186 367,231 I _2_6_9_,0_2_7_1 __ 5,062 :~,897 .346 157,489 2,522 8,15G 186 3,867 201 ,667 i ,241 261,35G 9,0(jtj 270,.'364 152,063 7,331 1------,-----Total, ............... 1 2,843 i----I 4,293,269 : 165,645 .Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes, ............... : 2,265 Do. do. in Ballast, ..................... / 580 3,6.53,500 l 45,190 i 646,821 : 24,i24 I I 1----Total, ............... 1 2,845 i 4,300,321 i--169~914 i Steamships nuder 60 tons entered with Cnrgoes, ... Do. do. do. in Ballast., ..... 971 609 49,6541 I 20,588 : I Total, .............. 1,580 :------[ i 70,242 I Steamships nncier 60 tons cleared with Cargoes, .. Do. do. do. in Ballast, ...... 1.001 I 579 ----Total, ............... -1,.580 I Junks entered with Cargoes, ....................... """""""""' /,I Ii) 4,769 Do. do. in Ballast, ............................. 1 ,_ ___ Total, ............. .. ,Junks cleared with Cargoes, ........................ Do. do. in Ballast, ............................ .. -Total, ........... Total of all Vessels entered, ...................... Total of all Vessels cleared, ...................... .. Total 12,544 9,921 2,625 21 ,8!J8 21,886 I 50,3841 19,858 .1 io,212 I I 638,610 i 440,496 1,099,106 951,959 192,8;)5 1,144,264 11,184,701 I 1,230,424 22,415,125 of a~l Vessels entered a111I cleared, i II l 43,794 Foreign Trade, ............................... j 11 __ -___ 1_. Loc,\L TRADE. 11,888 4,452 16,335 12,043 4,292 16,335 88,558 61,210 149,768 119,392 29,340 l48,iB2 603,414 604,008 1,207,422 2,708 2,152 569 2,721 I, l 78 845 2,023 1,213 824 ----2,037 -----8,233 4,723 ----12,956 4-,068 ,908 : 159,394 I 3,440 622 ,865 128 ; 137,760 21,989 --,------4,062 ,993 15!-J,749 61 29 90 58 32 l07 ,205 ,312 15,592 G,876 22,4GS --:----,228 i 1 u,948 ,602 I 6,645 __ I 90 ,83o I 22,.-59;3 --j-----679 ,448 ; 82,633 430 ,232 57,;192 1,109 140,025 --9,7401-876 ,680 ,669 ,893 107,0,59 31,9, 4 3,137 I 12,87i ----22,740 22,697 --45,437 I' 214 1,091 11,164 11,142 2~,307 ,562 ,386 ,731 139,033 590,068 591,739 ;117 1,181,lOi --/--/----:_,".''''-''." Total ,J 1111ks entered, ................................... 21, 79:i 1,u:;0,2-12 i 184,~ltm 20,5oi \\29,2:rn l H,421 Do rlearcd i JJ ;oi I I O'i7 07H i Hll,,j,5 20,:\84 919,28,1 171,D78 .'ocnl Trndc ;11~~,,:~:;;,~:~;:.~~,::.~,~:::: ::::::.::1===--40-~:-4!-J~---2-:(-l~',':!120 1,---:l_G_6_,5_7_4_ ---4-0,-95_1 ___ 1~,~-4=8=,5=2=2=::. ==::_3-4:5_,-i_.,~=19= al Foreign Trnile rntered m//l cfrarerl, ......... 43,i9,1 22,415,\2.i J' otnl Local Trnde rutcred and t:/c{(rcd, ............ : '13,498 2,0H7,::l20 ----------Gr:111:I Tola), ...... :!4,5n2,H5 1,207,422 :l66,5H l,fii:3,990 45,437 I 40,951 86,388 22,307,11 i 1,8-18,.'i:?2 24,] ,5,i,li:3/1 1,181,807 8-1.\99\J ] ,.j27,806

PAGE 110

Table X. --~~turn of Liceuscd Steam-launches Entered in the Colony Of Hongkong dnring the year ending 31st Deeernlier, lD
PAGE 111

Table XI. Return of License,! Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the year ending 31st December, 1909. PLACES. Within the WatersoftheColonyl909, Do., 1908, Outside the Waters of the Colony:Shamshui, Kongmun, I : Kamcheuk, TOWING. NOT TOWING. TOTAL. ----------------------------Vessels. TonCrews. PassenVessels. TonCnws. ShippPassenVessels. TonCrews. ShippPassenCoal. Cargo llnrgo \Bunker ~~--gers. ___ I nage. ---~d.Ton~:~---~---ed.Tons. gers. Tona. i r22,2so 2,501,124 s2;,ss; 0,1;0 lli.iH 2.661,11c; 0;1,424 I 3,2;r.,ooo 219.094 0,1114,200 1,~05,311 a,2s21010 i 30,508 12n,416 2,520132i 932,i62 :l,260 9314-ltl 2,710,014 Gii,698 1,8:3,633 222,862 512S0,3H 11610,460 1,826,893 I 31,701 ------------___ i ___ -----1-------_________ __ 8 7 228 121 52 51 1 28 9 7 256 121 60 51 68 .'jQ Total, ............... --1-5 103 1 28 i 8 I 16 877 111 118 Wuchow, ................................. 14 3971 100 I 14 397 JOO 110 i I I Macao, ................................... ., 50 2,0l5i 406 219112,1111 3,673 2,83D 2,555 269 14,126 4,079 2,839 2,5551 475 I I I Other places, ........................... 500 li,097 I 3,683, 2,230 38,245 8,362 __ 18,56_:,_/ 1,281 ,55,342 12,045 __-120,792 :-4,657 Total, ........................ 564 19,509 4,189 2,230 1,000 j:i0,356112,035 j 2,839 ,21,117 1,564 69,865 16,224 2,839 j23,347 1_5,242 Grand Total, Foreign, 579 19,858 4,292 2,230 I !,OJI 1.50,384 j12,04312,839121,l l 7 1,580 i0,242 16,335 2,839123,34715,360 --------------

PAGE 112

Table ,XII. Number of Boat Lieeuees issued and fees collected during the year 1909 as compared with the previous year. ( Unde1 Table U, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.) DESCRIPTION 0~' BOATS. LICENCES. 1908. DUPLICATES. REPAINT ING. FEES. 1909. LICENCES. DuPLI I REPAINT-CATES. ING. FEES. ---$-1-----------Passeuger Boats, Class A, ......... 1 Passenger Boats, Class B, ........ -: Passenger Village Boats, ......... / C~rgo Boats, .......................... f Lighters, .............................. Water Boats, ......................... 1 Other Boats, ......................... li38 813 1,454 1,350 154 81 892 3 } I 5}9 } 1 10,348.00 997 1,617 1,242 3 1 25,185.75 6,669.00 1,493.25 4,309.75 153 76 1,229 Cinder, Bum, Hawker allll Mar-I ine Dealer's Boats, ............ 341 il7.25 410 ii Fish Drying Hulks, ...... ...... 66 416.25 2 1 4 Repaintiug Fees, $0.25 each, ...... ----_____ \ ____ s_1_, ___ 20_._2_5_, _____ -----, 783 ---TOTAL, ................ 5,689 I 8 I 81 $49,159.50 G,320 I 8 i83 -----$ 10,933.75 22,709.75 6,838.00 1,454.00 5,60S.80 864.00 492.25 195.i5 $49,096.30 t1 u~ Ul

PAGE 113

-D~3 -Table XIII. Comparative Statement. of Revenue collected in the Harbour Department Lluriug the Years 1908 anJ 1909. Hea
PAGE 114

Table ~II. Number of Boat Liceuces issued and fees collected during the year 1909 as compared with the previous year. ( Under Table U, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.) DESCRIPTION 0~' BOATS. LICENCES. 1908. DUPLICATES. REPAINTING. 1909. PEES. LICENCES. CATES. ING. FEES. DuPLI I REPAINT---------1-1------Passeuger Boats, Class A, ......... 538 3 } $ 1 519 } $ 2 Passcnge~ B?ats, Class B, r 813 1 10,348.00 997 Passengm Village Boats, 1,(54 1,617 C~rgo Boats, ........................... 11 1,350 25,185.75 1,242 Lighters, .............................. 154 3 6,669.00 153 Water Boats, ............. 81 1,493.25 76 Other Boats, ......................... 1 892 1 4,309.75 1,229 Cinder, Bum, Hawker a11Ll Marine Dealer's Boats, ........ .. Fish Drying Hulks, ............. 341 66 717.25 416.25 410 77 1 4 Repainting Fees, $0.25 each, ... _________ \ ____ 81_, ___ 20_._2_5_, __________ TOTAL, ........ .. 5,689 81 81 $49,159.50 G,320 I 8 ~-------------------------10,933.75 22,709.75 6,838.00 1,454.00 5,608.80 864.00 492.25 783 195.75 783 $49,096.30 t1 i:,,:,

PAGE 115

-D 33 Table XIII. Comparative Statement. of Reven11e collected in the Harbour Department ,lnriug the Years 1908 auJ 1909. Head of Receipts. I. Light Dues, Ordinauce 10 of 1899, ,, Special Assessment, .......... .. 2. Licences and Internal Revenue not other-wise specified :Amount 1901:i. $ c. i9,97.5.68 Amount 1909. $ c. 82,473.37 90,33i.67 Boat Licences, .. .. .. .... .. .. .. .. .... .. .... .. ... 49,159.50 49,096.30 Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-dinance 1 of 1889, ..................... 1,30.'i.OO Emigration Brokers' Lice1weti, Orrliuance I of 1889,............ ......... ...... 1,000.00 Fines,............................................. 6,5i 5.60 Fishing Stake and Stat,ion Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, ................. 137.90 Fishing Stake and Station Licences, New 1,035.00 1,000.00 6,115.25 206.20 Territories, Onl. 10 of 1899, ............ : 2, I i6.G0 2,205.50 Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899, ... 45,826.75 46,599.~5 Junk Licences, &c., New Territories, i Ordinance 10 of l 899, .................. I 19,831.45 22,897.00 Pilots' Licences, Onli1rnnce 3 of 1904, I 105.00 100.00 Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899, .............................. 4,476.25 3. Fees of Court or Office, P:wments for specific purposes and Reimbursements-in-Aid:-Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, 4,106.50 Ordinance 10 of 1899,.................. 23, i65.80 22,i 13.20 Engage1ncnt of Masters and Engineers of Stearn-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance 270.00 320.50 JO of 1899, ...... ........................ 2,370.00 2,607 .'50 Explosives, Storage of-Ord. lO of 1899, 9,831.43 lil,469.lG Medical Examination of Emigrnuts, Ord. 1 of 1899, ................................. "'43,1.55.75 t,-50,723.00 Printed Forms, Hale of, ............... ...... 278.50 151.50 Prirnte Moorings anti Buoys, Rent for-Ordinance 10 of 18D9,............ ...... 3,480.00 Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act), I Ordinance 10 of 1899, ................ .. Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificat.es, Orrlinance 10 of 1899,..... ............ 8,810.00 699.00 3,480.00 593.00 3,480.00 Sugar Certificates and Permits, Ord. 14 of 1904, .............................. 1,155.00 Survey of Steamships, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899, .............................. 29,692.71 29,790.52 Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord. .. 1 of 1891,......... ..... ...... ............ 28,600.00 29,200.00 M;scellaneous Receipts-Message Fees for 605.00 notifying ships, ...................... 90.60 134.40 Total, .................. $ 357,768.52 462,469,82 t P. T. 0.

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-D34 Stntemebt of Emigrution Fees, 1908 :Revenue rollected. by. Harbour Department, .... $ 43,J,'55.7,'i Registrar General's Office, 3,862.00 St.amp Office, on a/c of Bill of Healt.h, .. 8,928.00 ::.\ledical Department, ... $ 55,945.75 Expenditure incuned by. $ 4,000.00 (Estimated.) 3,88u.40 14,634.46 $ 22,519.86 Net Revenue, .... $ 33,425.89 t l:,tatcment of Emigration Fees, 1909 :Revenue collected by. Harbour Department, .... $ Hegii,t.rar Geueral's Office, :-itamp Office, 011 a,'c of Bill of Health ........ :.\Iedical Depart.men t, .... .. 50,723.00 3,778.0ll i,H0.00 $ 61,941.00 Expenditure incurred b,IJ, $ 4,000.00 (Estimated.) 4,669.01 15,963.98 $ 24,632.99 Net Revenue, ... ,$ 37,308.01

PAGE 117

Table XIV. :sumrua.ry of Chinese Emigration from Hongkong for Ports other than in China, ,luring the year ending 31st December, 1909. --------------,-----------________ _____________ .,, BRITISH VESSELS. FOREIUN VESSELS. Adults. Children. Adults. :children. --,-. Total. :----f M. F. M. F. I Jf. F. JI. F. WHITHER BOUND. Total. --------.----------1---------1----1---To Bank~, ...... ....... ... .. .. .... ...... .. I I 403 1 403 ,, Batavia, ... ................. .... ... ........ i 2,030 154 185 IS 2,387 Billiton, ...... ......... ... ... ......... ......... I .. I 4,42i'> 191' 15 5 4,464 ,, Callao, Peru, ... .. ..... . 939 4:~ 5 .. r, ,, Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, ....... .. .. 561 3 4 6:1 J ,545 122 i 8-1 33 ,, Iquique................... ...................... ... 197 I i 4 ,, Japan Ports, ........................ ....... 6 fl 121 11 3 2 ,, Liverpool, ......... ......... ............ ..... 127 3 130 ... I M acassar, ...... ............ ...... ............ 190 fj i 13 Manzanilla,..................... .............. 300 4 304 2 ,, Mauritius, ........ ..... .... .. ..... .. .. .... .. 270 10 17 297 ,. Muntok, ... .................................... 2,0.50 ,, Pellew Islands, ......... ... ............... ... 51 ,, Salina Cruz, ................................. 414 16 430 29 3 2 1,784 202 127 209 2 2,050 r,7 20 4 ,, Samarang, ......... .. .. .......... ... .. .. ... 4 San Francisco, U.S.A., ..................... 5!!9 2 41 M2 4,9H 40 MO 9 5,533 ,. Seattle, ... .. ... .... .... .. .. ... ... ..... .... 2,5 3 28 ,, Sournbaya, .......... ....... ............... ... ::: I ::: 27 2 ... I 29 ,, Straits Settlements, ........................ 82,117 6,2071 1,75:l 745 ,40,822 6,000 827 25!1 108 i 7,104 ,, V~nco~ner, ~~itish Colu~bia, ........... 7,656 5' 32! I 1,e~1 ,, V1ctorrn, Br1t1sh Columbia, ............... 1,168 6 BI "I l,-60 i Total Passcugers, 190\/, ..................... 143,652 6,233 2,286 752152,!)23 22,048 1,1,s 1,10~ 17G i2-l,507 .n,,., 1908, ..................... 43,097 7,168 2,011 1s2 lss,11s 16,27-5 oso 602110a ,17,963 Total Passengers by British Vessels, ....................... Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels, ....................... Excess of Passengers hy British Vessels, ..... GRAND TOTAL. I Adults. Children. Total. I 111. F. JI. .F: ------------403 ... ... .. 403 2,030 J;j4 185 18 2,387 4,425 I!) 15 5 4,-164 944 ... 43 .. 987 l.601 125 88 33 1,847 197 l 4 ... 202 127 I 3 2 133 127 j ... 3 ... 130 190 6 13 ... 209 302 / ... 4 .. 306 270 10 17 ... 207 2,050 ... .. ... 2,050 51 3 2 1 57 443 ... !Cl .. 459 l ... ... .. 4 5,543 42 581 9 G,175 25 ... 3 .. 28 27 2 ... ... 20 38,117 7,034 2,012 853 48,0](l 7 .(J5(i 5 324 2 7,987 I,1Ci8 (I BI 5 l,:WO --------(l,'j 700 j_'_ 7,408 3,301 928 77,430 159,372 8,148 2,673 888 71,081 -----43.652 6,233 2,28(i 752 52,923 22;048 1,175 I.108 17(1 24,;;01 -----------21,604 5,058 1,178 576 28,416

PAGE 118

-D36 -Table XV. Return of Emig~ation from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1876 to 1909 inclusive, YEAR. 1880, 1885, 1890, 1895, 1900, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, No. o~ EmGRANTS. 50,325 57,517 42,066 73,138 83,643 64,341 76, i25 105,967 71,081 77,430

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Table XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Porta other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1900 to 1909 inclusive. Whither bound. 1900. 1901. 1902. I 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. I 1907~ 1908. 11909. Straits Settlements, Males, til,0i\7 48,732 49,260 53,759 fi3,131 45,948 51,5891~=40,746 40,129 Straits Settlements, Females, ......... 8,156 8,174 8,408 9,628 9,596 9,026 ~1__!.:~ 8,893 7,887 ------------Total, ........................ G9,213 56,903 57,668 63,387 62,727 54,9i4 60,320 83,048 49,639. 48,016 ----------. Other Ports, Males, ........................ 14,350 12,758 13,967 19,915 13,499 9,308 16,348 22,829 21,299 28,966 Oth~r Ports, Females, 80 113 76 82 78 59 57 90 14/1 449 ---------------------Total ....................... 14,430 12,871 14,043 19,997 13,577 9,367 16,405 22,919 21,442 29,414 ---------76,7251 l 05,967 G ranrl Total, ............ 83,613 (;9,7i4 71,711 83,384 i6,30-l 64,3-ll 71,081 77,430 ------------------~ ----------------

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Table XVII. Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the Year 1909. BRITISH VESSELS. WHERE FROM. Adults. / Children. J I Total. ____________ ._!!:__-3::_I~ P. --From Bangkok, Siam, ......... .. ,. Batavia, .................. .. ,. Callao, Peru, .... .. .. .. .. 739 739 ,. Honolulu, Sandwich FOREIGN VESSELS. GRAND TOTAL, Adults. Children. Adults. Children. Total.1-'--------1-----1 Total. JI. F. M. 1'". M. F. M. F. -------------~---------19 5,009 4,U5 ... 10 10 6,048 ... 4,415 5,009 4,415 739 19 10 10 5,048 -1,415 739 Islands, 75 ... ... ... 75 924 16 12 9 961 999 16 12 9 1,036 ,. Java and Sumatra, ...... 1 ... ... ... ... ... 844 ... ... ... 8H 844 ... ... ... 844 ,. Japan Ports, ... ....... 563 ... ... ... 563 791 ... ... ... 791 1,354 ... ... ... 1,31i4 ,. Germ,m New Guinea,., ... ... ... ... ... 21 ... ... ... 21 21 ... ... ... 21 11 Mauritius, ............... 274 ... ... ... 274 ... ... ... ... ... 274 ... ... ... 274 ,. Macassar, ... .... .... ..... ... ... .. .. 389 .. .. .. 389 389 ... .. ... 389 ,. 'Melbourne, ............. 11 1,057 14 8 7 1,086 120 ... ... ... 120 1,177 14 8 7 1,206 11 New South Wales,.... 488 4 2 1 495 157 ... ... ... 157 645 4 2 I 652 11 New Zealand Ports, .... 80 ... ... ... 80 ... ... ... ... ... 80 ... ... ... 80 ,. Queensland Ports,...... 734 13 4 r, 756 .. ... ... ... ... 734 13 4 5 756 ,, 8alina Cruz, ............. j 75 .. ... .. 75 ... ... ... ... ... 75 ... ... ... 75 ,. San Francisco, U.S.A., 189 ... ... ... 189 4,199 31 20 14 4,264 4,388 SI 20 14 4,453 11 Seattle, U.H.A., ......... 46 ... ... ... 46 477 ... ... ... 477 523 ... ... ... 523 ,, Soma,nn,, ............ ... .. ... ... ... 1,236 .. ... ... I"' 11,235 ,,, ... ... 1,2'5 11 South Australian Ports, 71 2 I ... I 74 .. ... ... ... 71 I 2 1 ... 74 Carri1d furll'ar1l, ... 4,391 33 I I,; 13 i 4,452 ~,ii:,~-66 4~ 33 22,972. !lFI-_ ~-7 46 23~ t::J c,.:, 00

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Table XVII,-Continued. Summury of Chi11ese Emigrnuts Retnrned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the Year 1909. BRITISH VESSELS. FOREIGN VESSELS. GRA.ND TOTAL. WHERE FROM. Adults. Children. Adults. Chiklren. Total. ________ 1 ____ 1Tot:tl. ______ _____ -----M. I F. Ill. i 1,: -Jll. I F. Ill. 1 F. --Ji. Jt'. .JI. I F. Brougltt Jo1rvard,. ... 4,391! 33 Iii : 13 4,4ii2 I K,iifll liG 4~ I il/l; 18,722 22,971 9U :H -iti From Straits Settlements, ... 95,746 2,:i2G I, 129 725 100,12)1 ,;, 1 ,Ii I OJ 42 3,i : J,Ul54 l I 0.!l:22 2,627 I, I, I '60 ., flourabaya, ............... 2-1 ... ... .. 24 1,112 ... ... .. ; 1,112 1,11l6 ... ... .. ., Tacoma, U.S.A.,......... 1,589 ... ... 1,589 ... ... ... 1,;;s9 ... ... .. Adults. Children. ,. Tasmania, ........ ...... 52 .. 52 ... .. .. ... 52 ... .. 11 Vancouver, British 1 Columbia, ... ...... 2,492 ,, Victoria, British 1 Columbia,.......... 873 I ... I 7 31 2! I 8 a 7 2 a 2 2,510 880 2,492 8i3 s 3 2 Total. I J.i,S:l 1.136 1,589 52 2,510 880 --------------i----Total Passengers, 1909, ... 105,167 2,570 1,153 743 109,633 3,869 167 84 681:li\,188 140,01l6 2,737 1.:!37 ~I l-14,8~1 no., 190s, .. 110,sa1 3,a3o 1,2aa 837 116,091141,3a8 j 1n 102 as 41,11s 1s1,120 3,so1 1,368 I oos I 151,soo I I I Total Passengers by British Vessels, ......... 105,lfl7 2,570 1,1:',a 743 ,1 l~~,G3:l Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels, .................. ........ 34,869 167 8-l: 68 I 3,,,188 ICxcess of Passengers by llritish Yessels, ....................... 70,298 2,403 l ,0(i!l G75 l~-i,4-l6 I

PAGE 122

-D40Table XVIII. Return of Emgirants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1875 to 1909 inclusive. -----------18i.5, 1880, 188.5, 1890, lt-95, moo, 190.5, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909. 1 / ......... : :::::::::1 / 1 Xo. o~ bnnGRANT8. 38,;,02 Sl,01 l 80,773 98,,534 112,685 121,322 140,483 134,912 145,822 15i,809 144,821

PAGE 123

Table XIX. I Return of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other thau in China, for 10 years, from moo tq 190!:1, inclusive. --------------IVhnt from, UJOO. 1.901. 1902. 1003. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. Straits Settlements, )lales, Straits Settlements, 1rcmulcs, ....... !lS,782 106,02:l I08.:l62 116,70/; 123,542 l 14,6ii3 110,525 121,935 125,228 4,58(i 4,fH3 a;so1 5,778 4,842 6,210 4,043 2,403 4,422 Total, ............ 103,368 I !1,866 112,253 122,483 1128,384 120,863 114,568 124,338 129,650 -----Other Ports, l\falcs, ................... Other Pol'tR, l<'emalcs, ................ i li,6GI rn,srn 17,/J2(j i 17,826 20,447 19,291 I l!J,848 21,387 27,869 293 2\J-1 2:rn 242 364 329 496 97 :l90 I Total, ............ Orr:ind Total, ............. 17,954 17,164 I 17~559 I 18,0GS 20,811 19,620 20,344 21,4841 28,159 __ I __ 121,322 129,030 129,8121140/,51 14!l,19ii 140,483 13-1,912 145,822 I 57,809 -----~-------------_, ---!DOD. 112,09:l 3,387 115,480 29,180 161 29,341 lH,821

PAGE 124

Table XX. Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1909. 'C ., ., ., ,.; Official ... bll Built Name of Vessel. "'di "'., Rig. Where built and when. Remarks. Number. ~J:l t5 of. -~ J:l Mo ~.,,.. ~E-< --------127,002 ,----:-4:-8------La Conference, ...... (Str.) ~il Wood Hongkong, ............ l!.108. ..... Hoi Tung (formerly J Ship's name changed under Yingking), ...... 116,031 467.87 90 ,. ............ 1903. / the sanction of the Board of Trade. Shibata Marn (forr N orlhsands, Sunder-I \ Ship's name retained under merly Moyune), 91,986 1,714.35 i50 Schooner Steel t land, ............ 1887. f / the sanction of the Board of Trade Hong On, ............ Motor. 127,003 47.50 70 Nil Wood Hongkong, ............ l!l09. ...... Po Koi, ............ Lighter. 127,004 153.20 Nil Canton, .............. 1906. ...... Tien Ma, ............... Motor. 127,005 35.72 13 I Mongkok, Kowloon, l ...... '' I Hongkong ..... 1909, I Ladye Jessie, ......... (Str.) 127,006 32.00 20 Hongkong, ............ 1901. Sold to Foreigners, 1909. On Lee, .............. ,, 127,007 396.55 80 Steel ............ 1909. Po Kwong, ......... Lighter. 127,008 85.74 Nil Singapore, ............ 1900. ...... Hoi Wen, ............. (Str.) 127,009 56.15 20 Wood Hongkong, ............ 1909. ...... Africus, .............. Lighter. 127,010 31.86 Nil Steel ............ 1909. ...... Arctos, ................ 127,011 31.86, ............ 1909. ...... Taikoo Law, ......... (Str.) 127,012 20.37 16.6 Wood ............ 1909. ...... Koo Kut, ............ Lighter. 127,013 86.68 Nil Steel ............ 1909. ...... KooWo, ............. 127,014 33.23 ............ 1909. ...... Koo Lee, 127,015 53.22 I ............ 1909. ...... ---------------------------------

PAGE 125

Table XXI. Return of Registers of Vessels ca11<,elletl at the Port of Ho11gkong, during the Year 1909. Name of Vessel. Oflki:il Number. 109,867 Wai Hoi. ............... 1 Tow,..................... I Ui,O,l!I J,ady~ J~ssi:,~-... .. __1 _1_2_7_,uuG Rig. Bllilt of. \\'here an,l when built-. Ilc,,son of Cancellation. '---------------------------------------63.22 1902 H
PAGE 126

Table XXII. N11ml1cr 11ntl To1111nge of Vos~el~ in Foreign Trude cmlerntl n11d clonrcd i;i11ce IH!J9, ~bowiug increases and docrensc8. Y~:An. 1900 !!JOI I D02 I90a 190,J l 90;i"' 1906.t 1!:lOi 1908 190\) No, OF VESSELS. 46,36,5 46,20] 48,i0G 46,2ii6 51,173 ,51,iii8 44,,iii0 47,660 4,i,40:l 4:l,i!H Not iuercnsc, .Net docrcnse, ToNNA,5l4/a!37 :n,716,sio 22,299,;382 22,653,616 22,4.53,077 2:\,032,891 22 ,30,5, 131 22,41 !i, 125 lNCHEASE. Y cssels, 2,5();j 4,918 405 113,692 551,28G 1,688,928 2,202,633 ii1'!2,i 12 354,03-1 --------------DECREASE. 9,607 164 2,45 l I I i,028 I 3,110 579,814 200,539 2,257 I____ l 09,994 l ,G09 : i27,i60 1~938 ____ 1 G,183,083 ::==:_=J:=1,=1=16-.-i--928,299 ........................... 1 I 5,2.i4,794 ........................... 12, l iS Steamships not excccdin~ no tone in ~'oreign Tra,le included for first time. t Decrease dnc to Typhoon of 1/sth September, l 901;. t:J

PAGE 129

-D,17 Table XXIII. Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. Year. Total Revenue of Dr.partment. Total Ex venditure of be part men t. Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue. ---------------1------------1900, ........... .. 1901, ........... 1902, .......... .. 1903, .......... .. 1904, .......... .. 190,'i, .......... .. 1906, .......... .. 1907, ........... 1908, ............ 1 1909, ........... $ c. 246,039.12 251,597.39 :266,765.99 285,288.42 301,128.95 H02,8li.i6 27.4,008. i8 348,300.10 3.5i,768.,52 462,469.82 ----------------------------------$ c. 96,401.,59 128,061.74 187,575.65 15:-i,936.52 1 46,9,11.90 147,396.i2 l (i0,899.99 160,339.48 163,5i9.54 172,680.,55 0/ /0 39 50 51 55-71 41:l 48 67 58-!3 46 45-72 3i

PAGE 130

-D 48 Annexe A. MERCANTILE MAIUN 1,; 01-'l<'[C I:. Eighteen thousand three hundred and forty-nine (18,349) seamen were shipped and 17,395 discharged at the l\iercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year (20,990 and 19,529 in 1908). One hundred and nineteen distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home, &c., of these 18 .were sent Home, 11 to Calcutta, 1 to Colombo, 2 to Port Said, 3 to Sydney, 3 to Singapore, 14 passengers to Canton, 1 to Calcutta, 1 to New York, 1 taken charge of by Superintendent, Sailors' Home, 1 joined Chinese Customs, l joined Harmston's Circus, l employed locally, 2 disappeared, 1 remained at Sailors' Home and 58 obtained employment. Two thousand nine huuclrecl and fifty-Rix clollars and fifty-two cents (;if2,D5G.52) were expended by the Harbour lHm;ter on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressetl seamen. Annexe B. h1PoHT:-: ,\XlJ EXPORTS OFFICE. Li'luor Traffic .for the period f1om the 17th September to the 31 st Decembe1, 1909. Ordinance No. 27 of 1909 to provide for tho collection of duties upon Intoxicating Liquora was passed on the 17th ~eptem ber at 7 p.m. and step:, were immediately taken to make provision for the immediate collection of such revenue. 2. A Preventive Service was at once instituted and began operation on the same evening that the Ordinance was passed' by boarding and searching all incoming Rivel' Steamers, a West River boat heiug the first to be boarded. The Preventive Service under the Superintendent's control is composed of:--5 European Officers and 20 Chinese Searchers ; and tho Imports and Exports Opium and Sugar Office was organized as a Revenue Office-coping with the traffic in the three commodities-Liquors, Opium and Sugar. These premises having proved too congested an additional office adjoining the Harbour Office is now under construction and will be r,eady for occupation during the enrrent month.

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-D49 -A fast launch was purchaseJ for the Preventive Service afloat. The Water Police assist this service by a morning search to the eastward of all junks arriving in the Eastern Junk Anchorage, and the preventive launch with boat in tow boarding all junks arriving in the \V estern Junk Anchorage. 3. The Revenue collected on Liquors imported into the Colony during the period under review amounted to :-European Liquors, ........................... $ 32,603.61 Chinese Wines, ...... ... ... .................. 64,490.59 Licences issued for 19 W arehouses@$250 = 4,750.00 $101,844.20 4. Table I gives a return of the working of the liquor traffic from the 17th September to the 31st December, 1909. 5. The quantity of liquors and wines in stock when the Ordin ance came into force will somewhat delay the revenue attaining estimated figures but it is anticipated that as this old stock is liquidated the collection will show a marked increase. 6. The Godowns of the Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co., Ld., and those of the Halt's Wharf have been bonded as King's Warehouses and the following is a list of the Licensed Warehouses :-No. 1 Messrs. A. S. Wat~on & Co. Ld., ... Alexandra Building. ,, 2 ,, Caldbeck,McGregor&Co., .. 15 Queen's Road Central. ,, ;J ,, ;Jelisen & Co., ..... ............ 18 Catchick Street. ,, 4 H. Price & Co., Ld., ......... 10 Queen's Road Central. ,, 5 ,, Ki Fung Hong, ............... :W Connaught Road We~t. ,, 6 ,, Rn.decker & Co., ............... b Burrow Street, Wanchai. ,, 7 ,, 8hiu Wo Hon~, ............... :J96 Des Vceux Road West. ,, 8 ,, W a Kee Hong~ ............... 70 Con naught Road VVest. ,, 9 ,, Yu Kee Hong, ............... 2 In Ku Lane. ,, 10 ,, Kwon~ Sang Houg, ......... :36 Wing Lok Street. ,, 11 ,, Chu Win~ Oil, ............... 22 & 24 1\ew Market Street. ,, 12 ,, Hang Lam Chong, ............ 15 Possession Street.. ,, 13 ,, Caldlieck, :McGre~or & Co., 8 Queen's Road Central. ,, 14 ,, i-l. Ruttonjee & Son, ........ .4 Wo On Lane. ,, 15 ,, Kwong Man Tseung, ..... .4 Wilmer Street. ,, 16 ,, Kwan Tye, ..................... 112 Queen's Road Central. ,, 1 i ,, Lai Wo Tseung, ............ 5 Lee Shing Street. ,, 18 ,, Tin Wo Yuen, ............... 32 & 326 Qneen's Rd. West. ,, 19 The Connaught Aernt.ed l Water Manufactory 1 St. Francis Street. Co., Ld., ............... } 7. Up to the present there has been no friction with any of the licensees who are apparently satisfied with the administration of this Department as regards the control of these vVarehouses and the interpretation of the Ordinance. One European Excise Officer attends to the licensees dealing in Chinese Wines and another European Officer to the firms dealing in European Liquors.

PAGE 132

-I>508. Of Distilleries there are the following: --Oriental Brewery ......... at Lai Chi Kok. Victoria Distillery ...... at Kowloon City. Kwong Shing Yuen ...... at Tseung Sha Wan. Tung Mi .................. at 15 Tung Lo Wan. Ching Kee Ohan ......... at 1 Shau Ki Wan. Pan Ohan .................. at 46 Cross Street, Kowloon City. Wo Chan ............ at 26, Belchers Street, Kennedy Town. Sheung Wo, On Kee .. at 2, Wo Hing Street, Shau Ki Wan. Tiu Yuen .......... at 30, Kennedy Street, Yaumati. Hop Fat ........ -I Yee Loong ............. I Lun Yick .............. ~n Tai .................. 1rat Chin Wan, New Territories. Sun Lung ............. 1 Ye Ki l Cheung On ........ Wo Shun ............. J Sun Hing Loong ...... Tye Kiu, Un Long, New Territories. Li Sang Un ............ -, Kwong Lung Shing .. I Tiu Hing .............. r Cheung Chow, New Territories. Kwong Lung Chan ... I Hung Hing ............ J 9. The collection of duties on liquors from all Distilleries in the New Territories was made effective from the 1st January, 1910, but previous to that date the following Distilleries contributed the sums shewn below :-Hop Fat. ............ at Chin Wan,. Sun Hing Lung .. at Un Long, ... Li Sang Yuen ..... 7 5,796 Gallons=$ 869.40 6,776 ,, 1,039.60 Kwong Lung Sing. I t Oh } Tiu Hing ............. r a Chung 12,995 Kwong Lung Chan I ow, 1,94!)..!6 Hung Hing ......... J Total collected in New Territories, ...... 25,568 Gallons=$3,858.46 No difficulty prevails in this direction and they all comply with the Ordinance; a control on the out-turn of each distillery is effected by one European Officer who frequently visits them and by Chinese Searchers. 10. In conclusion I would remark that while safeguarding the Revenue by the observance of the Ordinance much leniency has had to be shown so as to allow one and all to fall in with the regu lations but a gradual strict application of the law will now become necessary.

PAGE 133

-D 51 Opium. 11. Eighteen thousand one hundre1l and sixty'-three (18,16a) permits for export all(! rernornl were issued from this Offic
PAGE 134

Im ported, Ex ported, I 1908. I 'Cases. lb. Oz. 289=7,053.i 384=9, 129.2 -D52 -MORPHIA. 1909. I lncrease. Cases. lb. Cases. lb. 293='7,410 4= 356. -282=7,23.'i I ... .. -------------COCAINE. I Decrease. I Oz. Cases. lb. Oz. 9 --... 102=1,894. 2 -----------------------------1908. 1909, Increase. Decrease. I Cases. lb. --;------1 lm-i Coses, lb. Oz. I Co.~es. lb. ,Casrs. lb. I I 121, __ p:n'ted,; li=68. i--Exported, ----------2=12. 8 1 ----------------------Imports and Exports of Sugai', 13. Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong Ly vessels of different nationalities during the Year:-1908. 1909. Tons. Tons. American Steamers, 373 6,663 Austrian ............... 27 101 British 163,317 175,Ia3 Chinese ............... 723 2,314 Dutch ............... 58,234 77,344 Danish ............... 102 French ............... 2,103 3,254 German 22,824 61,119 Italian 169 294 Japanese 71 36 Norwegian ............... 8,851 Portuguese ............... 1,100 1,503 Russian ............... 14 Swedish ............... 40 2,801 By Junks 1,372 271 -------Total, . 250,469 ~~.Jc

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-~ D 53 Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong during the Year :1908. 1909. Tons. Tons. From Belgium, ................... .. ,, Chhia, ....................... ,, Cochin-Chiua, .............. 30 12,101 12,108 7,767 .5,012 ,, Gennany, .................. 25 16 ,, Java, ........................ 178,790 278,030 ,, London, ................... .. 33 16 ,, l\fauritius, ;, ............... ;330 400 ,, New Territories, ........... 129 62 ,, New York, ................ .. 2 ,, Philippine Islands, ........ 50,492 41,930 ,, Straits, .................... .. 772 2,108 Total, .... ., .. .. 250,469 339,684 --= Ninety-one (_!H) Certificates of Origin for exportation of Sngar were issued from this Office during the Year Hl09. Thirty (aO) Permits for Delivery of Sugar which arrived in the Colony without Certificate of Origin were i~sucd from thi,s Office during the Year 1909. IMPORTS. The Heturn shows that during the Year the amount of Sugar reported was as follows:-Imported, ......... 4th Felmiaiy, 1910. 1908. Tons. 250,469 1909. Tons. 339,68-! Increase. Ions. 89,215 CHAHLES \Yllr. BECh\\Tnr, Lr., H.>"., Supc1lntenrlent, Imports & Exports Office.

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Table I. Class of Liquor. Ale and Beer, ....................... Bitters, .............................. Brandy, .............................. Champagne, .......................... Claret, ............................... .. Gin, ................................... Liqueurs, ............................ .. 11alaga, .............................. Maderia, .............................. Muscatel, ............................. Marsala, ............................. .. :Medicated Wine, .................. Port, ................................. Rum, ................................. Sake, ................................. Sherry, .............. ................ ; Stout, ................................. Spirits of Wine and Arrack, 8till I-lock, .......................... .. j Exported Arr ivals. J ex Ship I to Ship Ga 17 1 2 6 or ex Bond. llon.~. ~;:;-1 I 7,050 68,620 188 16 8,401 7,229 4,375 1,305 3,043 9,499 9,fi03 3,719 1,557 I 919 4 : ... 38 ... 20 ... I 76 i I 16 42 22 I 3,580 700 1,072 405 1,6i"2 295 1,4081 408 9,304 4,710 8,923 46,379 1,3] 4 I 438 0,429 Imported into the Colony (Duty paid). Gallons. 44,439 35 316 1,203 1,690 1,161 157 4 16 20 18 ... 850 667 1,377 145 9,691 ... 741 433 ~t(ll Red. Win~, .................. I 8 Still White Wme, .................. ; 9,023 886 295 Sparkling vVine, ..................... I 298 94 140 29,734 Vermouth, ............................ 1,384 750 I 215 Whisky,............................... 22,483 6,136 1 2,019 I N.i;,. w;,,., ...................... 1ss,a20 1s2,oa1 I s,121 I From Oriental B~-Beer, ... I I 1,930 ... From Distilleries-Native Wi-~1__ _____ 1 ___ a_,75_7 ___ 105,531 Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1909. In Holt's Kings In Hongkoni: & I d Kowloon Godown In L1cen~e WareCo.'s Kin:;' Warehouses. house. VVarehouse, Gallons. Gal/1>1,,q. Gallons. 200 18,304 45,487 ... 90 I 47 '"'8 I 160 8,, b I 1,908 ... 992 I 875 ... 1,260 594 I ... 2,654 2,069 ... 90 391 ... ... ... ... .. 22 .. ... .. ... .. 42 ... .. 20 I 8 J, 140 832 ... ... 4 856 ... I ... I ... I ... ... 150 1,980 21,946 20 .. ,. ,. ,,, 10 158 6,334 2,248 i i I I ------170 ... .. 701 12,067 598 115 262 132 64 261 5,674 74,986 Total in Bond. Gallon,. 63,991 137 10,856 1,867 1,854 4,723 481 ... 22 ... 42 20 1,980 ... ... 855 14,903 22,544 Ia5 262 7,842 64 419 14,256 75,156 13,484

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-D55-Table II. The following Tables show the quantity of Opium imported and exported during the years 1908 and 1909 :-1908. 1909. Increase. I Decrease. I ----I Chests. C/1csts. Chest.~. I Chests. i Imported, ............ 1 41,821 35,733~ 6,087 i Exported, 39,609 35,988 I 3,620! I I Through Cargo ----reported, but not 10,136 9,476 660 lnutled, ............ Imports and Exports of Opium Skins were reported as follows:I 1908. 1909. Increase. I Decrease. I I_ lh. lb. lb. lb. Imported, ... 55,178 43,472.5 ll,705.11 Exported, ... 55,106 44,278.11 10,82i.5 ------------

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VARIETIES OF OPIUM IMPORTED. MALWA.. PATNA. BENARES, PERSIAN, TURKISH. CHINESE, TOTAL. chests. c!tests, chest.~. chests. chests. chests. chests. 1908, 5,607 22,424 10,266 3,490 5 28 41,82 l 1909, 5,249 19,463 8,355 2,644 22 35,733 Increase, ............ Decrease, 358 2,961 1,911 846! 5 6 6,087! t, VARIETIES OF OPIUM EXPORTED. 01, v,) MALWA. PATNA. BENAR~;s. PERSIAN. TURKISH. CHINESE. TOTAL. chests. chests. chests. chests. cl11:sts. chests. chests. 1908, 5,681 21,093 9,700 3,102 5 28 39,609 1909, 5,332 19,419 8,472 2,743 22 35,988 ---Increase, ............ Decren::;e, 348 1,674 1,228 359 5 6 3,620! Thro11gli cargo reporied in Manifest but not landed { 1908 ............................. 10,136 chests. 1909 .............................. 9,476 ,,

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PLACES OF Dr,:sTINATION OF 0PIU:\I EXPORTED DURING 1909. Malwa. I Patna. I Benares .. Persian. Turkish. Chinese. 'l'otal. \ 'l'otaC-c/1ests'. cl1ests. chests. ; chests. chests. chests. chests. in tb. .----,--------1 -------____ 1_ --B1 Steamers to Amoy, 15 239 2,884 241 3,3i9 532,0,59 Bandarabbas, ........ 4 4 547 Bushire, .................................... 6 6 820 Canton, ................................... 1 474 4,955 932 9 6,370 46J,383 Chefoo, .................................... 1 39 33 72 10,-lR0 Foochow, ...................... .......... 853 428 226 703 2,210 314,4-EJ Hankow, ................................. 1 l 2 a -i3 Haiphoug, ................................. I 2 2 27-1 Boho", .................................... 153 1,761 251 2,165 342,:l:!O Hoihow, ................................ ..1 638 62 22 742 l lH,Ll:l Kong Moon, .............................. 1,021 15 l,Oafi I G,5, 76J Kwong Chow Wan, ..................... 278 278 44,4
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Table IV. DESTINATJON OF OPIGM ExPOHTF.D SINCE 1888. MALWA. P!tilip-...:Y. 4c. Other Total Year. China, Form?sa. Straits. ]!illeS, Amrrica. Canada. Eg_r;pt. f,ondon. Ports. Chest.,. 1888 27,090 2 27,092 1889 ............... 16,702 16,703 1890 ............... 13,404 5 13,409 1891 11,826 4 11.830 1892 11,936 9 8 I 1,94R 189:1 ............ .. 10,692 4 10.696 1894 ............... 10,132 53 10 2 10,197 t:1 1895 10,337 I 2 8 10,348 ~, 1896 ............... 7,464 12 7,47fi 00 1897 5,956 6 1 5,954 1898 ............... 6,896 6,896 1899 ............... 8,999 17 9,017 1900 9,391 9,392 1901 ............... 7,42 2 7,427 19(.12 ............... 7,:l 12 7,313 1!:103 ............... 7,99'.l 2 2 8,00-1 1904 ............... 8,253 15 12 8/.id 1 1905 5,878 6 2 2 5,888 1906 ............... 5,853 4 1 5,859 1907 ............... 5,700 5,700 1908 .'i/i80 1 5,681 1909 5,332 5,332

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DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED SINCE 1888. PATNA. Philip1V. c$-C. Other Total. Year. China. Formosa. Strait.~. pines. Ame1'ica. Canada. Egypt. /,ondon. Ports. Chests. 1888 ............... 23,951 17 46,5 437 8 24,878 1889 ............... 23,040 40 379 443 23,902 1890 ............... 22,775 ..... -. 250 260 908 24,193 1891 ............... 23,075 315 203 844 3 24,440 1892 ............... 18,410 410 174 954 19,948 1893 ............... 16,675 429 301 787 4 18,196 I 1894 ............... 16,758 16 4.1 330 6 167 ., 17,320 I 0 1895 ............... 15,033 245 3 307 20 15,608 tj 1896 ............... 15,783 265 5 334 16,387 Ct 1897 ............... 16,721 6 360 6 410 6 li,509 Q 1898 ............... 17,297 1 444. 37 4""' a, 18,2;-)6 1899 .............. 17,285 432 32 61 2 17,81!>. 1900 ............... 15,892 100 618 17 2 l 16,630 1901 ............... 18,328 150 160 1,073 22 19,733 1902 ............. ., 21,482 300 163 323 6 22,274 1903 ............... 21,843 309 34 507 8 80 6 22,787 1904 ............... 20,152 120 520 4 105 2 20,903 1905 ............... 22,193 602 13 90 5 2:2,906 1906 ............... 24,.569 312 8 278 10 25,1 ii 1907 ............... 21,271 22::l 307 9 592 2 22,404 1908 ............... 20,698 61 48 280 6 21,093 1909 ............... 18,959 456 4 19,419

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DES'l'INA'l'ION OPIUM EXPORTED SJN!'P.: 1888, BENARES. PhilipN.JC. Other Total, Year. China, Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Canada. Epypt. London. Ports. Chests. 1888 13,390 658 86 35 7 14,176 1889 ............ 14,625 530 37 29 874 16,095 1890 14,011 560 109 38 46 14,764 1891 ............ 15,112 399 24 109 10 15,654 1892 12,309 157 332 79 4 12,882 1893 ............ 7,418 124 2,i6 92 4 7,894 1894 ............ 6,569 179 26 70 13 6,857 tJ 1895 ............ 6,209 96 214 139 6,658 C, 1896 5,185 34 30 129 5,378 C ............ 1897 ............ 6,747 302 157 10 7,216 I I 1898 ............ 7,316 1 387 17 7,712 1899 ............. 8,263 330 4 8,597 1900 7,104 300 543 l 7,948 1901 7,297 360 42 1,099 6 8,804 1902 7,606 500 10 555 8,671 1903 7,394 566 3 753 8,717 1904 ............ 7,775 1,120 9 578 9,482 1905 ............ 8,396 880 22 615 4 9,9li 1906 ............ 10,667 2,000 84 432 8 13,191 1907 ............ 8,840 1,348 428 2 2 10,620 1908 8,491 I, 191 11 6 1 9,700 1909 ............ 7,924 544 4 8,472

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DESTINATION OPIUM ExPOllTED SINCE 1888. PERSIAN. PhilipN.,1-C. Other 1'ot1Jl. Year. China. Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Ca11arl11. Egvpt. Londo11. Po,ts. Chests. 1888 1,389 3,414 Bi 2 4,892 1889 1,463 a,429 1 64 14 6 5 4,9:12 1890 ............ 1,102 4,328 31 2 i3 18 5,554 1891 ............. 1,282 4,63i 9 10 41 5,9i9 1892 3,161 4,296 210 3 67 7,737 1893 .., ---3,i95 286 7 18 6,661 ............ -,iJiJ:) 1894 ............ 1,05 i 3,321 156 2? 4,556 1895 ............ 957 2,5f,fi 69 15 3,60i t, 1896 ............ 2,811 991 187 97 5 4,091 C: 1897 2,584 2,035 114 3 32 22 4,i90 .... ............ 1898 1,805 2,771 262 17 9 41 4,905 1899 900 3,502 572 17 43 5,0:J41900 521 2,729 1,128 5 26 92 4,497 1901 466 :!, 160 1,237 l 7 I l 90 135 4,107 1902 ............ 2,376 1,348 999 90 9 2 264 l 5,089 1903 ............ 3,774 i62 2,104 265 15 l i 6,928 190-l 2,974 1,500 333 333 H 2 1 .'i,151 1905 1,543 1,060 234 206 11 3,'i ,'i2 3,141 1906 881 485 19 47 121 2 -12 15 1,612 1907 1,396 1,209 120 149 7 771:5 16 3,6i5 1908 ............ 1,574 1,:-WO I 5 27G 46 3,102 1909 965 l,6i3 15 28 11 2.6~)2

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DESTINATION 0~' OPIUM Exi>ORTRD SINCE 1888. TURKISH. PhilipN.4" C. Othe1 Total. Year. China. Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Port.,. Chests. 1888 ............ 92 2 9 103 1889 ............ 126 2 128 1890 105 105 1891 9i 97 1892 111 111 1893 ............ 2.5 2 46 73 1894 ............ 5 44 49 t, 18>5 ............ 20 20 0 1896 22 32 54 l\!> 1897 2 2 1898 .. ......... 10 2 15 7 a 37 1899 6 20 1 27 1900 ............ 17 120 18 6 94 255 1901 ............ l 5 .5 178 189 1902 2 ..... 2 1903 ............ 10 l 9 20 1904. ............ i 1 8 1905 ............ 10 2 2 29 4 4i 1906 l 960 14 10 985 1907 3 17 5 2,5 1908 ............ 5 5 1909

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DESTINATION OF OPIUM EXPORTED SINC~~ 1888. CHINESE. Philip-N. ,t c. Other Total. J?ear. C/1i1,a. Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Ports. C!tests. 18RS ............ 1889 1890 ............ 1891 ............ 1892 1893 ............ 1 1 1894 t1 1895 ............ .... .. g 1896 ............ 1897 ............ 32i 32i 1898 ............ 34 34 1899 ............ 37 :37 1900 ............ 1901 ............ 1902 ............ 1903 ............ 94 94 H)04 ............ :H :34 190,'i ............ 169 169 1906 ............ 31 621 l 1 6,j4 1907 106 106 1908 ............ 28 28 190~ ............. 22 22

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D64 Annexe C. MARINE SURVEYOR'S OFFICE. The total number of vessels surveyed for Passenger Certificate and Bottom Inspection in 1909 was Hi8 Yessels of 398,755 gross tons, 87 being surveyed at Kowloon Docks, 45 at Taikoo Dockyard, 14 at Cosmopolitan and 16 at Aberdeen Docks, 3 on Chinese owned slipways, the remainder being surveyed in the harbour on bottom certificates previously granted at Hongkong or Shanghai. The nationalities and tonnage of these vessels were as follows:-British, 105 vessels of 287,849 tons. German, 37 67,905 Chinese, 4 ,, 7,988 Norwegian, -1G 26,075 French, 5 7,318 ,, Swedish, 1 1,620 ,, Emigration Surveys "ere held on 3G British and '17 Foreign Steamships, as compared with 49 British and 51 Foreign Steamships in the previous year. The principal vessel built under inspection for Hongkong Passenger Certificate was the twin-screw river steamer On Lee of 695 gross tons, by the Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., at Hunghom, for the river trade.

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,.... I ,.... I 8 I 8 I f1s _oo I 50 I ,.... 00 .... ,.... 0 0 ----,.... 00 ,.... m 00 Passenger Certificate and Inspection of Bottom. I 2; \ Emigration. 1 ,.... I Tonnage for I c.-7 I Registration. I I British Tonnage c: I ,-.., Certifi("a te for I Foreign Vessels. ----,-----,--I 0 """ Inspection of Crew Space, Lights and Markings. --,.... \ 0 1 Minor I1~pections. l\'.l 01 H"I l\'.l I SmTey of Licen-1 I sed Passenger ----:[ ____ I Steam-launches. i I S1.u-vey of ,.... --Cl I I Boilers under I I Construction. --1 -~---i-In.Rpection 0 __ I Government 1 ____ 1 ____ [ _Launches. o \ '.:; I Examination ,.... I O I of Engineers. 1-----'----~-~---1 I Examination of Chinese Engineers I for Steamt~ g I __ CN -,.... (Y.) ,.... v-0 1-' CN c. c., --sg a I launches. I Estimatod-~l'otal __ I ~umber o~ Visits 1 m connection with fo:egoing I InspPctlons. i:c ;:: 8 =< 0 ..., >o ::! p., <:S' -----=: is:, ('t) Q 0 <1 (P :::: (D :::: n-~ :::: (P [/1 ;:: '.;j (P '< 0 ...,_ [ t:i (P >,:: :,; ..., c:::: fil

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DGG Annexe D. GOYERJ\l!E~T GF~PO\YDER DEPliT. During the year 1909 there has heen stored in the Government Gunpowder Depot, Green Island:-Gunpowder, privately owned, ....................... Do. Government owned, ................. .. Cartridges, privately owned, ....................... .. Do. Government owned, ................... .. Explosive Compounds, privately owned, ........... Do. Government owned, Non-explo;,ivcs, privately owned, .................. Do. Government owned, .............. Total, ....................... N Approxi.1. 0 mate of Cases. W 1 c1gH. 1,867 liO 1,378 93 8,091 4,900 31 2 1(i,ti32 lb. 47,405 16,902 263,860 5,730 421,,-i53 255,792 4,425 60 1,015,727 During the same period there has heen delivered out of t.he Depclt:-N Approxi-o. mate of Cases. u 1 netg 1t.. For Sale in the Colouy :-Gunpowder, privately owaei.l, ................. CartridgeJ:1, privately owned, .................. Explosive Compounds, privately owned, ..... Non-explosives, privately owned, .,., ...... For Export :-371 26 2,382 28 Gunpowder, privately ow11CLI, .............. .. 1,420 Cartridges, privately owned, ............ ......... 969 Explosive Compounds, privately owued, ... :3,989 Non-explosives, priv:ttely owned, ............. __ .. -~ Total, ..................... .... 9,185 I !IJ. 7,740 8,325 122,7,50 4,:200 3,800 168,900 203,775 .:53,690

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-D67-On the 31st December, 1909, there remained as follows:Gunpowder, privately owned, ....................... Do. Government owned, ................... .. Cartridges, privately owned, .......................... ; Do. Government owned, .................... Explosive Compounds, privat.ely owned, .......... .. Do., Government owned, .... .. Non-explosives, privately owned, .................. Do., Government owned, ............. .. 'l"otal, ...................... Annexe E. GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE. N IApproxi-o. mate of Cases. W rrht 81" 76 104 883 42 1,720 980 3 I 3,309 lb. l,66S l 1,126 86,635 3,780 9,5,028 49,354 225 30 2-17,843 During HJOI), eight hundred and fifty-four (854) vessels passed the station all of which were reported. Three thousand five hundred and thirteen (3,513) telegraph messages were sent including weather reports for Observatory, and six hundred and fifty-five (655) mer;sages were received, telegraphic communication being maintained throughout the year, with the exception of 24 hours interruption between 1 p.m. on the 19th and 1 p.m. 011 the 20th October. There were forty-eight hours and ten minutes (48 hours 10 minutes) fog and the signal was fired three hundred aml fonr (304) times. On four occasions the relief was
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li

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Appendix E. REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR O.F THE OBSERVATORY. The comparison of weather-forecasts issued daily with the weather subsequently experienced ha!'\ been conducted on the same system as heretofoJ"e (compare Annual Report for 1896 5). The results are as follows :Sureess 58 per cent., partial suceess :12 per cent., failure 2 per cent., partial failure 8 per cent. Following the method used in :Meteomlogical OffiC'es and taking the sum of total and partial success as a measure of suecess, ancl the sum of total and partial failure as a measure of failure, 90 per cent. of the weather-forecasts were successful iu 1909. The average resultH for the three preceding years were as follows:Success 58 per cent., partial success ::12 per <"ent., failure 1 per 1eut., partial failur1 9 per cent. 2. The number of typhooni-; tlirei::tly affecting the North part of tho China Sea was, as in the pnffious )-ear, greater than usual, hut the gales which resulted in thn Colony were not of great severity with the exception of that of O!'tober 19th, wheii storni.-foree was reached. The centre of this clisturba1we passed a few 111iles to the South of Gap Rock where typhoon fnn:e of wind was experieueecl for Iwelve hours. At the Obsenatory the maximum hourly wind velncitv was 7:3 miles. At VietOl'ia Peak the wind had attained an averag~ houily velocity of 90 rniles when the cups of the Anemo graph blew away. ::. From the t:011miencement of the mouth of June, the weather map made daily for use in the Observatory has been reproduced on a scale suitable for exhibition, and copies have been posted at the following notice bnards:-the Harbour Offiee, Blake Pier and the Ferry Company's Pier. These maps while showing the broi1d features of pressure distrihution are necessarily lacking in .detail. It must be re1nemhered that '.the telegraphic. reporting stations are situated almost entirely on tl~e sea-board and with the ex.ception of a couple of stations on the Yangtze riYer, the interior of the eon tinent is unrepresented. Notwithstanding these disaclvantages it is believed that the public has found the maps useful ancl applications for eopies have been received from several persons. But as those at present exhibited have to be made by hand, it has not been found possible to meet their wishes, and in the present state of our communications the expense of reiwoducing the map for distribution would not be justified. 4. Under the arrangement menti~110d in my last report () the ordinary dailv meteorological telegrams were supplemented oc-

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-E2 casionally by extra observations from stations in the PhiliJ_Jpines aml Southern Formosa, during the prevalenee of typhoons in those localities. The fullest use could not be made of this arrangement owing to the interruption of telegraphic communication, so apt to occur at these times, in the islands. These observations were forwarded by the courtesy of the Directors of the Philippine vV eather Bureau and the Formosa Weather Service, and many of them proved of great value. 5. The Imperial :Maritime Customs authorities at Swatow kindly forwarded an observation made at 9 p.m., from May till October. Unfortunately owing to delay in telegraphic transmission the greater part of these messages failed to reach the Observatory until next morning. Nevertheless they have been frequently useful. 6. It is to be regretted that the meteorological telegrams for warded from Hoihow and Pakhoi, while showing some improvement in the time of receipt as compared with former years, are still received too late for forecasting purposes. 7. At the request of the Government I visited Manila Observa tory in the spring, when I was received with the greatest courteRy by the Reverend Fr. Algue, the Director. During my short stay he was good enough to afford me every facility for seeing the equipment and the working of the establishment under his control. Opportunity was taken to arrange details for the forwarding of the extra meteorological observations mentioned in paragraph 4. 8. In addition to the ordinary warnings, special warnings of the approach of typhoqns have been sent regularly to the Authorities in Canton. 9. By the courtesy of the Naval .Authorities meteorologiC"al messages were received occasionally from H.M. Ships during the year by wireless telegraphy, and in the case of the typhoon over the China Sea in November which caused so much delay to shipping, some valuable observations were received by this means from H.M.S. Kent, then en route to Singapore. 10. As already announced by His Excellency the Governor, the Chinese Authorities have promised to erect a Wir~less Telegraph Station on Pratas Island, and this Government has agreed to allow the staff for the station to attend at the Hongkong Observatory in order to receive some training in making the necessary meteorological observations. These latter will be of material assistance in the framing of weather-forecasts and storm-warnings. ll. The thanks of the Government are clue to the Telegraph Com panies who continue to forward meteorological telegrams from outports to. Hongkong free of charge ; and also to the staffs of the Eastern Extension, Australasian and China Telegraph Company at Sharp Peak, Iloilo, Bacolod and Cebu, who make and transmit observations twice daily. 12. During 1909 in addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations on shore, 1,480 ship logs have been copied on hoard

PAGE 153

or forwarded by the captains. The total number of vesHels whose log hooks. have been mad.e use of was 194. 'l'he total number of days' observations (counti~1g separately those made on hoard different ships on the same day) was 14,726. Acknowledgment is here made of the courtesy of those masters of vessels who have been good enough to forward their observations. 13. The entry of observations made at sea in degree squares or the area 9 South and 45 North Latitude, and between the longitude of Singapore and 180" East of Greenwich has been continued by Mr. Jeffries and, after her return from leave of absence on November 3rd by Miss Doberck, and 347,190 in all have now been entered. The means of these observations have been taken or the degree squares comprised in the following areas :-Equator to 6 South Latitude and from the Longitude of Singapore to 125 East for the months of January to December inclusive; Equator to 25 North Latitude and from 100 to 125 East Longitude for the month of .January. 14. The tracks of the typhoons of 1909 have been laid down by Mr. Plummer, and they will be printed and distributed as soon as possible. 15. During the past year several hundred indirect comparisons of harometers and aneroicls on hoanl ship have been made. A few barometers and aneroids have been eornpared or various people in the Observatory. Hi. The rainfall in inches recorded by the gauge placed in the Police compound at Tai po, Kew Territories, was as follows: .January 1.21, February 2.08, March 2.87, April 2.30, May 8.15, June 10.45, July 19.42, August 9.28, September 7.07, October 25.58, November 0.07, December 0.00, the total for the year 1909 being 88.48 inches. On an average of the four years during which this gauge has been in operation the rainfall measured at, Taipo has exceeded that recorded at the Observatory by 20 per cent. 17. The Dines-Baxendell pressure-tube Anemograph ordered from London in the spring had not been received at the close of the year. It has since arrived and is now being mounted, and it is expected that it will be brought into use shortly. A chronograph of inexpensive form ordered at the same time, was received in December, and has since, by rneans of an electrical device, been made available for obtaining a record of the revolutions of the cups of the Beckley Anemograph during short intervals of tirpe, whenever required. The registering parts of these instruments are placed on the ground floor where the record can be inspected at all times, which is a great advantage. 18. In 1909 the number of transits observed was 431. The axis of the transit instrument was levelled 262 times, and the collimation and azimuth errors were determined 18 times by aid of the meridian mark. The whole of these observations have been made by Mr. Plummer. Both the standard clocks have been cleaned during the

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---E,Jyear, the :Mean 'l'ime clock on the 7th .Ma.v antl the Sidereal doek on the,29th of the same month. The Time-ball clock was oiled and the escapement cleaned on the 27th March. The going of !Lll of them subsequently, has been satisfactory. 19. The errors of the Time-ball are given on Table I. The ball is not dropped on Sundays nor on Government holidays. There were no failures in. 1909. On_ the Hth July and on October 19th it was not dropped in consequence of heavy gales, and on October. 20th and December 8th because the line was out of order. It was there fore dropp!:ld successfolly on .296 days. The probable error was in January 0".22, in February 0'.24, in March 0'.18, in April 0'.15, in iVIay 0'.13, in June o.17, in July O'.Hi, in August 0".18, in September 0".15, in October 0:.17, in November 0'.11, and in December 0'.13. F. G. FIGG, Dire,,t,w. HoNGKOKG OnsERV.-1.TORY,

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Table I. Errors of the Time Ball in 1909. means too late. + means too early. Date. January February March April May Jnnc I July Augnst Sept. October Nov. I Dec. --I 1 0.1 +l.l -0.3 0.1 +0.2 I -0.2 0.1 O. l 0.1 0.1 ... ... 2 ... 0.1 +0.4 -0.3 ... +0.2 0.1 ... 0.1 0.1 0.l 0.1 3 ... 0.1 +o.3 0.1 -0.3 +0.4 0.1 0.1 -0.2 .. 0.1 0.1 4 +0.2 0.1 +o.3 ... 0.1 +0.4 .. 0.1 0.1 +0.2 -0.2 0.1 5 +0.3 +0.2 0.1 O. l 0.1 0.1 -0.2 0.1 ... +0.2 -0.2 ... 6 +o.4 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 ... 0.1 0.1 +0.2 +0.2 -0.:l 0.1 i +0.4 ... ... 0.1 0.1 -0.3 0.1 +0.4 0.1 0.1 .. 0,1 8 +0.5 -0.3 +0.2 -0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 ... 0.1 '......0,2 0.1 .. 9 +0.3 -0.~ +0.2 ... ... +o.s 0.1 +O.i +0.2 -0.3 O. l 0.1 lO ... -0.3 +0.3 ... +0.2 0.1 +0.2 +0.4 +0.3 .. 0.1 +0.2 11 +0.5 -0.3 +0.3 ... O. l +0.2 .. +0.4 .+0.2 -0.6 +0.2 0.1 12 +0.4 -0.4 +0.3 ... 0.1 0.1 +o.4 +0.3 ... -0.2 +0.3 ... 13 0.1 0.1 +0.3 +0.2 0.1 ... +0.6 +0.4 0.1 O.l 0.1 0.1 14 -0.2 ... ... 0.1 -0.2 -0.3 .. +0.4 +0.3 0.1 .. 0.1 16 -0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 I -0.2 -0.2 +0.9 +0.2 +0.2 i 0.1 0.1 ... 16 -0.4 0.1 -0.2 0.1 ... +0.2 +o.a 0.1 +0.2 +0.2 0.1 0.1 I I ----"-----

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Table !,-Continued. Errors of the Time Ball in 1909. means too late. + means too early. ------------------I I I I I Date. ,faunury February Murch I April May Jnne July August Sept. October : Nov. Dee. I I i --I ----------I i I I I Ji 0.1 0.1 i 0.1 0.1 +o.3 -0.3 0.1 +o.3 i 0.1 0.1 ... ... I 18 0.1 0.1 0.1 I ... 0. l 0.1 .. -0.2 +0.2 +0.2 I 0.1 0.1 19 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.l -0.2 I 0.1 ... I ... I .. 20 0.l 0.1 0.l 0.1 +0.2 ... 0.l 0.1 0.1 i .. 0.1 0.1 :!I 0.1 ; +0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 +0.4 0.1 ... .. I .. 22 +0.2 0.1 ; +0.2 i 0.1 +0.2 0.1 0. l 0.1 0.1 ... I I .. +0.2 I I I 23 +o.4 0.1 +0.3 +0.2 0.1 0.1 +0.2 0.1 I 0.1 0.l ... I .. ; I 24 ... +o.6 0.1 +0.4 .. +0.2 0.1 +0.2 0.1 .. i 0.1 0. l 25 0.1 +0.7 0.1 I +0.4 +o.a +0.2 0.1 -0.2 I ... .. .. .. 26 0.1 +o.9 0.1 +0.4 +0.4 o. l 0.1 0.1 -0.5 I 0.1 ... ... 2i 0.1 +1.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 ... 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.l 0.1 .. 28 -0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.2 0.1 I -0.2 ... .. ..... 29 -0.3 ... -0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 .. -0.2 0.1 0.1 -0.4 30 -0.4 ... 0.1 I 0.1 .. 0.1 0.1 0. l -0.2 O.l 0.1 -0.6 31 ... ... -0.2 I .. ... .. 0.1 0.1 ... .. .. 0.1 ;

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Table II. Monthly and Annual Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements at the Hongkong Observatory for the year 1909, and departure from the mean of 25 years ( + excess; defect). Jan. I Feb. llfar. Apr. I lllny. June. Jnly. Aug. I S,pt. j Oct. I Kov. Dec. Y~nr. ----------------------------------------M.S.L. ............ 31.1011 30.101; 30.0W 29.951 29.885 29.i!ll 2f!.7f:ii 2!l.'i81 29.7811 29.888 30.067 30.175 29.!l4.5 Bar. Pressure at I Departure ........... ... -.0li~ -.?39 -.013 -.OOH +.022 +.029 +.036 +.OHS -.O~i -.097 -.. 040 +.OOl -.015 Temperature .... ...... 60.h W.4 6!.I 71.l 74.!l 82.1 82.2 82.8 S:!.2 77.8 70.4 f\3.6 72.7 Departure ............... + 0.5 0 + 2.4 + 1.4( 1.0 1.9 + 1.4 + 0.4 + 1.5 + 1.8 + 1.5 + 1.2 + 0.9 + 1. Rel. Humidity 0 / 0...... 81 7 Departure .. .. .. .. .. .. + 6 0 ) 81 81 79 Sil Bo 81 81 80 77 62 59 7 2-6 i 2 + 3 + 6 3 7 + 5 -0 :; -Vap. Tension (Inches of Mercury) ....... 0.431 Departure ... ..... ... .. + .oan 8uushine (Total hours) 85.0 Depamlrc .............. -57.8 Cloudiness lo .. .. ...... 83 Departure ............... + HJ Rainfall (Total Inches) ........... i l.460 Departnrc ............... :+0.002 Wind Direction ......... I!] U,0 :,; Departure -N + S ... I -1 Win3 + ,009 -.1,02 85,G 6,1.2 1 r,5.4 113.9 2:!0,3 2,,2.0 -2.:l -:18.2 +:;1.1 -3\J,9 +H.l +50:l 80 9:! 78 85 78 70 + 4 + !I --3 + 11 + 2 + 2 l,(i60 2.845 2.4,;;; 6,700 7.B85 12,82,, -0.0!Hl -0.518 .-3.427 -:,.o!li> -fUl!JS +o.0i'iii g Il0 NE r,o N,E go :--ijl~ ii0 N E 78 s E 15 ,-+ 3n + ,10 ~o I 180 + 25 41 -1-'1-1+2 rn.~ 14.1 I is.4 1 ~.5 1-U -0.3 + 0.6 1 -0.8 I + 0.4 + 0.1 + :i.2 0.90H O.f:80 + .OZ.5 +ms 2l ii.3 2112.li + 13.7 + 6.U 64 6H 0 + G 8,340 8.505 -5 861 -1.132 s :l:!0W E 2 S + 730 + 130 7.8 9.0 1.9 \2,9 -0.740 0.469 o.s5i I + .0~8 + .009 -.0321 137.ii 187.1 249.7, -7i.8 2.5 + 70.r, 80 57 30 + ~9 + (j -21 2:l.985 0.065 0.000 + ]9.42:l -1.387 -1.185 B: 2-10 N 1,;,>10 N l~ 1s0 N 50 2:10 + 70 lli,8 12.tl I 11.4 + 2.2 o.u 1 1.0 0.65 +.0! 1978, +70. 5 6 2 7 + 6 70.72, ', l s -8.71: ]~ 0 + 3 0 13. 0. 0 l NB.-The observatirns for 190!1, as abow, are compared with the 25 y,,a.r means for the'period 188! to l908 inclnsiv<'. ,. Not corrected to Standard Gravily

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--EH --Table V. Number of Days with Wind from eight different points of the Compass during each mont.h of the year, 1909. Month. N. I NE, I E. I SE. s. SW. W. NW. ____ ______ ------------,January,............... 3 6 19 :February, ........ ..... 4 2 19 March, ... ............ 2 4 23 April, ...... ............ 2 4 19 3 May,................... 1 2 24 2 June,................... 7 2 July,................... 1 18 5 August,................ 3 3 September,............ l 18 4 2 l 2 9 ., 3 October, .. .... .. ..... .. 6 7 12 2 l l 12 3 18 2 November, ... ......... 11 8 I O l 2 l 1 4 2 2 1 2 3 l December, .. .. .... .. .. 6 4 20 I 1 II l Sums, ......... 35 39 1 192 21 : 21 37 13 7 I I --------

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Table IX. Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered dnrine,: tlic year, 1909. :.; :.; :i f-< t 0 BARO~IETEH. TE~ll'EltATV RR. V.APOUR RAIN. 0 ;:: 'fENSIOl'i. ;:. 0 --! MONTH. :::: Z >-l c=; ;:;, --~ ::::> < ----------1-------,----------Max. Min. Max. Miu. :Min. Max. Min. Daily Honrly Max. Sun Max. Max. Max. i ---------January, 30.223 29.i5i 73.4 50.8 52 0.63(i 0.255 1.160 0.600 I 40 121.2 February, .275 .739 73.4 48.i 41 0.676 0.189 0.450 0.165 I 39 126.9 t.=.J ...................... Marnh, ....................... 1 .276 .647 77.8 53.0 46 0.838 0.243 1.000 0.300 40 128.1 ,April, ........................... .001 .640 85.7 61.6 28 0.863 0.195 0.790 0.650 40 137.3 May, ............................ 29.931 .600 85.5 62.0 36 0.924 (Ul!l 2.260 0.620 :3 137. l June, ............................ .835 I .467 90.0 i3.9 5i l.005 0.666 2.610 0.550 40 141.5 July, ............................ 1 .8H .436 90.8 74.6 56 1.065 0.70.S 2.8:20 0.740 48 I 14.4 .-5 August, ......................... .838 .481 90.,5 74.9 51 1.008 0.707 l.i20 O.i05 34 I 141.l I September, ..................... 1 .866 \ .386 90.7 76.2 42 1.017 0.506 2.685 UiO'.l 37 142.8 October, ........................ 30.003 I .101 90 .-5 65 3 49 0.9:W 0 492 6.3i5 0 .S::l0 75 I 139.2 N overn ber, ..................... I .203 .764 82.8 54.8 20 0.794 I 0.171 I 0.035 0.015 34 138.8 I December, ...................... J .328 l .7/ll 77.9 50.8 23 0.620 I 0.1w 3! I 126.0 I -------------1-Year, ......... 30 328 29.101 90.8 48.7 20 l.0G5 0.129 6.375 l.800 I '" 1 141.-l

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-ElOTable XIV. Statement of Annual Expenditure on the Observatory Drpartrnent. Year. Tottil Increase. Decrease. Expenditure. $ cts. 1900 18,651..'55 $ cts. $ cts. 1901 18,111.10 540.45 1902 22,480.98 4,369.88 1903 22,iS0.97 299.99 1904 21,937.15 84i\.82 1905 21,:rno.40 716.75 1906 19,995.17 I ,22,5.2:3 H.107 20,110.53 I Jn.36 1908 21,110.61 1,000 08 1909 22,388.63 1,278.02 JY.ll.-Tahles IU, IV, VI, VII, VIII, X, XI, XII and XIII omittr1d from this report will be found in ":Mcteorologicul Oliservatio11s fc,r 1909".

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Appendix F. REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR 1900. l.-0RIGINAL JURISDICTION. The number of Actions instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1909 was 181, and there were 316 pending at the commencement of that yeat as against 20G and 280 respectively in 1908. 116 were disposed of during the year, 41 being settled or withdrawn before trial; 1 transferred to Summary Jurisdiction and 1 transferred to Probate, leaving a balance of 379 undisposed of, as against 168, 58 and 316 respectively in 1908. The total amount involved was $1,321,363, as against $:2,466,274 in 1908. The debts and damages recovered amounted to $531,247, as against $902,846 in 1908. The total feeR collected amounted to ~:15,3i0, as against $15,341 in 1908. Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages (0. 2), (0. 3), (0. 4) and (Y. 3) and (Y. 4) of the Blue Doak for the current year. 2.-SUMMARY JURISDICTION. The number of ActionR instituted was 1,417 during the year and 122 were brought forward from 1908, as against 1,735 and 225 respectively in 1908. 1,417 were disposed of, 518 being settled or withdrawn before trial, 185 being struck out, dismissed and lapsed Writs, and 80 struck out of the Cause-Book as having been standing over generally for more than a year, leaving a balance of 122, as against 1,838, 724, 184 and 135 respectively in 1908. The total amount involved was $281,047, and the debts and damages recovered amounted to $116,222, as against $345,051 and $111,283 respectively in 1908. The total fees collected amounted to $7,809 as against $9,261 in 1908. The number of Distress Warrants for Rent issued was 522, representing aggregate unpaid Rents amounting to $34,212, of which the aggregate sum of :trll,616 waR recovered, as against 512, :tG0,687 and $17,579 respectively in 1908. 337 Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties, as against 270 in 1908. The total fees collected amounted to ij;2,701 as against $2,729 in 1908. 3.-CHii\IINAL JURISDICTION. 'I'here were 66 cases and 120 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 26 and 59 respectively in 1908.

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-F2'l'he number 0 persons actually indicted was 100, of whom 73 were convicted and 27 were acquitted. Against 20 persons no Indictments were filed. In 1908 the figures were respectively 53, 26 and ti. 4.-APPELLATE J URISDIUTION. There were 12 Appeals instituted during the year, viz. :From the decision 0 the Chief Justice, 8 as against 3 in 1908. ,, othe Puisne Judge, 4 1 of the Magistrates, -0 1 12 of which the following were disposed of, viz. :-From the Chie Justice, -5 Puisne Judge, -1 Magistrates, -0 6 5 2 1 1 4 The decision 0 the Privy Council in the case 0 Ohan Hang Kin and six others committed to gaol for perjury reached the Colony on the 1st April, 1909. The appeal was allowed, no order as to costs. On the 21st June, 1909, another decision of the Privy Council in the Bankruptcy of the Lai Hing Firm, ex pa1te Ma Lung Ko, was received. The appeal was dismissed, no order as to costs. Leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted in two cases, viz.:(1) in Hip On lusuranee Co., Ld. r. Li Po Lung (0. ,J. Action No. 57 of 1907). (2) in Imperial Bank of China r. Leung Shiu King (0. J. Action Ko. 73 of 1904). 5.-ADMIRALTY ,JGlllSDICTIO!-:. There was no action instituted during the year. OJ the two cases that were pending in 1908, one was disposed of, leaving oue pending. No vessel was arrested. The total fees collected amounted to $117 as against $352 m 1908. G.-BAx1rnt:PTCY J1sorcT10x. There were 30 Petitions filed, 20 being Creditors' Petitions, and 10 being Petitions by the Debtors themselves. The figures for l908 were respectively 34, 23 and 11. The number of Receiving Orders made was 12, being 7 on Creditors' Petitions, and 5 on Debtors' Petitions. The figures for Hl08 were respectively 30, 21 and 9, and 1 Administration Order. The number of Public Examinations held was !J, aR against 22 in 1908.

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-F3There were!) Adjudications aml 2 Compositions. The figures in 1908 were 14 Adjudications and 1 Scheme of Arrangement approved by the Court. There was 1 Discharge, as against 2 in 1908. The aggregate amount of declared Assets was :$65,803 and declared Liabilities $189,155, as against $776,144 and $ l,261,13f5 respectively in 1908. The fees amounted to $14,104, including the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors, as against l6, 176 in 1908. 7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATIOX. There were 210 Grants made by the Court, being:-Probates, !}O Letters of Administration, 120 210 The figures in 1908 were respectively 101 and 133. The aggregate Yalue of the Estates was $:3,422,250, as against $3,405,400 in 1908. Probate Duties amounted to $95,047. Additional Probate Duty paid in 1909-$2,375. Court Fees amounted to $8,290 and Official Administrator's Commission to $1,154. The figures in 1908 were respectively $81,136, $120, $8,236 and $1,812. There were 18 Estates vested in, or administered by, the Official Administrator during the year, representing an aggregate value of $25,!J0O. The figures for mus were respectively o9 and ~14,978. 19 Estates were wound up during the year, representing au aggregate value of $10,210, as against 28 in 1908 representing $42,479. 8.-OFFICIAL TRUSTe;. The total number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the encl of 1909 was 23 and the aggregate amount of Trust Funds $88,067 as against 25 Estates aggregating $ll5,052 in 1908, and certain house property. The amount of Commission collected was $396, as against $ 234 in 1908. 9.-REOISTHATION OF COMPANIES. The total number of Companies registered from the commencement of the "Companies Ordinance, 1865," was 599 with an aggregate capital of $270,240,647. Of the 599 Companies on the Register 99 are defunct, 2 were not floated, 132 were wound up and 67 were in the course of being wound up, leaving 299 on the Register at the end of Hl09 representing an aggregate capital of $264,464,047. The figures in 1908 were respectively 501, $25B,7(:il,334, 5Gl, 99, 2, 123, li6, 271, and $353,246,635.

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-F4-There were 38 Companies registered in 1909, as mmpared with 31 in 1908, the revenue from which was :-Registration Fees,Filing and other Fees, $5,917 as against $4,858 in 1908 1,939 ,, $1,931 $7,856 $6,789 ----:-:--; The number 0 licences granted under section 4 of "The Com panies (Local Registers) Ordinance 1907" (No. 16 0 1907) enabling Companies operating outside the Colony to keep local registers of members was 115. The foes collected in respect 0 such lic~nces amounted to $14,873. The number 0 authorizations issued under section 5 0 the same Ordinance to Companies to keep their registers 0 members at their head offices instead 0 at their registered offices in this Colony was 14. The foes collected in respect 0 such authorizations amounted to $32. 10.-FEES AND COMMISSIONS. The total sums collected during the year by way 0 Fees and Com missions amounted to $45,861 as against $46,592 in the previous year. 11.-STAFF. Mr. Arathoon Seth, r.s.o., Registrar, retired on pension on 30th October and was succeeded by Mr. Joseph Horsford Kemp, Head 0 the Sanitary Department, who, previous to his appointment, acted as Registrar from 30th June to 29th October. Mr. John Roskruge Wood, Deputy Registrar & Appraiser, was promoted to Second Police Magistrate on 30th June and Mr. Charles Alexander Dick Melbourne was appointed to succeed him. Mr. James Dyer Ball, r.s.o., Chief Interpreter, retired on pension on 25th January and was succeeded by Mr. Nicholas George Nolan, First Interpreter, Magistracy. Mr. Li Hong Mi, Second Interpreter, retired on pension on 1st February, and Mr. Wong Kwong Tin, Second Interpreter in the Registrar General's Office, succeeded him on the 9th June. Mr. Mackie, Third Interpreter, was transferred to the Magistrney on the 15th June to be First Interpreter there, but returned to this Department on 6th October. In the meantime Mr. Ng Yuk Shu, a Clerk in the Police Office, performed the duties 0 Third Interpreter in this Department. Mr. Wong Kwok U, Clerk and Translator, resigned on 30th October and Mr. Wong Kwong Tin, Second Interpreter, was appointed to do his work until the appointment of a successor, Mr. Mackie doing the work 0 the Second Interpreter and Mr. Ng Yuk Shu that 0 the Third Interpreter.

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-F5Mr. Leung Tsau, 4th Grade Clerk and Shroff, retired on pension on account of ill health on 1st May and was succeeded by 1\fr. Wong Kin W o, 5th Grade Librarian in this Department, who was succeeded by lVIr. Wong Po Keung, a Clerk in the Post Office. Mr. Wong Po Fuk, Temporary 4th Grade Clerk, resigned on 30th November and Mr. Wong Po Ki was appointed in his place. Mr. Wong Po Keung, 5th Grade Librarian, resigned on 31st October and was succeeded by Mr.Wong Yui Sham, 6th Grade Usher and Process Server, Magistracy. J. H. KEMP, Regisf1a1. 19th ,,larch, 1910.

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Table I. Table showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Conrt. Year. 1900, ......... 1901, ......... 1902, ........ .. 1903, ......... 1904, ......... 1905, ......... 190G, ......... 1907, ........ .. 1908, ......... 1909, ......... \Total No. of Cases I dealt with. I I I I 646 .. I 764 .. I .. 1,070 .. 968 .. 1,038 .. 1,166 .. 1,039 .. 1,031 .. 1,014 .. 1,030 Total. $ c. 57,091.55 62,179.09 70,617.65 75,544.q2 58,681.03 66,711.72 69,667.23 69,592.75 87,2i0.40 89,555.52 (FROM 1900 TO 1909.) Expenditure. Increase. Decrease. I Total. $ c. $ c. $ c. 4,948.44 40,234.91 .. 5,087.54 39:904.72 .. 8,438.56 ... 30,275.42 4,926.87 ... 41,758.83 ... 16,863.49 49,108.37 8,030.69 ... 61,984.69 2,955.51 .. 52,904.11 ... 74.48 56,156.78 17,677.65 46,592.80 I I ... 2,285.12 ... 45,861.55 I Revenue. Increase. I Decrease. ----$ c. $ c. 3,172.96 ... ... 330.19 .. 9,629.30 1,483.41 ... 7,349.54 .. 12,876.32 .. .. 9,080.,58 3,252.67 .. ... 9,563.98 .. 731.25 0 evenue Percentage fR to Ex-penditure. ----% 70 64 42j 55 83 I 92 75 80 53 51

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APPENDIX G. REPORT ON THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS. Mr. H. H. J. GoMPERTZ acted as and drew half pay of Puisne Judge and half pay as First Police Magistrate from 1st January to 20th March: he was appointed Puisne Judge on 21st I\farch. Mr. J. H. ]{emp acted as First Police :Magistrate from 1st January to 29th June and d~ew half pay of First Police Magistrate and half pay as Head of the Samtary Department from 1st ,lanuary to 22nd June. Mr. F. A. Hazeland was on leave from 1st .January to 26th :M:arch and resumed duty as Second Police Magistrate on 27th March: he was appointed First Police Magistrate on 21st. March but did not sit as First Police :Magistrate until 30th June: he drew half pay of 1st Police Magistrate from 21st March to 26th March while on leave and full pay from 27th Ivlarch: he acted as Attorney General from the 27th October to 31st December. l\Ir. E. R. Hallifax acted as First Police :Magistrate from the 28th October to 31st December. Mr. J. R. Wood acte
PAGE 168

YEAR. 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expernlitnre and l?evenue of the Magistracy for the years 1900 to Ul()'.l. E Total. $ c. 20,914.59 23,i94.2:3 29.050.62 38,046.30 38,486.48 35,762.86 39,:-l0:1. l 6 40,455.52 46,018.18 40, 19.69 XPENDITURE, Increase. $ c. ... 2.8i9.6-1 ,5,2;",6,:l9 8,99,).68 44J1.l8 3,fi40.30 1,l-'i2.36 5,.562.66 i I I : : I I Decrease. $ c. 438.99 ... ... ... 2,i23.62 5,898.49 REVENUE. -~-~--~Total. c. il.~34.61 6Li64.5,'i 96,723.26 71,310.7i -9,),40,).12 88,115.26 i9,5ii7.6i 67,l~l3.:!6 68,69ti.-i3 (i9,986.42 I Incre11se. $ c. 31,159.5i .. 27,9.58.71 ... 24,094.30 1,568.17 l ,289.9D I I I I I : ; Decrease. $ c. .. :-l,0i0.06 .. 25,412.49 7,2.59.86 8,587.62 12,424.:)8 Total Number of Cases tried. -14,081 14,531 16,070 14,268 -14,o05 13,450 13,871 13,414 10,5,55 10,771 Percenta)!'e of Expenditure to Revenue. % 29 34 30 53 40 34 40 49 60 66 57

PAGE 169

Appendix G 1. REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER. 1.-REGISTRATION. During the year one thousand four hundred and fifty-four (1,454) Deeds and Documents were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 affecting two thousand five hundred and ninety-two (2,592) lots of land particulars of which are shown in Table I. 2.-GRANTS OF LAND. The total area of land sold and granted on Lease during the year was 284 acres 3 roods O poles of which 200 acres 1 rood 21 poles was in respect of lands dealt with by the District Offices. The total area resumed was 210 acres roods 37 poles leaving 74 acres 0 rood 3 poles additional land granted during the year. Particulars of the Grants are shmrn on pages W 2 and W 3 of the Blue Book for 1909. 3.-GRANTS OF LEASES. The number of Crown Leases granted during the year was 45 particulars of which are specified in Table II. 4.-FEES. The total amount of fees collected by Stamps during the year amounted to $25,863.75 being $1,205 less than the previous year. The amount of fees collected under the different headings for the years 1900 to 1909 is shown in Table III. 5.-CRowN RENT RoLL. The total Crown Rent due in respect of leased lands in Hongkong and Kowloon (excluding certain Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon entered in the Village Rent Roll) amounted for the year ending 25th December to $417,172.63, an increase of $11,451.90 on the previous year and the total amount due in respect of leased lands in the Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon appearing in the Village Rent Roll for the year ending 30th September was $2,517.03, a decrease of $36.80 due to certain resumptions for public purposes. The total number of Lots of Crown Land as appearing in the Rent Rolls with the total rents appears in Table IV. 6.-NAVAL AND :MILITARY LANDS. During the year the fornial documents transferring Victoria Battery, Stonecutters' Island, Gui1 Club Hill, Kowloon, Central Block, Kowloon, and land at Crown Point in the New Territories to the War Department under arrangements already agreed upon were completed as were also the transfer from the War Department to the Colonial Government of areas of land at King's Park, Kowloon, the Time Ball Station, Mount Cochrane, Garden Lots 21, 48, 49 and 50, the Kowloon Dock Battery and Position Finder Station and also a small piece of lan(l in Q\rnen's Roatlformerly part of the Military Cantonment.

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-Gl 2 i.-XF.w TrmnrTonrns. The Ranction of the Spcretary of State was obtained during the year to dispense with the practice hitherto in force of holding an auction for every small piece of Crown Land granted on a longer lease than 5 years in the case of building lots not exceeding 1,000 sq. ft. or agricultural lots not exceeding of an acre when the Land Officer certifies that there is no probability of any competition and that the applicant is the only person interested and that the land is required for bona fide Chinese occupation and there is no probability of much development in the neighbourhood. By this means a con siderable saving of expense has been effected in advertisements. Rules requiring the registration of graves have been made by which it is hoped the many disputes regarding graves and grave sites may be lessened. The system of issuing annual or 5 years leases of waste lands for agricultural purposes at double the usual Crown Rent to persons who were unable or unwilling to pay a premium and take up the ground on long leases, which was sanctioned at the encl of 1908, has been much appreciated. Many such leases in which suitable pro vision is made for the compensation of tenants in the event of their leases being determined have already been applied for and granted. Owing to the difficulty of access to the portion of the Northern District known as the Hang Han PPninsula in ,Tunk Bay from the District Office at Tai Po, it was decided to transfer this area to the Southern District Office at Hongkong and the necessary transfer has now been carried out. The provisions of the Foreshores and Sea Beel Ordinance, 1901, necessitating advertisements in the Gazelte of every small plot of foreshore in the New Territories having been found to hamper sales of land owing to the cost of advertisement frequently exceeding the purchase money of the land, Ordinance 41 of 1909 was passed exempting lands in the Kew Territories from the provisions of the Ordinance as regards noticeR of the sale, the provisions of the Ordin ance regarding posting of notices on the land which alone are likely. to be seen by the inhabitants still however continue in force. In order to shorten notices of sales in the Gazette special condi tions of sales were drafted to meet all ordinary cases; these conditions are now referred to only by number. A part from the portion known as the Southern District Mainland in which district fees for registration are already charged under the Order in Council of 17th August, 1908, it is considered that the time has not yet arrived when the fees or registration can be charged without the disadvantage of preyenting registration. In accordance with the promise made by His Excellency Sir Matthew Nathan not to increase the Crown Rents of lands held by the original leaseholders after the expiration of the first 10 years of the lease a notification was issued in June stating that the Director of Public Works had fixed the rents originally payable as those to be paid during the remainder of the unexpired leases which are mostly for 75 years expiring 30th June, 1973.

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-Gl ;-J ~\8 it was found that it waH necesHary for the proper working o[ the Southern Distoict including Lantao and the other Islands that a Land Bailiff should be appointed, Mr. R. H. Craig was temporarily appointed to that post during the year and arrangements made for a permanent Bailiff to be appointed during the ensuing year. Mr. D. W. 'l'ratman, Assistant Land Officer, was transferred from the Southern District to the Northern District in May in the place of Mr. S. B. C. Ross who was appointed to act as District Officer and Mr. G. N. Orme reverted to his substantive post as Assistant Land Officer for the Southern District. Mr. A. R. Wellington, one of the Land Bailiffs for the Northern District, absconded on 30th June and has not since been heard of. Mr. W. J. Unwin was appointed to succeed him on the 1st August following. 8.-STAFF .Mr. A. G. lVI. Fletcher was appointed as Deputy Official Receiver on the 1st .January and took up the duties of that post in May. Mr. P. Jacks, Assistant Land Officer, was on vacation leave from 12th .Tune to 12th September. l(Jth .June, 1910. Table I. G. H. WAKEMAK, Land O;(ficer. Particulars of Deeds and Documents registered in the Land Office. Description of Documents. No. Ilcgis t.cred. Assignments, ................. 439 Mortgages, Transfers of Mortgages, Reassign-ments and Satisfactions, 812 Surrrenders, ...... ...... ...... 12 J utlgments and Orders of Court,..................... 43 Probates and Letters of Administration, ......... 68 Miscellaneous Documents, ... \ 80 No. of Lots or port.ions of Lots affected. 589 1,429 27 188 169 190 1 _______ Total, ............... j 1,454 2,592 I I Total Con sideration. $ c. 6,215,769.07 11,011,232.73 -------

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-Gl 4 Table II. Crown Leases granted during the year 1909. -------------------1:ongkong. Kowloon. New Territories. Cl -~ .E t g b -~ -ri g = C1 -~ ... -~ ~: = > ~] 1-_, __ ---------1 i 11 i 2 29 I i ... \ Cl I 0 Total. 0 -,d co ci i:: :..:" "' 0.. t.: I!:'""' Q) ;; z r-< <12 ----i ... 4fi i --------Table III. Fees collected during the 10 years from 1900 to 1909. --------------------. : RegistraI Searches and I Year. 1 tion of J Copi<:'s of ; Deeds. I Documents. 1 ---:--$--;-j$--c-. I 1900, ........... 12,716.5011 1,837.i5 j 1901, .................... 10,258.00 1,742.50 1902, .................... 10,128.00 t 1,915.25 1903,* .................... 27,664.00 I l,50i.00 1904, ... .. .. .. 30,209.00 2,029.00 1905, ..................... 34,161.00 2,5(i7.05 1906, ......... ............ 27,56,5.00 2,219.30 1907, .. .. .. .. . 21,.507 .00 2 ,o 10.05 1908, ..................... 23,178.00 1,920.50 1909, ......... ............ 22,a2s.oo I 2,26s.15 Grnut.s of Leases. $ c. 1,:30.3.00 1,895.00 2,135.00 2,805.00 I 2,355.00 I 1,220.00 1,310.00 1,835.00 1,970.00 1,270.00 Scale of fees increased, --Ordinance 36 of 1902. Total. $ c. 15,859.25 13,895.50 14,l 78.25 31,976.00 34,593.00 37,948.05 31,094.30 25,352.05 27,068.50 25,863.7.'i

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Gl 5 Table IV. Crmrn Rent Rolls. --------------~------------------------Locnlity a.nil Description. Nos. of Lots. -, Hm,gkoa, M,...i.,,. .. ............................ 1 ~); ,, Prnya Reclamation to Marine, ... 1 178 ; ,, Inland,................................. 1,433 Q11arry Bay, Ma,rine, ...... ...... ..... .... ..... .... 3 ,, Inland, ...... ...... ......... ......... 7 Hongkong, Farm, ................................ Garden, ............................ .. ,, Rural Bnilding, .................... Aberdeen, 1\1arine, ............................... .. ,, Inland, ................................ Apleechow, Marine, ............................. ,, Inland, ............................. Shaukiwau Bay, Marine, ................... .. ,, ,, Jnlaml, ....................... Sta11ley, Iuland, ................................. I{owloou, Marine, ................................. ,, Inland, ................................. ,, Farm, ................................... ,, Garden, ................................ Hunghom, Marine, ................................ ,, Inland, ............................... Shek 0, Inland, ................................... Tai Tam, Inland, ............................... .. Tong Po, Inla11d, ................................ Lan tao, :Wiari nc, ................................... Quarries, ............................................ New Kowloon, Marine, .......................... ,, Inland, .......................... ,, Farm, ............................. ,, Rural Bnihling, ................ .. Tai Po, Inland, ................................... Sai Knng, Marine, ................................ ,, Inland, ................................ Ping Chau, Farm, ................................ Mining, ......... ...... ~ Total, .............. 42 29 111 5 61 20 20 ]O 127 4 61 781 8 3 2 220 1 l l 2 24 5 26 2 I l l 2 l 2 3,454 Total Crol\'11 Rent. $ c. 63,153.14 19,843.00 132,957.13 14,589.00 7,231.00 1,84,5.80 781.00 9,670.84 579.16 2,106.16 150.56 172.72 2,006.00 2,249.74 4.00 46,202.13 47,127.38 199.37 64.00 3,862.00 6,"175.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1,300.00 41,428.00 6,020.00 2,359.00 940.00 14.00 100.00 564.00 225.00 2,560.00 $417,172.63

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-Gl G -Yillage Rent. Roll. --------------------------------,-----Locnlit.y and Description. W ongneichung, .................................. .. Aberdeen, ....................................... .. Pokfulam, ......................................... Taihang, ........................................... .. Ahkungngam, ...................................... Kailungwan, ..................................... .. Sowkiwan, ........................................ .. Taikokt.sui, ......................................... Moug Kok, ......................................... I-Iok Un, ........................................... .. To Kwa Wan, .................................... .Shek Shan, ....................................... .. Sun Shan, ......................................... Ma Tan l{ok, ...................................... :Mati, ............................................... Ho Mun Tin, ..................................... .. Ma Tan Chung, ..... ; ............................ .. lfa Tau Wai, .................................... .. Noe. of Lots. ]26 29 36 158 26 1 181 I 1 53 105 190 31 19 32 9 58 127 Total,............... 1,194 --~-----------Total Crown Rent. $ c. 81.00 87.50 73.03 635.i'.iO 18.25 9.80 269.00 18.00 112.50 304.50 331.00 69.00 59.50 46.50 5.50 37 .50 138.50 220.50 $ 2,517.08

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Appendix II. ,1 ;) REPORT O~ THE ~EW TERRTl'ORIES. t, d 'l n I, A.-NORTHER~ DISTRICT. 1.-AD:IIINISTIL\TJO\". Certtain changes were made istriit Officer bnt no separate :1.l_epartment 1rn., neated ancl the District Officer had still no power fu __ hear lancl ease,;. The.District Officer was subordinate to the Captaii'r, Superintendent of Poli<"e ancl tlw Treasurer while the Assistant Litud Offi1,et was subordinate to the Lanrl Officer. Early in 1909 the Assistant Lm{d Ofliicr was given the title of A.si-;istant District Officer and was mac/e subordinate to the District Officer and at the beginning of l!JlO a n~)w department was created uncler the title of District Oflice. The District Officer and the Assistant District Officer have eqnal/power.~ in all cases. The.v are both .\s,;;istaut Sn perinteudcnt:-:: "I', l'"liie and as snd1 snhonliuate tn the ( \tptain Snperintell!lcnt ol" P,-,li1. A certain continuity of poliey is thus attained which m1s not possible under the old system. Dnriug the _1Jar H)()!J :\Jr. llallifax, tlrn Distrist Officer, acted from February 1st to }lard1 23nl. I acted as Distriet Officer for the remainJer of' the mar. Mr. Tratman aded as Assistant District Officer from :\fay 15th to Deeember 3 lst. 2.-PuLIOE. At t.he enil of the year the force stationed in the district consisted of 8 Europeans, 60 Inclians d 24 Chinese. The waters of the district are patrolled by No. 2 lannc-h with a crew of 2 Europeans ancl 1:i Chinese. There 1rnrc also l:i Indians quartered in the district during the year for railway pnrposts. A reduction of the European force was made 011 September 1st, b, the withdrawal of the Sergeant from A.11 Tm1 Station. This statim is now visited hy the Ping 1-\han and San Tin Sergeants and ii-; hr purposes of discipline under San Tin.

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-Hi -3.-IlE\'EN (jE. I have set forth in Table I, under the variom; hea.,ds, the sums c-ollected as reYenue. The total collection at Tai Po amounted to $97,928.20. But in order to arrive at the real revenu e from the district the fees collected by the water police for licence~; of various descriptions under the Merchant Shipping Ordinance must be added. These fees are paid to the Harbour Office. During 11 )09 they amounted to $5,377.80. The gross revenue in cash is 1~Jierefore $103,306.00. Something should moreover be credited to the district on behalf of the opium monopoly. The annual sales of opium within the Territory a; ppear to amount to something like $57,800.00. No difficulty was experienced in collecting the revell ue. The rent collection began on the 1st J nly and the collection was < ompleted in two months. During the month of July alone $55,3r .:l6.84 was collected. In the Sha Tin District the entire sum due w.as collected without the issue of any summons or warrant. This is I the first time that anything of the sort has happened. ,r 4.-MAGISTRACY. The following Table shews the numbr~r of eases heard by the Police l\fagistra~e :Cases heard, Fines impm1ed, Persons imprisoned, Warrants issued, Opium fines paid to jfann, 1908. 481 $1,442.15 177 :174 $766.63 1909. 382 $1,947.27 116 :::100 $47G.80 During the year 27 4 lieen>i;es to carry arms were issued and 341 miscellaneous permits. These 111er111its are issued without fee and are for the most part permits to re1'.air houses but they include a large variety of subjects, viz., permissi nn to hold unicorn dances, to erect altars, to rebuild bridges, to repti',ir roads and to hold theatrical per formances. 5.-LAND OFFICE. In the Land Office 2,544 deed.s relating to dealings in land were registered. The Land Ordinance came into force on July 7 th, 1905. The following Table will shew file number of deeds which have been registered since that date:1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, No. of deeds registered. 1,794. 1,407. 2,160. 2,384. 2,544.

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(L~ Jee, was a cert1 persons that this some decis, are made. The section 0 the Peak to Ping Shan was extension of this section to L commenced on this section. 7.-CROPS, 1 The two rice crops were good in all owing to lack of rain. The pineapple c1;c was good and pines were sold for frov against $1.20 in 1908. The laichi C.' some reason a complete failure. There was large reduL:tion in f towards the end 0 the year. The m:' the Kwai Shin district and in spite <:' :j,000 on the various railway works 1 place. The general prosperity of the 'I\ ease and rapidity with which the cc' that the old type of mud house has that a much better type of houses i, the district and by the number of tl and pi yau dances which were held d 12th April, WlO.

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,) A.00 13.50 4,!0.50 (i) 21.00 J.7;j MU5 ... ,H23.80 1,0%.71 2,013.80 '3,044.00 244.00 340.00 241.00 155.00 35.00 :J,489.67 (3) __ 61.75 88.00 1G4.00 65.00 1 ii.00 1 fi.20 111. ,u 281.00 144.00 1,442.15 1,9-17.2, -----------$93,001.17 $97,928.20 ,nd adjacent villages were tr,tnsferred to the as tlrns transferred. years. usly collected by the Botanical and Forestry

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-H 5 B.-NOUTHERN DISTRICT. 1.-REVENUE. The total revenue collected by the Assistant Lancl OJiil:er, Southern District, during the year 1909 was $33,978.32 as compared with $28,317.07 in 1908. A Table is attacheLl showing the amounts 1ollected under their different headings. This does not inclmle fees paid direct to the Treasury and other departments, e.g., for Kerosene Licences, Spirit Licences, Licences nnder the Merchant Shipping Ordinance, etc., and does not therefore represent the real reYenue of the District. Increases are shown, as compared with 1908, in the amonnt collel'1ed for AsRessed 'faxes in New Kowloon and Crown Rent, the latter being due to the transfer of the Hang Hau District from the Xorthern to the Southern District. The collection of rent from the Stone Quarry at Chi.i. Lap Kok, Lantao Island, ancl of fees for Forestry Licences was transferred to this Llepartment in n:Iay, 1!)09. Fees for the regiRtration of transactions in land have been imposed in New Kowloon since October, 1908. l\o fees are charged for the Islands or the Hang Hau District. 2.-LANll OFFICE. In the Land OJ-lice 1,022 deeds were registered during the yeal'. The following Table show,; the number of cleeds registered sinc:e 1!)05:-1905, G81 1906, 1,061 1907, 714 1908, -1344 1909, 1,022 4,122 ---The large number registered in 1906 was due lo the issue of leases in Cheung Chau Island. The whole of the island was adjudged to belong to the Wong family and it is let. out to various tenants on leases renewable every five years. All these lea,;es ;were registered in 1906. 4 acres of land was sold by public auction and '52 acre by priYate treaty. The amount realised from these sales was $1,415.00. During 1909, 205 land cases were heard under the Land Ordin ance of 1905, 7 writR of execution were issued and one person was imprisoned. 3.--Sl!ALL DEBTl:l CnGHT. Twelve cases were heard under the Small DebtR Conrt. Ordin-, an('e of 1908 aml 3 tfoitreRs warrants were issued.

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H fi -4.-PrnLrc WonKs. The new road from Kowloon City to the top of t'lhatin Pass was completed during the year. The land required for this road was resumed between December, 1908, and Augus1, 1909, at a total cost of $1,118.49. 5.-CROPS, ETC. The crops in the District were good and the people generally seem to be prosperous. Crown Rent was collected with greater easp and rapidity than in former years. 6.--STAFF. Mr. D. W. Tratman acted as Assistant Lancl Officer till May when :Mr. G. N. Orme took up his duties as Assistant Lancl Officer and acted for the remainder of the year. HoN<;J;:oXG, .'ll.,t .f111u', 1910. R. 0. Hurcmsnx, Assistant Di.~trict 0/ffr,,,, So11thrrn Di.~trirt. Revemie collected by Assistant Lancl Officer, Southern Distril't. Land Sales, Crown Rent, Assessed Taxes, Lease of Stone Qnarries, Forestry Licences, Earth Permits, Matshed Permits, Boundary Stones, Nun print Plans, -writs of Summons, Pineapple Licences, Registration Fees, October, 1908, Building Plans, Warrants of Attachment, l\iisc-ellaneous Receipts, Arrears oJ Revenue, ~ale of Street Index, Total, i 1908. $ e. 1,917.78 20,033.47 !i,G57.51 !ili.00 89.00 ii7.00. 55.00 27.00 :18.GG H:i9.GG 5.UO 196.UO 10.00 !5.00 : <1!?93 91" o~ '!Y"""' ,.J '. 1909. $ c. 1,415.00 21,200.44 7,612.88 1,059.67 1,404.38 (i6.00 234.00 18.00 35.00 22.00 30.32 723.:Vi 144.00 13.28 $3') 9"Q ')') : o,r lu.t> ....

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Appendix :i:. REPORT8 OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE AND OF THE SUPJmTNTENDENT OF FIRE BlUGADE. The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9 819 as aa-ainst 9,562 in 1908 being an increase of 257 or 2 per ce~t. 0 In the division of these cases into Serious and Minor Offences, there appears an increase, as compared with 1908, of 103 cases or 3-17 per cent., in the former, and of 154 cases, or 2-43 per cent., in the latter. The increase, as compared with 1908 in Serious Offences of 103 is shown as follows :Increase Robbery, 11 Assault with intent to rob, 1 Larcenies, 273 1 )ec1ease Murder, 6 Burglary or Larceny from dwelling 35 Kidnapping and Protection of vV omen and Children, 33 Unlawful Possession. 88 Other Felonies, 20 285 182 -:-Jet lnc1ease, 103 2. Table I shows the nurn.ber and character of the Serious and Ylinor Offences reported to the Police during 1908 and 1909 and number of persons convicted and discharged in com,ection "'ith these offences. MURDER. :1. Nine murders were reported to the Police during the year as against Hi in 1908. In connection with three of these reports no arrest was made. ln the remaining six cases arrests were made as follows :In one case 1 Discharged ,, 1 Convicted 1 l lYilNSLAUGHTER. 1 3 5 4. Three cases were reported to the Police. In one case no arrest ,, 1 and discharged. )) 1 )) )) ,,

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12-MURDER oF PouoE. 5. On the night of the 21st January an armed robbery took place at 43 Kennedy Street in the Yaumati District. Lance-Sergeant Mills, who was on duty at Yaumati Station, hearing police whistles blown, at once ran out into the street where he saw some of the robbers running away. I-le gave chase, and while in the act of arresting one of the robbers was shot by the latter through the abdomen with a revolver. The murderer was pursued by other police and finally shot by P. C. Hedge, whom he was also attempting to shoot. Sergeant Mills and his assailant were both removed to hospital in a dangerous condition. The latter died soon after admission and the Sergeant succumbed to his injuries at 6.15 a.m. on the 24th. Four other men were arrested, two of whom were convicted of robbery and sentenced respectively to 7 years and 5 years imprisonment, the other two being discharged. MURDER oF INDIAN PoLIOE n1 THE NEw TERRITORIES. On the 20th of August Indian Lance-Sergeant 627 Karm Deen and I. P. C. 877 Nawab Khan left Au Tau Station at 7 a.m. in charge of money (Crown Rent) to escort to Tai Po. The constables arrived at Tai Po Gap at about 8.45 a.m. when they were suddenly attacked from both sides of the road by 6 men armed with choppers and other weapons. The fodian Sergeant was killed on the spot, the constable was found about 200 yards from the road down the hillside. He survived about one hour and was able to give an account of the crime. Three men were arrested in September and one in October. One was convicted of murder and hanged, the others being discharged. A fifth man was arrested in Chinese Territory where at the close of the year he was still awaiting his trial or the crime. GANG ROBBERIES. 6. Thirty-six gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 26 in 1908. In 17 cases no arrest was made, arrests were made as follows :-In one case 3 Convicted ,, ,, 1 1 2 1 2 5 1 1 1 2 2 6 3 ,, 1 ,, 111 the remaining 19 cases 1 Discharged. 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 "

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-'--13STREET. AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES. 7. Seventeen street and highway robberies were reported during the year as against 15 in 1908. In connection with 11 of thm;e no arrest was made, in the re maining 6 cases arrestH were made as follmYs :--In one ease, 1 Discharged. 2 2 Convicted. 2 l One case unde(ided. RonBEHIES o:s: BoATS A:l:D Ju~Ks. 8. Nine cases were reported to the Police during the vear as against ten in 1908. In connection with 5 cases no arrest wa~ made. In the remaining '1 eases arrests were made as follows : -In one case, 2 ConYicterl. l l Discharged. 2 l OTHER FELo~rns. 0. Under this heading are comprised the following:-Arson and attempted arson, Malicious damage to property Cutting and wounding, -Demanding money by menaces, Embezzlement, Forgery, Housebreaking, :i\forder, Manslaughter, Indecent assault and rape, Shooting with intent to murder, \Vounding with intent to do grievous bodilJ harm, Abominable offences, Throwing corrosive fluid, Total, GAMBLING. 190.9. 3 i;:~ 9 ,) 2ti 28 108 9 c') 2 5 5 1 206 1908. 1 1 9 5 .30 11 151 15 l l 5 2 232 10. One hundred and fifty-three gambling warrants were executed and conviction!=! obtained as against 132 in 1908. PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED. ll. 'rhe estimated value of property stolen during the year was 1210,160.42 as against $199,211.10 in 1908.

PAGE 184

14'rhe value of property recovered by the Police and restored to owners was $21,953.31 as against $20,711.19 in 1908. LosT P1wPERTY. 12. The following is a return showing property lost or recovered. ----------------------------Articles A rtic:les recovered and ::i reported Value lost. articles found which a5 1 I Value found. _: ____ o_st~-__ ------------~~::_n-~t~~~orted lost. l 1909 292 1908 309 '$13,3:38.90 rn,043,26 8) .-, 115 OPIUM ,v ARRANTS. $1,612.GO H,898.58 13. One thousand six hundred arnl eighty-six (1,686) Search \Varrants for prepared opium were execntecl by the Police and Excise Officers of the Opium Farmer, as compared with 1,821 in 1908. ln 477 cases opium was found and 040 persons were arreste
PAGE 185

-I 5 ---Foon AXD Dnuas OrmINANCE. 16. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance:No. of Cases. Con,, ict.ion s. Total amount 0 Fines. 5 $285 Samples collected and sent to the GoYernment Analyst were as follows:-Ale. G Whisky. 12 Brandy. 8 All these samples were certified to be genuine with the exception oJ five samples of brandy. l\fE'.:IDIC,\XTS. 17. Sixty-nine beggars were dealt with by the :Magistrate and one Rent to Tung wah Hospital. 130 were sent to Canton as follows:-How often sent away. Onre, ..................................................... Twice, ...................................................... Thrice, ..................................................... Total, ---------------------------'--DEATJ BODIES. Canton. 119 lO 1 130 18. Table II shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year. LICEXCES. H). The following licences were issued during 1901) :-1,100 Hongkong Jinrickshas. 50 Quarry Bay Jinrickshas. :145 Kowloon ,Jinrickshas. 2 Private Vehicles (16 Carriages, 3 Hearses_ and 5 Motor Cars). 1,155 Truck Licences. 005 Hongkong Chairs. GO Hill District Chairs. J:3.772 Drivers and Bearers.

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I (i --From the 7th July when the issuing of certain licences was transferred to this Department, the following were issued :-2 Auctioneers' Licences. 7 Billiard Tables. 1 To store Calcium Carbide. 1 To deal wholesale in Cocaine and its Salts. 1 To store Detonators. 3 Distillery (New Territories). 12 To store Dymanite. 9 'l'o store Ether and Alcoholic LiquiclR. 138 Game Licences. 1 Gunpowder (Storage). G Kerosine Storage (in Go
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!7 -MUSKETRY. 2:3. The Europeans and Indians were put through the usual course of Musketry, 32 Europeans and 55 Indians qualified as marksmen. foE~TIFICATIOX BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS. 24. 190 persons were identified as having previous conv1ct10ns against them. This number is 32 more than during the year 1908. 109 identifications were those of criminals who had returned from banishment ; 8 were on record as having paid fines in lieu of going to gaol. CONDUCT. 25. The conduct of the European contingent (average strength 122) was good. The total number of reports against them was 55 as against 37 in 1908. There were 8 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 6 in 1908; 4 for sleeping on duty as against 2, 1 for disorderly conduct and 9 for neglect of duty. The conduct of the Indian contingent (average strength 380) was on the whole good. There were 335 reports as against 401 for the preceding year. For drunkenness there were 29 as against 38. for disorderly conduct 24, as against 30, for neglect of duty 37 as against 33, for absence from duty 48 as against 38, for gossiping and idling on duty G7 as against 77, and sleeping on duty ;31 as against 24. 208 men had no report. Seven Indian constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate ('1 dismissed from the Force) :-5 for assault, 1 for misconduct and 1 for larceny. The behaviour of the Chinese contingent (average strength 328) was good. There were altogether 896 reports as against 1,044 in 1908. There were two reports for drunkenness (same as last year), 134 for sleeping on duty as against 112, 12 for disorderly conduct as against 17, and 263 for minor offences as against 37 4. Twelve constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (10 dismissed) for the following offences :-6_ for assault, 1 for desertion, 1 for being watchman in a common gambling house, 1 for assault and attempting to obtain a bribe, 1 for unlawful possession of prepared opium, 1 for keeping a common gambling house and 1 for aiding and abettig a man to carry a letter into Victoria Gaol. 142 men of this contingent were not reported during the year. The seamen, coxs,vains, engineers and stokers (average strength 114) had 213 reports as compared with 215 for last year. For drunkenness there was no report (same as last year), and l00forabsence from stati011 and late for duty as against 106 in the previous year. Two seamen were convicted by the Police Magistrate (both dismissed), one for larceny and one for desertion. 53 had no report recorded against them. POLICE LAUNCHES ED BOATS. 26. The outer waters of the Colony were, on the recommendation of the Retrenchment Committee, patrolled by two launches, one of which is stationed at Tai Po, instead of three, from the 17th June. Each has a crew consisting of 1 European Sergeant, 1 E~ropean Constable, 2 coxswains, 2 engineers, 2 stokers, 1 boatswam and

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-1'88 seamen. The third patrol launch (without crew) is kept 1n reserve for use when either of the above is under repairs. The harbour is patrolled by two small launches and two pinnaces (not all on duty at once) ~anned by 8 European Police, 8 coxswains, 8 engineers, 8 stokers and 16 seamen ; and two rowing boats each manned by 1 European and 4 seamen. There is also one spare boat in reserve. REWAlWS. 27. One European Sergeant was commended by His Excellency the Governor for his services in the Sha Tau Kok murder case, and one European Constable was granted a medal for plucky conduct in connection with the case of robbery and murder at Yaumati. One Indian Sergeant was granted a reward or the smart capture of a burglar and one Indian Constable for smart and plucky conduct in in arresting a burglar with stolen property. One Chinese Constable was granted a medal or zeal and activity displayed in connection with the capture in Chinese Territory of the men who committed a murder at Sha Tau Kok, and two Chinese Constables were granted rewards or plucky conduct, zeal and activity shown in the discharge of their duties. l-IF:ALTH. 28. Admissions to Hospital during the last three years were as follows :-1907. I 1908. 1909. NATION-ALITY. s h Adh I Ad-Strength. Ad-trengt Strengt mission. m,ssmn. !~ mIBfilon Europeans, .. 135 132 135 97 132 72 Indians, ...... 410 427 410 394 411 I 371 I Chi1?,ese, ..... 503 187 501 136 511 I 131:i --_ I -------Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever from 1st ,January to 31st December, 1909 :OLD TERRITORIES. I NEW TERRITORIES. Strength:-;,;~::ecl. I Strength. I Treated. NATIONALITY. ________ i _______________ l ____ Europeans, ......... 1 119 4 13 I In~ians, ............... 11 Chmese, ........... I 297 465 uO 18 114 46 1 23 1

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-I 9 --In addition to cases treated in hospital for FeYer or Dengue Fever, the cases treated for Fever in the various stations in the New Territories without being removed to hospital were:-Europeans 4, Indians 55 and Chinese 7. Ex1wcTIVE STAVV. ~9. The Deputy Superintendent (Captain F. W. Lyons) returned from leave on 21st October. :Mr. G. N. Orme acted during his absence. The District Officer (Mr. E. H. Halliax) left for England on leave on 24th March and retumed on 27th October. ::\fr. S. B. C. Ros8 acted during his absence. The Assistant Superintendent (Mr. :r.P.J. Wodehouse) retumed from le::n-e on 12th May. ::\fr. T. H. King acted during his abse1wr,. PoJ.Jt:E Foucts. 30. Thirteen Europeans were engagecl during the year, l\rn were recruited from England and eleven enlisted locallr. Table III shows changes in the personnel of the Force during the year, and Table IV the strength, expenditure and revenue for the past ten _vears. 2\ EIY TERRITOH!ES. 31. The District Officer for the New Tei-ritories reported as follows:-''The strength of the Police in the Xorthern District was until September:9 Europeans, GO Indians and 24 Chinese. During September the Force was reduced by one European owing to the withdrawal of the Sergeant from Au Ta:u. The waters of the District are patrolled by No. 2 Launch with a force of 2 Europeans and 15 Oninese. 15 Indian Police are stationed in the District for railway duty. The total Police Force in the Territory at the end of the year was therefore 124 men. The health of the Force was only fairly good. Forty-six cases were admitted to hospital and in twenty-five of these cases the cause was Malaria. Over fifty cases of fever were treated in station and one dP.ath from Malaria occurred at Sheung Shui. The staff at Tai Po suffered from fever throughout the year. Twelve armed robber.ies and three murders were reported. At the end of the year there was a great reduction in the number of railway coolies owing to approaching completion of the works. No statistics are available as to the number of strange coolies who found employment in the Terrritory but the number can hardly have been less than 5,000. These coolies caused very little trouble to the Police though they kept the Small Debts Court busy." 25th .. 1pi-il, 1910. F. J. BADELEY, Capt. Supt. of Police.

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VICTORIA. KOWLOON. 112 Table II. Dt'llPED BODIES, 1909. HARBOUR. ELSEWHERE. lmoolli i I Total. Under and 1 year itncl 5yea.rs ID years Under 1 month 1 year and 5:n_e;rs 15years Under lmontb! lyc:uand iiycars liiyea.rs Under lmonlb:l lyca.raull 5yca.r& 15years one under unde1 five u:d~r and one and uncle, under 6 under and one u~d~r undet 5 u~d~, I nnc\ one un
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-II:3 Table III. R.eturn showing the Establishment, Enlistments and Casualties in thP Police Force 1909. Nationality. Europeans,. 132 12 1 9 Indians,...... 411 I 38 6 2 9 i 2 12 20 I 37 51 104 Chinese,..... 511 i 108 ,3 8 40 -------___ : ___ _______ : _________ Total,...... 1,054 .L~s i 12 I 10 I 58 i 73 153 [ This number includes tlrn Police paid for by ot.her Departments arid Private Firms and also the Engineers, Coxswains and Stokers, but it is exclushe of :-Captain Superintendent. 1 Deputy Superintendent. 1 District Officer. 1 Assistant.Superintendent. 1 Probationer. 1 Accountant. l Clerk and Hindustani Interpreter. 4 Clerks. (l Telephone Clerks. 81 Coolies. Strength 011 31st December, 1909 :128 Europeans (4 short of establishment.). 411 Indians. 5ll Chinese. Total, 1,050 NorE.-a E11r11pcans, 4fi Indians and 13 Chinese are paid for by other ne.partmcnts and 6 Indians and 17 Chinese by PriYnte Firms.

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-I 14 --Table IV. Table showing the total Strength, Expenditure and Revenue of the Police and Fire Brigade Departments for the years 1900 to 1909. Total Strength. Expenditure. Revenue Year. Collected b,r Police Fire Police Fire the Police Force. Brigade. Force. Brigade. Force. ----------$ $ $ 1900 ... 929 96 393,485 18,240 90,028 1901. .. 920 !)(j 380 787 18,592 97,343 1902 ... 919 I 97 392'.248 25,992 118,160 1903 ... 921 97 512,860 25,167 141,491 1904 ... 993 I 97 506,008 27,428 133,597 1905 ... 1,018 97 509,298 i 28,956 130,873 1906 ... 1,047 97 515,874 25,499 134,212 1907 ... 1,048 9G 522,406 I 46,250 138,417 1908 ... 1 1,046 9U 556,607 I 31,172 124,288 1909 ... 1,054 97 564,835 : 72,227* 125,958 I '-------------------_____ NOTE.-No revenue is collected by the Fire Brigade. $44,120 was for t-lw );'e\,. Floating Engine.

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I 15 -REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE FIRE BRIGADE. There were 31 Fires and 63 Incipient Fires during the year a1:1 against and 59 in 1908. Details are given in Table I. The estimated damage caused by Fires was $548,838.00 and by Incipient Fires $1,497.00 as against $198,219.00 and $1,025.80 in 1908. The Brigade turned out 47 times during the year. 2. There was a constant supply of water in the fire mains through-out the year. 3. 'I'hree Fires occurred in the harbour during the year. ,1. There was no prosecution for arson during the year. :3. There are 34 Despatch Boxes kept in different places in Vic toria and 12 in Kowloon, 8 different Telephones to which the Police eau have access to communicate with Central Station in the event of a fire and 16 Fire Alarms. n. I enclose a copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of Fire Engines (Annexe A). i. The conduct of the Brigade has been good. 8. The pumps and other machinery for a new floating fire en gine, furnished by Messrs. Merryweather, were received during the year, and the hull constructed locally was nearing completion at the end of the year under review. 29th Mcwch, 1910. AxxEXE A. F. J, BADELEY, 811pt'1"inte11d1nt, F'fre Biiga,fr. Hu~GKOXG, 8th .llr.nc/1, 1910. Sm,-I luwe the honour to forward the Annual Report on the condition of the Government Fire Engines and gear for the year ending 31st December, 1909. Steame1 No. 1. FLOATING FIRE ENGINE BY SHAND, MA801' & Cu. This vessel has been used at Fires and Drills during the year. The Hull, Machinery and Boiler are all in good order and fit for service at Fires in the Harbour or on the lower levels on shore. Steame1' No. 2. LAND ENGINE BY SHAND, l\!lAsoN & Co. This Engine has been regularly used at Fires and Drills for Drivers. The Machinery and Boiler were overhauled in December and are in good working order.

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116 -Steamm No. 3. LAND ENGINE BY SHAND, MASON & Co. This Engine a11d Boiler were thoroughly overhauled in April. It has been regularly used at Fires and Drills for Drivers and is now in good working order. Steame1 No. 4. LAND ENGINE BY SHAND, MAHON & Co. This Engine and Boiler have been overhauled as required during the year and are now in good order. Stea11w1 No. 5. LAND STEAMER BY SHAND, MASON & Co. 'l'his Boiler was renewed in 1907, it, was cleaned and tested in June, and has been regularly used at Drills for Drivers and Fires and is now in good working order. MANUAL ENGINES AND GEAR. All the Manual Engines and Gear, Hose, Reels, Ladders and supply carts have been kept in repair and are now in good working order. All the Bamboo Ladders have been replaced by 1st Floor Fire Ladders. FIRE ALARM. The Fire Alarm 0 12 Points installed last year has worked very satisfactorily and is now in good order. I have, &c., F. J. BADELEY, EsQ., Capt. Supt. of Police. (Sd.) D. MACDONALD, Engineer, Ffre B1-igade.

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-l'.17 -ANNEXE B. SrnEx<.a oF THE FIRE Hn.IGADE. i:luperintendent, Deputy Superintendent, Asssistant do., Engineer, Assistant Engineer and Station Officer, Clerk, Engine Drivers, Assistant Engine Drivers, -Fitter Black~mith, Carpenter, Rtokers, Sailmaker, Overseer 0 Water vY orks, Inspeetor 0 Dangernus Goods, Assistant to do., Foremen, Assistant Foremen, Firemen, Interpreters, FLOATIKG EKGlNE. Foreman and Engine Driver, Engine Driver, Coxswain, Stoker, Seamen, Total, l!.11rop1a,11.,. Cki11.1s1. 1 1 2 l 1 l l ,, .:, 4 22 l 1 46 l 2 l l 1 i l 1 28 ') d l 1 l 2 51

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Table I. Fires durin,q the rear 1,909. No. Date .. Time. Situatiou. I No. of Buildings 1 Destroyed. I 1 I :amnl~e. ------! I Wholly. Partly I I I (':wsc. -------------. ----------------------I 1 Jan. 2nd 5.45 p.m. House No. I, Sutherland Street .. 2 ,, 4th 3 ,. 4th 4 ,, 25th 5 ., 28th 6 Feb. 28th 7 Mar. 20th 4.20a.m. 4.30p.m. 10.00a.m. 11.4n p.m. noon. I.05p.m. 8 21st 11.40 p.m. ,, 101:, Des Vreux Road West A matshed, Reclamation, H unghom House No. 6, Nam Hong, K'loon City Junk No. 1159, Victoria Harbom ... Cement Worb, Hunghom ... House No. I, l'ottin~cr Street ...... 43, Gough Street ......... 9 April 7th 3.00 p.m. A matshed at Ma Ti ................ .. 10 11 ,, 9th ,. 16th 1.00 a.m. House No.109, Queen's Rd. Central 1.15 a.m. Hunghom Cement Works .......... .. 12 May 1st 5.20a.m. IS 11 4th 3.00 a.m. 14 ,, 29th 12.45 a.m. 15 June 4th 5.45 p.m. House No. ISO, Des Vceux Hoad Central........ .. ......... A matshed at Tai Po Tau A matshed at Cheung Sha Wan ... House No. 20, Tsat Tze Mui.. ....... I $1~,{HHI I 1,HlO 6 matsl1d l -uao 30il 10,0!,li 2.70ll -!,i1:" t1f 1ne.licinc, ........ I ~"me medcal herbs cat1!!ht firc .... 1 1 ,,rcleHsly thr .. wi11~ a ligiitecl match ~p:irk!, from :i furnace .. ..... ...I. lI11know11 ...... OY
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Table !,-Continued. Fires durin,q the Year 1909. !-00 Hot ashes placed near a matshed .... 29 15lh 7.00a.m. On boa1cl ll.S. "Prinz Ludwig" in Victoria Harbour ..... ... ... 225,000 Unknown .................................. 30 21st 1.55 p.m, A matshed on Conduit Road ....... I matshed. 250 ..................... 31 30th 10.20 a.m. Houses Nos. l & 2, Tsat Tsz Mui. .. 2 ... 10,000 Total,$ 548,838

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Appendix J. REPORT OF THE SUPEUINTENDENT OF PRISON. 1. The number of prisoners rnceived into prison during the year and the corresponding number for the year 1908 were as follows:-1909. 1908. Convicted by Ordinary Courts; ,, Courts Martial, 4,183 4,005 10 18 ,, ,, Capt. Supdt. of Police, ,, ,, Commodore, R.N., Rupreme Court for China and Corea, ,, ,, ,, Siam, -High Court, W eihaiwei, Debtors, On remand or rn default of finding surety, Total, 1 5 5 l 3 3 75 86 933 665 5,215 4,778 ---~ There was thus an increase of 437 on the total number of admissions as compared with the year 1908. There was a decrease of prisoners convicted for L'.Lrceny during the year under review the number being 799 against 815 for the previous year. 2. The number of prisoners admitted to prison for offences not of a criminal nature was 2,957 made up as follows :Convicted by Courts Martial, -,, Commodore, R.N., Debtors, Convicted under the Opium Ordinance, Garn bling Ordinance, Market Ordinance, ,, Arms Ordinance, Vehicle Ordinance, Sanitary Byelmrn, ,, ,, Harbour Regulations, for Drunkenness, ,, Cruelty to Animals, ,, Tresp1ssing, ,, Disorderly Conduct, ,, Vagrancy, ,, Contempt of Court, Assault, ,, Obstruction, ,, Cutting Trees, Fighting, Ca1Tiecl foiwanl, 10 5 75 595 561 421 21 59 73 1(-jfi 17 2 128 161 14 1 141 149 38 4 2,641

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Hruuulit foiwanl, Convicted for Mendicancy, ,, ,, under the Post Office Ordinance, ,, ,, Police Ordinance, for Rogue and Vagabond, under the vVomen and Girls' Pro tection Ordinance, Stowaway Ordinance, ,, ,, Servants' Quarters Or dinance, 2,041 66 5 ., ,) 8) d Hi 7'i lH ,, Chinese Wine and Spirit Ordinance, -PublicHealthandBuildings Ordinance, 8 ,, .Dangerous Goods Or dinance, for :Malicious Damage, -under the Prison Ordinance, -,, Stamp ,, Total,(. ) 19 14 :! 2,957 3. The above figures show that o9 per cent. of the total admis sions to prison were for non-criminal offences. The following Table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine:----------------------------------WITHO{;T OPTIO:\' OF FINE. IN DEFAULT OF PAYMENT OF FINE. Served the imprisonment. -_1,3m_ __l __ 1_,6_60_ -Paid :full fine. GIG Paid part fine. G'il 'l'OTAL. 4,207 4. There were 128 juveniles admitted into prison 39 of whom were sentenced to be whipped in addition to various terms of impri sonment varying from twenty-four hours' detention to eight weeks' imprisonment with hard labour. 5. The percentage of convietecl prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 13 as compared with 12. for 1908. 6. There were 82 prisoners admitted who were convi~ted by the Police Courts in the New Territories against 151 for the previous year. 7. The following Table shows the number of prisoners in cus tody on th,e 31st December for the past ten years and the percentage borne by this number to the estimated population of Hongkong.

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. I I ''er,,. Estimate,! No. of I Percentage Daily aver-; Percent.age i : to age number 10 l'opulat,ion. Con vil'ts. f Popu!at.ion. of prisoner8 .. Population. I i -----------1----1900 i 347,689 l.J.l 486 1 1901 i 38i5,(j71 180 ()46 !99 rno2 I 396,835 215 -5i6 1903 i 410,6 245 653 1904 446,21 i 24a 726 1905 4G2,81il 216 697 1906 414,0,W 156 518 1907 414,-115 146 502 1908 420, i 41 1 ao oss -165 1909 428,8513 80 560 159 l!O --------~ -------------------------------8. There wore 775 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline being an average of 1 per prisoner as compared with 593 with an average of 1 for the preceding year. There were 4 cases in which corporal punishment was inflicted during the year. There were 121 prisoners whipped by order of the Courts. 9. There was one escape but the prisoner was recaptured within a few days by an Assistant Warder. 10. There were 9 deaths from natural causes and 2 executions. 23 prisoners were released on medical grounds. ll. The industrial activity referred to in my last year's report continues and no efforts have been spared in all its branches to secure the attainment, of the objects desired, v-iz., employment for every available long sentence prisoner on useful industrial work. 12. There were 4,185,70(3 forms printed and issued to the various Government Departments and 19,381 books bound and repaired dur ring the year under review. 13. To improve the ventilation of the old prison the window areas on the East, South and West sides have been considerably enlarged. 14. During the year under review and especially in the months of April, May and June the Prison was very much overcrowded. For HH days during the year the daily population of the prisoners confined in the Prison varied between 551 to 639. From 29th April to 25th Jt1ne a number of prisoners were bedded out in the main corridors, ~11 accommodation being insufficient. In consequence of the above on the 30th April, 1909, I submitted a scheme for increasing the prison accommodation by 78 cells. The scheme involved the demolition of the Old Offices, \Vest portion of the Hospital, Prisoners' Reception Room, etc., the removal and reconstruction of the steps to the Entrance Hall and the Inner Gate; the old materials to be used in the re-erection of these structures on improved lines

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--J-!--the work 0 demolition and reconstruction being done by prison labour ; and the building 0 a Hall of 78 cells by the Public \f arks Department. This was approved by the Government and the work was inunediately put in hand and is now being rapidly carried out. The scheme when completed will increase the yard area of the prison by 1,669 square eet. The use of the building known as the Belilios Reformatory as a Drunch Prison has been discontinued. 15. The sanitary condition 0 the prison is good. lo. The buildings generally are in good repair. 17. The conduct 0 the European Officers has as a rule been excellent and that 0 the 1ndian Staff on the whole good. 18. The appliances for use in case 0 fire are in good conditiou and the water supply adequate. 19. The rules laid down for the government of the Prison have been complied with. 20. Mr. R H. A. Uraig, Assistant Superintendent, returned from leave on the 14th ,January, 1909, and resumed immediate charge of the Prison. 21. I append the usual returns. F. ,T. BADELEY, S11p1i,,frnd,,,,t_ :Nth Pebn1my, 1910.

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Table I. Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the Year 1909. --------------------------------------------~ EXPENDITURE. AMOUNT. !NOOME. AMOUKT. ___________________ ----Pay and allowance 0 officers including uniforms, &c., --I Victualling of prisoners, Fuel, light, soap and dry earth --, Cloth!ng of prisoners, bedding, fnrniture,'. &c., _, $ c. li6,855.H 16,522.74 8,Hl.61 (\, L07.0l 1$97,926.80 $ c. Earning of prisoners, 43,946.88 Paid by Military for subsistence of :iYiili tary prisoners, Paid ~Jy Navy for suhsistenre of Naval prisoners, Debtors' subsistence, W ci-lrni-wei prisoners' subsistence, Shanghai prisoners' subsistence, Subsistence for prisoners sentenced by Marine Magistrate, Waste food sold, Actual cost of prisoners' maintenance, ~-\0.00 142.80 iiH.25 700.80 485.40 533.70 68.40 51,503.67 $97,926.80 Average annual cost per prisoner $91.97-in 1908 $102.09.

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-JG -Table II. Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the past 10 Y cars. I I Average Expendi-Actual Cost of Year. Income. Prisoner's Cost per t.ure. Maintenance. Prisoner. -------$ ... $ $ 1900, (1::l,94G.94 19,721.70 44,225.24 90.99 1901, -73,102.37 29,053.70 44,048.67 88.27 1902, -96,311.53 33,523.09 62,788._44 108.92 1903, 108,139.GO :34,136.64 7 4,002.9ti 113.33 1904, -113,251.48 37,18G.G4 7G,0G4.84 104.77 1905, --110,687.83 39,444.50 71,243.33 102.21 190G, 9G,202.08 [ 39,Gl3.2G 5u,588.82 109.24 1907, I 89,111.mJ 40,079.90 49,G31.49 98.8G I I 1908, I 95,537.85 48,066.33 47,471.52 102.09 -1909, 97,92G.80 46,421.13 51,505.67 91.97

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Table III. Return showing Yalue of Industrial Labour for the year 190. Nat11ro of InJnstry. 0,1knm, .............. ................ .. Coir, .................................. Netmaki11g, ......................... .. Tnilori11g, .............................. I Rattan, ................................. JI Ti11-~mithi11g, ........................ C I -arpeutt:n,'.I! ........................ 1 Gra~s-rnu.ttn1g, ...................... .. 8hoemakiug, .......................... Laundry, ............................. Pnntiug nud Bookbinding, ....... .. Building, .......................... 1 2 a 1 s 6 7 I s i I Vaine of Value "f Ar-Vahw of Vnluc of ~toek on Va I no of i "'.alnc of Articles ~!arm-8tock on l:nruing:s Im.nil JanMaterial Total D t1cparrmcnts. Jlst, 1909~ _____ I :land~ $ c. 1,559.:36 886.63 28.00 4H(iv 1.60 587.87 1.60 144.29 ;um 4,43-1.30 ('. I ,03,i.10 150 25 1,984.08 64.~2 9.2,j 40:l.U9 19.20 1,5,58.t,9 865.51, 10,487.t-;5 $ ('. 1 .. 5.59.36 1,n1.7a 178.25 2,431.78 6L12 10.86 990.96 20.80 J ,7il2.98 86~.78 14,922.15 $ c. 1,H94.33 2, 166.~!4 :29:;, 17 96.61 29.40 1.17 25;-l.65 .H4 IGU2 7.10 3-18.90 $ c. 260.95 :!,744 ~3 176.90 20,Li5 877 .6 24.1'<4 I ,9~)1.95 5,919.fi4 41.3-H.7-'i 700.00 $ (', t:36.01-1 ,H8.li 20,'l,'j 650.06 4.00 4.90 40.:i.80 .ti6 117.92 :!."7 7,456.04 $ c. l,R30,J 1 2,94t-UJ6 3: 6.02 3,,W2.00 210.'30 :! I l.ti2 1,,i3'i.ll 26.34 2,273.,i9 5,92:,.21 49,14ti.!J9 700 00 i $ c. 271.05 l,C2 :.63 !Ji.77 l,0.0!).:c2 145)!8 20u.76 546.15 .5.54 570.Gl 5,0fi0.~3 34,:,:21.84 700.UO Total, ...... $ I 8,095 .'i5 ](j,5 ii .5:! I 21,673.0i "'4,7 57 .83 54,244.07 9,6ltl 05 6:s,619.V5 I 43,946.88 ---------------------------------------* }'aid into Bank ,luring-l90~ which sum inclu,lc, $~1:J 711 f.,r w ,rk xe :11tetl in mu", $4,BU!l.7~. Value uf work urncutet! rluring l!l09 fur whkh paymeut wa,; ddcrrc1! t, I :llo. $1/;J. 7:i.

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-JSTable IV. Return showing.the Employment of Prisoners and the Value of their Labour, during the year 1909. Descripti, n of Employi;ncnt. Rate per diem. Daily Average Number of Pnsonerb. i Males. Jemal-.-s Total. 1--!-----@ I Sunday, Christmas Day, Good P'ri-,1 day and Chinesu ~ew Year l)ay:' Cookiog, ............................... 1 12 Cleaning, ...... .. ..... .... ...... ... I 0 lion-productive, .................. Other Days :-Debtors, Remai:ids, On punishment, :o;ick, ................. .. Crank, Shot, !Shot and Stone, .. lo Manufactorics :-Bookbinding, ................... .. Printing, ............................ ; l'rintiug 1:. bourers, ............... 1 Oakum picking, ................. '' m t _,mra nn~, ................... Shoemaking, ........................ Tai.lodng, .......................... I Net-making. "'tring-making, & i tihips' fender makmg, ..... 1 In Building : Carpenttiring an; 0.1 4(i5.(J() 15, 1:;:;.411

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Appendix K. MEDICAL AND SANITARY HEPOR'l'S. TABLE OF CONTENTS : Pf/.ge. ANNEXE A. -Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department., --1 ANN~XE B. -Joint Report nf the Principal Civil Medical Offieer and the Medical Officer of Health, ---3 ANNEXE C. -Report of the 8uperintemlent, Civil Hospital, --37 ANNEXE D. -Report of the Medical Officer in l'harge of Victoria Hospital for vVomen and Children,---!5 ANNEXE E. -Report on the Lunatic; Asylum, ------47 ANNEXE F. -Report of the :Medical Officer in eharge of the Hospitals for Infectious Diseases, ---49 ANNEXE G. -Report of the Medical Officer to Victoria Goal, -50 ANNEXE H. -Report of the Railway Medical Officer, ----52 ANNEXE I. -Report on the New Territories, ------54 ANNEXE J. -Report of the Inspecting Medical Officer of the Tung Wah Hospital, -----56 ANNEXE K. -Report on the Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals, ------64 ANNEXE L. -Report of the Govemment Bacteriologist, ---f-i5 ANNEXE l\L--Report on the Public Mortuary, Victoria, ---69 ANNEXE N. -Report on the Public :Mortuary, Kowloon, ---7:J ANNEXE 0. -Report of the Government A_nalyst, ---75 ANNEXE P. -Report of the Health Officer of the Port, ---79 ANNEXE Q. -Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon, --83

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APPENDIX K. Annexe A. HEPOHT OF 'l'HE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 1. Mr. R. 0. Hutchison acted as Head of the Sanitary Depart ment until June 30th, when I was appointed to act as Head of the Ranitary Department. This appointment was confirmed on October :30th, 1909. Dr. W. W. Pearse continued to act as Medical Officer of Health until Dr. Francis Clark's return on March 4th. Dr. Pearse there upon relieved Dr. l\.facfarlane as Assistant Medical Officer of Health in Kowloon, the latter going home on leave. Owing to the death of Dr. W. Hunter it was decided to appoint Dr. Macfarlane to succeed him as Government Bacteriologist. He will therefore not return to this Department. The Government, acting on the advice of the Board, decided not to replace Dr. Macfarlane, the former Second Assistant Medical Officer of Health, and at the same time the number of Sanitary Inspectors was reduced from 28 to 24, as it was considered that the work of the special Plague Staff might now be undertaken by the District Inspectors in addition to their other duties. 2. The year has been singularly free from epidemic disease except that the number of cases of enteric fever was above the average. Further details on this subject appear in the joint report of the Prilleipal Civil Medical Officer and Medical Officer of Health. 3. The incidence of Malaria in the Colony shows a reduction as compared with recent years. During the year various works have heen carried out in rural districts and especially in the village of Shau Ki Wan with a view to reducing the number of breeding places for the mosquito; while the byelaws dealing with the prevention 0 mosquito breeding have been amended by the Board, so as to make it possible to dear more effectively with their breeding places. 4. The Public Health law was amended during the year so as to give fuller powers for dealing with cemeteries especially in reference to the disinterment of unclaimed bodies after a lapse of years. Certain duties in regard to the registration of births and deaths, the control of vaccinations, and the letting of market stalls were trans ferred from the Registrar General to the Head of the Sanitary De partment. The byelaws dealing with cemeteries, d~pots for animals,

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--K2---marketl::l and slaughter-houses were amended by the Board ; and a new handbook of the Public Health laws, regulations and byelaws was compiled. 5. The total number of permits issued to remove bodies out of the Colony in 1909 was 538. The total number of bodies exhumed under exhumation permits issued by this Department was 129. Of these 108 were removed from the Colonv and 21 re-buried within the C'olony. 6. The report of the Colonial V eteriuary Surgeon deals in full with markets, slaughter-houses and cattle depots, also with cattle disease. It shews an increase in the revenue derived from slaughter houses of $5,656.00 and of $1,561.08 from the markets. The number of animals slaughtered is roughly the same as in 1908. 7. The total revenue collected during the year including that derived from undertakers' licences, market licences, and market stalls collected by the Registrar General during the first six months of the year amounted in all to $203,070.76. The estimated revenue for the rear was $226,780.00. The total expenditure during the year was $352,826.64 compared with $:376,73fl.H in 1908. The estimated ex penditure in 1909 was $408,882.00. E. D. C. WoLFI!:, llead of the Sanitary Depaitment. :Jlst March, 1910. The sum of $166 of this amount although collected during 1909 was not paid into the Treasury until the early days in 1910 and these figures do not there fore correspond with the Treasury returns of revenue, but shew the exact partii:ulars of the fees collected.

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K3 Annexe B. JOINT REPORT OF THE PHI~CIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER ASD THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH, FOR THE YEAR 1909. ARl~A. The Sanitary Board's jurisdiction extends to the Island of Hongkong, which has an area of 29 square miles, and to that por tion of territory on the mainland between the shore and the first range of the Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay, on tho Ea::;t, to the village 0 Kau Pa Hang on the West-with a sea frontago of about thirteen miles and an area of about sixteen squaro miles. Old Kowloon, with an area of about 2 square miles, has Leen in British occupation since 1861, hut New Kowloon was leased to this Government in 1898, as part of what is known as the New Territories. The remainder of the New Territories is not under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board. The City of Victoria, built on tho Northern shore of the Island of Hongkong, has a frontage to the sea of nearly five miles and is separated from the opposite mainland of Kowloon by the Harbour, which is rather less than a mile and a third wide opposite the centre of: the City and widens out to somewhat over three miles at its widest Jrttrt, c,mtracting again at Lyemun Pass on the East to little more than a quarter of a mil1:> in width. The domestic buildings of: the City of Victoria number 9,677 lxclusive of Barracks and Police Stations, of which 946 are Non Chinese dwellings, while there are also 160 European dwellings in the Hill District. The number of new houses completed during the year was as follows :-City of Victoria 44, Kowloon 54, Outlying districts 27, and Peak 3, making a total of 128. In addition to the above there were erected misrellaneous buildings such as offices, godowns, etc., to the number of 78. AmnNIST HA'l'ION. The City of Victoria is divided into ten health districts and Kowloon into thre.e health districts with a Sanitary Inspector in charge of each district. The Inspector in charge of No. 3 health district of the City (the principal European quarter) is also in charge of the Peak. There are in addition four Inspectors in charge of the scaveng ing work of the City and of Kowloon, one Inspector of Cemeteries and one Inspect.or in charge of the City Disinfocting Station.

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-KJ-The supervision 0 the sanitary work in the villages of Hong kong and in Kowloon City and Sham Shui Po is done by the Police Inspectors in their respective districts. The Inspectors in Kowloon work under the personal direction and supervision of the Assistant Medical Officer of Health. Owing to the general improvement in the sanitary condition of the Colony and to the simplification of the methods of dealing with Plague cases and Plague-infected houses since the publication of the final Report of the Indian Plague Commission in 1908, it has been found possible to reduce the number of Sanitary Inspectors by the abolition of the five special Plague Inspectors, who!'e duties are now performed by the District Inspectors. G-ENERAL SAXlTARY C'ONDITION. In connection wJ.th anti-plague measures to render as far as possible houses rat-proof, :391 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired and 1,048 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. In addition 20 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated, while permits for the use of 19 basements and for 40 base ment kitchens have been issued. An open space in the rear has been provided to one existing house while exemption from the provision of a yard has been granted in the case of 568 houses and modification in the, case of 420 houses erected previous to 1899. Obstructions have been removed from backyards, undtr notice, in 27 4 houses. Nuisance notices to the number of 1,~51 have been issued during the year. In addition to the above improvements carried out under the supervision of the Sanitary Department various other permanent improvements have been effected by the Public Works Department. These include the training of nullahs to the extent of 792 feet, and the building of public latrines in the village of Wong Nei Cheong, in Kennedy Road and in Chuk Hing Lane in the City, and at Tai Kok Tsui (Kowloon). A considerable improvement is always taking place in the matter of scavenging lanes but the full effect of the Ordinance in this respect will not be noticeable for a considerable number of years. Nevertheless the total area of lanes obtained for scavenging purposes during the year has been 11,450 sq. ft., the length being 1,756 ft. while a further area of 7,906 sq. ft. was resumed for the construction of a new roadway. During the year one well, the water of which wa:a un~afo factory, was closed.

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-K5METEOROLOGICAL RE'l'l'.HN". 'l'ho following Tal>lo records the meteorological conditions which prevailed during the year:--WIND. ~H. I mi I = I TEMP!sBA-HUMI: itl c,j Month. 8 TU RE. DITY. ; .9 C: R g:a _______ i ;l nm.:------dl.., I o r C _____ ~~lean~ Rei. I Abs, i o I __ Dir. ins. 0 0 0 p. c., ins.: p. c. : houri. ins. Points. miles p. h. January, ... 30.10 61.l 60.6 57.6 80 I 0.4:!' 83 i 85.0 1.460 ]<; by N 14.1 February, ... 80.11 6-l.3 60 l ,i7.0 81 t 0.4.3: 80 : 85.6 l.6G0 ]~ by N 14 2 i\larch, ...... 30.0:i H7.G Gi.l II0.8 81 0.5i 92 64.2 2.345 E 16:5 April, ...... 29.\l5 7,;,8 71.1 67.4 791 0.H 78 : 155.4 2.45/i Eby N 14.1 May, ....... 29.88 78.6 74.8 71.5 83 0.7~/ 85 113.!) 1 li.700 E 13.4 June, ......... 29.79 86.3 81.8 78.6 !II : 0.8S 78 I'. 230.:J 1 7.385 8 by E 12.5 July,29.77 86.5 81.!l 78.2 8210.89 70 25:,!,0 12.825 Eby S 14.l August, .... 29.78 87.ri 82.8 78.8 81 0.91 64 ; 215.3 1 8.340 SW by S 7.8 September,. 29.78 87.0 81.2 78.ii 80 : 0.88 li3 I 202.6 I 8.605 E 9.0 October, ... 29.89 81.6 77.8 74.0 77 I 0.74 SCJ 137.5 j23,985 ENE 16.8 Novemher, 30.07 75.5 70.4 65A 621' 0,47 57 187.1 .065 NE by NI 12.6 December, ., 29.96 68.9 63.6 58.!II 59 0.36 30 2'19.7 0.000 EN ffi _:::_ Meanor Total, j 29.94 76.7 72.6 68.9 7710.65 72 1978.6175.725 E i 18.0 'J'he average annual rainfall during the ten years ending 1899 was 83 inches and ranged from 117 inches in 1891 to 45 inche:,; in 1895 ; the averago for the decade ending 1909 has been 81 inchei-. The rainfall for last year is therefore somewhat below the averng( of recent years. The population 0 the Uolony is primarily divided into Chinese and Non-Chinese. The Non-Chinese comprised at tho Census 0 1906 a white population 0 12,925 of whom 6,085 were civilians while 4,429 belonged to the Navy and 2,411 to the Army. The coloured races (Non-Chinese) numbered 8,500 and included East Indians, Asiatic Portuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians, and a few others. The Table on page 12 shows a similar classification of the Non-Chinese population for the year 1909 and from this it will be seen that the total Non-Chinese population for 1909-inclnsivo of Army and Navy-iH c~timatod at 20,479 (including 446 1\falays), whil~ tho total Chinese population inclm;ive 0 Army and Navy_:_i;; estimated at 323,398.

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-KG-The estimated population to the mi
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K7 -British women and children, and 4 7 Indian women and children, making a total of 500. The average strength of the British fleet was as follows:Europeans permanently in the Colony 250, Europeans occasionally in the Colony 5,340, Chinese permanently in the Colony 140, Chinese occasionally in the Colony 140-making a total of 5,870. For the purpose of estimating the population it is considered a fair average to include one-third only of those "occasionally" resident in t.he Colony; this gives 2,217 and of these 187 are Chinese. The Chinese boat population (exclusive of the New Territories), is estimated for 1909 as 46,240 and the number of boats belonging to tho Port and the villages of Hongkong, is as follows :-Passenger boats, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,605 Cargo boats, ... .. .... ... ... .. .. .. ... .. .. 1,242 Steam-launches, ...... .... .. ... ...... ...... ... 291 Lighters,....................................... Harbour boats, .............................. 1,736 .Fishing boats, ......................... ,..... 4,~60 Trading junks, .............................. 2,874 13,861 This gives an average of 3a persons per boat. The number of boats enumernted at the Census taken in November 1906 was 6,459 but this was only a month after the great Typhoon by which many boats were destroyed. There are in addition 9,016 boats in the New Territories.

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The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and the inmates per house and per floor in the City of Victoria as estimated for the year 1909. h h h I>--. Q) .,; Q) .,; Q) .,; f ~o ... bO ... bi) ... bi) 0 0 0 Citv of Vil'toria. 0 ::s ., C ..., C ..., C ...., -~ r:/J:.::: ell== UJ :.::: "' ::: H~alth District. Q) 0 Q) Q) ... Q) Q) e:: Q) ::: e:: ... 50 E-4 A ..c:10 ~A E-4 I --} ................................. 161 425 227 321 2 ................................. 3 848 585 82 3 ................................. Nil. 11 18 Nil. 4 .................... 8 I 48 562 437 i I 5 .... 14 I 135 547 I 264 6 ................................. ,52 39 381 I 416 7 ................................. 11 59 450 1 396 8 ................................. I 75 576 !133 9 ................................. 1 28 471 SOI 107 10 ................................. i 61 358 345 87 --Tot:tl and Averages 1909 ... 339 1,969 4,192 2,154 Total and Averages 1908 I 326 1,939 4,188 2,2<'2 j I I Nil. Nil. Nil. 1 Nil. 4 9 16 Nil Nil. 1 l i I : I i" 63 I ; .,; bi) .!3 ..... a) ii: 0 ..., 0 E-4 845 1,018 29 1,066 960 929 I 925 I 1,001 1,107 851 8,731 8,718 rr.i ... 0 0 0 E-4 1,820 2,782 76 3,593 2,981 3,142 3;10s 3,291 2,901 2,160 25,854 25,899 0 bi) C ..,.:.:::: Q) -.c, Q) El ::si=I z ... Q) p.. g, (~ ""'4 2.1 2.7 2.6 3.4 3.1 3.4 3.4 3.3 :?.6 2.5 2.9 2.9 Number of Nu mber of ons per loor persons per I pers 1Dwelling. F I 15.:J I 20.3 Most of the Ch this district live in attached to offices. 22.5 19. l 17.5 20.7 18 .5 I 22.9 17.2 20.ii 20.l 7.1 7.2 inese of quarters Q.6 6.2 5.2 6.2 .5.6 8.7 6.8 6.9 6.7

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-k9The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each such district as estimated for the year 1909. BuiltI Chinese Health Total over. DwellDistricts. Acreage. Areas m. ir,ig~. Acres. i -----1, 531 134 i 845 I 2, ......... 243 140 1,018 3, 232 137 29 4, 56 53 1,066 5, 29 27 960 6, ......... 30 27 929 7, 36 31 925 8, 49 47 1,001 9, 44 44. 1,107 10, 252 106 851 Total 1909, ... 1,502 746 8,731 I ,. 1908, ... 1,502 I 746 8,701 NonChinese Dwellings. 159 73 428 103 22 19 7 5 16 54 946 932 I Chin~e Population. Population. 1,104 Persons per Acre (built over). 12,954 20,735 9,070 24,014 18,:,75 16,232 19,150 18,510 25,390 14,620 ) 1,800 } 2,501 / troops 105 179 88 477 696 615 620 399 581 141 3,040 1,276 416 380 84 234 160 356 l.i79,050 11,351 II 175,'130 9,173 255 247 The number of Chinese living at the Peak and Stonecutters' Island is estimated at 1,700. The following Table shows the distribution 0 the Chinese population 0 Kowloon according to Houses and Floors in the different sub-districts into which Kowloon is divided :'1 Three Four I One storey ,Two storey storey store, zf J-c ClO s O .~ ~A o:.= o J-c :,a --'-_...._... _.__ 00 aJ f CO .6 .; I .; Ii .; .; i ~l ::..rar.. e .; J .; .~ .; .~ .; .~ 1 j 5 ; ; o I :a a e 2] $ -s .e 0 ,.. =0 ;:: 01':1 .S I .S .S 1 ~0"' ., "2. .S Sc S 5 ... 5 z 6 z 5 .~ 5 I ., 5 z z < ---:-----,-___ ,_ ---__ ____ ---------1, .... .. 2 ...... 118 ... Is ..... 1s8j1 382 2.0 1.190 108 2, ...... ... ... ... 17 69 1 74 6 166 561 3.4 3;600 25.2 7.1 126 3,.. ... 8... 310 2 389 I 1 91 801 ,2,166 2.7 19,310 24.4 8.9 198 4, ...... 1 1... 78 1 331 ... 7 ... 418111,180 2.8 9,230 22.1 7.8 163 5,.. .. 20... rn1 rn u 1... .. 205 401 1.9 5,020 26.1 13.4 319 6,...... 19 ... 163 69 292 ... 231 566 1,451 2.6 12,010 24.2 9.1 323 7,...... 601... 452 5 4 ... .. .. 1,062 1,527 1.3 10,750 10.2 7.1 2.758 8,...... 926 11 208 4 ... ... ... .. 1,139 1,351 1.2 18,620 7.6 6.4 2;068 .:~ r,:..:.: ..:~ ..::__ ~~6. :-735. _1.1 __ 4_.87~ _7.1 __ 6_.6 __ 7_32 1909, 2,213 2 1,4201290,1,096 9 ,19~ 6 ~.~3! 9,754 1.8 174,600 15 8.2 6,795 1908, 2,250 2 1,433 t9011,oso I ~Ima~ :>,-6ll 19,761 1.s 74,.%0 15o s.1 6,795 Sub-districts 7 (Kowloon City) and 8 (Sham Shui Po) are in New Kowloon, the remainder comprise the whole 0 Old Kowloon and are distributed as follows :-Health District 11 comprises

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-K10-suh-districts 1, 6 and 9, Health District 12 compri,ses ~u L-l.listricts 2 and 3, and Health District 13 comprises ;;ub-districts 4 auJ 5. The Non Chinese population of Old Kowloon at the 1906 Census was 2,269 civilians and 2,215 troops, most of whom reside in suL-districtR 1 and 2, while the Non-Chinese population of New Kowloon was 47. BrnTa:;. The births registered during the year were as follows:-Males. Females. Total. Chinese, ........... 874 328 1,20i Non-Chinese, ..... 170 145 315 Total 1909, ...... 1,044 473 475 1,517 1,412 1908, ...... 937 This gives a general birth-rate of 4 per 1,000 as compared with 4 per 1,000 in 1908 and 4 per 1,000 in 1907. The birth-rate amongst the Non-Chinese community was 15:18 per 1,000 as compared with 14 per 1,000 in 1908 and 15!:15 in 1907. The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows :-British 134, Portuguese 91, Indian 47, lVIalay ::rnd Filipino 1:3, German 11, American 5, French 3, Jewish and Spanish 2 each, Swedish, Roumanian, Brazilian, Italian, Annamese, Japanese and Norwegian 1 each. The number of Chinese births registered does not give an accurate record of the number of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese of not registering births unless the child has survived for a month and often in the case of female children not at all, it i,; probable that the majority if not all of the infants which are sickly at birth or die before they have lived one month have not had their births registered. It is customary, there fore, to assume that all chilJren of one month old and under who are admitted to the various convent;; (being brought there sick by poor people) and all young infants found dead in the streets, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the Police, have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to tho number of the registered births it is assumed that a somewhat more correct number of births is obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth-rate. The number of such children in 1909 was 425 male:i and 646 females, total 1,071, which being added to the registernd births, makes a total of 2,588 as compared with 2,2GJ in 1908. The corrected birth-rate i,; therefore 7 while amongst the Chinese community alone the rate becomes NJ instead of 3 per 1,000.

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-Kll-The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked amongst the Chinese, there being 266 males to 100 females ; in 1908 the proportion was 233 males to 100 females. With the a
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-Kl2-The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purpose of ready comparison with similar tables given in the reports from other Colonies :---------------. --------Nwnher of Inhabitants in 1900 11,390 of Births of Deaths in ,, ... 159 in ,, ... 110 13 4,384 323,844 4,246 343,877 47 1,215 50 7,023 96 1,517 84 7,267 of Immigrants in ,, ... 144,821 of Emigrants in ,, ... ---... ___ : 77,430 __ _I_ __ of Iilibi!AnW in 1908 11)52 I 10 4,1161316,850 4,260 336,488 Increase, ......... ........ 138 3 2681 6'.094 7,403 or Decrease, .............. 14 14 There is an enormous passenger traffic between Hongkong and the mainland of China, the passenger figures by river steamers alone being as follows :-Arrivals 1,240,207 ; Departures 1,175,575. It must not be assumed, however, that the excess of passenger arrivals by steamer over the departures (64,632) or the excess of immigrants over emigrants (67,391) represents an increase in population of the Colony, for thousands of those who arrive by passenger steamer subsequently leave for China and these figures are not available. AGE D1sTRIBU'I'ION OF DEATHS. The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 2,295 or 31 per cent. of the total deaths, a., compared with 22 per cent. in 1908 and 22 per cent. in 1907. The infant mortality amongst the Non-Chinese community during the year was 111 per 1,000 as compared with 91 per 1,000 in 1908 and 91 per 1,000 in 1907. This increase in the Non Chinese infant mortality was not due to any extensive epidemic but to the fact that the climate during the year was unfavourable to infant life.

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-Kl3 -Among the Chinese population thfl known deaths of infants numbered 2,260, while only 1,202 Chinese births were registered. Taking the corrected birth figure to be 2,588 (as explained on page 1:1) this gives an infant mortality of 873 per thousand. The Ueusus return for 1906 showed 1,329 Chinese infants under one year of age, and 14,980 Chinese children between the ages of one year and fivn years ; it is very evi1le11t therefore that}the majority of these children are not born in the Colony but are, brought lwre from the mainland of China. DISEASES. Reapiratory Diseases. The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 2,564 of which 50 were among the Non-Chinese community leaving 2,514 among the Chinese population; 823 out of this total occurred in infants under one year of age. Phthisis alone accounts for 773 deaths of which 751 were Chinese. Pneumonia camrnd l,Li6 deat.hs of which 1,136 were ln1i1rnse; many of these bodi<'s were examined in the Public Mortuaries, and were not deaths from Pneumonic Plagtrn. 563 of these deaths from Pneumonia occurred in infants under one year of age. The death-rate among the Chinrse from Respiratory Diseases was 7 per 1,000 as compared with 7 prr 1,000 in the previous year and 5 per 1,000 in 1907 ; that for Phthisis alone w:is 2 per l,000 as compared with 2 per 1,000 in 1908. The deaths from Phthisis amongst the Chinese were 10 per cent. of the total deaths amongst that community, as compared with 9 in 1906--a sure indication that deaths from tubercular disease are proportionately on the increase, although the total mortality is less. Nervous Diseasea. The number oE deaths under this heading for the year 1909 was 494 a:; compare
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-K14which 5 only were Non-Chinese, 3 being from the civil population, and 2 from the Troops. Of these 417 Chinese deaths, 123 oc curred in the City of Victoria (133 in 1908), while there were 120 deaths in Kowloon (141 in 1908), 165 in the villages of Hongkong (173 in 1908) and 9 in the Harbour (9 in 1908). Some of the deaths however which occurred in the City were cases brought over from Kowloon or from the Harbour for treatment in the various City Hospitals. Of the deaths which occurred in the villages 85 were at Shaukiwan (50 from the land population and 35 from the boat population) as compared with 67 in 1908, 76 at Aberdeen (26 from the land population and 50 from the boat population) as compared with 106 in 1908, and 4 at Stanley. Anti-malarial measures were first inaugurated in this Colony in 1899 and during the past year considerable attention has been paid to this work--special visits have been ma
PAGE 223

The following Table shows the Admissions for Malaria to our two largest Hospitals during the past ten years :-Admissions to Hospital for Malaria. Government Tung Wah I Civil Total. i Case-mortal-I. Hospital. Hospital. 1ty per cent. I YEAR. rri u.i a:i I~ ,.q A u.i :::: u.i A a:i ;;. ...... d.-< "'4 .s ,:S 0 ,.q 0 ,.q r ......, ;;; .... .....,.-"' ...., "' -+-" p., bi)~ "' o;! "' d "' d 00. CD CD CD 0 0 0 ;;. 0 ~ o::r:: '"O '"O '"O C:l E-4
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-Kl6-'l'he Police admissions to Hospital for l\Jalaria ar0 shown in tlu1 following Table :-Police Admissions to Hospital for Malaria. ------------From the City. Total. I A,,erage 11 Strength Percent of Police age of Force. Strength. From rest of the I _______ i ____ o_,o_l_01_1y_~----~~--; I 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, H)04, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, -11 Hi7 243 -, 121 83 40 42 37 ,10 ;32 :-17 22;1 Hi4 !'i5 84 (i7 85 37 G5 76 50 390 407 17(i lfi7 107 ]27 74 105 108 87 929 42 920 44 !)H) 19 !)21 18 !l93 11 1,018 12 1,047 I 7 1,049 10 1,018 10 1,050 8 The next Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years :-Year. 1900, _I 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, Total Deaths from Malaria. Deaths in the City Total Deaths. (Chinese only). 242 555 281 574 189 ,125 152 300 90 301 87 287 134 448 138 579 133 499 123 422 i 4:n. f Average ) f Average 447. I } A distinct diminution iii the last two years, although the average for the past five years is more than thQt in the previous quinquennial period; this may be accounted for by the large number of natives employed on the Kowloon-Canton Railway. The fact must also not be overlooked that the Malarial in fection is not in all cases contracted locally, for the Chinese

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-K 17-population is constantly receiving additions from the mainland of China, and the resident Chinese pay somewhat frequent visits to t~eir native l_and, b~t for the p_11r]:!ose~ of comparison the figures given are fairly reliable as an mdicat10n of the effect of the anti malarial measures undertaken in the Colony. Hygiene is taught systematically in all the schools in the Colony and special attention is paid to the teaching of the mode of conveyance of the infection of Malaria by the mosquito and the manner in which the mosquito bree co 273) -< 254 314J ~.0-+ 196 i.. ao 256 138 ------------------------There was again a marked diminution of admissions for Malaria amongst the Native Troops, there being only 104 admission1::1 from this disease during 1909. The ratio of admissions per 1,000 for the last three years were 574 in 1907, 102 in 1908 and only 54 in 1909. Be1i-Beri. There were 545 deaths (736 in 1908 and 562 in 1907) from this disease during the year, of which 3 only were among the Non-Chinese community ; one of them was an Indian destitute, the second was a Japanese sailor and the third a Japanese tallyman. Attention has been drawn to the fact that the cause of this disease is probably due to the eating of white or polished rice, and further in ve;;tigations are being made into this subject. INFECTIOUS DISEASES. The total number of cases 0 infectious disease notified during tlw ycar was 292 (1,6613 i11 1908) of wl1ich 135 wer.-:1 of Plagm.

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-Kl8 The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases :--I I l~I I ...: I ...... ~ ...,,., C:0 CITY OF VrcToRIA HEALTH g.~, 0 aI al g g DISTRICTS. 11 '.Q !_8 i'E ~Ja "O t: ,...., ,...., 1 ~1 .~'~ 5 ~ 1 1 ---~--~~-...., '""' I:: >!:I: o H o o ------'[',' 'l'i'1 'i''-1 i-:-~ __ r -I'"/ Plngue, ......... ...... 5 61 ... 5102121241 ..1. .. 911., ... 31 ... 101135:10n T l 'rl I r-6' r1 G 2 6 ,11118 20 1 9 3 '>3 7r' 38 lP 101 J .................. l': () i ... ) I I :. I. 1I () Cholera, ................... .. ;-... 1. ...... .J .. 1 ..... t 2 ... ...12: 2 56 Small-pox, ............... 3 5 / 1 !i 11 ... 111 2 1) 5 / 8 ... 1 .. -;io1 472 Diphtheria, ............... 1 313 3 I l ......... 1 G 1 1 j 2 1 ... .. .. 11 22 H Puerperal Fe,er, ......... 1 1 1 1] 5 ... 3 l 1 .. 2 211 1 : : l!) Hi Relapsing Fever,........... ..11 ... J ... 1 ...... 1.)..\.. J .. i ... / ... 1 .. .' 1 1 l I I ( j Table II (page 30) shows the number of notifirrble diseases rceorded in each month of the year. Plague. There was a small outbreak of Plague during the year, the total number of cases registered being 1:35 as compared with 1,07:3 in 1908, 240 in 1907 and 893 in HlOG. Of the:-e 1;35 case~ 91 occurred in Kowloon and 10 were imported. Thirty-one of the Kowloon cases occurred in Kowloon City--a native city of old rat rirlden dwellings which only came under British jurisdiction in 1899 an
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-Kl!) ---when a Plague-infected rat is found in oue of these bins men are specially detailed to fill up all rat-runs in the houses adjoining such bin, rat poison is offered to all the neighbouring householders, and specialattention is paid to the integrity of all gratinas for the exclusion of rats from the houses. 0 In addition to the foregoing special measures rat poison and traps are distributed throughout the year to all householders on application, and the Chinese generally are encouraged to keep cats in their houses and godowns, while a special rat-poisoning campaign i!! instituted just before the onset oE the usual epidemic seaf;on, i.e., during January, Febrnary and March. Throughout the year there is also a continuous house to house cleansing of native dwellings with a view to the removal of all rubbish which may serve as nesting places for rats, while the floors and skirtings are washed with a one per cent. solution of kerosene emulsion to destroy fleas and other vermin. During the year 60,113 rats were caught or found dead in the City of Victoria and 16,022 in Kowloon. Those from the City were examined by the Government Bacteriologist a.t the Public Mortuary and those in Kowloon by Dr. Pearse, the Assistant Medical Officer of Health, with the result that 399 of those from the City and 108 of those from Kowloon were found to be infected with Plague. It is somewhat remarkable that throughout the whole year there was a marked preponderance of female over male rats caught, the numbe1s for the City being 28,946 males and 31,167 females. Table III shows the monthly rlistribution of the PlaguA-infocted rats during the year. 'Typhoid Fever. The number of cases of this disease during the year was 75 as compared with 38 during 1908 and 66 in 1907 : 23 of the cases were imported, namely, 14Europeans, 5 Chinese, 3Indians and 1 Japanese. The cases of European or American nationality numbered 27, while the Chinese cases numbered 35, and 13 cases occurred amongst the other Asiatic races in the Colony. Seven of the European cases, three of the "other Asiatic" cases and 23 of the Chinese cases died. The case mortality among the European cases was therefore 26 per cent. In most of the cases of 'l'yphoid Fever that occur in this Colony the infection is probably contracted by eating salads of raw vegetables, which have been grown in Chinese market-gardens, where it is customary to water and manure the plants with diluted human excreta-both urine and nightsoil. Residents in the Far East should carefully avoid such articles of food as water-cress, lettuce, etc., in view of this danger of contracting Typhoid Fever, Cholera or Intestinal Parasites, all of which diseases may be conveyed in this manner. Oysters from neighbouring Chinese ports are also occasionally the source of infection.

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--K 20 --It will be sceu from the above figures that this disease is much less prevalent among the Chinese than among Europeans in thi~ Colony, the ratio of cases to population being in the case of Europeans 2 per 1,000 and in the case of Chinese 0 per 1,000. Small-po,r. During the year ; 38 ca:,es of Small-pox were certified, of which 2 were Europeans, 28 were Chinese and 8 were of other races; 10 of the cases were imported. One Japanese case and 24 of the Chinese cases died. The number of_vaccinations for the year was 6,721 as compared with 7,655 in 1908. Efforts were made during the year to secure the re-vaccination of school children, and a memorandum was issued to all school teachers in the Colony setting forth the advantages of re-vaccina tion, while arrangements were made for this to be done free of cost at the schools on application. A copy of the memorandum is appended to this report. As a result, 91 re-vaccinations were per formed in Government Schools and Ial:i in Grant St!hools-which cannot b,~ regarndfog 1908 was nme. ALICE MEMORIAL MATERNITY CHARITY. The Government employs eight Chinese midwives, trained in ,v estern methods, to attend the poor in their confinements, and during the year 1,381 cases were attended by these women as against 1,043 in 1908. Two of the mothers died of Puerperal Fever, while there were 40 cases of abortion and 46 still-births. 43 of the infants died during the year, 21 and were taken back to China, while 63 were lost sight of owing to removals ; the remainder of the infants aro well.

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--K 21 ---INTERMENTS. The following number of interments in the rnrious ct:eleries of the Colony have been recorded during the year:--General Cemeteries.-Colonial Cemetery, . Ia2 Chinese Roman Catholic Cemetery, 805 Mahommedan Cemetery, ........ 45 Jewish Cemetery, ... ...... ......... 5 Parsee Cemetery, .. . .. 2 Cemeteries. -Mount Caroline Cemetery, ........ Kai Lung Wan ,, Tong W a Hospital ,, Protestant Shaukiwan Aberdeen Stanley Shek 0 ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, 989 610 214 3,591 24 290 178 24 Ma Tau Wai Shai Yi.i Shek Sham Shui Po Christian J
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--K 22 --Article:, were received for steam 11isinfoction according to the following Table:Vict01ia Station. Articles from Private Houses, ..................... 7,468 ,, ,, Kennedy Town Hospital,......... 741 ,, ,, Tung W a Hospital, .. .. .. .. .. 17 5 ,, ,, Government Uivil Hospital, ...... 1,360 ,, Peak Hospital,...................... 31 ,, ,, Alice Memorial Hospital,......... 189 ,, ,, Victoria Hospital,.................. 415 ,, ,, Police Stations and Gaol,......... 593 ,, ,, Convents, ... ... ......... ........ ... 28 Government Clothing lent to Contacts,.......... 133 Clothing and Bedding of Staff,................... 31.l Ambulance covers and stretchers,................ 481 11,925 The disinfecting apparatus was in use on 212 days, and in addition 4,928 articles were washed, 12 public vehicles were disinfected, and 248 articles were fumigated. Kowloon Station. Articles from Private Houses, .................... 3,238 Military Clothing, .................................. 3,034 PolicP, Ulothing, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 354 6,626 The disinfecting apparatus was in use on 105 days. PcBLrc BATH-HousEs. The free Public Bath-houses erected by the Government at Wanchai and in Pound Lane, Taipingshan, and also the temporary bath-houses, fitted up in Uhinese tenement houses rented for this purpose, at 92 SAcond Street and 2 Sheung Fung Lane, have been in considerable demand by the poor class of Chinese and the follow ing figures show the total number of persons who have used these bath-houses during the year 1909:-W anchai, ....................... ........... Pound Lane, ............................. .. Second Street, ............................. Sheung Fung Lane, ..................... 149,747 210,648 70,610 21,671 Total, .................. 452,676

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K 2:-1 Separate baths, with an ample supply of hot water, are furnished at each of these bath-houses-that at Wanchai is for men only, and is largely used by the coal coolies engaged in coaling ships in the Harbour, and that at Second Street is also for men and boys only. The Pound Lane bath-house has separate buildings or men and for women and children, and the Sheung Fung J,ane bath-house is for women and children only. AMBULANCE SERVICE. A complete ambulance service has been established throughout the City, and ambulances can now be procured not only at any hour of the night or day by telephoning (No. 363) to the Disinfecting Station, Taipingshan, bnt additional ones have been stationed at the following places for nse by the Police in all_ cases of emergency:-The Bay View Police Station. No. 1 Police Station. The Recreation Ground, HappyValley. Eastern District Sanitary l\fatshed (near No. 2 Police Station). The Sailors' and Soldiers' Home, Arsenal Street. The fJity Hall. The Supreme Court. The Central Police Station. The Fire Brigade Station, Queen's Road Central. The New 1\~estern Market. The Tung Wa Hospital. The entrance gate in (,,lueen's Road "\Vest to the Govern ment Civil Hospital. The Western District Sanitary Office. The Cattle Depot, Kennedy Town. Outside the City limits ambulances have also been stationed at the Pokfulam Police Station, at No. 6 Police Station, Peak, at Aberdeen, Shaukiwan and Stanley Police Stations, at the Water Police Station at Tsim-sha-tsui and at the Kowloon-Canton Railway camps. The Kowloon Disinfecting Station (Telephone No. 44 K.) also serves Kowloon in the same manner that the City is served by the Taipingshan Disinfecting Station. These are all hand ambulances on bicycle or light wooden wheels, with rubber tyres, and 0 the St. John Ambulance pattern. Those stationed in the City are in the charge of the various District Inspectors, whose duty it is to see that they are kept clean and efficient, and that they are disinfected after use. At the Sanitary Stations coolies are always available or the conveyance of these ambulances, but at the other stations the Police obtain volunteers or engage street coolies for this purpose, while if the ambulance has been soiled or used for an infectious case, the Sanitary Department is notifi.:ld so that it may be cleansed and
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The European ambulances at the City Di,infocting Station wero used 148 times while those at the Eastern and Western Sani tary Offices in the City were used 151 times. So complete records are kept in this Department of the number of times the Police emergency ambulances were used. The European ambulances at tho Kowloon Disinfecting Station were used 15 times and the Chinese ambulances 142 times, while the ambulance at the compound of tho Water Police basin was used 10 times ... I\ DULTERATION OF Ji'oon A?-<:D DurGs. Thirty-three samples of milk were taken for analysis during the year, four of which were found to be adulterated. A number of cases of tinned fish and a quantity of fruit which bad become unsound, were seized and destroyed. The purity of alcoholic liquors is dealt with by the Police, who periodically sub mit samples for analysis. PnosECtTTIO~~. A list of prosecutions un.n 11.T.lf.& H., .lllf'dic11l O{!fN1' "f lll'alt/1. 1st Pel,ruar_y, 1910.

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K 2GDEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF IIONGKON<; DURING 1909. -t I 11 ~--;-----1-~ ____ I ___ --1--~-8 J t i g _i_: i :_-_!=~~= .. : I t -~-:... t I 1 l 0 i 1 ii] g I i j :~ ,: -:4 I ;f .,, .c .Q i ;{ ; ; I -_ --~ 0 0 = = ~" I 1! i -~ o: I :~ i :~ 'c : = 1 g i 5 t I 5 ~! J t .c I ; f G ii!. 1 l j : 1 i I J I :,... ::. p:; :il::::;:; i -i~ i:::/ I o' I ----------1--1---1-------------i---,---if, 1! ____ ____ 1'-' --:-! ,,-1-\-!--'-:-i---' I n J ': n '[ ... 1s I JI 22 2 : 4 6 9 1 46 2 2s1 British and Foreign Community. Chinese Community. rCivil, ....... I ~Army, ...... I lNavy, ....... J I !Victoria, ... 1 21 Harbour, .. I I Kowloon, ... [ I Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, .. l Stanley, .... 6 18 10 : 2 I I I i 2 2 2 21: I J I 41... 20 294 77 3i 123 15 25 76 62 21 10 9 4 29 38 42 63 120 12 37 33 llO 8,i II 3 76 2 I 4 I i I I 788: !8!292 3121 15 4181 IH 906 444 6 8 9 20 37 461 63 4682 I i 8 i :?3: 35! 59 5 15 j G4! 1s2I 159 I 8 I i) ,59 I I I 47 i 971 31 124! 2 10 11 3 10 l8i 28 43 361 68 1350 46 I 9i 84 4 31 15 410 2 4,i j i ... 3 j ... 4! 4 45 185 24 I 'I "i 11 I ; I i i,15 Totals, .... ~.-.. -.. -.. -... :_1_3_ -_3_3 __ 1_2_ --2-+-3-9-5+-16_5_1:-I-0-8 _2_1_1_: ~; -7-1~i~r~--::1:1: n~1=!~i=::-9 -:-\-:-1-:-1-::--: ;267

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-K 28-RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDER MENTIONED INSTITUTIONS Du1'ing t!te Year ended 31.~t December, 1909. Tung Wa Hospitals,-Co11d. I{ortuary,-Continued. Causes. JJ'o. Causes. N,,. Brouglttforward, ... 1,136 Brought forward, 960 Small-pox, . .. .. ,'i Puerperal Fever, ...... ... ... 6 Syphilis,........................ 3 Rupture of Aort.a, ... ......... 2 Tetanus,........................ 9 Tuberculosis,.................. 4 ,, ~f Spleen, ....... .. 1 Sept1cmmw, ...... ............ 7 Typhoid Fever, ......... ...... 14 ~,mall-pox, .... '................. 3 let.anus,........................ 6 Total, ......... l,lil Tnbercnlosis, .. .. .. .. 6 Typhoid Fever, .. .. ...... .. ... 4 L' ndiagnosecl, .. .. .. .. .. ;'5 ::Mortuary. Total, ......... 1,000 Causes. 1Yo. Acute Yellow Atrophy of Liver, .................... 1 The Alice Memorial and Aneurysm, .................... Apoplexy, .............. I Nethersole Hospitals. 7 Causes. No. Beri-beri, .................... .. 138 Absce,.s of Buttock, ......... 1 Bright's Disease, ........... Bronchitis, .................... 3 li nmmia, . .. .. .. 3 78 BBri-heri, .. ... .. .. .. .. 1 Cerebral Concussion, ........ 2 Bright's Disease, ...... .... .. 1 Convulsions, .................. 49 Bronchitis, .. .. .. .. .. .. 4 Debility, ....................... 5 B11rns, .......................... 1 Diarrhcea, .................... 119 Dysentery,..................... l Drowning, .................... 2 Eclnmpsia, ...... ............ ... l Dysentery, .................... Eclampsia, .................... 13 Empyema, ..................... l l Epiphysitis, .................. l En
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K 29 RETURN OF DI~ATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDER MENTIONED INSTITUTIONS During t/1e Year ended 31st December, 1909. -----------The Italian Convent. Causes. 1-.To. Atclectasis,............... ...... 5 Beri-bcri, ...... ................ 3 Bronchitis, .. .. .. ...... .. .. .. .. 79 Convulsions, ...... ............ 1 Chicken-pox,.................. 1 Cirrhosis of Liver,............ 1 Diarrhrea, .. ....... ...... ...... 81 Diphtheria, .. ......... ......... 6 J?yse1'.t?ry, ............... ...... 6 Enteritis, ....... ... .. ...... ... 6 Erysip~Ias, .. .... ...... ... ...... ] Gastnt1s,...... ......... ......... 1 Gastro Enteritis, ...... ...... l Hepatitis, .... ... ......... ...... 1 Hyurocephalus, .... .. ......... l Ictcrus Neonatorum, ......... 8 Irnm:1~urity at Birth, .... .. 41 Inun1t1011, ....................... 6 Int.nssnscept.ion,....... ...... ... a Mnlarial Fever, ............... 6 Mumsmus, ..................... 298 Meningitis, .................. 37 .Nephritis, ......... ...... ...... 2 Oeuenm of Lung, ...... ...... 1 Perienrditis, ............ ...... 3 Perit.onitis, ............ ...... ... 4 Phthisis, .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .. .. .. 3 Pleurisy,........................ 14 Pneumonia, .... ....... ......... 807 Rickets, ............... .... ..... 19 Septicremia, ............ ~..... 1 Sma-Jl-pox,, .............. ,...... I Syphilis,........................ B5 Tabes l\1esenterica, ...... ... 45 Tetanus, .... .. .. ............... 20 Trismus, ..................... 27 Tuberculosis, ... ......... ...... 143 Total, ......... I ,248 FRANCIS CLARK, Superintendent of Statistics. 1 L'Asile de la Ste. Enfance. Causes. No. Abscess of Chest Wnll,...... 1 Anremia, ........................ l Apoplexy, ........... .......... 1 Atelectasis, .......... ;........ 5 l~eri-beri, ... ... ............... 2 BrPnchitis, .. .... ............... i2 Cellulitis, ............... ...... 1 Cerebral 'i.'hrombosis, ...... l Convulsions, .. .. .. .. .. ..... l Diarrhrea, ..................... 19 Diphtheria, ...... ............ 2 Dysentery, ..... ......... .... .. 1 Epilepsy, ...... ...... ......... l Fracture of Skull, ... ......... l Gastro Enteritis, .. ..... .... l Heart Disease, ... .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 Hydrocephalus, ...... ...... ... 1 Icterus Neonatorurn, ... .. .... l lmrn~~urit.y at Birth,......... 26 Irmn1t10111 ..................... 9 Malarial Fever, ...... .... ... .. 3 i\larasmus, .. .... .. .. .. ..... .. 186 Measles,........................ 1 :Meningitis, .. .. ... .. .. .. .. 98 Nephrit.is, ..................... 3 Old Age, ..................... 11 Osteomyelitis, ............... 1 Pericanlitis, .................. 2 Peritonitis,..................... 4 Phtbisis,....... .. ......... ...... 4 Pleurisy, ...... ... ...... ...... 16 Pneumonia, ...... ...... ...... 178 Post Part.um Hmmorfl111ge,.. 1 Syphilis,........................ 35 Tubes Meseuterica, ...... ... 17 Tetanus,........................ 114 Tnberculosi,,;, .................. 122 Tumour of Brain, .... .. ...... l Typhoid Fever, .. .. .. .. ... .. 2 Undiagnosed, .. .. .. .. .. .. 11 Total, ...... :.-. 960 E. D. c. WOLFE, llegistra1 General of Deatl1s. SANITARY BOARD OFFICE, HONGKONG, 1st Febmary, 1910,

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Table II.-CAsEs ol!' NoTn'1AnLE D1sEAsg nEconDED 1N EAcu 11IoN-rn 0.1, THE YEAR 1909. h S a ,.; Q) ..0 s Q) > 0 z -------------------1----;---------------{ European, ... ... ... ... I ... ... ... ... ... .. Plague, .. .. .. .. Chinese, .. .. 6 I 6 22 32 38 9 4 .. .. I Others, .. I .. .. .. 4 2 .. .. .. .. Typhoid, ............... J ~~r~~:;:n:.. ..~ : : 1 : : 1 Others, .. .. l ... .. .. 2 .. 2 I .. 3 2 { European, ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Cholera, .. ... .. .. .. ... Chinese, .. 2 .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. Others, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... { Enropeo.n, I .. .. I ... .. .. .. .. ., ... Small-pox, ............ Chinese, ... 2 I S 3 11 31 ... ,.. ... ... .. Others, l 3 I I 2 .. .. .. .. .. J Enropean, .. .. 2 .. .. .. I .. .. .. 1 .. Diphtheria, .... ....... l Cbiuese, .. 2 2 5 I .. I ... .. ... .. 2 l Others, .. .. I .. I .. .. .. .. ... .. Puerperal Fever, ... J .. ::: \ ::: ::: 1 "2 "2 "i '2 '2 "i .. 5 ::: l Others, .. .. ... .. .. .. .. I .. 1 .. .. .. I 2 2 1 1 2 3 0) 00 00 0 0 0 -:::,0) 0) "ClO) C::1""'"'4 ,....., i::-ol d 3 c5] ] ~] 0 0 0 ...:., 0 1-_E-t ____ E-t __ l;_E-t _____ E-t_ 128 7 27 35 18 135 15 2 38 22 19 I .l,Oi3 38 56 472 14 1.-5 Relapsing Fe,er,... ... Or.hers, .. .. [ ... I ; ... ... ... ... .. I .. ... .. Total, 1909, ............ 11 I 19 37 i 34 57 53 28 161 5 11 I 9 J_1_2_ ---" 1908, ............ 93 jl56 147 1175 I,4ii5426 11-11 45 19 1 2 I 8 I I I 292 I ... i ... 1,668

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K 31--Table III. :;\fo~TI-JLY DrnTH.IBU'rION OF THE PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS DURING THE YEAR 1909. CITY OF VICTORIA. -------------------------------------1 I I I I i 1 ;? l l t 1 1 J~ < < oo OZ A~ ------1--------------------------Mus Rattus, ...... 1 4 3 18 1 35 34 42 31 23 6 2 1 200 Mus Decumanus, 1 3 11 30 2 33 24 9 23 12 13 13 11 184 Mus Musculus, .. 1 6 8 .. ... .. 15 1-------Totals, ... i 7 14 48 3 68 58 52 60 43 19 15 12 399 Human cases of i I Plague, ...... ... ... 1 3 12 15 3 1 ... ... 1 36 KOWLOON. -----f-1 i h a Ji { I I f i.~ = ., ., "" d ::, ::, I ::!" ., Q 0 ., 0 < oo OZ A~ ------___ ____ ----1-------Mus Rattus, I I 10 9 81 51. I 32 M: ~!~~:i!!~s'..: ::: I .:. I .. ~.: .. .:. -~ ::: ::: I ::: .. :6 --1--1--')----~ --.------1------Totals,... ... 7 l 31 A 8 2a 111 1 1 ... ... I ... 108 r i : I Human cases of Plague, ........ I 711-1 j 18 19 I 25 I 5 3 I .. .. 01

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Table IV.-L1sT oF P1wsECUTJO'-R nnnw, TTrn YEAR HlO!l ------------------------------------------------------------OJ.fences. Summonses. Convictions. Breaches of :Market Bye-laws, .............. 15 15 ,, ,, Cowshed Bye-laws, .............. I I ,, ,, Laundry Bye-laws, .............. 6 6 ,, ,, Bake-house Bye-laws, ........... 16 16 ,, ,, Dairy Bye-laws, ................ .. 2 2 ,, Offensive Trade Bye-laws, ..... 5 5 Carryin~ nightso!l ~hrough public streets} durmg proh1b1ted hours, ........... 3 .3 1 I 41 I 40 10 10 2 i 2 3 3 Con ,~~tn!!:~-~~rnt.~ ~~-i.t~ } Depositing rubbish in streets, .............. ,, ,, ,, __ Harbour, .......... .. ,, U nne 1n drains, .................... ,, Nightsoil in streets, .............. I I I I ,, Pig-wash in streets, .............. Dirty latrines, ................................... 2 2 Failing to fill up rat-runs, ................... .. I ... Penalties. s 140 20 39 ]51 12 7 1 229.50 138 8 3" ,) 4 30 ... I I i Remarks. { Bound over to com_e up for judgment when called upon. I discharged. 4 2 ,, ,, limewash, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 20 Case withdrawn. 2 cautioned. 1 I 114 110 Hawking fish in a market, .. .. .. .. .. .... ........ 20 ...... __________________ ______ _______ _______ I _________________ $852.50 \ Carried fo1'ward, ........ ---------------i _____ _____________

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Table IV.-LrnT OF PROSECUTIONS DURI.\G TUE YE.m 19O0,-Continued Offences. Brought jol'waid, ........... Illegal cubicles, ................................ ,, occupation of basements, ........... O,ercrowding tenements, .................... Obstructing lane by refuse, ................. Occupying latrine as dwelling, .............. Refusing to sell milk from dairy, ........... Selling pork without licence, ................. unwholesome pork, ................. milk, .................... ,. ,, food, ................... .. Stealing 3 bottles the property of the l Government, .............................. J Storing timbers in market stall, ........... Unla;;:;7rt;~e?~~~.i~1~. ~-1~-} '\Y ilfull): damagin$ the property of His } MaJesty the !\.mg, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. I Total, ................. Summonses. Convictions. Penalties. Remarks. $ 114 110 852.50 6 2 20 4 ordered to remo,e the cubicles. 2 1 10 1 discharged. 8 7 64 1 absconded. 1 1 20 3 3 25 1 1 75 4 4 275 1 1 150 1 Absconded. 1 1 5 1 Case withdrmn1. 1 1 5 1 1 10 1 Case withdrawn. 146 13~1 $1,511.;'50 I i,:i w c.~

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K 3-! }fomornmlum 011 the suhjed 0 Vaccination and Re-vaccination for the information of School Masters and Others. One of the diseaseR whieh has caused the greatest number of deaths in Europe in past years, and which still causes many deaths and much disfigurement in China, is Small-pox. It is very seldom indeed that a person suffers from a second attack of Small-pox and there are some seasons during which out breaks 0 very severe and fatal Small-pox occur, and other seasons in which the disease is not so virulent. 'l'his no doubt suggested the idea that if healthy persons were deliberately given an attack of the disease during a mild season they would have a very good chance of recovery and would thus be protected from contracting the disease again should a virulent outbreak occur at some later date. This method of what is called "PROTECTIVE INocULATION was practised in India several hundreds of years ago and was introduced from In dia into Europe and became quite common in England from the year 1700. The same method of protection found its way into China, and even at the present day this method is largely practised throughout this country, the usual procedure being to place some of the Small pox crusts, perfumed with a little musk and wrapped in wool, into the nostrils of the person. This is followed, some days later, by the usual Small-pox rash over the face and body, with fever and general sickness, and if the person is fortunate he recovers and has thus acquired, in most cases, protection against future outbreaks of Small-pox, but at the cost of at least two or three weeks of serious illness, and at the risk of his life, for many of these inoculation cases die. Fortunately, however, the discovery was made in Europe at the end of the eighteenth century that cows and calves suffer from a disease very similar to Small-pox, and that if we take the inoculation crusts from this animal, instead of from a human case of Small-pox, we can protect persons from Small-pox without producing any serious illness or running any risk of loss of life. This process is called "Vaccination" and its introduction is associated with the name of Jenner who first tried it in England in 1796. It is now in general use throughout almost the whole world, and there is usually a law that infants shall be vaccinated before they are six months old and that inoculation with human Small-pox material is illegal and will be severely punished. The result o. this general vaccination of infants has been to enormously reduce the number of deaths from Small-pox and to alter very materially the age-incidence of the disease. In the 18th century almost all the cases o. Small-pox occurred in infants and very young children, as many as 90 per cent. of the total deaths from this

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K 35 --disease being children under 5 years of age, whereas nowadays the bulk of the cases occur i~ persons ~ver ten years of age and this is well shown by the followmg analysis of some 10,000 cases treated within recent years in the London Small-pox Hospitals:-Vaccinated ; V accinatecl ; I Said to be good marks imperfect I vaccinated ; Un vaccinated Ages marks no marks Cases Deaths 1 Cases I Deaths Cases I Deaths Cases / Deaths 0-5 I 51 0 182 21 128 47 677 383 5-10 267 2 714 48 325 87 1187 563 10-20 1045 17 1976 98 419 81 521 160 20-40 725 I 37 1898 258 420 140 382 181 40+ 48 6 266 51 131 I 44 79 34 It is very evident from this Table that the influence of Vaccination performed in infancy fades gradually, and although its power against death remains to a considerable extent, reducing that is to say the chance of a fatal ending to an attack of the disease, yet its power to prevent an attack gradually becomes less from the age of ten years onwards. This is why Germany passed a law in 187 4 that every child must be re-vaccinated at the age of 12 years. This law applies to all children,whether boys or girls, but boys have again to be re-vaccinated when they enter the Army at the age of about 19. As a result of this law Germany has been able to practically eradicate Small-pox from the country as will be seen from the following figures: The population of Germany is 56 millions and from 1891 to 1902 inclusive there were 607 deaths due to Small-pox, or less than one death per million of population per annum. It is stated that most of these deaths occur near the frontiers of the country, where it is not so easv to exercise such absolute control over the re-vaccinations as it is in the interior. England with a population of 32 millions had during the same period 6,761 deaths from Small-pox or more than 17 deaths per million of population per annum. The death rate in fact from Small-pox in England is almost twenty times as heavy as in Germany, and this result has been obtained by Germany solely through insisting on the re-vaccination of school children at the age of 12 years and by the further re-vaccination of all boys who enter the Army. All school children of whatever age should therefore be at once vaccinated if they have not been vaccinated in infancy, while if there is evidence of infant vaccination they should be re-vaccinated at the age of 12 years, and it is well to explain to the children that the discomfort attending re-vaccination is very small indeed, and so many improve ments have taken place in the preparation of the lymph that there is no risk whatever now attending it.

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K ~1G -Vaccination is usually performed by making three or four very small scratches on the muscular part of the upper arm and applying the vaccine to the scratches. In the case of re-vaccination this will produce a small pimple on the second or third day which then becomes a small blister, while on the seventh or eighth day there will be a scab or crust. There will be a small amount of itching for the first two or three days, and the child must take care not to knock the arm roughly, but there will be no ill-health, the child will be able to take its meals as usual and will be able to run about and play, so long as it does not join in rough games with its school fellows. This re-vaccination will be performed free of cost at any of the Public Hospitals or Dispensaries or arrangements can be made for it to be done at the School. A certificate should always be obtained by the child from the Doctor who performs the re-vaccination and this should be haneed to the School-master or School-mistress. .July 14th, 1909. FRANCIS CLARK, llfidical Ojficl'r ,if Hea/tl,

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-K37 -Annexe C. CIVIL HOSPITAL. REPORT BY DR. J. BELL, Superintendent. STAFF. From May to November I took over duties as Principal Civil Medical Officer, Dr. Koch acting as Superintendent and Dr. Moore as Assistant Superintendent of Civil Hospital. On my return to duty here Dr. Koch proceeded on home leave. i-.listers Millington and Stollard left for home, the latter leaving the service on transference to Nairobi. Sister Lee returned from England. Sisters Johnstone, Park, Luckman and McLeish joined the service, the last named resigning after a few months' service. Nurse Poole, Probationer Nurses Kennett, senior and junior, Wilson, Chisholm, Olsen and ]1/facGowan resigned and Probationer Nurses Mooney and Kennedy joined. Maternity Nurse Ma Fong left and was succeeded by Nurse Evans. Mr. R. Chapman, Accountant, left for long leave in Australia, the first taken since he joined the service in 1892. W ardmaster Cooke went home on leave. W ardmaster Brown ,ms dismissed and was succeeded by Wardmaster Grant. STATISTICS. The total number of admissions was 2,384 as against 2,527 last year and 16,981 out-patients were treated as against 18,207. The following Tables are attached:-1.-.Admissions and Deaths under respectiYe diseases from all Government Hospitals. II.-:Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police Station during 1909.

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The following Table gives the number and class 0 patients admitted during the past ten years and the deaths:~ -------YEAR. 1900. 1901, 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. I 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909 I Police, 920 937 938 759 707 726 742 776 660 633 Priyir1g Patients, ..................... 928 858 956 794 794 866 720 762 724 659 Covernment Servants, ............. 266 339 460 319 I 267 271 339 367 315 250 Police Cases, ......................... 347 348 300 276 262 329 307 I 318 285 287 Free, .................................... 569 466 454 646 555 512 637 488 fi43 555 I Total, ................ 3,030 2,948 I 3,108 2,794 2,585 2,704 2,745 I 2,711 2,527 I 2,384 ------. --Total Deaths, ............ 155 153 140 142 128 150 167 170 157 131 Percentage, ............... 5 5 4 5() 4'l 5 I 6 6-2 6-2 5

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-K 39This shows a decrease in ;111 classes but "Free" as compared with last year. Deaths.-There were 131 during the year making a pereentago of 5"4. 0 this number 47 died within 24 hours of admission. The average daily number of sick was 90 as agaim,t 88 last year. lVomen and Cliild1en.-There wl3re 2,36 women admitted as against 185. Of this number 25 died (13 3/,,). 64 children were admitted, with a death rate of 5 as against 49. Nationalities.-Europeans-548 against 594. Indians and coloured-778 against 87 4. Asiatics-1,058 against 1,059, The death rate amongst thP nationalities was European 4 % Indians 3 and Asiatics 7. DISE.\8ES. The most prevalent diseases were: .WOY. 1908 I 11c1ease or Decrease. Malarial Fever, Febricula, Influenza, Dysentery, Tuberculosis, Beri-beri, -Rheumatism, Diseases 0 Respiratory System, Diseases 0 Digestive System, Injuries, 188 -against 98 80 40 66 42 59 159 240 505 282 93 140 84 45 56 69 123 22fi 482 94 + 5 60 44 + 21 14 1 + 36 + 14 + 23 The largest number of deaths oct:urred m the following diseases:-Tuberculosis, 23 deaths. Diseases of Digestive System, -13 ,, ,, Respiratory System, 7 ,, ,. Urinary System, Typhoid Fever, Plague, InjurieR, 8 !) 6 32 Seu: GrowOzs.--The following cases of malignant diseases were under treatment :Chinese male aged 42 ,, frmale ,, ,, 33 50 34 32 42 22 4fi 38 Carcinoma of neck. Sarcoma 0 neck. ,, ,, ,, ,, uterus. Carcinoma of uterus. Schirrus of breast. Sarcoma of neck. Carcinoma of uterus. Sehirrus of breast.

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-K 40-Fractuies.-The following were the principal fractures treated:-Spine, Skull, Jaw, Thigh, Forearm, Arm, Leg, 1 with 7 -2 -5 -6 -2 -7 1 death. 6 deaths. MalarialFever.-There was a decrease under this disease-188 as against 282 in 1908, 24 7 in 1907 and 239 in 1906. Dengue Fever.-No cases of this disease were under treatment. Typhoid Fever.-28 with 9 deaths (32o/o) as against 12 with 1 death (8o/o). Appendicitis.-Four cases were under treatment. All recovered after operation. Two were Chinese. Liver Abscess.-3 cases with 3 deaths. The two Europeans were imported cases and the Chinese came from Tung W a. All were in an advanced stage and the operation was performed as a forlorn hope. OPERATIONS. A total number of 195 were performed during the year-(147 in 1908). Chloroform was administered 200 times whilst a few minor operations were done under local anresthesia. No casualties occurred under the administration of the anresthetics. Eight cases of radical cure of Hernia were done by Dr. Koch-all successful. Two cases of OYarian Tumour were also operated on successfully rand four cases of Appendicitis. VACCINATIONS. During the year 521 were performed as against 627 last year-300 primary vaccinations of which 220 were successful and 221 re-vaccinations with 86 successful. SICKNESS AMONGST THE POLICE, GAOL AND SANI'fARY STAFFS. Police. Admissions.-633 were under treatment as against 660, a decrease amongst Europeans and Indians and a slight increase amongst the Chinese (2). Table II gives the admissions or l\lialarial Fever from each station. Deaths. -There were seven deaths during the year, two Europeans, one from heat stroke and one from a bullet wound received on duty, three Indians from Leprosy, Phthisis and Pneumonia and two Chinese from Dysentery and bullet wound. Invaliding.-Four Indians for Leprosy, Phthisis, mental instabi lity and paralysis, four Chinese for Phthisis (2), Heart Disease and Hernia.

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K 41 -Sick Rate.-59 per cent. for Europeans as against 87 in 1908, 99 for Indians as against 117, 21 for Chinese as against 28. Mortality Rate.-1 per cent. for Europeans as against nil, o as against nil for Indians and 0 for Chinese as against 0. Malaria.-87 cases as against 108 last year. The Europeans suffered to the extent of 3 per cent., the Indians 16 per cent. and the Chinese 2 per cent. The percentage incidence of the whole Force shows a decrease of 2 "/o as compared with last year. There were 6 re-admissions for this disease as against 15 last year, all amongst the Indians, five coming in twice an
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-K 42 -Table I. DiseaseR and Deaths in 190\J at the Civil, Yi<"toria anJ Gaol Hospital:,:. i: .. Yearly Total. Total DISEASES. 'bL -as~ 1 Cases ;; a. "o I ____ 1 Trl'ut.ed. E ~-: Admis~iom IJe~t.hH.
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K 43 -Table II,-Continued. Diseases and Dtaths in 1909 at the Civil, Victoria and Goal Hospitals. -----------------~------------DISEASES. .B -4,,il oo tto d O .e d i'l ..., Yearly Total. ...., c+-1 cl ::i., 0 ---8 c5 p:: Admissions Deaths. Total Cases Treated. --------------1----1----1-----l-----1-----Brought forwaid, ........... SUB-SECTION 2. Functional Nervous Disorders:-Apoplexy, .................... Paralysi8, ................... .. Chorea, ...................... .. Epilepsy, .................... .. Neuralgia, ................... .. Hysteria, ....................... SUB-SECTION 3. Mental Diseases:1Wania, ....................... .. Melancholia, .................. 1 Dementia, .................... DeluRioual Insanity, ....... .. Disease of the Eye, .................... .. ,, Ear, .................... .. ,, Nose, ................... .. ,, Circnlatory System, ... ,, Respimtory System, .. ,, Digestive System, ... ,, Lymphatic System, ... ,, Urinary System, ..... ,, Male Organs, ......... ,, Female Organs, ...... ,, Organs of Locomot.ion, ,, Cellular Tissue, ..... .. ,, Skin, ................... .. I nJuries, ...................... .. . Effects of Heat, ............. .............. Malformations, ............. PoisonB, ...................... .............. Parasites, .................... ............. Under Observat-ion, ....... In Attendance, ............. .............. Parturition, ....... ........... TOTAL ............ ---------38 ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 1 1 5 1 .. I 5 3 2 1 1 4 1 20 1 1 ... ... 2 l I 98 I I 1,087 77 8 .5 10 l l ... 5 ... 11 ... 3 ... 1 3 5 1 ,54 ... 11 ... 2 .. 43 4 184 8 268 13 69 ... 33 9 76 ... 31 ... 68 ... 80 ... 32 ... 492 32 19 1 .. ... 5 ... 16 ; ... 188 i ... 31 I .. 2i 1 2,871 I 151 1,125 10 11 1 5 11 3 I 1 3 6 I 59 11 2 44 191 273 72 35 77 32 72 HO 33 512 20 8 5 16 190 32 28 2,969 42 2 2 2 1 2 5 1 l 3 1 6 5 1 12 88

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Table II.-Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Polire Station during 1909. ------------------------------------l----~-------1 Q)._: I Q)...Q ,_. i,.'., ..: f blj C) c5 ci ; 1 2 1 1 e g ;: r:= bO -t,;I O ; > 0 -0 ..... f .... co d ~. = = = ~10 co too cogco Station. < < O,Z A ---i-----i-------1-Central, .... .. .. .. .. .. .. I l 11 2 3 2 3 3 5 3 4 261 8 + 0 No. 2, ...... ... ...... ....... 1 1 I 2 I / 51 13 + 2 ,, 7, .. . . 2 1 2 i I 6 9 1 + 4 Bay View, .. ..... ......... 2 2 20 -80 Tsat Tse Mui, ...... ......... .. 1 l l 2 50 30 Shaukiwan, .................. Stanlev, ....................... Aberdeen, .................... Pokfulam, ................... Kennedy Town, ........... Yaumati, ..................... l Sham Shui Po,............... l Ping Shan, .................. Au Tau, ..................... Sheung S!mi, ............... Tai Po, ................. ; .... .. Tung Cheung, .............. Sha Tin, ..................... S11i Kung, .................... Mt. Gough, .................. Lamma Island, .............. Water, A .................... .. 3 l 1 I 1 l l 1 2 3 1 2 1 3 42 + 33 4 19 23 1 16 16 1 14 + 0 5 14 I+ 4 7 41 5 2 12 0 3 21 24 2 14= 1 I 4 21 1 1 2 -I l I 3 16-6 .58 1 1 2 l 7 87 + 37 1 ] I 1 5 + 5 .. ... ; 1 I .-.. .. .. I 1 3 2 2 1 : ... 1 .. I I I 20 + 20 ----!--i--1------i-----------1-----'~o~al,_~~___J __ 3 \ 3 \ 3 4 3 s __ j --~3 11 \ l~-l~>--I~-8-7_1_8_a __ 2__

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K 45 -Annexe D. VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN. REPORT BY DR. J. M. ATKINSON, Medical O.dic~1 in Charge. Stafj.-Dr. Atkinson was in charge 0 the Hospital until the 4th 0 May, Dr. Bell from May 4th until November 18th when Dr. Atkinson returned to the Colony and resumed charge. Nursing Stafj.-During the year there were seven of the Nursing Sisters and five of the Nurses of the Medical Department on duty for varying periods 0 the year when required. Buildings.-These were maintained in a good state 0 repair. The walls of the wards were plastered and re-colourwashed and the bath rooms 0 some of the private wards tiled. Admissions, Diseases and Deaths.-There were 219 admissions during 1909 as compared with 234 in 1908. Table I gives in detail the diseases and causes of death during the year, from this it will be seen that there were eleven deaths, a percentage 0 5 as compared with 3 in 1908. The admissions during the last three years may be classified thus:-1. Age:-1909. Under 3 years, 82 } 106 Between 3 and 12 years, 24 Over 12 years, 113 i. :N"ationality :-Europeans, --196 Asiatics, 23 3. Class 0 Patients:-Paying Patients, 131 Government Servants, 2 Wives. and children 0 Government Servants, 50 Free, 36 1908. 66} 110 44 12,1 208 26 108 3 65 58 1907. 60} 89 29 122 166 45 134 13 41 90 Mala1'ial .Perm.-There were 26 admissions as compared with 23 in 1908. They are classified as follows:-Simple tertian, 10 Malignant, 13 1\Iixed infection (simple tertian & malignant), 3

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K 4.tl -Of the te,tian cases four were from Lyemun, two from Kowloon, one each from Victoria Barracks, Murray Barracks, Magazine Gap and Bay View Police Station. The inaz.ign<.ml cases were from Kowloon (3), Lyemun (2), Victoria Barracks (2), Bowen Road Hospital (2), and one each from Quarry Bay, Tai O Police Station, Sai Kung Police Station and South Face Camp. The t.hree 11ri-,1'.ed ,in.f ectiun l'ame from Lyennm. In the month of December, there were no less than eight European patients admitted suffering from Malaria, seven of whom came from Lyemun. Five were children from one family, all had enlarged spleens, three were suffering from mixed infection (simple tertian an
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K 47 Annexe E. LUNATIC ASYLUM. REPORT BY Dn. W. B. A. :i\foonE, Jfecl,ical O.({icr,r. During the year there were 17G patients under treatment. SeYen Government Servants were admitted and of these, four were treated for alcoholism, one was under observation and three were certified to be insane (2 Indian Policemen and 1 Chinese Lighthouse keeper). Eighty-se,en cases were brought in by the Police. There were 34 paying patients, (39 in 1908). The deaths numbered 14, nearly 8 /o of the number under treatment (5 /a in ]!)08). Table I. J\iationality and Sex of Patients treated in 190\). --Hemai mng ate nd of 1908, ... ted, rnmber treated Admit Total 1 Discha Died, Remai rged, . ning ate nd of 1909, ... Europeans. --_!!~I~:~ 9 1 26 3 35 4 27 1 1 I I ... 7 I 3 I i Other Indians. Chinese. Nation: alities. I ~----------I I I lvI. F. M. F. M. I F. j __ I ___ I ------I I 3 1 1 ... ... 3 7 81 34 G 1 ... 7 ... 84 37 7 2 4 ... 66 34 4 ... 1 ... 11 1 -. .. 2 ... 7 2 3 2 Total -18 158 176 136 14 2G

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K 48 Table II. Return of Diseases and Deaths in 1909. Remaining YEARLY TOTAL. Diseases. in Hospital at en,l of Ad-Deaths. 1908. missions. --------I GENERAL DJS EASES. I Delirium Tremens, ............... .. I 2 1 Alcoholism, ...... ..... ............ 1 i 25 .. Acute Nephritis, ................. ... l 1 I LOCAL DISEASES, i Diseases of the Nervous Sys-tern:-SUB-SECTION II. Functional Nervous Dis-orders:-Epilepsy, 1 ... ... Bnlbar Paralysis, ............ ... I 1 1 SUB-SECTION III. I I :Mental Diseases :Idiocy, 1 2 ... Mania, 7 51 4 Melancholia, ................. :-3 9 3 Dementia, ..................... 4 21 3 Delusional Insanity, ......... 1 11 ... General Paralysis of the Insane, ... 1 1 Poisoning, ......................... ... 1 .. Under Observation, ............... ... 31 ... Immersion, ... 2 .. Total, 1909, ..... 18 158 14 1908, ...... 21 191 11 !lemaining I Total Cases m Hospital\ Treated. at end of 1909. ---2 .. I 26 I ... 1 ... i I 1 1 1 .. 3 1 11 12 3 25 6 12 1 l ... 1 .. 31 3 2 ... 176 26 212 18

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-K 49 -Annexe F. INFECTLOU:-; DISEASES HOSPITALS. REPORT BY Dn. G. H. L. FnzwILLIAMS, Jledical O.ffecer in Charge. Dr. W. B. A. Moore was medical officer in charge 0 the hospitals or inectious diseases from the beginning 0 the year until May 4th. Dr. ,T. C. Thomson from May 5th until December 28th when I assumed charge. The facts for this report were supplied by Dr. Thomson before his departure Cases 0 Plague being now treated in the General Hospitals only cases of Smail-pox or other inectious disease are now admitted to the Kennedy Town Hospital. Ten cases of Small-pox came under treatment in the Government Hospitals (90 in 1908) and eight cases in the Tung Wah Small-pox Branch Hospital (69 in 1908). Kennedy Town Hospital. Two caseH were admitted:--A .Japanese, confluent Small-pox, died. ~\.11 Indian, discrete Small-pox. Hospital Hulk Hygeia. Ten eases were admitted:-European, one confluent, one discrete. Indian, six discrete. European, one or observation (Syphilis). Chinese, one for observation (Gastritis). All recovered. The Hulk JI ygeia has now been sold. The Tung Wah Small-pox B1'Clnch Hospital. Eleven cases, all Chinese, were treated at the matshed hospital:-Four confluent, four discrete, cases. Three for observation (Acue Vulgaris, Syphilis, Erythema). Three cases con fluent died. The Government havi11g given permission that the buildings hitherto used for a Plague Branch Hospital at Kennedy Town, 3:nd not now required for this owing to the erection 0 a Plague extens10n -0 the main hospital in the City, may be utilized as a Small-:pox Branch Hospital, extensive repairs and improvements are bemg done to fit them for their new purposes.

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-K 50-Annexe G. VICTORIA GAOL. REPOitT BY DR. G. H. L. FITZWILLIAMS, Medical O;[Jicer. Dr. W. B. A. Moore was Medical Officer of the Gaol until May 4th,. Dr.wJ. C. Thomson from that date until December 28th, when I assumed charge. The facts for this report were supplied by Dr. Thomson before his departure. Buildings.-The prison buildings are well maintained and in good sanitary condition. In the old prison the windows have been enlarged in the corridors and stairs on all the floors, greatly improving light and venlilation both of which in this building are now adequate and satisfactory. Towards the end of the year the West end of the Prison Hospital and the Gaol Offices were taken down in order to make way for the erection of a new hall capable of accommodating seventy-eight additional prisoners. Besides this hall, a new reception room, offices, bathroom for new prisoners, boiler house and clothes store are to be erected on the site of the buildings removed. In the planning of this re-arrangement, improvement of the ventilation of the prison has been held in view. Statistics.-The geueral health of the prisoners throughout the year has been good. There have been no cases of serious epidemic disease during the year. Admissions to the Gaol Hospital were 360. Of these 91 were admitted under observation and found to be malingering, so that the admission for genuine illness only totalled 269, a percentage of 5'1 to the total admission to the Gaol (5"8 in 1908). Malaria has been less prevalent this year. The number of cases treated in the Gaol Hospital during the past ten years are as follows :-1900 163 1005 52 1901 98 1906 22 1902 63 1907 5G 1903 93 1908 68 1904 59 1909 13 Most of the cases classed as F'eb1icula occurred almost simulta neously in September, and consisted of a transient fever of less than 48 hours duration, influenza-like in character, but leaving no debility or tendency to other illness. At the same time a similar febricula was prevalent outside the Gaol. A number of cases of mild Scurvy occurred in the same month, and one prayed fatal in a man who was debilitated by previousl~ diseased conditions of important organs. The prison dietary was earefully overhauled, and precautions are being taken to prevent a recurrence of the probable cau~e of this disease next summer. There were 8 cases of Beri-beri (13 in 1908). The disease ,ms in all cases contracted before admission to the prison. There were 35 cases of Dysentery (17 in 1908).

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K 51-'l'he total number of out-patients treated was 1,137. The principal diseases so treated were:-Syphilis, -50 Gonorrhrea, 17 Rheumatism, -66 Diseases of the Respiratory System, -119 Scabies, -124 Ringworm, 160 Twenty-three prisoners were discharged on medical grounds (Phthisis 12, Leprosy 3, Beri-beri 2, Bright's Disease 1, Pregnancy 1, Peritonitis 1, Dysentery 1, Mental Conditions 2). There were 9 deaths from natural causes, and 2 deaths by hang ing in execution of death sentences. \faccinution1<.-2,594 prisoners were vaccinated during the year of \Yhich 1,413 were successful, 319 unsuccessful and 862 not in spected owing to early discharge. No case of corporal punishment required any after treatment. The following Table is appended : -I.-Rate of Sickness and iVIortality for 1909. Table I. Rate of Sickness and Mortality in Victoria Gaol. Total Number of:-Daily Average Number of:-Rate per cent. of:-------I-----,--------,-----,------,---1909 5,215 360 l,13, 1908 4,778 4321 750 9 560 i 26-66 10146516 23 6 9'.J 1 l 6 6 0 0

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_,__ X 52 Annexe H. KOWLOOK-CAKTOK RAILWAY. REPORT BY DR. ,J. \V. HARTLEY, Medical. O_ijice1. Staff. l\ir. Naidu has been stationed at North Face Camp, Beacon Hill Tunnel, throughout the year. Dr. Chan Tsan Kun was Assistant Medical Officer at Taipokau until the 5th April, when he was transferred to the Bacteriological Institute in Hongkong and his place was taken by Mr. Lam Yun Hae who remained until the end of June when the post was abolished. Mr. Kelly has superintended the Sanitary Work in the Camps along the line. At each of the three Dispensaties, Kowloon Chai, Shatin and Taipokau, a Chinese dresser has been on duty, day and night, and from each Dispensary an Indian Foreman has made a daily round of coolie quarters on his section, issuing quinine, etc., to those in need and bringing in or reporting cases requiring medical attendance. Quinine pills were issued daily to coolies whenever practicable during the months of June, July, August, September and October. As the population was such a shifting one, it was impossible to carry out the regular issuing of quinine with any degree of thoroughness. Coolie lines and all drains were regularly cleansed with disinfectant fluids throughout the year. Camps are all supplied with Sanitary Dust Bins and Refuse has been burnt daily. Pools of water which afforded harbour for mosquitoes and which for one reason or another could not be drained, have been regularly treated with kerosine oil. The general health of the Railway employees has shewn a steady improvement; there was a decrease in the number of entries from Malarial Fever and Dysentery in spite of the fact that a much greater proportion of the sick men came forward for Western treatment than formerly. There was an increase under the heading of "Injuries but the cases were for the most part slight-very few being serious enough to necessitate hospital treatment. Beri-beri still causes a fair amount of sickness and several deaths have occurred from this cause,-some with remarkable rapidity. In November four coolies died at Kowloon Chai on four succes sive days, three of the deaths taking place in the same room. The coolies had apparently been in fairly good health, at any rate they had been working as usual when they suddenly

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-X 53developed symptoms of acute Beri-beri and died shortly afterwards. Post mortein examination confirmed the diagnosis. The building in which these deaths occurred was promptly disinfected and closed, since when there have been no more deaths from Beri-beri at Kowloon Chai. The Camps at No. 5 Tunnel, Tai Po, have shown distinct improvement since drainage and other prophylactic measures, which were made possible by the appointment of an axtra Assistant Medical Officer at the end of last year, could be carried out with some degree of thoroughness. Until the headings of Beacon Hill Tunnel met, allowing a free current of air through, there was considerable trouble caused by the irritating vapours given off from the gelatine used for blasting purposes. The vapours given off from a well and thoroughly detonated charge do not appear to do much damage but if for any reason part of the gelatine is lighted and burns slowly before detonation takes place, the fumes given off from the slowly burning part of the charge are exceedingly dangerous causing stupefaction very quickly and deatI1 is liable to result owing to fixed chemical compounds being formed in the blood, thus destroying its oxygen carrying property. On June 10th, a gang of coolies had to come through dense fumes on their way out of the Tunnel at Shatin. They all complained of feeling sick and dizzy and three of them died very shortly afterwards. The rest had completely recovered by the following morning. The total number of cases seen at the three Dispensaries was 2,192 against 2,064 in 1908 and 3,667 in 1907. Of these the following were the principal cause :-Disease. laria, Ma D ysentery, Beri-beri, Injuries, -Tai Po. -140 -8 -I I -I 84 Tunnel No. 2. South Face., NorthFace. 1909. 1908. 1907. ---I 113 197 450 556 1,168 10 11 29 53 124 7 44 52 58 81 264 I 260 608 354 371

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'-le 54Annexe I. NEW TERRiTOlUEt:l. REPORT BY DR. J. W. H.~rrTLgY, Jlecliwl O.fficer. Dr. Li Ho Ching was in charge of the Dispensary and Cottage Hospital at Taipo and the Leper Asylum at Au Tau until October 31st when he resigned. Since that date there has been no Chinese medical officer at Tai po, but a trained "dresser" has been constantly on dut.y at the Dispensary to attend to the numerous minor cases whieh have occurred and to report more serious ones. Routine fortnightly visits have been paid to the following stations during the year by the Chinese medical officer:-Taipei, Sheung Shui, Sha Tau Kok, Au Tau, San Tin, Ping Shan. The Assistant Railway Medical Officer has regularly visited Sha Tin station as he was in residence at Sha Tin railway camp close at hand. An outbreak of Small-pox occurred in the Castle Peak district in March and occasioned a few deaths but never became very serious In May Plague broke out in the Chinese town of Sam Chiin with disastrous results to the populace. It was feared that villages in the British territory would became infected as a result but the only place attacked apparently was the small village of Loi Tung near Sha Tau Kok where eleven deaths occurred in 21 days. By the end of the month the disease had totally disappeared. The Head men of the neighbouring villages were instructed in the methods to adopt to prevent the spread of such an epidemic, and made use of the best means at their disposal. These were the only epidemics in the territory during the year. Vaeeinations.-112 vaccinations were performed, out of which 108 were successful, 2 were unsuccessful, and 2 were not seen again. Leper Asylum.-13 lepers have been inmates of the asylum during the year.

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-K 55-Taipo Dispensary.-2,200 new cases were treated at the dis pensary and 453 old cases. The following Table shows a detailed list of the cases:-New Cases. Old Cases. Malaria, 956 43 Injuries, 150 23 Diseases-of the Skin, 285 49 ,, Respiratory Organs, 120 68 ,, Digestive ,, 173 44 ,, Eye, 42 13 ,, l~ar, 24 1 ,, Nervous System, 20 11 ,, Circulatory 11 10 ,, Urinary 2 Ulcers, Abscesses, &c., -2fiij 85 Dysentery, 20 12 Beri-beri, 8 1 Rheumatism, 45 15 Febricula, 12 2 Adenitis, 7 Anremia, 6 6 Tumour, 2 Kerosine Poisoning, 1 Debility, 7 6 Diseases of Women, 5 5 Venereal Diseases, 39 59 2,200 453 --Tciipo Cottage I-lo8pital.-The hospital was closed from October 31st to the end of the year. During the ten months it was open 35 new cases were admitted. Out of these 4 were transferred to hospitals in Hongkong and there were 7 deaths. The following shows a list of the cases :-------------------------------------------------.. Malaria, Dysentery, Diseases. Ulcers, Abcesses, &c., Heart Disease, Pneumonia, Pleurisy, &c., Phthisis, Injuries, Trachoma, Epilepsy, Orchitis, -l ----------------' -1 Total, 3 .3 5 1 3 1 4 3 1 1 2 2 1 15 3 1 1 1 I -6 *i--4

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K 56 -Annexe J. TUNG WAH HOSPITAL. REPORT BY Dn. G. H. L. FITZWILLIAllIS, Inspecting Llle_cliwl O;tJice1. Dr. J. C. Thomson was Inspecting Medical Officer throughout the year until his retirement from the public service towards the end of December: I assumed temporary charge of this duty and the data for the following report have been supplied by Dr. Thomson. BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. The year has been one of rapid advance in the organisation and equipi'nent of the Tung Wah Hospital. In March all the wards were thrown open by the Directors for the purposes of the clinical instruction of the students of the Hongkong College of Medicine, and the Inspecting l\Ieclical Officer became Lecturer on Clinical Me dicine to the College. An equipment of clinical apparatus for all ordinary purposes was procured from England, and is now in regular use, with a corresponding itnprovement in the value 0 the work being clone by the institution. Three large plague wards and seven private wards have been added to the accommodation 0 the hospital, and were formally declared open by His Excellency the Governor, Sir F. J. D. Lugard, K.C.M.G., c.B., n.s.o., on the 23rd 0 December. New convenient accommodation for a receiving ward has been provided, and the former receiving ward has been transformed into an out-patient department for out-patients desiring European treat ment. Out-patients being treated by Chinese methods are seen in the large hall of the extension hospital on the opposite side 0 Po Yan Street. An improved European dispensary has also been pro vided. There is now a well equipped laboratory, and the office accom modation has been increased considerably. The hospital kitchen is being rebuilt with new quarters for part 0 the hospital staff on the floor above it. Arrangements have been made for a complete overhauling 0 the extension hospital be fore the Chinese New Year, when all defects and results 0 wear and tear will be made good. STATISTICS. There has continued to be a greater demand for admission to the wards than it has been possible to meet, and many cases that might suitably have been received as in-patients have had to be refused admittance, and treated in the out-patient department. Overpressure has also had to be relieved repeatedly by the transfer of batches 0 chronic cases, especially cases 0 Beri-beri, to a hospital in Canton, by arrangement with the Directors of that institution. The admissions to the Hospital were 3,723 as against 4,122 for 1908.

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-I{ 57 -At the beginning of year 1909, there were, 209, patients remain ing in the wards from the previous year, and 3,723 patients were admitted during the year, making a total of 3,932 cases treated. 2,514 were discharged, and 1,167 died, leaving 251 remaining in the hospital at the close of the year. Of the 3,932 cases, 40 were transferred elsewhere for treatment as follows :-20 to the Government Civil Hospital, 1 to the In fectious Diseases Hospital, 2 to the Ho Miu Ling Hospital, and 17 to Canton. Of the fatal cases 290 were in a dying condition at the time of admission and died within the 24 hours. There remains a total of 3,433 patients actually treated in the Hospital, of whom 1,710, i.e., 50 per cent. were under treatment by European methods, and 1,723, i.e., 50 per cent. under Chinese nati,e treatment. The percentages in the preceding year were European 49, Chinese 50. The-number of visits to the out-patient department was 118,324 (9U,G50 in 1908). 113,010 were seen by the Chines3 native doctors, and 5,314by Dr. Jou Hawk ancl Dr. Leung Chik Fan. One thom;and '-two hundred and twelve (1,212) persons were rnc1:inated at, and in connection with, the hospital (2,348 in 1908). Vaccinations continue to be performed by Dr. Leung Chik Fan, who also attends at the villages named on Table IV for this purpose. Two thousand three hundred and five (2,305) destitute persons were temporarily sheltered and fed, until they could be sent to their native villages, or otherwise be provided for (2,425 in 1908). Of these 1,681 were sent in by the Registrar General. One thousand one hundred and thirty-eight (1,138) dead bodies were brought to the Hospital Mortuary to await burial (1,258 in 1908). For purposes of registration, diagnosis of the probable cause of death is made in all possible cases by inspection of the bodies and cross questioning of relatives as to the symptoms preceding death. Where internal examination is considered necessary, for medico-legal or public health reasons, or because of contradictory statements regarding the fatal illness, such examination is made at the Public Mortuary. During the past year 61 bodies of persons brought in dead, and also 79 bodies of persons who died in the Hospital, chiefly of persons who were moribund at the time of admission, i.e., 140 in all, were sent to the Government Public :Mortuary for post-mortem examination (239 in 1908). Free burials were provided by the Hospital for 3,690 poor persons (4,112 in 1908). INFECTIOUS DISEASES. The Plague Braneh Hospital was not opened during the year, all cases of the disease brought to the Tung Wah Hospital being retained there for treatment. The Government having given permission that the buildings hitherto used for Plague purposes at Kennedy Town, and n~t now required for this use, owing to the erection of a plague extension of

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-K 58-the main hospital, may be utilized as a Small-pox Branch Hospital, extensive repairs and improvements are being done to fit them or their new purposes. The Small-pox Matshed liot:ipital West of Kennedy Town was opened when required during the year. The number of admissions was 11 (69 in 1908). EYE DrnEASE:-l. Dr. Harston C'ontinuccl his Eye Uliniques on Mondays and Frida~s at 4.30 p.m. until his departure from the Colony in Sep tember. Since then the work 0 the department has been carried on by Dr. Leung Chik Fau, who has become proficient in eye practice and Dr. Marriott has acted for Dr. Harston as consultant for eye cases. 603 new cases \Yore seen ((ii:-l7 in 1908), and 2,542 visits were made to this department. Of the new cases 258 were Trachoma. 96 pupils were sent from various schools to be examined for this disease, and of these 82 were found to be cases of Trachoma, the remainder suffering from other diseases of the eye. 112 eye operations were performed, of which the following were the more important:-Excision of Fornix Conjunctivm, 5 Jaesche-Arlt operation for Trichiasis, 2 Snellen's operation for Entropion, 25 Ectropion, 1 Mules' operation for evisceration of eyeball, 3 Enucleation of eyeball, 1 Hess's operation for Ptosis, 1 Cataract, 22 Iridectomy, 28 Glaucoma Iridolysis, 1 Pterygium, 4 Symblepharon,3 Paracentesis in Corneal Ulcers, (i Table V is a clm1sifi.ration of the diseases treated m the eye department. BERH!EHJ. During the year 70n cases were alhnit1cll of whom 261 (36o/o) died as compare<[ with 941 mlmiKsiorn, and 368 deaths (39 "/) in 1908. MALARIA. There has been a large number of cases of Malaria, chiefly from the railway ,rnrks and the outlying villages. Three hundred and eighty-three (383) cases of whom 88 (23 o/o) died were admitted as agairn,t 355 (93 deat.hs,-26 o/o) in 1908. b,SPECTlON. The hospital has been duly inspected by the Visiting Justices twice monthly, and has been certified by them to have been found on all occasions clean and in good order. Certain of them have called attention to the necessity for repairs in the Extension Hospital;

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-K 59 the reason or the delay in this has been the overcrowded condition of the institution, which has made it desirable to wait until the new wards should be opened, to allow temporary emptying of those now about to be overhauled. THE DIRECTORS. The Inspecting Medical Officer has again to acknowledge the courtesy and consideration he has throughout the year received at the hands of the Directors in all his relations with them. 0PERATIOXS. Cases requiring serious operations are so far as possible persu aded to be transferred to the Government Civil Hospital, and this is much more easily done than in former years, few cases when such a transfer is recommended by the Inspecting Medical Officer refusing consent, and sometimes the native doctors recognising the wisdom of the proposal ha,e joined in the efforts to secure transference to more favourable surgical conditions than can be provided in the Tung Wah Hospital. Operative cases in the Tung V-1 ah Hospital itself are usually dealt with by Dr. J eu Hawk, whose results have been very successful. Amongst the operations undertaken during the past year have been the following :Cataract, 6 Pterygium, Entropion, 13 Amputation, Harelips, 1 Fistula in ano, Lateral Lithotomy 6 Enucleation of eyeball,Fibroid, 2 Removal of breast, Glands in neck, -4 Trachoma, Phymosis, 2 Paracentesis Abdominis, The following Tables are appended:-I.-Returns of Diseases and Deaths. 1 4 1 2 Il.-Proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese natiYe methods respectively. III.--Vaccinations.

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K G0Table I. Diseases anJ Dentl:s i:, l:J:l'.l at 1.lie T11ng Wah Hosp:t,al. --------------------------,-----DISEASES. I~emain. Yet1rly Tot.al. I 11" IIJ I Uo;pitnl'1------at. eud 0f Total Ca~es Tre:tted. i \.)v;i. iA,lH,issions Dea tlis. ______________ _________ ___ I i G,:NERAL DISEASl.S. Small-pox, ................................. }Ieasles, ................................... I ufl 11e11za, .................................. Febric:1b .................................. E111eric F,;ver, ........................ .... Cholera, ..................................... Dyse11tery, ................................. Plagne, ..................................... MalarLd Fe\-er :-1. Qna:tan, ......................... :!. Simple Terti,rn, ................ .. a. :Malig-11an t, ....................... 1 Malarial Cadiexia, ........................ Beri-beri, ....... ............ .. ... .I Erysipelas, ................................. 1 Pvmmia, .................................. ~,~pticrernia, .............................. .. letann~, .................................. Tubercle, ................................. .. Leprosy, .................................... Sypbili~:-(".) t-cconJary, .................. ., .. (b.) l11beriteJ, ...................... .. Gonorrhcea, ................................. Rheumatism, ................................ New Growth, Non-malignant, Do., Malignant, ............. .. Anremia, ................................... 1 Debility, .................................... LOCAL DISEASES. Diseases of the Nervous System :SuB-SECTlON 1. Diseases of the Nerves:8 {3 3 ., .., I 4 3 J 2 3:l 2 l 9 l l 1 2 168 2::J ,, 70 ] '.),j l:i~ 24 2 i09 llJ 1 1 '.) ,.., 10 .-, 5 l 7 32 l 1,,,1 12 17 31 il8 2
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K Gl -'I'able !,-Continued. Discaoes and Denths in 1909 at the Tnng Wah Hospital. DISEASES. I ~ema_inYearly Total. mg m 1Hospital :at eucl Of Admissions Deaths. 1908. Total Cases Treated. Remaining in Hospital at end of 1909. ----------------------------------------Brought forward, ...... SUB-SECTION 3. Mental Diseaaes : Idiocy, ......................... .. Mania, ........................... Melancholia, ................... .. Dementia, ....................... Diseases of the Eye, .................... .. ,, ,. Circulatory System, ,, ,, Respiratory ,, ,, ,, Digestive ,, ,, ,, Lymphatic ,, ,, ,, Urinary ,, ,, ,, Male Organs, .......... .. ,, ,, Female ,, .......... .. ,, ,, Organs of Locomotion, ,, ,, Cellular Tissue, ....... .. ,, ,, Skin, ................... .. Jnjuries :-General, ............................... .. Local, ................................ .. Malformation, ...................... .. Poisons, ..................................... Parasites, ................................... Parturition, ................................ .. Total, ....................... 97 5 8 36 10 2 6 1 5 21 2 15 1 209 1,752 8 5 4 4 71 143 803 282 20 49 15 5 26 95 107 181 121 l 5 4 22 3,723 556 50 437 91 20 8 2 1 2 1,167 1,849 8 5 4 4 76 151 839 292 22 55 15 5 27 100 128 183 136 l 5 5 22 3,932 109 1 7 9 33 13 3 6 ( 14 23 19 8 251

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--K 62 -Table II. Showing the Adrnis::;ion,a nml Mortalit,y ill the Tung Wah Hospital duritJg 1909, with the proportion of cases troatc
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K 63 -Table !!,-Continued. Showing the Aumissious anu :Mortality in the Tung Wah Ho8pito.l
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-KG4Table III. Vaccinations at, and in connection with, the Tung Wah Hospital during 1909. Hl09, ..... 1nos, ..... ~haukiI I V1ctona. wan. I Aberdeen St:inlcy. Shek 0. If';, --1 IV t" I ,.h,llll-I'' ,.&uma I. i bhui1,o, rng,hao I I ----i-----------!l!l7 G:i on I 19 Nil. 1,410 f,l) 49 I 28 20 I 3li I 52 Nil. UR I 1:1:i I 518 -1 1Tot.al l 90~ I l.212 ,, 1908 I 2,R48 I Anne.x:e K. ALICE ME.MORIAL AKD AFFILIATED HOSPITALS, HJ09. Total i-n-pati, nt.~ treated. IJn1th.~. Alice Memorial Hospital, 88 i Ho Miu Ling Hospital, .. ...... .... .. 405 18 Nethersole Hospital, . . 473 :-.14 Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital, 235 f.i Total,.. . l~~?! GO

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K65Annexe L. l.L\CTE11lULUGIOAL l~S'l'JTUTK REPORT BY D1:. E. 1\. ~11.m, H.X., 1lcling lfode1'ioloyisl. 8taf]. Early in June, 1009; 01ring to the most unfortunate death of Dr. W. Hunter, the then Government Bacteriologist, my serviees were asked for to carry on his duties until the arrival in the Colony of the officer appointed to permanently succeed him. It thus fall~ to my lot to prepare this report for t.110 year 190!), which is based in part on records left by Dr. Hunter, and by Dr. 0. l\L Heanley whose appointment as Assistant Bacteriologist terminated on April 4th. The newly appointed Bacteriological Assistant, Mr. Chan Tsun-kon, who commenced duty on 5th April, is showing Yery considerable aptitude for his work, and bids fair to thoroughly justify his selection for the post he occupies. Build,ing8. These haYe been maintained in goocl repair. During the Sum mer, I had the whole of the micro-photographie apparatus, which was placed in the upper storer of .the Institute where its efficiency was much interfered with by its susceptibilit)' to vibration, and consequent blurring of phothographic pl1c:c,s, transferred to the basement where it now stands on a concreLJ floor, is much more steady and correspondingly increased in efficiency. The Pre1Jarat,ion o.f Vaccine Lymph. On taking over the duties at the Institute in June, 100!), I found the prepared vaccine lymph was being stored in chambers cooled to a constant temperature of 65 F. Finding that from time to time many tubes of lymph had to be rejected because of an obvious growth of' contamination in them, and further finding on microscopical examination that this was fungoid in nature, for the growth of which 05 F. was a most favourable temperature, I determined to store the lymph at a temperature of 40 F. This ans"ered admirably, and it is now Yery rarely necessary to reject a tube of lymph for the above mentioned reason ; moreover the duration of potency of the lymph is by this procedure greatly prolonged ; to as much as six months certainly in the ease of l~,mph prepared in the hot weather and reported on by various vaccinators just recci~tly. In eYery case the lymph used for vaceinating the calves has been first intensified by passing through rabbits, which is found to greatly increase the potency of the final produot. In August specimens of calf rnccine (&,_) dried, and (b.) lano linated, and intended for tropical use, were received or examination and report from the Lister Institute, these were tested by myself on rabbits and by Dr. ,J. C. Thomson at Victoria Gaol on cases requiring vaccination, but neither waR found by either of us to be as efficient as that made in this Institute. This dried and lanolinated

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ir 66 vaccme was intended to survive a long sea voyage t,hrough the tropics. With a view to seeing whether storage at 40 F. would effect this, I arranged accordingly with Capt. Mann 0 the transport Rewa ", to take specimens 0 Hongkong prepared lymph thus stored to England for report, which will be made later. During the Autumn I made an exhaustive examination 0 vaccine vesicles 0 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 days growth respectively, in an attempt to discover the organism 0 Vaccinia, but without success. Nine thousand five hundred and ninety-one (9,591) tubes of vaccine were issued during the year. Bacteriological E:-eam.ination of Water Supplies. The routine monthly examinations 0 the Kowloon, Pokfulam and Tytam have been carried out regularly during the year. These waters are 0 high bacteriological purity, comparing favourably with those 0 all Colonies whose reports are at present available. In addition, Dr. Hunter in May made an exhaustive examina tion 0 the waters passed through the Albany Filter Beds near Bowen Road, also various other samples 0 water from scattered sources were examined during the course 0 the year. &eamination of Pathological Material sent for the Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases of Man. 1908. 1909. 17 76 Specimens of blood for Typhoid Fever. 7 16 from throat Diphtheria. { 3 ,, chest ,, Tuberculosis. 6 1 abdomen 1 0 urine ,, 10 2 from intestines ,, Cholera. 1 ,, ,, Typhoid. 1 of urine Tumows &c. sent for E;wmination. Degenerated Placenta. Cancer of breast. Sarcoma of arm. Sarcoma 0 lung. Cancer of Orbit. Fi bro-sarcoma of Ovary. Fi broid 0 Uterus. Adeno-myxoma of neck. Carcinoma of Pancreas. Sarcoma 0 lung. Enchondroma of Metatarsal. Lympho-adenoma of Axilla. Gumma. Ovarian Cyst. Fibro-adenoma. Sebaceous Cyst. Adeno-myxoma. Lipoma. Various other specimens not included in the foregoing have been also exhaustively ilXamined. At the request of His Excellency the Governor, with the assist ance of Mr. Gibson, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon, Stomoxys Cal citrans, a biting fly which is known to convey Trypanosomiasis, was obtained at the Slaughter-house in somewhat limited numbers. He and I having both verified the identity of these flies, I commenced

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-Kfi7 -an investigation as to the presence of Trypanosomes in them, and the possibility of their transmitting these parasites to infected animals. At the time of writing this investigation is still proceeding, as is .also one into the distribution of Spirochrntes in Gummata. Exrmi'ination o.f Rats. On taking oYer the Victoria Mortuary, where this work is clone, early in J"une, I found that the rat returns had been kept in the manner showi1 in Table I. Table I has been completed for the year and from it will be seen that the number of rats placed in the rat-bins and sent for examination is larger in the hot weather months than in the cool and further that the proportion of plague infected rats decidedly increases in the hot weather and decreases in the cool, from 10 per 1,000 of rats examined in J"une, J"uly ancl August to 3 per 1,000 in October, November and December. Table II, so far as it goes, indicates that in all three spec-ies of rat the male shows a greater predominance of plague infection than the female. It also shows that Mus Ruttirn presents a far larger proportion of infected rats than either of the other two species. Particulars of rats caught in Kowloon will be found in the Kowlcfon Mortuary Report. Table I. ------------------~-----MALE. I I r.!) C !:l t:l z I P-i 0 a, a, 0 .... ti::o P-4 -1----1--,----.----.Janunry, ......... 1 5,087 2,46,5 2,621 7 146 [ ... .. February, .. ...... 3,805 1,908 1,897 14 69 March, ............ 5,616 2,802 2,814 48 162 264 April,............... 5,491 2,737 2,754 3 151 363 May, .1............. 6,209 2,916 3,096 68 162 1,560 197 June,............... 5,737 2,623 2,872 58 79 965 242 July, ............... 5,8i9 2,745 3,005 52 72 822 129 ~ugust., ............ 5,335 2,4?99J 2,~9~ 60 90 821 132 Septembe-r, ...... 4,818 2,1.Jw 2,u2u 43 139 i60 141 October, 4,597 2,050'. 2,400 19 149 i 660 147 November, ...... 4,678 2,1761 2,373 15 170 I 654 129 December, ......... 4,115 l,963j 2,016 12 160; 580 136 ----------1----'fotal, ... 61,367 28,9461 31,167 399 1,549 i 7,449 1,254 I

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KG8 -Table II. --------------------------Six months: Julv to Dece~ber inclusive. :M. Decnmanus, ,, Rattus, ...... l\foles Males i Ratio Females Females Ratio exPlague i per ex-Plague per amined. infected.; 1,000 nmined. infected. 1,000. 7,225 3,936 51 54 ---1 7 13 8,279 4,045 30 51 ,, Mus_c_n_1i_15_,_._ .. __ 2_,_3_s,_l --_ 1 ___ ~1-0 I_ ~~-8-9 ____ -8

PAGE 275

KO!) Annexe M. PUBLIC :MORTUARY, VICTORIA. REPOin BY DR. E. A. SHAW, R.N., A.cting Bactel'iologist. During the first three months 0 the year. the work at the Mortuary was done by Dr. C. M. Heanley; by Dr. Hunter from April till the commencement 0 his fatal illness, then by Dr. J. C. Thomson till I took over in June. Mr. Chan Tsun-kon has ably assisted in the work since his appointment to the Department in April, 1909. Repo1t on Post Mortems. ~Iale bodies examined, Female ,, Sex undetermined, 'l'otal, ... Claimed bodies sent from Hospitals and other places, Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned, Total, ... 1909. 1,006 1,015 2,021 -1,766 255 1908. 1,329 1,373 3 2,705 --2,006 699 2,021 2,705 Epitome oj Causes of Death. 1909. 1908. J. General Diseases, ... ... 882 1,165 II. Local Diseases :-(a.) 0 the Nervous System, 44 3 (b.) Circulatory System, 30 33 ,, 715 865 (c.) Respiratory System, ,, 207 260 (d.) Digestive System, ... (e.) Genito-Urinary System, 11 10 ,, 2 (f.) ,, Other Systems, III. Death from Violence, 63 106 IV. Decomposed Bodies, 67 263 Total, ... ... 2,021 2,705 ---------

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K70General Disease,. Small-pox, Plague, Cholera, Beri-beri, Malaria, Septicremia, .. Diphtheria, .. 'l'yphoid, General Tuberculosis, Prematurity 1 Marasmic Condition, Pyremia, Cellulitis, Syphilis, Abscess, Still Birth, Tetanus, Erysipelas, Old Age, r __ Atelectasis,' ... Convulsions, Leprosy, Tuberculosis of Joints, Congenital Syphilis, Senile Debility, Icterus N eonatornm, Neglect at Birth, Debility, Chicken-pox, Measles, Inanition, 1909. 1908. 16 245 30 300 2 9 21 65 25 50 3 18 6 6 11 2 152 63 88 113 354 281 1 3 31 65 10 1 26 1 9 1 2 1 3 2 2 21 2 48 9 3 1 15 1 1 2 Other Diseases (Skeleton), ... 18 2 Total, ... ... 882 1,165 Local Diseases. (a.)-Of the Nervous System:19O9. Softening ol the Brain, ... Epilepsy,; Meningitis, 40 Hydrocephalus,.. 1 Cerebral Embolism, 1 Cerebral Hremorrha:ge,. 2 19oS. 1 1 1 Total, ... 44 3 = -iTIT~ (b.)-Of the Circulatory System :-1909. 1908: Pericarditis, Aortic Aneurism, Cardiac Failure, Heart Disease, ... Fatty Degeneration of Heart, 1\Iitral Regurgitation, .. Aortic Regurgitation, .. Congenital Heart Disease, Hremo-pericardium, Valvular Disease of Heart, Acute Endocarditis, Acute Dilatation of Heart, Total, 4 10 6 6 11 1 2 3 3 30 4 4 5 1 2 1 33 -(c.)-Of the Respirator,!/ System:-1909. 1908, Broncho-Pneumonia and Bronchitis, 476 620 Tuberculosis of Pleura, 1 Pleurisy, 32 24 PulniCJrtary Tuberculosis, 14 48 Empyema, 15 Pneumonia, 187 130 Oedema of the Lung, 1 9 Congestion of the Lung, 15 Chronic Bronchitis, 2 2 Abscess of Lung, 1 1 Asphyxia at Birth, 1 Embolism of Lung, 1 Total, .. 715 865 (d.)-Of the Digestfre System:Tabes Meseilterica, Peritonitis, Wonns, ... Gastro Enteritis, Liver Abscess, Diarrhrea, Dysentery 1909. 1908. 65 24 11 8 1 2 26 1 106 173 3 6 Caniecl for1rarcl, ... 187 239

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-K 71(cl.)-Of the Digestii;e Syslem,-Oont;d. Injuries (Death f1om Violence). 1909. 1908. (a.)-Genel'al :Brought .forward,... 187 239 Imperforate Anus, Intussusception, 3 Strangulated Intestine,... 2 Overfeeding with King Sze, Gastric Tetany, Jaundice, Cirrhosis of Liver, 4 Cancer of Liver, Intestinal Obstruction, ... Acute Distension of Stomach, 1 Tubercle of :Mesentry, 4 Choleraic Diarrhcea, 1 Appendix Abscess, 2 Duodenal Ulcer, 1 Hepatitis, 1 Acute Yellow Atrophy of Liver, 1 1 2 2 3 1 :3 6 1 2 1909. 1908. Asphyxiation, 27 Opium poisoning, 2 2 Hanging, 4 Burns, 3 Drowning, 11 26 Multiple injuries, 4 8 Electrocution, 1 Arsenic poisoning, 1 Scalding, 1 1 Strangulation,... 6 Fracture of Ribs and Internal Hrnmorrhage,. 1 Loss of Blood through wounds 1 Shock, 1 Total, 27 73 ------Total, ... ... 207 2GO (b.)-Local :-(e.)-Of the Genito-Urinary System:-Acute Nephritis, Chronic Nephritis, Child Birth, Hydronephrosis, Abortion, Miscarriage, Total, ... (f.)-Oj Other Systems:1909. 1908. 6 3 2 5 1 1 1 11 2 10 -------1909. 1908. Acute Osteomyelitis, 2 Total, 2 1909. 1908. Dislocation of the neck, Hrnmorrhage from wound of Brachial Artery, Concussion of the brain, 7 Bullet wound of the head Spinal Hrnmorrhage, Ruptured Intestine, Bullet wound, ... Ruptured Spleen, 2 Laceration of the brain, Bullet wound of chest, ... Fractured Skull, 24 Fractured Spine, Abdominal Injury, Bullet wound ofabdomen, Cut Throat, 1 Shot through the head, 1 Ruptured Liver and Spleen, 1 Total, ... 36 1 1 4 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 12 2 1 1 33

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-K 72 .i\'ationality of Bodies. Chinese, ... Canadian, Indian, Spanish, ... European, German, .. Japanese, .. Malay, 1909. 1908. 2,010 2,678 1 3 :~ 1 1 11 2 2 1 1 1 Cwied fmwa l'Cl, .. 2,017 2,698 Ncit;ionality of lJodie,c;,-Conld. 1909. 1908. Brought foru:md, .. 2,017 2,698 3 1 1 I 1 Portuguese, 1 Norwegian, American, Filipino, ... Polynesian, English, ... Total, ,, i) 2,021 2,705 --

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K 73 -Annexe N. PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOO:N". REP01rr BY DR. H. MACFARLANE, Med-ical O,(fice1'. The total number of Post Mortem examinations made during 1!)09 was 898 ,as compared with 1,137 during 1908. The causes of death may be classified m, follows :-General Diseases, Diseases of the Nervous System,. -Diseases of the Circulatory System, -Diseases of the Respiratory System, -Diseases of the Digestive System, -Diseases of the Urinary System, -Diseases of the Hremopootic System, -Diseases of the Reproductive System, Diseases due to Internal Parasites,Diseases of the Organs of Locomotion, Developmental Diseases, New Growth, Injuries, General, Do., Local, -1909. 1908. 359 684 0 0 25 25 399 259 U4 12 3 3 0 (i 1 3 1 0 2 0 1 0 -24 128 13 14 898 1,137 ----Oenel'al Di.qeases. Plague, Small-pox, Enteric Fever, Diphtheria, Puerperal Fever, Septicremia, Saproomia, -Leprosy. Beri-beri, Dysentery, -Malaria, Syphilis, General Tuherculosis, Marasmus, --1909. 1908. 31 2 3 1 l 8 1 2 33 10 -25 4 16 38 98 84 1 1 2 6 0 1 31 9 63 2 29 09 Car,.ivd fon1,arcl, ... 175 396 Gl'11eml Disea.~es,-Contd. 1909. 1908. }fraught font:al'd, ... 175 39fi Prematurity, ---18 47 Still-births, -49 38 Senile Decay, 4 2 Debility at Birth, 2 0 Decompm1ecl Bodies, -103 199 351 682 Local Diseases. Oirculatmy System. 1909. 1908. Acute Pericarditis, 7 5 Septic Pericarditis, -2 3 Valvular Disease of Heart,7 16 Aortic Aneurysm, 1 l Anremia, l 0 Endocarditis, l 0 Fatty Degeneration of Heart, 6 0 25 25 -Respiratary System. 1909. 1908. 71 138 6 Lobar Pneumonia, Broncho-Pneumonia, Septic Pneumonia, Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Empyema, Emphysema, Pulmonary Hremoptysis, Pleurisy, Pulmonary Ifremorrhage, Capillary Bronchitis, Atelectasis, Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis, Gangrene of Lung, Infarction of Lung, Other Diseases, -28 3 3 1 33 2 39 39 32 1 2 1 0 65 158 3 28 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 399 259

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-K74-Digestire 8y.~le111. ]9(1[}, WUS. .AbRcess of Linr (Arncebie), ,, 1 Hepatitis, 1 () Catarrhal Jaundict\ 1 0 Icterus Neonatornm, -') 0 Cirrhosis of LiYer, 7 0 Peritonitis, G l Septic Peritonitis, 1 4 Tubercular Peritonitis, 1 l Tabes :M:esenteriea, 10 1 Noma, 1 () Gastritis, 1 0 Intestinal Obstruetion, l 0 Perityphlitis, ] 0 ])iarrhcea, -:21) 0 Choleraic Diarrhcea, l 0 Enteritis, -K 2 OthPr Diseas(s, -0 4 7"!, H Urin.my System. Acute Nephriti8, Chronic NephritiK, Chronic Tnbercnlof.lis of KidneyR, Ila:mopcelic 8y.q/em. Abscess 0 Spleen, Splenic Anremia, Other Diseases, Repmductive Sy.q/e111. (i l :2 0 1 / 2! i 1 ol --! 3i 2 0 1 I 3 I -l I \ Placenta Prrevia, -I J 1 l\1st Partnm Hiernorrhai;w.( > r; \ ---{) __ ,~ --1 Dael,1z,me11tal .lii.~eo.~,-~('ongPnital l\falformatin11 of Diaphragm, l O ,, Ahrlnminal Hernia, l O 2 () New
PAGE 281

-K75Annexe o. ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT. REPORT BY F. BROWNE, Government Analyst. The number of analyses performed was 594 (517 in 1908). The following classification shows the nature of the work done:I. -Chemico-legal. VI.-Aepared Opium Ordinance. 1909. 1908. Substances,-1909. 1908. 5 8 Toxicological (including 17 stomachs), Articles for stains, Articles for fire enquiry, 27 19 0 11.-Potable Water.~. Public Supplies, Wells, &c., -36 31 58 19 4 Opium Pills (from various Ports in China), Powders, -lczenges, -43 0 0 VII.-Pharmacy Ordinance. 36 Medicines for Poisons,-25 4 'VIII.-Mineralogical, &c. III.-1Jange1'0'us Goods Ordinance. Petroleum Oil, 56 82 Coins, Metals, Ores, Coal, 0 rn 9 12 Liquid Fuel, 10 8 IV.-F'ood and Drugs Ordinance. Brandy, Flour, Milk, Whisky, Port Wine,Beer, Opium, Stout, Cheese, Rum, Other Articles, 14 3 44 16 1 7 0 4 2 2 8 V.-Building 1vlate1-ials. Cement, 1 Concrete, 0 Powder for waterproofing ('oncrete, -0 Brickfi 2 Stones: 3 6 1 67 20 3 IX.-Lig_uo1s _Ordinance. 7 European Liq_uor, Chinese do., Denatured Spirit, 7 84 65 56 0 0 0 0 X. -Miscellaneous. 3 l Aerated Waters, Coal-tar Disinfectants, Rat Destroyers, Codeine Phosphate, Crucibles, Chloride of Lime, Chemicals, Condensed Milk, Public Gas Supply, Silk Wrappings, 1 i Cigarettes, o Guano, 0 Florida w ater, 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 12 6 6 5 3 8 2 6 4 1 11 17 5 0 0 0 3 4 2 3 3 2 22 2 12 0 0 0 0

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K7u X .-111 iseellaneuus ,-Ounld. 1909. 1908, 1909. 1908. Galvanised Plate, 'l'Pa Dust, Tea l)eed Husk, Deeds for forgeries, Stamps for chemicals, Ice, 4 2 3 0 () () Suppository, Bran, Serum, Bird Lime, Bean Curd, VulPyroligneous Liquid, Tar, -2 2 1 0 <:anite--one each, !J Other Substance;;, 0 Salt,-2 O Total, 594 TOXICOLOG WAL. 2. Among the chemico-legal investigations conducted were 18 cases of suspected human poisoning. Nux Vomica was present in one, DaturaAlba in one, Phosphorus and Opium together in one, and Opium in eight cases. The Nux Vomica seeds in the examination referred to had been roasted then powdered so that much of the ac-tive constituents (Strychnine and Brucine) had been destroyed. None of the powders so prepared for medicinal purposes could be obtained at Chinese shops in the Colony, but some was bought without difficulty at Canton. One-sixtieth part of a grain of Phosphorus and much Opium was separated from a case in which the deceased had taken rat-poison, and Opium later. \VATER8. 3. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month from the Pokfulum, Tytam and Kowloon reservoirs, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities. DANGEROUS Goons ORDINANCE. 4. Of petroleum oil 66 samples were tested during the year. Most of the oil that now arrives here is already covered by certificates, so that there has been a large decrease in recent years in t,he number of oil examinations. 0 g 5li

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--K77-Fo(\ll c\~D D1t1ws 0RDINA1'CE. 5. The following Table gives the results of lil analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Board : --DESCRIPTION. N 0. OF SAMPLES. No. FOUND No. J<'ou;i, GE:-IUINE. ADULTERATED. ---------------Beer, Brandy, Cheese, Milk, Whisky, (:j 2 2 t9 12 0 6 0 4 () Many other samplur; ,Yere examined for the public, mostly at the low fee prescribed by the Ordinance. P1u1nucY 01mINANCE. G. Informality was proved in the sale of a depilatory containing a compound of arsenic. Three patent medi('ines said to be made up with poison were obtained for examination but no poison was !'On tained therein. Ml N ERALO(ilC'AL. i. More Mengt:11e tin came through last year, so that it seems that miners are tired of holding stocks with a view to a rise in the priee of the metal. A fair number of coals were examined. For sl'l~amraising purpose Hongay lump (unmixed or mixed with ,Japanese) and Kaiping Loco seem to he economical coals. LIQUORS ORDINANCE. 8. A few samples of European liquor, mauy of Chinese makP, and numerous kinds of denatured spirit were examined. A good deal of Chinese liquor was analysed to see if the names, under which the brands were sold, indicated to any extent the strength in alcohol. With the assistance of the Registrar General it was found to be possible to classify these beverages into groups. In connection with this work murh was learnt of the nature and composition uf Chinese Wine::; and Spirits. These partieularR have heen compiled by Mr. A. C. Franklin, F.I.c., Assistant Government Analyst.

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-K78 MISCELLANEOUS. 9. Gas Examinations.-The amount of carbon monoxide in the public supply is limited by the Government to 16 per cent. The following Table shows the proportion present for each month :-January, February, March, April, -May, -June, Paeeiita_qe b/t :olu,111e of Ou1bt111 J)lono:cide. 13.6 11.2 13.4 7.1 16.0 10.0 July, August, September, October, November, December, -EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC. Pmorntngr. hJ/ iolu-me of Curbon .ill1111uol'ide. 11.4 <-5.6 4.6 8.0 9.6 4.6 10. The public continue to take advantage of the Laboratory and have forwarded a great variety of samples for examination on pay ment. The fees paid into the Treasury during the year ~mounted to $2,518 as against $2,010 in 1908. SPECIAL REPORTS. 11. Special reports have been supplied on :--Thebaine. Naphtha Licence Conditions. Osmium. Cheap Whisky. Spirit Standards. Classification of Chinese Wines. Denaturing of Spirits. 12. The value of the year's work as determined from the tariff of fees (Government Notification No. 285 of 1907) is $8,287 ($7,085 in 1908). The amount does not include anything fq; the special reports mentioned above, and there is much beside for which nothing has been set down. LIBRARY. 13. Several standard ,vorks of reference have been added, and some old edit.ions of useful hooks replaced by new.

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K79 Annexe P. T-CEALTH OFFICE OF Tirn PORT. Hi-:PoHT BY Du. F. 'I'. KElT, Heolth OJ/iee1 11.f the .L'l)i'/. During the year the "ork of the department "as carrietl ou hy Dr. ,Jordan, Dr. Keyt, Dr. Griine and Dr. Aubrey. On March 10th, Dr .. Tordan left the Colony on vacation lean) for t,rnlrn monthH. The duties of the Health Officer of the Port. nrn.Y he cnnsidcred under tll'l'ee seperat.e divisions:(a.) '1'he claily inspection of Shipping. (b.) The i1u;pection of Emigrants. (c.) <)uarantine duty. ( a.)---The Daily Inlspection of Sltippi "'.I Thi:-i dnty consists in regnlarly hoarding all ships as they arrive in Port between the hours of 5 a.m, and G p.m., ships arriYing after fi p.m. arc hoarded e:wly the next morning. "Infected" and ''Suspected" ships, from ports which are cleelared to be infected, are uot permitted to enter the Port after 6 p.m., they anchor outside the harbour limits and come into the Quarantine Anchorage at. six o'clock the following morning, and their crews and passengers are then examined and the ships dealt with under Section 23 of Ordinance 10 of 1899. "Healthy" ships, however, are exempted from these restrictions provided they have on board a qualified Ship's Snrgeon. Two forms are then signed by the ::\foster and the Surgeon certify111g that there haR been no sid,:i1css, nor deaths during the Yoyage. During the year there were 4,198 arrirnls, of t.liese 2,0H were British vessels, and 2,157 Foreign vessels. These figures do not in clude the River Steamers from Canton and Macao; these are not boarded except when cases of an epidemic nature are reported to us, H.M. Ships and Foreign Ships of War are also not boarclecl by us. (b.)-The Inspection of Emigl'Clnts. This is an important part of the Health Officer's duties, and consists in the Medical Examination of all Emigrants leaving the Port of Hongkong. They muster on board a few hours prior to the sailing of the ship, provided with their tickets, and in the case of assisted emigrants, women, ancl children, with photographs as well. In this work the Harbour Office and the Registrar General's Department send representatives who check the tickets and examine the photographs so as to prevent any substituting or kidnapping of ehildren. The emigrants pass in single file, aml thm,e who appear to he suffering from any communicabll;.l disease, and those physically unfit for labour are stopped and sent ashore. This examination at best can only be a superficial one, but yet sufficient to detect febrile eon ditions, skin Lliseases, eye diseases, physical debility, ancl the more pronounced symptoms which make themseh-es eYidP.nt in Bcri-lwri, Syphilis, aml Tuhercnlosis._

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--K 8U Emigrauts for the American Ports, Mexico and British Uolum hia. are preYionsly examined on board the hulk of the Disinfecting Hnrea11, where they receive a bath, have their temperatures taken, ancl their dothing and baggage thoroughly disinfected; they then embark and undergo a final examination before sailing. The total number of emigrants passed during the year amount ed to 76,430, of these 48,016 were for the Straits Settlements, while tlw remaining 28,414 were for San Francisco, British Colurnhia. Honoluln. Mexico, and other Ports. Table I shows emigration figures for 1908 aud 1909, and also the nmnbcn, rejected for each Port during the two yr.ars. 'l'he monthl~ figures reached their maximum in the -month of April. when 9,121 left the Colony. One thousancl firn hundred and ninety-two (1,592) Filipino labourer:,; arrived in Hongkong during the latter half of the year, and "ere traus-shippecl by the Pacific Mail Steamers in ba1;ches twice monthh-. These men are under contract to work for the HmYaiian 8ugar '.Planters' l1ssociation. 'l'hus the figures for Honolulu show a marked increase mcr those of last year, being 1,831 as compared ,vith 30. The total numbers reject.eel during the year amounted to 9z3 and the follmYing Table gives the causes ancl the nnm hers under each headin,g:-Rkin Diseases. Scabies, Tinea, Other forms, E~e Diseases. ::!39 27 n Trachoma, Ophthalmia and blindness, Fevers. 112 21 8nch as Mala1;ia, Small-pox, Plague, et,c., 1.!>2-Syphilis. Showing well marked Seeondariei:;, 11 Tu herculosis. Including Phthisis, enlarged l'ervical and inguinal glands, :J .J uunclice. From Yarious eauses, 17 Leprosy, 2 Beri-1.)eri. With l'ardiac dilatation ancl ataxia, 4 Hernia. Inguinal, Deformities. Such as kyphosis, scoliosis, paralysis, etc., (H Insanity, ,l Other c.auses. Including advanced old age, emaciation, and great physical debility, 257 Total,

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--K 81 -(c)-Quarantine Duty. During the year seven vessels were detained in Quarantine for the following reasons :-Small-pox, 5; Cholera, 1; Plague, 1. The causes of detention, and the number of ships for the past three years were as follows :Small-pox 5 (10 in 1908), Cholera 1 (2 in 1908), Plague 1 (2 in 1908), Dengue nil (1 in 1908). Several cases of Enterie Fever from ships arriving in the Port were treated at the Government Civil Hospital. In disinfecting these ships, special care was takerr in dealing with the clothing and bed ding of the patients, and in t,he cleansing of the water-closets. The Port was singularly exempt from such minor infectious maladies as Parotitis, Measles, and Chicken-pox. At the beginning of the year the following Ports were under Quarantine restrictions:-1.-Singapore, for Cholera, dating from December 5, 1908. 2.-Bangkok, for Cholera, elating from December 19, 1908. These restrictions were removed on February 3rd and April 28th respectivelr. Amoy was declared to be an infected Port, on account of Plague, from ,July 14th until August 14th, but no cases were de tected on ships arriving from that Port. Table I. Table showing Emigration Passes and Rejections for 1908 and 1'909. 1908. 1909. Ports of Destination. : Passed. Rejected. /~~~::~ejected. I Straits Settlements, .......... .. San Francisco, .................. British Columbia, .............. Java Ports, ..................... ,1 German New Guinea, ............ Salina Cru:,, ...................... Callao, ............................. Seattle, ............................ .. Tacoma, ......................... Honolulu, ......................... .. :Mauritius, ........................ .. ,Tap~n, ............................ .. Iqmqm, ........................... l\1anzanillo, ....................... Liverpool, ................. ... .. 49,643 .5,105 7,888 4,i89 329 2,301 710 42 48 30 196 740 32 82 48,016 6,192 8,247 9,546 5i 458 987 28 1,831 29i 132 203 306 13() 713 39 57 93 4 2 12 1 1 1 Other Ports, ..................... .. I --------11--------Total, .................. I 71,mn 882 76,480 I 923 ---

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K82 -Table II. Showing Monthly Numbers of Emigrants, Rejections an
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K83 Annexe Q. REPORT BY ADAM Grnsox, M.n.c.v.s., Colonial veterinary Swgeo11. Oeneml Statistics. The total number of cattle admitted to the Government Depots for the year was 42,742, an increase on the previous year of 644. In Kennedy Town 37,490 were admitted. To this number, however, requires to be added 10,493 being the number of cattle that were tran shipped in the harbour for the Philippines without passing through the depot. This arrangement was come to to facilitate shipping operations. The export fees were paid as usual. In Ma Tau Kok, Kowloon, 5,252 cattle were admitted, an increase of 1,136 on last year. In Kennedy Town 118 were rejected as unfit for food on admission to the depots and in Ma Tau Kok one was rejected. The total number of pigs admitted to Kennedy Town was 167,831, a decrease of 851 on 1908. The total number of sheep and goats admitted to Kennedy Town was 30,979, an increase of 861 on-1908. D,isease in Depots. Foot ancl Mou.tl1 Disease.-This disease existed throughout the year in the cattle dep
PAGE 290

-KS-1-In addit.iou to these, hones, discarded Pulice 1m ifonus, paperi-; from)Jovernment Departments, tinned goods, and unwholesome foods from shops and markets were destroyed. The total amount of fuel used was tons 25 cwts. 2 lb. 4(3 besides firewood and kerosene from the Slaughter-house account for lighting fires. Slaughter-hou8e.~. Kennedy Town.-The total revenue was $73,590.55, an increase on last year of S:5,656.00. The revenue was made up as follows:Slaughtered. 1909. Cattle @ 40 c., 25,898=$10,359.20 Sheep ,, 20 17,733= 3,546.60 Swine ,, 30 152,822= 45,846.60 Expo1ted. Cattle @ 50 ,, 21,832=: Hheep ,, 10 13,362= Rwine ,, 10 ,. 15,857= Duplicate of one order lost 10,916.00 1,336.20 1,585.70 .25 $73,590.55 1908. 24,812=$ 9,924.80 17,391= 3,478.20 149,234~= 44,772.90 l~,378,c_-= 6,689.00 12,243= 1,224.30 18,453=0-= 1,845.30 $67,934.50 Ma Tau Kok.-This slaughter-house is let to a contractor. The total housing fees collected were $450.49, a decrease of $12.90 on last year. There were a greater number of cattle killed but fewer sheep owing to the fact that the Indian regiments in Kowloon now kill in their own lines and fewer swine o'wing to the opening of a slaughter-house in Sham Sui Po by the contractor, who thus kills all the pigs for the Mong Kok Tsui and Tai Kok Tsui Markets. Shauhiwan and Abe1deen are also leased to a contractor. The total revenue from Animal Depots and Rlaughter-houses works out as follows :-Kennedy Town, fees collected Ma Tau Kok ,, Blood and Hair contract 1909. $73,590.7/i 450.49 7,608.00 Contractor's tender for Ma Tau Kok, Aberdeen and Shaukiwan 9,930.00 1908. $67,934.50 463.39 6,888.00 11,232.00 $91,579.24 S:86,507.89 There is an error in this table in the 1908 figures in last year's annual report. The figures given as $12,066.00 are those of the 1907 contract and should have been as abmre, -riz., $11.232.00.

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-K 85 The total number of animals slaughtered for food were:1909. 1908 Cattle. Sheep & Sicine. Cattle. Sheep & Su:ine. Goats. Goats. Kennedy Town, :25,770 17,733 152,312 24,812 17,391 149,243 l\fo Tau Kok, 5,078 122 20,211 4,800 713 25,652 .Aberdeen, 2,996 3,242 Shankiwan, 7,272 7,094 ~0,848 17,855 182,791 29,612 18,104 185,231 GralHl t1Jtal of all animals, 2:31,494 232,947 The figures for Aberdeen and Shaukiwan are got from the eont.raC'tor. The following table shows the numbers of animals slaughtered in the l'olony during the past ten years:-rew. ('little. moo, 23,939 s 1901, 24,938 i t 6 1902, 25,fi69 J ~1) g 1903, 28,335 1904, 30,829 1905, 26 758' ,.. I O 1906, 27,141 :i 1907, 27,631 l ~.() 1B 1908. 29,612 r 1909, -:10,848 J ,Su;ine. 165,7601 2i _c-;i 1"'9 "05 I .i ao 22,918 L'":l ~23, 736, 19,774') s 16,403 I re~ 18,279 }-! o_ 1s,104 I I.Q~ li,855, Rinderpest, which now appears to be an annual epidemic, occur red at the Dairy Farm, Pokfulam. Following the practice of former years inoculations of serum only were given to adult sick and in contact cattle and simultaneous inoculations of serum and virulent blood to all non-immune young stock. The results were very satis factory. Foot and Mouth Disease also prevailed during the latter part of the year at Pokfulam but by the end of the year the epidemic had ceased. The treatment of this disease which inflicts heavy loss among milch cattle is still far from satisfactory. The Chinese dairies, as usual, escaped all epidemics.

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K 8G As noted elsewhere in this report four cases of Tuberculosis generalised, were sent in from dairies to the slaughter-house. This number, however, does not indicate the degree 0 prevalence 0 this disease as immediately the Chinese owners recognise that a cow is suffering from Tuberculosis, and they are alive to the danger as far at least as the individual cow is concerned, the animal is removed out 0 the Colom. It is difficult to traee the ultimate destination of these cows. Tmpo,tation of Beef and Mutton. The importations 0 fresh bee and mutton were respectively 310,171 lb. and 306,678 lb. The Dairy Farm Company are the only importers. The meat is imported from Arn,tralia. Markets. Up to July, 1909, the Registrar General'R Department had the control 0 the markets as far as the letting 0 the stalls and the col lection 0 revenue was concerned while the Sanitary Department looked after the sanitarv condition of the markets. On that date the Sanitary Department took over the full eontrol of the markets, collecting the revenue, letting the stalls and generally superdsing the whole work. The following statement shows the aYerage revenue uerivecl from the markets from 1898 to 1907, the revenue for 1908 and the revenue for 1909 :Ma,.ke.ts. 1898 to 1907 (Are,1908. 1909. age fo1 10 Yean). Central l\farket, -$ 43,fi83.53 $ 52,798.03 "" 52,801.87 Des V reux Road Market, 917.73* 1,383.10 1,597.70 Hung Ho'.m l\farket, --1,701.8!) 3,758.4(i 3,817.79 :Mongkoktsui Market, 945.7Gt 949.73 992.40 Sai Wan Ho Market, 1,611.37 1,978.88 Saiyingpun Market, --10,124.rn 13,514.09 13,694.90 Shaukiwan Market, --815.IJ!i 1,243.30 1,404.74 Shek Tong Tsui 1farket, 330.22 603.10 694.80 So Kun Po Market, -930.44 l,32G.00 1,330.G0 Tai Kok Tsui Market, -638.26+ 409.89 652.93 W anchai Market, 2,819.71 4,001.71 4,303.77 Western Market, (New)13,27fi.02t 11,898.41 11,678.71 Do. (Old) -23,722.3fi 18,112.49 17,964.42 Yaumati Market, --4,281.64 6,179.18 6,436.34 -----------$104,195.80 $117,788.86 $119,349.94 3 years' n ,ernf-{c. t 2 do. t ,'o.

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K 87Inspection of Cattle Transports. Fnder Ordinance No. 15 of 1903, 136 visits of inspection were paid to ships leaving the Colony with more than ten head of cattle on board. In 1908, 81 visits were made. The increase is due to the fart that the trade was maintained with regul~rity throughout the year. New Territories. No outbreak of infectious disease among domestic animals was reported during the year. Staff. Kennedy Town.-Inspector Watson went on sick leave on 26th January and returned to duty on 2nd December. Inspector Woolley was in charge during Inspector Watson's absence. Kowloon.-Inspector U. W. Brett was in charge until the 1st November when he was transferred to District work and Inspector C. W. Ward took charge.

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Appendix L. REPORT ON THI<: BOTANICAL & FORESTRY DEPARTMENT. G,\IWENS AND GllOU::iDS. Botan:ic Grucle'/1s.-With the exception of the month of October, the year on the whole was a very favourable one for gardening. The rainfall for October was the greatest on record, and, in addition there was a gale of considerable force on the 19th of the month. For many years endeavours have been made, with little success, to flower Sweet Peas, although at Kowloon and at \Vest Point, places which get much more sunshine than the Botanic Gardens, the results have been more satisfactory. This year, seeds from Australia, pre sented by Mrs. Rmve, flowered freely in April, and were be1ter than anything 1weviously obtained in the Gardens. It is very pleasing to he able to record a still greater success. A. few seeds of an early flowering variet:v were obtained from :Messrs. Sutton and Sons and were sown on the 18th October, and the plants ,Yere in full flower on the 30th December. There was an exceedingly fine show of Gladioli in both the Old and New Gardens in May, ai1d Gloxinias made a brilliant display in the No. 3 house in June. In the same house earlier in the :vear Prim ula obconica ,ms Yery attractive. The old double-flowered Daffodil, bulbs of which were presented 1o the Gardens hy Mr. J. Barton, flowered well on the hank above the Grevillea walk in the Old Garden. A very pretty addition to our winter flowering plants was made in Mcmoclwsma Yipmium, a small shrub ,vith panicles of small white flowers which are produced in large quantities. The plant is easily grown, and is sure to become a general favourite. An addition to local Yegetables was made by the Tiger Bean, known botanically as Muenna-nii,ea. Besides being useful as a vege table, cooked in the same way as French Beans, it is of great intere::;t botanically. It was first described by Hoxhm-gh, in his Flora Indic:a in ] 832, from cultivated plants at Calcutta. Hitherto the plant was not known by Europeans in China, but it was described in Chinese botanical works centuries ago. The seeds from which the plants were raised, were presented to the Gardens by one of the gardeners who brought them back from his native village in Kwangtung, where he says it has been grown to his knowl~dge for the last forty years. The flower and vegetable show of the Hongkong Horticultural Society was held in the Gardens on the 26th of February, and was a great success horticulturall), but the financial results were greatly marred h)' the wet "eather.

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-L2 The sale of plants by the Department having been stopped, surplus plants remaining over at the end of the previous year, instead of being thrown a,vay, were distributed, without pots, to members oJ the Horticultural Society, as it was found that they would produce scarcely anything if sold by auction. The scheme for the proposed tramway through the New Garden having been dropped, very necessary repairs to the lower waHr were taken in hand. The old chunam was taken np ancl replaced with cement and disintegrated granite. Uore1nment House Cfround8.--Tho construction of the new staircase to the Ballroom necessitated the removal of a small shrubbery on the north side of the ground. An~' shrubs which were worth sa,:ing were transplanted elsewhere. The lawns on the north side oJ the house were re-laid as thev had become very uneven. Caterpillars were again troublesome in the Autumn on the tennis ground, hut were kept under liy applications of ,Teyei:;' Fluid and water. Blake Gc11'de11.--The vacanciei; C'.am;cJ by the 1.ree,; which were blown down in the previous year were planted up with young trees, and the turf which "as clanrngecl by cockchafers was partly renewed, and partly replaced with blue grass ( Ophiopogon ). Peuh Garden.-An extension was begun by continuing the old culvert a distance of 125 feet, hnt it was not possible to do any levelling. 1Fe8t End Prt1'h.-SeYeral trees were planted and the park kept in as tidy a condition as funds would allow. Xing's Parh.-Planting was commenced by putting in upwards of 400 trees of various kinds, but it is to be regretted that several of these were afterwards stolen by persons unknown. Colonial Ce111et1wy.-Trees were planted in rnriu11s places and a good deal of turfiug was done. Roadside Bnnhs.-'l'he planting of Battery Path Hauk was eon tinued, and the Bank between Wyndham Street.and Ice House Lane was planted with blue grass and other ornamental plants. The Hank between Upper Albert Road and Garden Road was planted with several species of Palms. Dr. E. A. Voretzsch, the Consul for Germany, presented several showy South American orchids to the Gardens in exchange for others. A large number of seedlings of the Coffin Wood tree, Machilu8 Nanrnu, Hemsl., were raised in the Albany Nursery from seeds sup plied in the Autumn of 1908 by the British Consul, Chengtu, Szechuen; and 14 wardians cases containing 70 plants each, were despatched to various British Colonies and India, and one case each to Manila and Tsingtau. As showing how much depends upon the treatment of the cases on board ship, and the "eather encountered

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on the voyage, it is only necessary to say that the seedlings sent to Pretoria, with transhipment at Calcutta, and which were nearly three months on the voyage, arrived in good condition whilst those shipped to Ceylon suffered severely, although it was stated in the letter of acknowledgment of the latter, that the packing left nothing to be desired. Trrn GALE OF OCTOBER 19TH. Although the destruction of large trees was small, very consider able damage was done to shrubs in the various gardens and grounds. Botanic Uarclens.-Four small trees including Brwhinia Blaherina were blown down but were afterwards raised. Xumerous Rose hushes and shrubs were destroyed. Poinsettias in beds which are nearly always a feature in the Gardens in November, were very much damaged and, as they hacl not time to recover, were more or less a failure. 81reet 'l'rees.-Upwards of 150 young trees in Hongkong and Kowloon were blown over but were afterwards raised, but few big trees were blown clown and killed. The Bamboos planted along the Peak Road snfferecl severel.v. l-JEIWARIU1I. The Superintendent, Mr. S. T. Dunn, described a dozen ne" species of Chinese plants, principally from Hongkong and the New Territories, in two papers which were published in the Journal of Botany. A collection of plants from S,rntow was made by the Superin tendent when on short leave and presented to the Department. The Superintendent also presented 16 books, mostly botanical, to the Library, many of which were in several volumes. The Bureau of Science, Manila, presented 478 Philippine plants, Professor Sargent of Harvard University 223 plants from Kiangsi, and 1he Assistant Superintendent 1,500 plants from Central China, to the Herbarium. During the year a list of the native plants of Hongkong, the ~ew Territories and Kwangtung Province has been drawn up with a key to the orders, genera and species, and is now nearly complete. Mrs. Gibbs, "hose recent untimel.v death we have to deplore, presented many specimens of local plants to the Herbarium and Captain Hodgins of the S.S. Ilaiycing presented several speeimens collected principally at Foochow. The list of additions to the Flora of Hongkong and the New Territories is given in a supplement. FoRESTHL A.~Dema1'Cation.-Letters and numbers were painted at their proper places, or the assistance of the Forest Guards, in the vicinity of Victoria (Blocks 1 & 2), at Little Hongkong (Block 5), at Aberdeen (Block 6) and at Pokfulam (Block 7 .) Level lines were marked out at Shing ~Iun (Block 11) for planting purposes.

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B.--Pormat-iun uf .l-'iw 'l'l'ee Plr.t.nlatiu111-1.-A11 area of about 300 acres in the Harbour Belt was sown (in sites) to the eastward of the plantations formed in 1908, and t]ie failures in last year's plantations in this neighbourhood, in the catchment areas of the Kowloon and Tytam Reservoirs and in the felled areas of Mt. Kellet and Aberdeen were made good. Fifty pounds of pine seeds were sown broadcast in the Shing )fon Valley. In all 389,290 pits were so-wn or planted at a cost of $3,281. 0.-Ca.ie o.f Tree.~ in Plnnf;ation.s.-Large quantities of under growth were given to the villagers in Hongkong and Kowloon in return for work done by them for the Department. The work done by the villagers was of various kinds, such as cleaning fire barriers, digging pits for sowing seeds, path making and cord making. In all 27,216 loads, of about 80 catties each, were disposed of in this way, and taking the value of a load at 6 cents, (the villagers had to cut it themsehes under the supervision of Foresters), it was a saying to the Government of about $1,700 in cash. The undergrowth was taken out of the following plantations :-Victoria (1), W ongneichung (2), Shaukiwan (3), Little Hongkong (5), Aberdeen (6), .Pokfulam (7), l\fongkok (8), Taipo Road (9) and Kowloon Reservoir (10). In the t,vo latter blocks pine tree branches were giYen as no undergrowth was available. The villages whieh participated in this work were .Aberdeen, Aplichau, Little Hongkong, l'llongkok, Pokfulam, Shauki wan, Tai Hang and ,v ongneichung. This method of paying for work cannot be carried on indefinitely as the undergrowth in the plantations is the result of many years' growth and protection, and its removal will also lower the price of :future tenders for free felling. D.-P.rotection f l'om Pfre.--Old fire barrierR ,rnre cleaned io the extent of 118,905 feet at a cost of 10,11!:l loads of bruslnrnod and !$52.80 in cash. Kew barriers, 17,914 :feet, 11ere made at T~tam and in the Harbour Belt at a cost of fi44 loads 01' hrnshwood and $92.61 in cash. Fifty-seven fires were reported, the largest occurring in 6B where 56 acres were burnt. E.--F01est Gunrd.s' Service.--There were more reports of pine tree and brushwood stealing during the year and more convictions than in the previous year. Notwithstanding the amount of brush wood given to the various villagers for work done, in every case, with the exception of Aberdeen and Wongneichung, the reports of fuel stealing have nearly doubled, and for Pokfulam they have more than trebled. See Tables II and III. During the year an Ordinance was passed amending the Maliciou:,; Damage Ordinance of 1865. This will enable the Department to deal with the destruction of trees near villages, when the damage may be reasonably supposed to be the action of residents of the village where such destruction has taken place. One fuel stealer was banished, on a second conviction, for the unlawful removal of trees from a Government Plantation. With regard to the agreements made with the occupants of matsheds mentioned in last year's report, a sum of $30 was received for dam age done to trees within a radius of 500 yards from such matsheds.

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-L5-F.-Revenue Pelling.-In October a contract was signed wherfl by the Government agreed to sell 710 acres of pine tree plantations to be felled under the Block System. These plantations were situat ed at Mt. Dav~s (7G), Aberdeen (7D & 6E), and Tytam (4Il & E). The contract 1s to extend over 3 years and not more than 280 acres or less than 200 acres are to be felled in one year. All trees within 30 ft. of main roads are to he left and all pine trees under G inches in circumference. The first instalment received by the Government in connection with this contract amounted to $4,091.67. A system of selling brushwood by cord was adopted during the year. The brushwood was cut down by the villagers of different places and the largest of it put into cords, the villagers receiving a certain amount of the small shrubs in return for the work done by them. The cords were then sold to a contractor at a fixed rate. A sum of $546.83 was received from this source. The total amount received from felling, including thinning, was $6,145.79. Grass-cutl/ing.-Consiclerable discussion has taken place in the past yoar in regard to the question of allowing villagers to cut grass on the hillsides for fuel and fodder. It was proposed at first that licences for specified areas shoulrl be issued to the villagers, but, on fur ther consideration, it ,rns found that the suggested areas were unsuit able for the purpose intended as they were nearly all above the 1,000 ft. level. It. was finally decided that the villagers should be allowed to cut sufficient grass on Crown land anywhere outside of Govern ment plantations for village needs, but not for the purpose of sale. I grass is cut for sale, leases or licences must be applied for, and the grass muRt not be cut on lands assigned for village use. G-.-Pla:11ting and Cmc of Roculsidc 1'1cc.8.-No new planting of street trees was undertaken but a considerable number of failures in Hongkong and Kowloon were made good. Altogether 243 trees were used for this purpose consisting principally of Poinciana and Aleurites. The large number of trees required to be replanted every year shows one of the great difficulties of establishing street avenues in such a wind-swept place as Hongkong. A sum of $433.49 was i,pent on the care of street trees during the year. H.--Nul'se1ies, .Agricultwe ancl Economic Planting.-Two hundred seedlings of the Coffin Wood tree, Jfochilus Nammi, were planted on the hillsides, 50 at Aberdeen, 100 on the :Mt. Kellet and 50 on the north side of Mt. Victoria. The tree is not likely to be of any economic value in Hongkong judging by the rate of growth of the tree which grew in the Botanic Gardens, where the conditions were more favourable than on the hillside. This tree was blmvn down in the year 1908 by the typhoon and subsequently died. At Kang Hau Nursery there are several kinds of economic plants in the experimental stage. These include 1-llew;ites Fordii, Sisal Hemp and Tea Oil, but none o:f them at present show promise of being of any practical value. The cost of the upkeep of the nurseries is shown in Table JV. I.-Forest1y Service Pnt:hs.-Paths were made during the year from the Peak Road to Hatton Road, from Peak Road to Magai-:ine. Gap Road, from Magazine Gap Road to vVanchai Gap Road, from

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LG -Wanchai Gap Road to Wongneichung Road and from Wanchai Aberdeen Road to W ongneichung-Little Hongkong Road. Although these paths greatly facilitate the work of the Forest Guards they ha,e, also, unfortunately been of great assistance to fuel stealers. New Forestry Service Paths. Description of Paths. Length in ICost oConMiles. struction. Peak Road, ........... Peak Road, ........... Magazine Gap Road, .. W anchai Gap Road, .. W anchai-Aberdeen Road, ................. To Hatton Road, Magazine Gap Road, W anchai Gap Road, W ongneichung Road, Wongneichung-Little-11 Hongkong Road, ... 1-l I 0 nr 1-1-4 2~ 4t -------------------1-----Total, .................. I $ 78.2'! G0.93 96.53 232.86 510.62 $979.18 The cost of keeping in repair the old paths was $176.80. The heavy rainstorms which frequently occur here will render it neces-sary to spend an annual sum on this item. K.-Clearing Undergrowth around l-louses.-The clearing, of brushwood around houses, to the extent of a million and a half square feet, was carried out at Shaukiwan, Bonham Road, Kennedy Town, Babington Path, Conduit Road, Kennedy Road and Bowen Road at the expense of the Government in connection with the crusade against mosquitoes and malaria. A clearing 0 140,000 sq. ft. was also done at the expense of private individuals at the Peak, Bowen Road and W ongneichung. As showing the utility of this work as long as breeding places for mosquitoes remain, it is only necessary to state that after the brushwood had been cleared in one of the districts where malaria was rife a tin was found nearly foll of water and containing large quantities of Anopheles and Culex larvae in the garden of, and close to, one of the houses whose inmates were suffering seYerely from malaria. FoRESTRY LICENcEs.-Nmr TERRIT011rn:,;. These foes are now collected by the District Officer at Taipo for the Northern District, and by the Assistant Land Officer in Hongkong for the Southern District. The total sum collected or the year as furnished by them was $4,890.59. The terms of these licences were altered during the year, and one of the eonditions now is that trees may not be cut within 250 yards of a village or within 50 yanls of ,mr-h main roach; as mp spe
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-L7-:-0oMMERcIAL INVESTIGATIONS. Lists of the vegetable drugs of Hongkong, samples of. many of which had already been forwarded, were sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute, London, for a report as to whether any of them contained medicinal or toxic qualities, or had economic value. 'l'hese lists were submitted by the Director of the Imperial Institute to the British Pharmacopceia Committee of the General Medical Council, the Secretary of which replied that the Committee d.id not feel there were sufficient indications of the extent of employment of individual plants to say which, if ariy, should merit inclusion in the Coloaial .\dden
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-L8-If these samples of various Aleurites barks from Hongkong may be taken as typical and fairly representaive of the barks produced by these trees elsewhere, it would appear that the statements made regarding their richness in tannin are inaccurate, possibly owing to the examination of unauthenticated material." ST,\l'F. The Superintendent Mr. S. 1'. Dunn was absent on vacation leave for 9 days between the 6th and 19th April, and from the 23nl October to the end of the year, and the Assistant Superintendent l\Ir. W. J. Tutcher from the 26th April to 24th May, and from the 4th to 31st August. REVENUE. Details of Revenue are given in Table V. The percentage of revenue to expenditure was 26 as compared with 23'(i(i in the preceding year. A comparative statement of Revenue and Expendi ture for the last 10 years is shown in 'J'able VI. March 4th, 1910. w. J. TUTCHER., Supeiintend,mt, Botanical ,y Fmest?y Depmt'lllent.

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Table I. RAINFALL, 1909. Botanic Gaidens, .. -------------------------------------------DATE. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May I June i July Aug. I Sept .. i (kt. I Xo,-. D1c. I I : i j -----.--------------------1 -----i----! I i inclt inch inch inch i11ch inrli inch i111/i i11di 111r/1 : i111-!1 i11di I .01 i .01 .03 .13 .i6 .0i .43 .oa .01 ........... 2 ........... .01 .20 3 ........... .08 .13 .12 .01 .02 .02 4 ......... .. 5............ .09 6............ .16 7............ .03 8............ .15 9...... ...... 1.36 10............ .01 11. ........... 1 .03 12 ............ ; .03 13 ............ 1 14 ............ 15 ............ 1 16 ............ 1 .02 .53 .Oli .07 .54 .O,'i 1.22 .01 .01 .03 .09 .21 .05 .20 .10 .. I ... .60 .06 .84 .24 .12 .02 .01 .64 .01 .01 .02 .03 .02 .26 .10 .09 .Of1 .o;; .04 .40 .52 .88 .34 .84 .07 2.49 3.70 i .04 .24 .68 H) .76 .7H .02 2.38 .91 .47 .04 l.6! .Oii .37 .4,l .Ol .74 .6) .57 .l(i 2.17 .07 .01 .06 .0 l .11 .30 .12 -----------'---------~-----------------------------------

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Table I,-<'ontinued. ----------------DATE. 1 : i Jan. Feb. Mar. A.pr. Mu_y June 1,Jnl_y : Ang. ( Sept. I Oct. Nov. l Del'. I i ; : i i : i inclt inclt inclt inch inch itll Ii : i11c/, i.11rlt I iuclt I i.11"11 ; ir1rl, ) i11r/1 i I 17 ............ 1 .11 1.4,} 18 ............ .87 .l:l .09 19......... ... .02 .oa .2~! .o5 20 ........... 21 ........... 22 ........... 23 ........... 24 .......... 2,5 ......... 26 ........... 27 2.:i ... 2 i 30 ........... 31 ........... TOTAL, ..... 1.89 .02 .02 .02 .13 .15 .20 .48 .02 .02 .43 .28 .12 .02 1.61 2.
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Village or District. Pokfnlam, ................. \Vest, Point, ............. Central, ................. Wongneichung, ......... Tsat Tze Mni, .......... .. 8hau .Ki Wan, ........... Wan Chai, ................ Aberdeen, ................. Stanley, ................. ;1 y~am, .................... fa1 Hang .................. Cheun!,(' Sha Wan, Shek Li Pui, ............ .. Kowloon City, ........... Kowloon Reservoir, ..... Yaumati, ................. Table II. FOR~sr GUARDS SERVICES: Ol<'lt'ENCES. Block. 7 7 I 2 3 3 I, 2 6 5 4 2,3 9, 10 10 9 11 8 Convictions. Reports of Compartment. i I rn ~c,~ 3 00 c a:, .S CD f:
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POLICE --Ll2 Table III. COURT RESULTS. PUNISHMENT. 1909. 1908. 57 days' imprisonment, --38 79 8-14 -55 51 15-31 -13 10 50 cts.-$1 fine, 3 17 l2 -31 48 $3 -29 15 t4-S5 -87 31 $10-$25 -17 2 i50 ,, 2 Dischai;ge
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L13: Table VI. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FRm.r moo TO 1900. ------------------------------------Year. 1900 HIOl 1902 190:J 1904 19:15 1906 1!107 1908 1909 Totul Expe11tliture. $ (". 21,.'i 19.9,'i 2.'i,.'.i6 t.70 3 l ,4C6.1 I 3 l ,'.J24.0{ 49,(-iHH.98 46,ili0.14 4fi, 79".19 4t,131.14 48 973.20 43,694.46 Totul Revenue. $ c. 1,819.10 l,7W.29 l,2D~.80 2.31 l.,'i8 2,3.:Wl 44 3,468.94 6,898.64 i,7a0.,'i2 11,.586.4!3 11,441.51 SUPPLEMENT. % of Revenue to Expendi1nre. 8 6 3 84 7 50 i 14 17.52 23 26-12 Additions to the Flora of Hongkong and the New Territories. Clematis jila.menlosa, Du1~n.-A species new to science, and discovered by Mr. Dunn at Ha Hong, near Taipo. Tuteheria miemcmz)(J., Dunn.-This is a second representative of this new Ternstrremiaceous genus and has been found in Hong kong, Kwangtung and Fokien. JJ[icmt1opis 1'eticulata, Dunn.-Collected by :Mr. Dunn on Lantao Island and not previously named. Sapindus !\Iul-w1'ossi, Gaertn.-A tree about 20 feet high of this species was found in the Little Hongkong woods in April last. Previously known :from Chekiang, Fokien and Kwangtung. Tephrosia Tutehe1i, Dunn.-This species, which is new to science, has been found at Aberdeen, Little Hongkong, Sheko and on Lantao Island. It grows to a height of 20 feet. Pileostegin viburnoides, Hk. f. et Thom.s.-A member of the Hydrangea family with the habit of Ivy. Collected on the hills above Taitam reservoir and on Taimoshan. Eugenia Sp.-A shrub 5 or 6 feet high found growing on the hills above 'l'aihang. Amm.annia peploides, Sp1eng.-Collected in a paddy field near Kung Tungin the new Territories. Also known from Canton and from Persia eastward to Ja pan, and southward in Malaya. Lagerstrmm.ia subcostatn, Koehne.-This tree is not uncommon in the Little Hongkong woods where it grows to a height of 40 or 50 feet. Its bark is very distinctive, and it is strange that it has not been detected before. Previously found in Kwangtungand Formosa,

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Ll4 -Cnieus a1'Vensis, Hoffm..-Collected on Victoria Peak. It ranges from Western Europe to Eastern Asia. Bonnaya braehiatn, Link et Otto.-Found by Mr. Dunri near Saiwan. Known from India, Ceylon, Malaya, Philippine Islands, South China and Formosa. Aristoloelu'.a 1'hwaitesii, Hook .f.-'l'his plant has now been found on Lantao Island. It was not known out of Hongkong previously. Peperomia dindygulensi:s, Miq.-This plant is known from Kwangtung, Loochoo Archipelago, Formosa anrl Eastern India. Collected on Taimoshan in March .. '1ntides11u1 inicrophyllum, Hemsl.-A small leaved Bpecies detected on the south side of Mt. Gough. Only known previously from i\fa On Shan in the New Territories, and from Szechuen. Ficus la.eemti.folin, Lei;el.-Oollected in Hongkong and the New Territories. Only known from China. Qumcus l-it.~eoidei;, Dunn.-Discovered on the rocky slopes oJ Lanta,J at 1,000 feet. A new s-pecies forming a shrub about 8 feet high. Bulbophyllwn mdiatzirn, Liml/..-An addition to the flora of the New Territories. Previously known from Hongkong, Hupeh and Burmah. Cinhopetalmn del.iteseens, Rolfe.-Found on Lantao, and another addition to the flora of the New Territories. Only previously known from Hongkong. Oalanthe z;emt,ifolia, R. Ifr.-This orchid is known from South India, Ceylon, i\Ialaya Islands and Tropical Australia. It was col lected in Hongkong a few years ago and recently on Lantao. Oryptostylis 1hnchniter;, Bl.-This plant is an interesting addi tion to the orchids of Hongkong. It was found growing on a shady bank on the hills above Taihang, and is a native of Java and Ceylon. but has not hitherto been collected in China. Alpinia Kwna,lwte, Jfok.-Discovered at Little Hongkong by Mr. Dunn. A Japanese species. Oalainus latifolius, Raxb.-This is the name of the fifth species of Calamus found in Hongkong, and mentioned in the Annual Report for 1906. Only known from India previously. Pandanus foreep8, 11:fortelli.-RJcorded from the New Territories in last year's Report 'and has now been found in Hongkong. Pyereus pulvinatu8, Des.-;Found at Aberdeen by Mr. Dunn. Cosmopolitan in the Tropics. W oodwardi(l, Kempii, 0.Jpiland.-Discovered on Taimoshan some years ag-1 by a native collector, but only recently named. Not known outside of Kwangtung. PolypJdium, dilrit1,tum, W ill.-A'1. a
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Appendix M. REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION. NUMBERS AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS. The number 0 Government Schools, of which details are given in Tables I and III, remains unchanged ; but Aberdeen School has proved unsuccessful, and was closed at the end of 1909. For reasons given below, the two sides of Belilios Public School have been treated as forming one school. No important changes have taken place in the number and clas sification of the Grant Schools. One small Vernacular School has been closed, number 32. NUMBERS Ol' PUPILS. The numbers in average attemlance are dealt with in Tables I, II ancl III. The total number ii; G,5G0 as compared with 6,178 last year. Table I shows the numbers at Government Schools to be 2,326 as compared with 2,223 last year. The numbers were purposely re duce(l at Queen's College. The three feeders to the College on the other hand, and especially Saiyingpun, shew marked increases, (932: 771). The two British Schools, Kowloon Girls' School and Victoria School shew a combined slight decrease. Several of the less important schools also have de-~lined in numbers. The increase at the Belilios Public School (Girls) is noteworthy. Further details are given below under the headings of the schools. The considerable increase in the numbers at Grant Schools (4,234: 3,927) is chiefly clue to the increase of Chinese pupils in the lower Classes of the Ellis Kadoorie School and St. Joseph's College. The steadily increasing numbers taking an English Education as shewn in Table II does not adequately describe the rush for places in English Schools during the past year. I the numbers admitted had not been limited to suit the capaqity of the Staffs and Class rooms, several hundred more pupils might have been enrolled. The same Table (Ko. 1) shews that the numbers taking a Verna l,ular Eclncation have increased. The increase is due entirely 1,> the tleYelopment of the Delilios Public School. The small Vernacular Schools managd by the various Missions shew a decline (2,011: 2,149). The satisfactory nature of the education given in these schools is considered under the hea.ding Vernacular Education below ; but their worldly success is very easily surpassed by that of the Private Vernacular Sd10ols. 0 these, careful records, so far as it is possible to obt.ain the!n, have b::iet1 kept for several years. If the numbers shewn by the black clotted line in Table II exaggerates their comparativa imp:)ltancc as it undoubtedly does, it probably giYes a true record of their rate of growth.

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-Mi-The fees charged in the Pri rnte Vernacular Schools average $1.25 a month ; the Grant Vernacular Schools make no charge in most cases. It is probably fair to say that except the Belilios Public School and one or two. others, the Vernacular Schools under the Education Department represent the leavings of Vernacular Education. The contrary is the truth as reganls an education in English. The dotted red line in Table II marking the progress of the Private English Schools seems to proYe that there is little money to be made out of teaching a smattering of English at low fees. Among the Private Schools are included two of great importance, St. Stephen's College (maximum enrolment 120) and St. Paul's College (50) : there is also an institution known as the South China Academv. In the remaining 24 Private Schools the fees average $2.75 a month. There are also 28 night schools in which English is taught to 659 pupils. REVEKUE AND EXPENDITURE. The expenditure upon education has increased by $J:~,48.t ($219,359: $205,875), as is shown in Table V; and the revenue has increased by $13,611 ($U8,214: $54-,603) as is shown in Table 1. The net result is a percentage of Revenue to Expenditure of 43:1, which is a high figure. At Government Schools the cost per unit (average attendance) fell to $37.15, the lowest it has been since 1902. At the Grant Schools on the contrary it is higher than ever before. This is due to the higher proportion of pupils in the Upper Grade Schools. Indeed there is no simpler and fairer indication of the progress of education in Hongkong than the steady increase in the average cost per pupil at Grant Schools since 1903, when the new Code and new rates of Grant came into force. DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION. Upon the retirement of Dr. Wright in April, to which allusion is made below, Queen's College was placed under the control of the Head of the Education Department, whose title was changed from "Inspector of Schools" to that of "Director of Education". GovERN.MENT ScHOOLH. A list of GoYermnent Sdwol:,; with the u:,;tml :,;tat.iHt.ici; is given in Table I. The Retrenchment Committee, while reeomrnen
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--M 3 ----Queen's College stands, ai:; regardi:; the numbers in its three highest Classes, far above any other school in the Colony. In other respects I am unable to report that it has acquired the predominance which it is the hope of the Staff and myself that it may win before long. Some weak points however have already been remedied ; and others are easily remediable with time and patience. Staff.-While I have nothing but good to say, from what I have seen hitherto, of the energy and willingness of the Chinese Masters, they are not all at present quite fit to cope unaided with the work required of them. At the end of the year, the following Divisions were under Chinese 1VfaRterR in indepenrlent control, IV a, 1\ d, e and two .Divisions of Class V. I have with the concurnmc.e of the Headmaster decided that all these six Masters shall be put under the orders and control of the }formal Master, whose excellent. work is producing valuable results. Oom'.~e o.f Instruction.--The school has not yet published any formulated and comprehensive course of instruction. This iH a serious defect. Without one, neither parents nor boys, perhaps not even the Staff, can clearly see the scope of the education which it is intended to provide. Simple courses have
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-M:4Overerowding.-Even under the present rules, th-;'3 still occurs though it has been greatly reduced. The following extracts are from the Headmaster's report. His sympathetic reference to Dr. Wright will appeal to all who knew him:-" By the retirement on pension of Dr. Wright, this institution has lost one whose services have been at its disposal for considerably over a quarter of a century. Dr. Wright arrived in Hongkong, and assumed duty, on 22nd January, 1882, and finally retired on 7th April, 1909, having thus completed more than 27 years' service In all, 9,401 boys were enrolled during the term of his connection with the College. Dr. Wright's capacity for work was, at all times, amazing. His tireless devotion to duty was a model for all with whom he officially came in contact. His name, like that of the first Head master, Dr. F. Stewart, will be honourably and imperish ably bound up with that of Queen's College and its traditions. The measure of the high esteem in which he is held cannot be better gauged than by the fact that whilst he was still with us, three of his old pupils, in pious gratitude, created the Wright Scholarship to perpetuate his name. A widespread movement is now afoot to found a further Scholarship, possibly at the local University, to record the lasting services that our late Headmaster so conspicuously rendered to educa tion in the Colonv. The average attendance' has fallen to 805, from 911 last year. The smaller numbers are attributable chiefly to the fact that we no. longer feed our Lower School from a Preparatory Division, the last Class of which was abolished in 1908; partly to the increased and increasing educational facilities offered elsewhere in the Colony; as well as to the strict enforcement of an age-limit. At least a score of boys have been refused admission on the ground of over-age: others, doubtless, have not presented themselves knowing that their age was a bar. Generally speaking, attendance is very regular. There is still, however, too much importance attached to certain family festivities-birthdays and other anniversaries. A portion of the central flat roof over the Hall was again partly blown off by the typhoon which visited the Colony in the night of the 18-19th Octobet. The Revenue of the College, smaller numbers notwith standing, shows a satisfactory increase of $9,745 over that of 1908. In consequence, the average cost of each scholar for the year has been considerably reduced, while the percentage of Revenue to Expenditure is higher than it has been in any year since 1901. The general health of the school has been satisfactory: 23 boyR h1, ve been off the roll on aec:ount of heri-beri, 12 for

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---M5--sl'abies, 4 for small-pox; consumption pneumonia Je,er and dysentery account for 5 others; 12 cases of mild trachoma were gratuitously treated at the Government Civil and Tung ,;va Hospitals, the boys, according to regulation, being allowed to come to school while undergoing treatment : 2 virulent cases of this disease were off the roll for 5 and G months respectively. T,vo new classrooms have been added to our accommo'dation : a large room capable of seating 50 pupils, at the back of the Hall Gallery, and a small room for 30 pupils, in the East wing. These additional classrooms are both fitted with dual desks, similar in pattern to those ,vith which it has been decided to reseat, during 1910, the whole of the classrooms on the first floor. Our maximum seating space, inclusive of three 50-elasses in the Hall, is now 996. The total examination results over the whole school are a slight improvement oYer those of last year. English subjects slww marked improvement. This is especially evident in the composition exhibited in the Upper School. :tlfathematics in IA and IB, in IIB and in IHA and IIIB were good : in IIA Yery good. In the difficult but highly useful subject of Book-keeping, taken entirely by }Ur. Grant, excellent results were got in IA, IB, and IC, and very fair results in IIA, IIB and IIC. In the Lower School, Elementary Algebra was well tackled by IV A, IVB and IVC : Geometrical Drawing was also well done in IVA2, IVB and IVD : in the other sections of this Class, these subjects were but fair. The Gen eral Intelligence paper, given only to the three section,; in Class I, was exceedingly well answered by th0 top section. Non-Chinese boys, in the Upper School only, take Physiology and Science in place of translation from and into Chinese. Thev are divided into Seniors and Juniors. The results ~ere better than those of last year. Of 11 Seniors, all passed in each subject ; and of 9 Juniors, 1 failed in Physiology and 2 in Science. Opt,ional Classes are taken in :Model and Freehand Drawing, and also in Trigonometry. These classes are volun tary, and extra to the Time Table. The results in both Drawings were very poor. The Trigonometry 'Class, in charge of Mr. Grant, was divided into Seniors and Juniors. Of the 6 Seniors, 5 passed on a fairly difficult paper: and of 11 Juniors, 9 passed: these results give 83 per cent. and 82 per cent. respectively. In the coming school year, an attempt will be made to instil into our boys a sound liking for good literature, by providing, in higher Classes, more than a single reader for the year's work. Boys will be encouraged in what has been happily termed silent reading which, under suitable guidanee, should create a wholesome capacity for organiserl study, and a healthy taste for good books. The system is now being tried at home; and there is mrnh to he arfranced in its favour.

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-MG--On the Yeruacular side, confined to the Lower School, 395 boys, arranged in 5 Classes and 15 sections, were examined, 3G2 or 91 per cent. passing. It has hitherto been the practice to insist on a boy passing the 4th Vernacular Class before he can be promoted from the Lower School to the Upper, i.e., before he can pass from Class IV. Boys entering the lowest Vernacular Class have so far been expected to have had a preparatory grounding equivalent to 2 or 3 years' work in Chinese studies. The standard ,vill now be raised at each end : we now hope to get boys with a still better Vernacular training in the Upper School, where they will he able to do more advanced translatiom;, and thns he better equippecl for the University later on. The Normal l\faster, l\Ir. Tanner, reports that the Pupil Tea chers in his charge have given him every satisfaction : their work has been systematic: and regular. He draws attention to the fact that thev have been considerablY hampered, owing to the lack ;f suitable accommorlatio~ for criticism anrl training lessons--most vital parts of any systematised Rcheme of normal ,York. This con dition has been brought about partly hy t.lrn increased munber of Pupil Teachers now under the Normal l\foster, and partly by the fact that "e lrnYe not hitherto had a properly equipped Normal Room. The disad Yantages named, however, will entirely cease to exist, when we come into possession of the new Normal Room now on the point of completion. As to the thoroughly sound work done by the Pupil Teachers, I can add my own testimony, based on close daily observation throughout the school year and on the Annual Ex amination. During the year under review, 113 boys are recorded as having got situations immediately on leaving school: 31 ob tained appointments, chiefly clerical, in different departments of the local GoYernment; 11 went into the service of the Imperial Chinese Government, 31 into various mercantile firms in the Colnnv, while 40 found openings abroad. The Tennis, Cricket, Football, Hoc:key, aml Bathing Clubs keep up a vigorous and successful existence, providing for the physical needs of thoRe who eare for the more active forms of exercise." I note with pleasure a distinct all round improvement in the practical nature 0 the teaching as compared ,vith what it was a few years lJack. The separate studies of the Non-Chinese boys and the optional Classes are a step towards the differentiation of courses which I have recommended above. The change in the readers and in the. method of teaching reading has my hearty approval. The changes in Vernacular Education were the result of a meeting between the Headmaster, the Vemacular Masters ancl rnyi;;el f. They are an instalment of a general scheme of improvement..

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M 7 --DrsnuoT Scuoorn. 'l'he three District Schools of Saiyingpun, Yaumati and W antsai fully shared in the general increase of attendance at Anglo-Chinese Schools, as can be seen from Table I. The fees collected were $20,703 as compared with $16,708. All three schools were practical:ly full for the greater part of the year, and during a considerable part of it were overcrowded in the lowest Classes, where the pressure makes itself manifest. Regulations which will prevent overcrowding in :future have now been made. The following increases in the establishments over those of last year were provided :-Saiyingpun. -One Grade II, one Grade III, two Grade VI Chinese Masters. W antsai.-One Grade II, one Grade V one Grade VI Chinese Masters. In addition, Mrs. Morris, Headmistress, Victoria School, was attached to the Staff of Saiyingpun. The experiment of putting a junior Chinese Class under an English lady was new in Govern ment Schools, and has proved most successful. I have never seen a better Class of beginners than hers was by the encl of the year. On the whole the three schools are doing very satisfactory work. There are seYeral points of detail which require more attention, and these can be conveniently considered l~nder the next heading. Entrance Examinations to Queen's College.-There have for many years been four scholarships awarded to boys from the District Schools tenable at the College. In 1909 the number offered was increased to 17. The exa1nination in previous years was held with out any particular reference to the work done by the candidates at their schools. This year I decided that it should be conducted strictly on the lines of the school work ; and, that it might form a convenient test of the work in the highest Class, all boys who were eligible were compel~ed to compete. Of the 17 scholarships, 7 ell to Wantsai, 6 to Saiyingpun and 4 to Yaumati. It is interesting to note that two of the successful candidates were already free scholars, one from Tanglungchau and one from the New Territory. The success of Wantsai is remarkable and a matter of congratulation or the Staff of that school. Saiyingpun obtained one or two places less than might have been expected from the numbers of the school, and Yaumati about her just share. I do not attach overmuch importance to the results of a single examination in weighing the merits of schools, but the relative precentages of marks gained are interesting. They form a curious contrast with the eighty and ninety per rent. averages which will be found given,

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-M8 in entire good faith, to any Class by its own master. 'l'he following Table summarises the result of the examination :I '-;i ,_; i:i .Sl >, oil ., ,_; :~ t, ..c:: i oj s ., -.l 0 ,0, c:: ; ... School. ;a O" '-' rn s Q) _;:j ., ..0 -., "' 0 g .s ... ., o.,,, ., c:: Q, 3 t,l) !,/l o~ Q) 0 ... g 0 z--c Q) ... ... ., i:S Q) < 0 > C!l 0 ..; C!l C!l ... -------Average Marks per cent. ---------------------s aiyingpun, ... 25 52 51 I 27 48 22 54 38 14 52 40 I Yaumati, ...... 10 51 61 I !) 45 33 60 8 30 72 40 I i Wantsai, ...... 11 36 52 I 37 58 46 71 48 16 72 74 I I I The Chinese Compositi'.on-~ are most disappointing and a revelation to me. Poor at \Vantsai, they were very feeble at Saiyingpun and very bad at Yaumati. The fault is probably to be found partly in the quality of the teachers, who were most of them recruited on the offer of very small salaries at a time when the work of the District Schools was considered less seriously than it is at present. A second obstacle to good work lies in the 'inability of the Headmasters (with the exception of l\fr. Young Hee) to follow the work done in Vernacular School. A third impediment is defective organisation. Some system of pari pas.m promotion, ensuring that a pupil cannot be promoted for proficiency in English while very backward in the Vernacular, will now have to be adopted. Special attention to Vernacular Education should be made a feature for 1910. Composition was remarkably poor at Yaumati and Saiyingpun, especially the latter, and Dictation was a hopeless failure, though a new voice and strange surroundings affect the results in this subject so greatly that I do not attach very much importance to them. Very fair all round results were ohtainecL in Reading, Colioquial and (}rCL1nmm. Geography was distinctly good, and so were the mathematical subjects, except Geo111et1u which had however only been begun towards the end of the year. I am of opinion that in future it will be well to assign a fixed number of scholarships to each school, so as to avoid competition of school against school. Such competitions while apparently stimulating have sometimes inconspicuous but untoward results. Masters have only a limited time at their disposal, which it is not desirable that they should bestow upon the special coaching of any particular Class or section. Fees.-At the beginning of the winter term the fees for new boys were raised at Saiyingpun to $4, and at Yaumati and Wantsai to $3, without any apparent effect on the numbers seeking admission. General.-The following extracts from the report of the Head master of Saiyingpun are of general interest:-" The first complete year spent in the new building has been a most prosperous one. The school has been quite full, and for over three months fresh applicants for admission were refused.

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--M 9 --Following the practice of previous years, swimming was taught during the summer months, and our picnics took us further afield. On Empire Day two large launches conveyed the Masters and boys to Tun Mun where a most enjoy able time was spent, the clay concluding with sports. Deep water Bay, Silver Sand Bay and Laichikok were among some of the other places visited. 'l'hese excursions exercise a most beneficial and refining influence upon the boys, and besides being of great educational value, enable a master to get more in touch and sympathy with his pupils. Football has receiYed more attention. Out of 7 matches played we have won 3 and drawn 2, so that at the present time this school comes second. For several months the school was seriously handicapped by the want of a ground for practice, as the privilege of using the ground at Kennedy Town was withdrawn in ~fay. Latterly we have been given a share in the use of the Vil estern Park Ground. Physical Instruction has received due attention, and each day a short time is spent in extension movements and breathing exercises. Already they have had a marked effect upon the posture of the boys in class. With the erection of the covered shed a more extended syllabus can be taken. Improrements in the latrines and urinals have been effected. By the erection of a new block the~, have been extended considerably and may now be considered as adequate. The playground has been relaid in lime concrete. 35 boys entered Queen's College during the year. Five have gone to America to continue their studies there. Two typewriters were subscribed for and purchased, and in spare time the boys in the top Classes are allowed to practise on them. Mr. Li Ping has very kindly sent a special prize for the hest conducted boy in the school." The educational value of excursions such as those above mentioned is very great. A model course, drawn up for the District Schools, was in force during the latter half of the year. It is the result of the combined experience of the Staff of the District Schools extending over a num ber of years, and aims at preparing the pupils for Class III at Queen's College. It is given in Annexe A. DrsTRICT ScHooLs,-LowER GRADE. The Indian School was in 1908 housed in the Belilios Reforma tory, which proved however too distant to suit, most of the boys. In July this year it was moved back to Wantsai, since when there has been a considerable improvement in attendance, which was 30 in December. Both the Masters have passed their first examination at the Technical Institute.

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--MlO--Ping Shun School shews far more vitality .than the other rural schools of its class. The Master has taken pains to keep up his know ledge of English, and is enthusiastic. Sanction has been obtained for the engagement of a Vernacular Master in 1910. Of 1'a1'. Po and Cheung Chau Schools little good can be said. The attendance has fallen off by 40 per cent. at each of them. The Masters are out of touch with educational affairs and what knowledge they once had of method and English has deteriorated. This applies particularly to the Master of Tai Po. Abe1deen School was closed during the year on similar considerations. The root of the trouble with these schools lies in the lack of superv1s10n. The Masters are quite unfit to go uncontrolled and unwatched for months at a time. BRITISH SCHOOLS. Kowloon School (Gi1'ls).-This school continues to fill a useful purpose. The number in average attendance is 53. The cost per unit has fallen to $115 from $143 last year. Experience has shown the limitations which are set to the use fulness of .Kowloon School. It provides schooling in a healthy and bright atmosphere for a number of ehilclren, but the very short average of attendance of the pupils makes it impossible to follow out any comprehensive school course. Hal the girls in the top Class are foreigners. -Victoria School (Boys).-On resuming charge of the.Department in April, I found this school in an unsatisfactory condition. The Headmaster went on leave shortly after, and the elder boys were taught for the rest of the year partly by l\ir. James 0 Kowloon School and partly by Mr. Curwen of Yaumati. There was an im provement by the end of the year. The Upper School consists at present o{ 11 boys, most of whom are the sons of Government servants. They are backward, and clo not seem to have been well grounded ; but they are making progress. Most of them are now being prepared for the Oxford Local Prelim inary. This Class promises to be of much value to the Colony. The attendance has fallen off very eonsiderably. The Head mistress was transferred elsewhere early in the year ; but still the cost per unit reaches the altogether preposterous figure of $220 per unit ($124 in 1907 and $166 in 1908). The numbers are not likely to increase materially in the near future. They were 27 for the year as against 41 for 1908. The following extract is from the report of the Acting Headmaster:-" The Cadet Corps. -There is a uniformed corps, attached to the Hongkong Volunteer Corps, drawn from Victoria, St. Joseph's, Diocesan and Garrison Schools. All the boys at this school who are big enough belong to it, but I do not remember seeing more than four strange boys present. Occasionally, when enough names offered I took a party of my own pupils do\Yn to the range

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-Mllfor shooting. A Drill Instructor took drill and rifle practice and a Band Instructor trained the buglers and drummers, each for one hour a week. A number of new cadets joined in December, when there was a rumour that the corps was going out to camp with the Volunteers. The corps was not taken however." Belilios Public School (English and Vemacular Sides): Reference to past reports will shew a radical change which has taken place in the nature of the Belilios Public School. Once perhaps the most important girls' school in t.he Colony, it gradually fell from this position and became mainly a resort for girls whose special edu cational needs were unprovided for elsewhere, viz., Jews, Eurasians, Japanese, etc. The attendance on the English Side, though eked out by a number of small boys, fell in 1905 to 85. By that year however to quote my annual report, there were "signs of an increasing desire on the part of the Chinese parents to give their daughters an English Education". To meet the new demand special Divisions of the lower Classes were formed where the instruction ran strictly on English lines. By 1907, the Chinese pupils preponderated so greatly in the lower Classes, that it was possible to do away with the Xon-Chinese Divisions altogether, and the school became organised as an "English School", to suit the requirements of the great majority of the pupils. It is hardly necessary to add that pupils of all nationalities were and are still welcomed. Nevertheless by 1908 the lowest Classes had become almost exclusively Chinese. Under the same roof as this English School but quite independent of it there had been for many years a Vernacular Chinese School of a not very high type, but with a large attendance. In 1905, this Vernacular School fell under the management of Mr. Sung Hok-pang to whose singularly able control is due the remarkable im provement which has taken place. In his time the average attendance has risen from 175 to 326; the fees collected from nil to $1,921. The curriculum now includes elementary music and painting. But more significant still is the remarkable change for the better in the bearing and intelligence of the pupils. It was due to Mr. Sung's influence that in 1909 the two highest Standards expressed a desire to learn English for an hour a clay. Their request was complied with, and the experiment has proved so successful that I have arranged for the four highest Standards to do so in future, the time spent on the subject increasing in the higher Standards. As the Chinese girls on the English Side are daily taught Chinese, the amalgamation of the Vernacular School (under Mrs. Tutcher) with the Vernacular School (under Mr. Sung Hok-pang) is practically complete. The following extracts are from the annual report of the Headmistress:" I am glad to be able to report that the arrangements made last year with a view to the drawing together of the two depart ments of the school haYe been a great success, and the ultimate fusion of the English and Chinese sides of the school to which His Excellency the Governor ad vertecl at the prize distribution two years ago, is already well within sight.

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-Ml2 -Instead of a graduated scale of fees according to the numbers attending from one family, there is now a uniform rate of one dollar over the whole school. There are at present ten Free Scholars in attendance. Four of these are internal scholarships; the other six were bestowed on girls from various Grant-in-Aid Schools. That these favours on the part of the Government are appreciated, is shown by the fact that all the ten Free Scholars have given a good account of themselves. Besides the weekly tests which have been continued throughout the year, a thorough examination was made at :Midsummer and again in December. All the Classes made a most creditable appearance, especially as regards the neatness and accuracy of the \Hitten work. The standard in Arithmetic has b~en raised considerably, the girls now taking the same s)llabus as that of boys' schools. Reading and explanation were Yery good indeed, showing no trace of the hesitation in the use of English, observable in former years. As in former years, Mr. H. E. Belilios generously sent six hand some books to be given as prizes for English Composition, ancl the awanls were made in June. The attendance has been steady all through the year." Gn.-1:-:T ScHonL:-:. The usual rc;tatistic-s arc given in Table III. A tteution has already been clrawn to the increased numbers in the English Schools. At the Ellis. Kacloorie Sd1ool, the average attfmdance inprea8ed from 498 to 596, and the Grant by $2,500. The following Table sets forth the authorised figures shewing the fees, numbers of boarders arnl the vercentages of different nationalities in eac-h of the English Grant Schools. There are however manv remissions of fees made in individual cases. ThE' distinction b~tween English and Eurasian 1s one not always very easily made. Sc,\rnul. !.-St. ,Joseph's Colkg-e,.. 4011 :,7 2.-Itnlian Convcnt, ...... 2-13 108 :l.-Frcnc!t Convent...... (i,l 18 -t-.-Anglo-Ponng11es(1, .... 1.-, i.--DiocesanGi,ls':,chool. fi:l ~O K... Boys 271 !Ji 9.-St. M:wy"s. .. ............ fH I !.-Ellis Kadoorie. ....... ,;% J X.-'-'t. ~'rnncis'. .. :{, 8 14 f,4 1 Ii 24 l'erccntnges of different rrntioniilit.ies. -ll ijj 2., 9!! !I n.-) i -5 12 Iii (;;) I) IS 21) ---36 10 12 11 2 :{ ,) 4!1 4 1-1 (I() 2 :-; l<'ecs. $8.011 2.00 8.00 2.00 I 2.00 to I ,,.to 8.00 2.00 2.00 :!.\:O --------

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-.M 13 -The Vernacular l::,chools keep up their numbers, though not in proportion to the increase of population. This is inevitable, since .the number of new schools is only occasionally increased, and many inefficient ones have been weeded out in the past few years. More than 25 per cent. of these schools are now returned as "thoroughly efficient ". A national habit inclines Chinese pupils in the direction of meticulous but unintelligent imitation. Drawing, rightly taught, tends to cultivate the powers of observation and should be a valuable corrective. I am glad to report that an English Mis tress at the Training Home (School No. 20) has begun to teach her pupils to draw from life; the results are promising and the methods worthy of study. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS. Table VI A shews the results. The two schools, St. Stephen's Boys and Girls, are not under the Education Department. Exclud ing these, eighteen pupils, out of the four thousand studying English in the Department, passed the Oxford Senior. Of these, sixteen had not sufficient knowledge of English to be excused responsions; and had the Hongkong University been opened, would have had to enter it, if at all, with lower attainments than would have been necessary to secure their admission to Oxford University. Their chance of eventually graduating would then depend upon their making up this initial disadvantage during their University careers. To pass the Oxford Local Senior can be, and usually is, accomplished by the study of a variety of subjects, such as Book-keeping, which will not project the candidate far on his way to a degree. 'l'his unsatisfactory condition of affairs requires the earnest attention of all Managers and Heads of Schools. The tesults of the last five years are given in Table VI B. SCHOLARSHIPS. After omitting the scholarships which had lapsed, as well as two which were cancelled, there remained at the close of the year 35 old free scholarships (26 for boys and 9 for girls). At the end of the year there were granted thirty-two new free scholarships, 25 for boys and 7 for girls. The large increase in the number of the former was made in consequence of the increased revenue derived from fees at Queen's College and the District Schools. Sehola1ships held at the encl of 1909. w. b.O ..... ....; I w. Cl) +" c;l C.-< i:::: b.O i:::: r=i] Total. Cl) ...... >, p i:::: p C) '@ A p o;l I Cl) c.; O'O c;l i:Qw w :,... I Boys, (old) 8 5 7 6 26 1909. 17 3 1 4 ... 25 Girls,(old) ... ... ... 9 9 1909.1 ... ... .. ... 7 7 I I 25 s I 10 I 16 67

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-M:14These scholarships are in each case the equivalent 0 the school ees, i.e., from $5 to $1 a month. They ai:e tenable for the remainder of the pupils' career at the school, and in the case of those helcl at Queen's College are limited to pupils who have been in the District Schools for at least a year. The scholarships tenable at the three District Schools are given to the senior boy in each of the Lower Grade Government English Schools and of certain Grant Schools. INSTRUCTION ON THE EMPIRE. Visual lnstruction.-The lanterns and slides were issued in the usual way to the following schools :-Elli.s Kadoorie School, Victoria School, Diocesan Schoql (Boys), Queen's College, and the Training Home for Girls. Notes by His Excellency the Governor.-Notes for lectures upon the Empire were prepared by His Excellency the Governer early in the year, and were issued to schools. They are given in Annexe B. I have called for reports upon the results obtained: it seems to be the general opinion among Masters, and I am inclined to concur, that the subject matter is best assimilated when imparted in connec tion with the ordinary school courses, such as Geography and History. The Headmaster, Queen's College, reports:-" Some very valuable notes on this enthralling subject, specially drawn up by His Excellency the Governor, were circulated among the Masters to be embodied in the course of instruction given in Geography, History, and General Intelli gence in the Upper School. Several questions in the General Intelligence paper, set to test the value of the work done in this direction, were answered in such a manner as to prove that the boys had signally benefited." The Headmaster, Diocesan School for Boys, reports :-" His Excellency's Notes were found very useful. A copy was supplied to each hoy in VII and VI Standards and the information was embodied in the ordinary teaching in Geography and in the Lantern Lectures. The whole course can be conveniently covered ii1 one year and is of great practical benefit generally, and especially to the Oxford Local candidates. The Lantern Lectures including His Excellency's Notes should be repeated each year as part of the School syllabus." The Director of St. Joseph's College reports:-" The Notes have been used with advantage in the Oxford Class and to a less extent in the lower Standards. We have found them useful in connection with the teaching of the "Historical Geography of the Britsh Empire" by Sir Charles Lucas, and "The Origin and Growth of the British Colonies" by the same author. Both of these are used as text books for the Oxford examination. These Notes may also be used in connection with the Oxford Senior Geography. In the Senior Division the students are expected to know the Geography of the British Empire in general, and must possess in addition a fair knowlege of its history.

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M15With regard to the course of Visual Instruction, I must Ray that our Oxford boys derived very great profit from it last year. \Ve regret however that it is not complete. At present there is only one set o-f lantern slides available, that is, on the British Isles. If we had two more sets, one on the British Empire, and another to illustrate a trip around the world showing .some of the most important places with their pro ducts, etc., we believe the course would be complete." HYGIENE. E;r,aminations on the Hygiene Manual. 'l'he usual shield competition was held among the schools in December, the papers being set by Dr. Pearse. There were 12 competing teams with 107 competitors. The Diocesan School was first. Four schools including Saiyingpun earned over 60"/o of marks. I must congratulate the Hollywood Road (Lower Grade) School on its success. The whole of its top Classes were needed to form the team, which beat among others Queen's College. Queen's College did very badly, when the circumstances are fairly considered, includ ing its very big field of selection. Yaumati should have done much better. The reason given by the French Convent for their weakness in the subject this year is that it has only been studied since September. This is however no real explanation, since Hygiene is a compulsory subject. The Diocesan School (Girls) did not compete, which seems a pity. Kowloon School and Victoria School did not compete either, on the ground that they had not enough pupils who had been under instrnction for the full year. I am of opinion that all Government and Grant Schools should compete, unless especially excused, even if only small teams can be sent in; and that any school intending to send in a reduced team should obtain sanction for so doing from myself at least a month before the elate of examination. The following Table gives the details:-Results of Hygiene Team Competition, 1909. al ;;;o s. g., Position.~ ~ame of School. ;g 8 .S i : 8 I Remarks. ci p,. E1 ------------z 11.. 1----------1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th llth 12th Diocesan Boys', ...... Ellis Kadoorie, ... .. Belilios Public School. .. Saiyingpun, ............. .. St. J oseph's, ............ Anglo-Portuguese, .... .. Italian Convent, ....... Hollywood Road, ........ Wantsai, ............... .. Queen's College, ........ St. Mary's, ............ .. Yaumati, ................. 444 429 384 421 410 rno 383 364 341 311 103 240 1 I 10 63.42 Showed the best 1esults. 10 61.28 Fair: !l 60.95 10 60.14 l<'air. 10 58.57 Fair. 4 57.H 10 54.71 10 52.00 10 48.71 10 H.42 4 36.78 Fair. Fair, 3 poor papers. Poor, 2 fairly good papers. 10 34.28 Very poor.

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Ml6 The next Table shews the average place taken by each competing school during the past 5 years. The District Schools send in teams from Classes IV & V ; the other schools from Classes III & IV ; the former are thus somewhat heavily handicapped. Saiyingpun has thus done very well. The Diocesan Boys' School is an easy first. Having regard to their numbers and the nature of the schoois the Anglo-Portuguese School and the Belilios Public School have done very creditably. A.verage Place in Hygiene OomzJetition 1905-1909. School. Remarks. -----------------------1. Diocesan Boys' School, .. .. 2. Anglo-Portuguese_, ........ 3. Belilios Public School, ..... 4. Italian Con Yant, .......... .. 4. SaiyiugpunDiHtrict School, 6. Ellis Kadoorie School, .... .. 6. St. Joseph's College, .... .. 8. Queen's College, .......... .. 9. Diocesan Girls', ........... .. 10. Wantsai District School, .. 11. Yaumati District School, ... 12. Holly woo
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Ml7 to understand what Rtyle of answers would suit the questions. In teaching elementary Hygiene to students who have had no preliminary instruction in the elements of natural science, all that can be done is to impress on them certain rules and make them learn them, taking most of the reasons for them on faith. In Victoria School the results were poor, the knowledge shown being too small. The girls' papers (except Kowloon School) were on the whole good. A superior knowledge of English enabled the girls competing to express their ideas much better than was generally done, and they appear to have studied the subject with interest. Adranced Papers. 1. Queen's College.-The answers were poor, a result evidently largely due to the fact that the students did not understand the questions, which were so worded as not to permit generally of an answer by quoting directly from the text book. Even if no further study 0 the subject than could be given to it by reading only the school text book were expected from the advanced students, yet much higher marks could have been obtained if the questions had been carefully thought over. So many of the boys evidently rushed into their answers, writing about something related to the answer required, but not the correct answer. 2. Dior,esan School and Orphanage.-The VII Form produced mostly fair papers and one good one. The amount of knowledge of the subject is small, but the questions were fairly well understood so that the most could be made of the knowledge acquired. In Form VI the refmlts were poor as in Queen's College, and apparently from the same reasons. 3. Ellis Kadoorie School.-This school produced mostly fair papers and one good one, the result being similar to that of the Diocesan School. 4. St. Joseph's College.-From this school the results were mostly poor, but slightly better than those from Queen's College, owing probably to the boys being better able to grasp the meaning of an indirect question. 5. Italian Convent and Diocesan Girls' School.--These two schools sent in very fair papers and some good ones. The English used was on the whole good and showed that the questions were understood, enabling the replies to be reasoned, so that the pupils made the most of their knowiedge, which might however have been more extensive. Generally.-There is ample evidence that the meaning of tho terms used in the subject are not understood. Thus hardness of water does not seem to c011Yey a correct idea to the pupils. Gei-ms of disease are as is usual with the public generally confnserl with insects, etc., etc.

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-M18-A course 0 elementary instruction in natural science is always required before Hygiene can be studied intelli gently, and that the pupils have not had this is very evident." INSTRUCTION BY MEANS OF LANTERN SLIDES. In a circular dated 28th March, 1907, the Secretary 0 State or tho Colonies wrote as follows :-" I think that arrangements can be made in this country or the preparation at a small cost 0 sets of magic lantern slides suitable to the circumstances 0 each Colony and, if your Government desires to participate in the scheme, I request that you will furnish me with particulars as to the number 0 slides required, the special diseases which they should illustrate, &c. On the receipt 0 this information an esti mate 0 the cost would be obtained and a further commu nication sent to you." Accordingly 51 "Danger to health" slides and 14 slides illustrating Malaria, Plague and other parasites were procured from home. These slides were made the subject 0 a special course at Saiyingpun, Yaumati and Wantsai Schools. In the case of Saiyingpun the lessons were given immediately after afternoon school. The rooms had to be artificially "darkened by closing the jalousies and doors with the result that they soon became stuffy and close, although the number of pupils present was limited to 50 or 60, and hardly fit to keep boys cooped up in for any length 0 time". The quotation is from a report by the Headmaster. At Yaumati and ,v antsai the lectures were taken after dark. The Headmaster of Y aumati reports :-" It is impossible to darken the school by artificial means as the wi1idows are not provided with jalousies, so the lectures had to be taken ater dark\ and this makes it exceedingly awkward or boys who live a considerable distance away from the School, e.g., Kowloon City." The allowing comments are extracted from a joint report made to me by the three Headmasters :-" Set 1. The slides illustrating:-Contamination 0 water, dampness in houses, vitiation 0 air by sewer gas, ventilation, ''made" sites, defective drains, cesspits, &c., were interesting ; but those showing w.c.'s, traps in sculleries and kitchens, failed to interest the pupils; and not unnaturally, since they concern foreign" houses only, Chinese kitchens and latrines being managed on altogether different lines. Set 2. This set dealt principally with :Micro-organisms; bacilli of Typhoid, Cholera, Consumption, Small-pox, &c. They were beyond the pupils; though they might do or medical students and others interested in bacteriology. Consequently they were regarded as so many illustrations of but passing interest. Old friends like the culex and anopheles mosquitoes, aearus, flea, louse, varieties 0 intestinal worms,

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l.\i 19 &c., appearing as they did on the screen in a highly magni fied form possibly did a great deal of good, as Masters fre quently have to write chits to the different Dispensaries for Sulphur ointment, Iodine and Quinine for the treatment of Itch," Ringworm and Malaria. For the boys to derive material benefit, the slides should deal with local conditions of life. It is not of much use show ing defects in the ventilation of a bedroom when a boy occupies at the most a cubicle ; showing faults in the con struction of a trap in a well equipped kitchen and scullery when their food is cooked entirely differently, perhaps in a rodin without a chimney and with utensils of the scantiest; ot shewing a well appointed w.c. when they have possibly an earthenware pot or a public latrine to resort to. Such generalities only detract from the educational value of the whole series and tend to defeat its object. A teacher by the judicious use of diagrams and coloured chalks, could in the majority of cases, achieve as good results as those obtained from these Lantern Lectures, and still be free from the petty annoyances and trouble occasioned by the state of the climate, defective apparatus, &c. The Headmaster of W ahtsai says that :-" The Lantern obtained froni the Education Department was not sti-ong enough to show the pictures to advantage." I have ventured to point out that Hygiene as hitherto taught in out schools is not, strictly speaking, educational. I cannot say that a further course based on these lantern slides is likely to improve matters in this respect. The fact that the lectures have to be given out of school hours is a serious objection. (They must be since Hygiene cannot again as at Saiyingptm be taught at the expense of the pupils' health.) But if given at night, such a course brings boys into the streets when they ought to be at home, interferes with their home studies, ahd after the charm of novelty has passed, is unpopular with both boys and Masters. These objections do not apply so strongly to boarding schools. There are however certain defects attaching to lantern lectures as means of instruction. The room is dark and it is im possible for the Master to see whether (a) pupils are attending, (b) whether what he says is going home. These are points which a schoolmaster fully appreciates, and will become apparent to any one who watches a good teacher,-how all the time he is recall ing the wandering attention of the units of his class, watching his class and recapitulating again and again, till he sees his points aie understood and absorbed. Lantern slides have in my opinion a distinct and limited func tion as an educational instrument. Where the subject is a large and general one and needs to be seen as a whole, such as the study of the Empire, it may well be illustrated by views taken of it from many points and passed before the eye in rapid succession. Thus a general and almost kinematographir effect is produced. The eye passes to the brain-a number of transitory impttlses, and the brain

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i\:I20is able to form from them a general if somewhat vague impression. In a subject like Hygiene, on the contrary, great attention to detail is essential. Representations of bacilli, or a system of drainage, require to be closely studied. This can better be done by the use of wall diagrams. TECHNICAL INSTITUTE. Extracts from the report of the Director of the Technical Institute are given in Annexe C. The number of students in attend ance since its opening is shown in Table II. After the first novelty wore off and many students who had joined out of curiosity dis appeared, the attendance fell. It is now rapidly increasing, and there can be little doubt as to the value of the work done. The numbers presenting themselves for examination were 120 as compared with 91 in 1908; of whom 102 obtained certificates. The total enrolment is 256. The subjects taught and the numbers passing are given in Table VII A. Statements of accounts are given in Tables VII B and C. Perhaps the most hopeful augury for education in Hongkong is the success of the Masters' Class, attendance at which is now obliga tory upon all Masters in Government and Grant Schools. The costliness of English Masters makes any great extension of their employment improbable. But it is lamentable to observe how mis takes of pronunciation, grammar, idiom, and mistaken methods of instruction picked up by pupils, are perpetuated by them as Masters. I this vicious circle can be broken by the Technical Institute, it will have done indeed a good work. PHYSICAL EXERCISES. Football.-Anyone who has visJ.ted a Chinese School will be struck by the narrow chests, round shoulders and weedy physique of most of the pupils. A bad habit prevalent in some schools of making the pupils sit arms folded over their chests accentuates these weak points. The development of a love of games is therefore much to be encouraged. Unfortunately the available recreation grounds are few and distant, so that only a fraction of the pupils can derive benefit from them. The following is the report of Mr. Barlow, Honorary Secretary of the Hongkong Schools' Football League. It is encouraging to see a purely Chinese School, and not even a school for big boys, like W antsai, taking a leading place in the Senior Shield Competition. It shews what can be done. "As was anticipated the season 1909-10 has been more suc cessful than the previous one. The Cup presented by His Excellency the Governor added considerable interest to Schools' football. Two competitions were run:-Senior competing for the Schools' Shield. Junior competing for the Governor's Cup.

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M: 2i 'l'he compet1t1ons, according to fixture, terminate at the end of March, and up to now a good proportion of the fixtures has been fulfilled. The lack of suitable grounds for matches is responsible for much delay in playing off fixtures. Results to elate. Senior. ---------~----------2'; ... = -----z rf; vv on. (f;, a: : C) j 11, F ; --; .E 1--1 or. 0 i I ]n I~ Goals School. 1. Diocesan ......... --G-. -,--.3---1-__ 2 ___ 8 ___ 3_1_8_ 2. Wantsai ........ 3. St. ,Joseph 's ... 4. j Queen's College I '-' School. '-::l 0 1. Diocesan ....... 2. Saiyingpun .... r Wantsai ......... 4. St. J oseph's .. r Queen's College 6. Ellis Kadoorie .. ... Yaumati ......... '. {j 4 4 eci a, >, d "E. "' a, ..Cl C) ..., d I 1 () ,Junior. Won. 0 2 2 ..., "' 0 H ___ 1 ___ --12 9 l 8 3 s 6 2 2 7 2 3 4 2 I 7 2 4 ... 0 6 I 5 1 2 I ci I "" ... 0 ---I 2 2 2 I l i I I I I I I I 5 2 2 4 3 8 Goals. ..., 00 For. i:: oi oJJ < -----1.3 3 8 6 6 7 I 5 8 6 2 9 7 l 20 7 3 2 o:i "'i:: z p.. 0 E-, 19 8 6 6 5 5 2 Victoria School and St. J oseph's "B scratched during the season.

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M 2~ -i rable I.-GovEnNME~T ScnooLs.-[ 171e jigure8 hi Red are those for last Hear. ] No. Name nnd 1 Taturc I STAFF. Number of I Standnnls, I Number Maximum Averngo I of School Monthly Atf Rate of F ees. Fees Gro ss Cost-. Dn.ys. Enrolment. tendance. f $ c. __ I--~--I ------Classes or English., An glo-C hinese. \ r el'llan nlnr. j Forms. ,------------,----:---I I .--Queen's Colleg<', .......................................... ............ I 2 Kowloon Briti:::11 S cbool--Children of European British \ ParPntnge. Bo)s 11ndcr thirt<'Pn a111l (~ irl:s ............... l 3 1 Vi ctorin B rilisli S ciioot-Ch i l1.h1..:n of European Bl'iti 1sh P:1rent:1ge. C: irl"' under l hirt~en nntl Boy~, ............... 1 I I 4 I I I Bc-lilios Public ~dioo1. 5 1 Saiying:pnn Aug-l o -Clii,10-E>c Sdwol. (Boy .:) .................... 6 Yaumn.ti do., dn 7 Wan tsni tlo. do., Anglo-Indian Seliool. (Doyf;), ................................... 9 \ Aberdeen A nglo-CArnese Srlwol, ( Ho.11s). 10 Tai I'o I do., do .. 11 l Ping Shan do., do., 1 11 5 2 ) 11 [j I G I 6 I 1unnpil Tenclt, ) 8 c r s :? ~cedlework. 'i Masters, 2 1 1 P11pil Ten.chors, / 4. :Wfasters, 2 1 Pupil Teachers. 8 Masters, 2 Pllpil Ten.chers. l '~ 1 2 3 ,) ,5 ,1 4 2 3 3 2 -1 2 24 229 202 J9G 201 ]97 234 205 198 18H 194 185 239 ]88 223 222 209 196 I 205 J98 I 202 I 205 126 223 I 1,103 911 63 69 59 88 494 5m 381 4~)() 278 289 304 361 43 32 17 16 26 20 21 22 35 2i I I I 911 5-;05 46 ~') ,') J 41 27 350 427 297 400 I 70.761.00 $ ~ I() $5 66,596.59 8,300.49 $2 t() $5 7,984.24 I 8,125.80 $2 t.c) $5 I 6,9] l ,,jQ I I so cents, I n,474.36 / e1.so & $ 1 12,588.46 I I 12,428.73 $2 n.rnl $4 16,696.i 4 225 I 2-30 $2 an
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Year. -900, ...... 901, ...... 902, 903, ...... 904, ..... l 905, .. 906, ...... 907, ...... 908, ...... 909, ...... Table IV. 'l'able showing Expenditure, Revenue and Average of Pupils under instruction in the Education D~partment, for the years 1900 to 1909. Total Expenditure on Education including Technical Institute and excluding Grants. Go,ernTechni-ment cal In-Total. Schools. stitute. $ $ $ 56,233 ... 56,238 67,072 67,072 "73,291 73,291 112,780 112,780 115,701 116,701 118,785 118,785 118,952 2,731 121,683 142,072 7,755 149,827 157,366 9,891 167,257 154,626 9,379 16-l,005 Total Revenue from Education Average of Pupils under includfng Technical Institute. Instruction. -GovernTechui/ Govern~Techuiment cal InTotal. ment cal In13chools. stitute. Schools. stitute. ---$ ,~. $ c. s c. No. No. No. 30,033.85 ... 30,033.85 1,750 3,870 ... 29,802.15 29,802.15 1,557 3,197 32,422.35 32,422.35 1.66! 3,107 34,366.30 34,366.30 1,618 3,542 36,251.59 36,251.59 1,665 3,305 41,201.50 ... 41,201.50 1,797 3,526 ... 46,436.07 645.00 4i,081.07 1,932 3,564 191 49,238.00 2,184:50 51,422.50 2,144 3,780 253 54,791.11 3,742.00 58,533.11 2,25! 3,927 317 68,204.25 3,699.50 71,903.75 2,326 4,234 256 Average Cost per pu,pil. GovernTcchni-ment Grant. cal In-Schools. stitute. $ c. $ c. $ c. 14.97 6.14 .. 23.93 6.22 24.56 6.14 48.48 5.37 47.71 10.86 43.17 11.31 37.53 11.34 10.92 I 43.30 11.10 22.01 45.57 12.35 19.39 37.15 13.07 22.18 Percentage / Percentage of ; of Revenue Revenue to : to Expenditure! Expenditure I excluding Technical I Institute. I I ---lo i 53-40 i I 44-43 I I 44 I 34"45 31 3~ 39 34'65 34 44 i I ncluding Technical nstitute. O/o 38 34 34-99 43 I

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-M30Table V. Percentage of Colonial Revenue spent on Education. ____ ___;_ _________________________ Total Revenue Total spent on Years. excluding Percentage. Land Sales. Education. -----$ $ '%, 1900, ............... 3,235,330 79,994 2 1901, ............... 3,973,578 86,946 2'.18 1902, ............... 4,329,712 92,356 2U 1903, ............... 4,728,692 130,620 2 1904, ............... 6,322,949 151,589 2~ 1905, ............... 6,526,144 158,678 2:i 1906, .............. 6,622,070 159,37:3 2 1907, ............... 6,442,530 184,028 2 1908, ................ 6,03,849 205,875 :Ml 1909, ti,286,833 219,35H 3 -----~--------

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Table VI A. Ox.for,! Local Examinations, HJOU. l'l
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Qnecns College. ; Table VI B. Oxford Locals. -------. ------------------------------------Diocesan Boys'. Diocesan. Girls'. St. Joacph's. Victoria British tichool. St St h I St. Stephen's ep en s. G"iI j I S. Private I Tuit.lon. Total. ----------------1---,----1----, ______ ----~-Year. 1905, ............ 6 4 1906, ............ 2 ll 1907, 2 3 1908, ............ 3 3 1909, .......... 6 19 12 ; 2 8 7 I i 8 5 4 3 8 3 4 8 6 3 4 11 10 a 3 8 3 2 4 ... I 2 I 1 6 9 16 I 6 I 7 I 14 151 ... 2 2 2 1 ::: I::: 4 4 6 3 i ... ... I 6 .. I -1 --2 1 9 17 34 9 I 16 2i 14 12 30 20 39 25 I 35 44 38 I

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M33Table VII A. Examination Results, 'l'echuir:alInstitute, ,Tune, 1909. '""g Passed Percentage QJ i:l SubjectR. Stage. .0 with Passed. Failed. of 8 S ::, Distinction. Passes. ;,!. M [,a --------------Building Coni .o/o s\ruction, ......... 11 3 1 2 0 100 I ;) 0 ;{ 2 6,l Fiehl f'urveying, \ I 7 0 ij 2 71 Machine Drawing,; II 5 4 0 100 [ 8 4 2 2 75 Steam, .............. lI r, 2 2 1 80 I J ;{ 0 2 I 66 Mechanics:-....... [ JI 2 1 1 0 100 I 7 2 :, 2 71 Mathematics, ...... I II r, 0 3 2 GO I I 21 0 10 11 47'6 I Chemistry:-I 'l.'heoretic1.l, ...... I II 1 1 0 0 JOI) [ { u 3 I 7:) Practical, ......... : II ;j :i 0 0 100 I I () 1 8 0 100 I Pl I 10 2 7 I 90 1ysics, ............ 1 Teachers' Class, ... I 24 :l 13 8 66 ]J;nglish, ............. II 8 0 6 2 75 I 11 0 8 3 72 Fl'encli, ............... II ;) l 4 f) 100 I 4 I 2 I 75 Book-keeping ....... I 3 0 :l I 6fl Shorthand, Pre. 11 3 8 u IOU Elc, H 3 9 2 8Vi Adv. a l I :i 40 ---------------__ ____ ------~-----,---i----! Tutal, ......... I l S3 :rn 10;, 4;, 75

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-M ;;4 -Table VII B. Heveuue aml Ex.peu
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-M35Annexe A. (;OURSE OF lNSTHUC'TJON FOR DISTRICT SCHOOLS. CLASS VIII. 1. Rerul-ing.-Accurate pronunciation and explanation of text of:(a.) The Royal School Primer. (b.) The Royal Reader No. 1. (c.) The Regina Reading and Object Lesson SheetR, First Series. 2. Writing:l. Dictation (from Header). U. Sentence Building, with special reference to (a.) Object Lessons (see No. 6 below). (b.) Pictures (Pictorial Language Series, No. 1). III. Copy Books (Vere Foster's, Medium Series, Nos. 1-5). :1. Recitation.-To recite about 40 lines selected from Reader. 4. Colloquial :I. According to List of Verbs (Appendix A 1). II. From Pictures (Pictorial Language, Series No. l, and Regina Reading ancl Object Lesson Sheets, No. 1). 5. Geography:-'I. Plan of School and neighbourhood. II. Cardinal Points. Object Lessons.-Cat., Clock, Compass, Cow, Dog, Hen, Horse, Pig, Sheep, Slate. 7. Arithmetic :-I. Notation and Numeration. II. The Four Simple Rules. III. Mental (to preface each lesson). CLASS vn. 1. Reading.-Slow and distinct reading and explanation of:(a.) The Royal Reader No. 2. (b.) The Regina Reading and Object Lesson Sheets, Second Seiies.

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MJti ') ff1ili11g :-I. Dit:tation (from Reader). Jl. Composition on easy subjects with speeinl reference to (a.) Object Lessons (see N'o. 7 below). (b.) Pictures (Pictorial Language Series ~o. 2). III. Copy Books (Vere Foster's, Medium Series, Nos. f}. and 7 ). :1. Reeiiation.-To recite about 50 lines selected from Reacler. 4. Grn1111nur.-Nouns and Verb (to pick ont). i'i. Collol)_uial :-I. According to List of Verbs (Appen
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M i.~7 --4. Ummnwi :--I. The Parti; of Hpeech (to pick out). U. Number, Gender and Person of Nouns and Pronouns. G. Colloqwial :-I. According to List of Verbs (Appendix A 3). II. :From Pictures (Pictorial Language Series, No. 3). U. Geography :I. General Geography of China. IT. Kwong Tung Province in detail. lIJ. Trade Houtes. 7. Object LessOH8 :Coal, Cot.ton, Electric Tram, Gold, Iron, Paper, Ship building, Sugar, Silk, and Wood. 8. cl 1itluoetic :--1. Reduction of Weights and Measures. ll. L. ('. "i\L and G. C. M. I IT. Four Hules of Decimals. IV. Mental (to preface each lesson). !l. II.11r1ic11e.--Course of1Hygiene-Elementary. Cus:-; V l. l?1iacl,:11u.-Intelligent reading and explanation of:(n.) Royal Header Ko. 4. (b.) Couse of Hygiene-Elementary. 2. Writ,:ny :-1. (Di!'.tation (from Healler). 11. Letter \Vriting (to contain at least 50 words). Ill. Simple Essays. l V. Copy Books (Vere Foster's, Medium Series, Nos. 9 aml 10). :-J. Uecitatiun.-To recite about 100 lines selected from Reader. 4. Um.111111cir :-I. Analysis and Parsing of simple sentences. II. English Prefixes. 5. Geography:-I. General Geography of Asia. II. China in detail. 111. (a.) Day and Night, (b.) Seasons, (c.) Latitude and Longitude.

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-M38 (i. Oh,ieet J,c8.s//11.s :-Cork, Fur, Glass, Knife. Lead-peueil, Leather, :-:eedlc, Pen, Soap, Sponge. i. J1ith111cl.ie.-Yulgar Fnwtions. 8. Al0elm1. -Addition, Subtraction, l\Jultiplieation and Divisi011, (Simple Exercises). 9. Geomctry.-The follow:ng or similar
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-M397. A ithmel:,:e :I. Praetice and Bills. [ l. Square Measures. HI. Simple Proportion. IV. Simple Interest. 8. !Ugcbm.-Up to Simple Equations (induding G.C.M., L.O.1\L Easy Fractions and simple equations containing an unknown quantity and problems producing such equations). (See Syllabus for Oxford Local Preliminary.) 9. Ucomet1y.-The Rubject Matters of Euclid, Book 1, Proposi tions 4-ll, 8, 13-16, 18, 19. (See Syllabus O.L.P.). LO. llyr.1,:c,w.-Oomse of Hygiene-Elementary.

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~-M JI 1 -=-~ a fi.il I X 14 X jff E JJJ Jt,~ fffllh Eli )i;J;,lfc w PJJ $ !iiif "*ii 11 ~'PJ !l!N ~--~-L~til Ifflmi 5R ,..,.,,...,.._ rv, -~ if""'\""' rv'ar""\ ffi J:{E~ ;{fJfl ~ff :t 1-F. .f121:Ef-ff ~tiL fl itlll m-:f= ;gam Ji A*~ -*.::. --1:;-l\** 11*::. fJfAJ ill ill* f'llrn fflpq ill ifi ..L. -.,, iii! itti, 1Jl.ii :g II V 4' "1 I; tt--a-1t~ 1fii'~~ ;Jt. ZtJ:llc Z;t;;~ ltZ =ff$ lit<:
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--M4::? --Tr1111sl11lio11 of 8y7ln7m;; fm tl1e Ohi11<'se Dirision. ULASS IV. 1. He11rli11y.-Healli11g and Explanatio11 of: (11.) National Headers No. III and lV. (b.) Outlines of History, Vol. VIT, (Presen1 DyHasty). 5!. n-riti11u:-l. Dictation (frmit National Readns). U. Transcription JlI. Cop? Book (selected). IV. f:lentence composing 011 giYeu words (l or 2). Y Questions on General Intelligen<'e with special reforcrn:!' to Readers. Uus:,; Ill. ]. Rc(l(/inu.---Heading.and Explanation of:----(a.) National Reader Nos. V and 1T (Ii.) Classics on Filial DntiPs. 2. lhiti'.ny :-I. Dictation (from Xational Headeni). Tl. Transcription Ill. Copy Book (selected). TV. 8entence composing on given wordR (2 m 3). Y. Letter Writing (Simple, Social). Yl. (~uestions on General Intellige1we "-ith special reference to Readers. ::\. l~'.i:pla11ation of:T. Letter Writer (seleetecl). fl. Ur:unmar for Beginnen,. ULASS li. 1. He1.1cli11g.--Reading and Explanation of:-~ational Readers Nos. VIT and VIIT. 2. 1Vrfring :-[. Dictation (from Readers). JJ. Transcription III. Copy Book (selected). IY. Essays. V Questions on General Intelligence \Yith special reforencE to Readers.

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M 4;3 -3. Nxplanato,y Lec/.we.~ on selecte
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(Stand, (Sit, (Open, (Shut, (Pick, (Put, Accept, Advance, Allow, Answer, Approach, Arouse, Arrive, Ascend, Attack, Attend, Balance, Bear, Beckon, Borrow, Choke, Choose, Clasp, Cling, Collect, Commence, Abstract, Advance, Arrange, Barter, Blindfold, Brandish, Capsize, Chastise, Chatter, Command, Compare, Compress, Connect, Converse, Crease, Crumble, (Laugh, (Ory, (Lie down, (Get up, (Pour, (Drink, Compel, Conceal, Convey, Copy, Curl, Damage, Damp, Depart, Descend, Destroy, Detach, Divide, Elevate, Employ, Enclose, Escape, Examine, Expand, Fasten, Finger, Decamp, Demolish, Describe, Disappear, Eject, Embrace, Encircle, Endeavour, Envelop, Extract, .Gallop, Immerge, Impede, Initiate, Inspect, Masticate, --M,U-Do11ble ,lcriuu. (Come, (Light, (Blow ont, (Write, (Clean, (Go, (Go, (Lift up, (Put down, (Throw, (Catch, II. Finish, Flatten, Follow, Force, Gather, Grab, Grind, Halve, Hammer, Hand, Hasten, Haul, Heat, Hoist, Hurl, Tnjnre, Lace, Lead, Leap, Listen, IIT. :Measure, l\liemic, Munch, Mutter, ObserYe, Oppose, Perform, Prepare, Pretend, Prevent, Proceed, Pronounce, Prick, Purchase, Pursue, Puzzle, (Come back, Load, Loosen, Lower, Obtain, Pelt, Pierce, Pile, Pinch, Polish, Present, Prick, Pry, Punish, Recall, Reckon, Remove, Repeat, Heopen, Hcplace, Hulile, (Juarrel, (~uench, ReceiYe, RelieYe, Render, Rouse, Serawl, Separate, Shape, Slide, Squat, Take aim, Tease, Transcribe, Transport, Tremble, ('l'ie, (Untie, (Rneeze, (Wipe, (Order, (Obey. Salute, Scrape, Search, Seize, Select, Shiver, Show, Shuffle, Sketch, Stride, Spread, Stroll, Supply, Svting, Thrust, Tickle, Tramp, Travel, Tread, Whistle. Trot, Twine, Twirl, Underline, Undo, Unfix, Unite, Utter, Vacate, Vanish, Water, \Vedge, Weigh, Whirl, Whisper, Withdraw.

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-M ,15 APPENlllX B. Method of 'f'earltiu "J\ction Verb8" in 1lppendi;e A. These verbs need not necessarily be taught in the order given ; but may be arranged to suit each teacher's convenience, Three boys are chosen and named 1st, 2nd and 3rd. The 1st one performs the action, e.g., Stand and exclaims, "I am standing up". The 2nd one points to the 1st and exclaims : "You are standing up". The 3rd one looks at his teacher and exclaims : "He is standing up". After a little practice, the sentences can be amplified, e.g., "I am standing up on the form". After the pupils have acquired a knowledge of such verbs as stand, come, open, shut, fold, clean, walk, run, &c., they should be allowed to perform these actions in front of their class without, any prompting from their teacher, DOUBLE ACTION VERBS. These are taught practically in the same manner as above ; but in addition, some of the rules of Verbs are included, e.g., Stancl and Sit:. 1st boy exclaims "1 shall (or am going to) stand up". 2nd "You will (or are_going to) stand up". :frd ,, "He will (or is going to) stand up". 1st 2nd 3-rd 1st 2nd 3rd 1st 2nd 3rd 1st 2nd 3rd 1st 2nd :3rd 1st 2nd 3rd ,, I am standing up ". "You are standing up": "He is standing up ". "I have stood up". "You have stood up". "He has stood up". "I shall (or am going to) sit down". '' You will (or are going to) sit down", He will ( or is going to) sit down ", "I am sitting down". "You are sitting down". "He is sitting down". "I have sat down". "You have sat down". He has sat down ". "I have been standing up", "You have been standing up". <, He has been standing up".

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--M4fi APPENDIX C. ~ubject. Text Books used. Publisher. Reading, ............ Royal Rchool Serie~, Primer and No. l to No. 5, ..... .. ...... ... ..... ... .. ... ... ........ T. Nelson & Sons. Regina Reading and Objeci Lesson Sheets, 1st. and 2nd Series, ....... .. ........ ..... Gcol'gc Gili & Som. Writing, ............ Vere l!'oste1,.8 New Civil Service Copy hooks, No. 1 to No. 11, ...................... 1 Blackie & Son. Grammar, .......... J. C. Nestield's Idiom, Grammar and Synthesis, Books Ill and IV, ............... ; .Macmillan & Co., Lei. Colloquial,. ........ Pictorial Language Series, No. l to No. 3, ... : The '\-Velsh Educational Publishing Co. Geography, .... Meiklejohn's New Geography, 36th :edition. Meiklejohn & Holden. Arithmetic, ......... Loney's Arithmetic for Schools, .............. i Macmillan & Co., Ld. Algebra, ............ Hall and Knights l!:lemcnt.nr.v Algebra, .... 1 Macmillan & Co., Ld. l Hygiene, ............ Course of Hygiene, Elementary, ............. Noronhn & Co. Willoughby's Hygiene for Students, ...... .. l\facrnillan & Co., T.cl. Geometry, .......... John Canoll's Practical Geometry for Art I Students, ..................................... Burns & Oates, Ld. Hall and Stevens' School Geometry, ......... I Macmillan & Co., Ld. I Annexe B. HOUGH NOTES FOR SERIES OF LECTURE8 ON "EMPIRE", ETC. 1. Brief history tracing growth of Empire, and causes which led to it. The three phases through which the sentiment in regard to Colonies has passed :( a.) The old idea of subordinate and tribute paying coun tries. Compare Adam Smith and the "Plantations" -and causes of American War and loss of the States. (b.) Phase when the Colonies were considered useless and an incubus. Compare the Commission of 1865. ( c.) Modern idea. Generally. 2. The Modern idea in detail. The various forms of Govern ment and object underlying all. Difference between "Dominions" and Crown Colonies, and Protectorates :( n .) Dominions as "Sister States", advantages in Union for Trade and Defence. Limits of obligation-" the Silk er:. Cord ".

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--M 47 ---(b.) Crown Colonies. Tropical and Non-Tropical (radieal dilference in treatment). Advantages of Home Supre macy. S. of S. trustee for Posterity, for the Native races, and for Continuity. Bechuanaland, Swaziland, etc. (c.) Protectorates. Indian Native States. :Modern development of idea. How they differ from Colonies,-and inter .~e. The "Sphere of Influence "-Protertorate in Africa, Cyprus, etc. :1. Duties of a Citizen at Home and Abroad : ( n.) Towards the Empire. (b.) Towards other nations. I. Duties of Defence and of carrying out general policy (See Patriotism). II. Duties of Maintaining characteristics of England and her Prestige. Not invoking quarrels. 4. Patriotism. What is it ? Why it is necessary r What have we got to be patriotic about. How patriotism can be associated with cosmopolitan sympathy. Labour movements, etc. Difference be tween Patriotism and Insularity. (Compare ,Japan.) 5. Advantages of Empire. i\Iutual Defence. Trade. Outlets for all Classes. Contrast with countries which have no Empire. Moral effect. Enlargement of views. G. Causes of decadence in Empires. Compare Rome, Spain and Portugal. ( n.) Selfish aims and pursuit of wealth. (b.) Denying the Colonies and dependencies free liberty of growth, and a sufficient autonomy. (c.) Non-recognition of obligations to subject races. (d.) Decline in morals and patriotism. 7. Ideals of Empire. ( a.) Justice the key note. (b.) Bond of Union for defence. Detailed causes of permanence of Empire, and contrast with those which have gone before. (e.) Continuity of policy essential. ( d.) A nation must send its best men to administer. (e.) The Public good must alone prevail not the benefit of the the individual. .8. Symbols of the Empire:-(1.) The Flag. Its origin and meaning. Regimental Colours. (2.) The National Anthem. Its origin and value. (3.) Empire Day. Its watchwords and object. (4.) The toast "'l'he King", and sentiment for Royalty. Effective link between all portions of the Empire.

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9. Results of Empire. Greater liberty and freedom under the British Flag than under any other in the world. More stlthle govern ment. Good Police. Jnstiee. Little or no corruption as comparec! "ith other states. ( 1.) (::?.) Betterment of subject races. Compare Africa Rlave-tracle, etc., and India Suttee, et(. Education. Must be practical and adapted to prOlluce useful men and women. Compare India. Hongkong University. (3.) Home Trade. Emigration. 'readies self-reliance. 10. Hongkong in its relation to the Empire:Coaling Station and X:wal Base. Outport for trade with Chi11a. British population ephemeral,-Chinese permanent. What Hongkong ~wcs to the Imperial connection. Compare development with l\facao. What Hongkong can do in return .. Imperial policy as it affcf'ts Ho11gko11g. Opium, ck. ] l. The Power of the Empire>-Reeent co-operation gifts to the ~aYy. The Imperial General Staff, etc. Annexe C. The Eveni11g Classes at the Tech11ical Institute openetl for the year on February 15th and closed for the Summer Vacation on JunP19th. At the P-nd of the Session in June, examinations were conducted by examiners not connected in any way with the Institute. Thirty three candidates "Passed with Distinction". A Distinction Certifi cate is awarded when the Student gains 80 per cent. of foll marks. Cher 75 per cent. of the candidate:-; passed. The Institute reopened after the Summer Vacation on October 5th, 1909, and the Term closed on January 31st, 1910, when an examination was held by the Lecturers, the papers being submitted to the Director. The work was found to he in eYer_\ respect sat"isfaetory. Cl1e111iwl and Physical Lu.lwratmics.~Thc Laboratories haYe, as in former years, been used regularl,, by the Hongkong College of Medicine, in return for an annual payment of $300 to the Institute. This sum, together with the Grant of $1,100 made by the Li Shing Scientific College, has enabled us to increase the stock of Physical, Mechanic-al ancl Chemie-al Apparatus, Diagrams anrl Cliarts, so that the Laboratory is n01Y ,rnll equipped and in a wr,1 satisfactor,1 eonclition.

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-M49 A statement of expenditure with reference to the College of Medicine contribution is given in Table VIII. Teachers' Olass.-This Class, commenced in December, 1908, has proved very successful, and is also very popular, notwithstanding that attendance is compulsory on all Junior. Chinese Assistant Masters in Government and Grant Schools. Shorthand and Typew1iting.-Shorthancl has proved popular. The Elementary Class has increased in numbers to such an extent that it has become necessary to divide it into two sections. Lectures have been given on Typewriting, and facilities are afforded for practice on the Typewriter. Work in this direction is, however, hampered by the lack of a sufficient number of machines suitable for the use of Students. l!Jeonomics.-Mr. Stuart J. Fuller, B. L., Acting Consul-General for the United States of America, very kindly offered to deliver a Course of Lectures on "The Elements of Economics". Students on the roll of the Institute were admitted free of charge to these Lectures; others were charged a nominal fee of $2.00 for the Course. In this Course, consisiting of 10 Lectures, Mr. Fuller outlined in brief and simple language the main principles of EconomieR. There was an average attendance of 25!5 at these Lectures. Hongkong Sanitary Institute.-In March the Hongkong Nanitary Institute, which since 1905 had provided Lectures on Sanitary 8nb jects with the object of preparing candidates for the examinations of the Royal Sanitary Institute of Great Britain, was amalgamated with the Technical Institute. The Sanitary Institute presented itR library, models, charts and furniture to the Technical Institute, together with a sum of $90, which hm, since been utilised for the pm-chase of ~anitation Apparatus. Scini.tation.-A Class in Sanitation was formed in October, Dr. Franeis Ulark, Medical Officer of Health, having kindly volun teered to deliver a Course of Lectures. The majorjty of those in attendance at this Class propose to enter for the examinations of the Royal Sanitary Institute to be held early in 1910. Annexe D. His Excellency the Governor distributed the prizes at most of the principal schools of the Colony. Brief summaries of his remarks. are given below. DISTRICT ScnooLs (31st January). His Extellency drew attention to the recent increase in the size of the builclings ancl in the numbers of the Staff, which however still proved inadequate to meet the number of pupils i:;eeking admission. Saiyingpun was the third largest school in the Colony au
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DwcESAN Boys' Scnoot. (28th ,January). His Excellency expressed his pleasure at the strength of the Staif in relation to the number of pupils, and at the increase in the number of boarders. Mrs. Piercy's retirement from the position of matron would be deeply felt. Addressing tlw bo)'S, His Excellenr:y spoke npon the s1tbject of perseveranee. ST. ,1 oSEPH's CoLI,EGE (23rd December). His Exrnllency congratulated the school on their success at the Oxford Local examinations, emphasising the necessity for a good kumdedge of English in Yiew of the early opening of the University. After referring to the advantage of a knowlege
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Appendix O. REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS. Expend,,:ture. 1. The mnount8 rnted, as compared with those actually expended hy the Department nndcr tlrn various headings were as follows:I Amounts \'Otecl. I Actual -------------Expenditure. : Supplemen j Iu l,st1mates. tary Votes. j I :::; ,, 8 Total. 8 (i) Personal ~]1_110,l~ments and I Other Cha1ges, ............... 1 ,Ha,Ul0.00 10,558.00 324,468.00 i 292,018.30 (iiJ Annually Recurrent Works, I 433,000.00 38,810.00 471,810.00 I 409,902.85 (iii) Extra01clinary Works, ... 1 1,0-12,GU0.00 I 713,829.40 1,118,429.40 1,214,498.28 1---:-------------!----Total, ............. ::-;, 1,789,510.00 125,197.40 1,914,707.40' 1,916,419.49 I ------------------------Detailed statements oI (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and 13. With regard to (i), the saving is due to vacancies in the Staff, lapsing pay of officers on leave and refunds on account of supervision of work executed by the Department for various public companies. ln the casa of (ii), the following were the sub-heads under which the principal savinga occurred:Maintenance of Buildings in New Territories, ... $ :.\faintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c., ... Maintenance of Public Cemetery, ... Dredging l<'oreshores, .Miseellaneons Senites, ... ::'IIaintenance of City and Hill District vVaterworks, Water AcC'ount (Meters, &c.), 2,476.96 1,783.44 2,885.28 4,255.35 3,278.24 13,975.34 11,331.92. 'l'he saving on Dredging Foreshores was due to less dredging being done than usual owing to frel[Uent typhoon scares and ne cessary repairs to the dredger ; that on Miscellaneous Services to the withdrawal of many charges such as had previously been defrayed from this vote; that on :Maintenance of City and Hill District Water works to less pumping.being done than was provided for; and that on Water Account to its not being found possible to greatly extend the meter system owing to the available staff being engaged on the supervision of the rider main system which was in operation for nearly 9 months. Excesses occurred in two sub-heads only, namely :-Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,... $21,700.25 Maintenance of Kowloon Waterworks, .. 1,585.34.

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-0:!-The ex
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-0 3 Land Sales and Surveys. 2. Land 8ales, Ea:len,.~ion.~, Ura:nls, &c.-The following tabulated statement gives particulars of these :-i No. OF LoTs., AREA IN SQ. FEE~~ __ A_~_N_i:_AL RENT. i Total. I Total. Total. ;'!'(Ill'.~ IJ.11 A11f'ii111,. Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula, ..... N. T., New Kowloon, .. Southern District, '.'. Northern Sil1s 1l'itlumt Auction. Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula, ..... Ne1v Territories, ........ l!a:t1n.iimi G,,, nted. Island of Hongkong, .. Kowloon Peninsula, ..... New Territories, ........ G1ants on .Nom.inal '/frms. Island of Hongkong, .. Kowloon Peninsula, ...... 11 New Territories, ......... (tm11ts on Slwrt LP(l,X{'.~. Island of Hongkong, .. Kowloon Peninsula, ..... '.1ew Territories, .. .. Pe,,wilx fo 111upy Land: fo, Slwrt Perinrl, ,J-c. Island of Hongkong, .. Kowloon Peninsula, ..... X. T., New Kowloon, .. ,. let by A.L.O., Southern District, .. ,, let by A.L.O., Xo1ihern District, .. H.rt11M~ion.fl ('f 8/unt Pti"i"d L1aes to 75 J!l'fl1'S, Island of Hongkong, .. ~ewloon Peninsula, ... ~ew Territories, ....... (l,11arr!I Lwuws. Island of Hongkong, .. ~owloon Peninsula, ..... 1 T., New Kowloon, ... i illi 1in_q L-iccnc,e.,. .j ______ _! ___ __ ___ I 7 2 1 66 I 187 2 2 1 2 1 2 l 313 13:i 223 161 i I 263 2 3 3 ., .. l!J7 i ---11,020 1 1 59,737 105,782 31,836 112,820 7,863,514 6,020 .. ... ----!J08 718 .. --6,605 4,080 ... ----31,872 9,900 ... ---2 ----8,173,689 6,020 1,626 10,685 41,772 $ (', 280.00 606.00 18.00 82.58 342.09 I 14.00 I ... ----1 6.00 I 26.00 I .. -----2.00 1.00 ... -----17,700.00 114.00 $ c. 1,328.67 14.00 32.00 3.00 :.:_ __ : 17,814.00 5,727.02 6,466.38 2,652.10 300.00 544.00 ----! 15,690.40 500.00 : 165.00 i ___ I 665.00 PREl!IJ;)l, Total. ----,------$ $ 13,483.00 1 15,968.00* 500.00 i 1,405.00 3,175.00 ----134,531.00 829.00 .. ----829.00 327.45 108.00 .. ----435.45 .. ---. .. ----New Territories, Northern District, ... j 1 27,878,400 250.00i ... ,-1 ---27,878,400---1 250.00 t----1 ... ---Total, ............ [ __ ----~,306 36,112)92 i 35,797fil 35,795.45 Includes an amount of $15,830 t.o be paid by four equal annual instalments, the first of which was not paid until January, 1910. A payment of $25 for boundary stones for the lot was also made in January, 1910.

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-04-The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $40,665.14 or very much less than the Estimate which amounted to $150,000. It included the following sums which do not appear in the above tabulated statement :-Premium derived from sale of right to erect piers, ........................... $14,401.90 Fees for Boundary Stones to mark lots, ~21.00 Re-adjustments in Hongkong an
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-----0 5 8. Pe1its tu or,,u11!J lancl /01 sl101t z1e1iocls.--These were ai:; usual of a very miscellaneous character and are too numerous to admit of individual mention ; most of them were for small arem; to be held ,11rnrterly. 9. F.:.r:,ten.~ions of Shol'I; Pe1-iocl LerrneN to 75 yea:iw.-There is nothing to repoi-t under this heading. 10. Qua1'1'y J_,r,;rrnes.-A Quarry at To Ti \Van on the South side of the Island was leased for a term of two years commencing from the 1st Mar<'h, 1909. The lease of Quarry No. 6 at Ngau Tau Kok, New Territories, was extended for six months, the lessee being subsequently allowed to remain "in occupation until the end of the year on a monthly permit. 11. Jii11ing Licences.----During the year a Mining Licence was issued for an area of one square mile in the vicinity of Ho Ching Village, New Territories. 113. NcsHmptions.-Extcnsive resumptiom, for railway purposes were undertaken, Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 443, 1,140 and 1,141, containing a total area of 159,527 square feet, being acquired for $438,699.25. An area of 10,225 square feet was resumed from Mari'ne Lot 29 by private treaty for the sum of $20,451.50, partly for the purpose of constructing a new road from Queen's Road East 10 Praya East and partly for seavenging lanes provided in accordance with the requirements of the Buildings Ordinance. An area of 6 Mows (Tai Hang Lot 77) was resumed at a cost of $37.50 for the extension of Queen's Recreation Ground; another small area (the remaining portion of Mongkok Lot 55), containing 11,520 square feet, was resumed by priYate treaty for the Kowloon-Canton Railway at a cost of :;.:41.00 and a third area, 73,177 square feet, was resumed from Kowloon Farm Lot 4 by private treaty for $13,690, in connection with the extension of Argyle Street, Kowloon. The following lots in Hongkong and Kowloon were resumed for non-payment of Crown Rent, 1;iz. :-Aplichau Inland Lot 25, Kow loon Inland Lots 977, 1,082, 1,083 and 1,084, J\Iongkok Lots 54 and 56, Sai Kung Inland Lot 37, and Sai Kung Farm Lot 3. In the Southern District of the New Territories, 116 lots "-ere resumed by the Assistant Land Officer, of which 26 were acquired for public purposes and 90 were Yoluntarily surrendered. Particulars of the resumptions effected in the Northern Distriet will be found in the Land Officer's report. 13. Lea.~e Plans.-Plans and particulars (in duplicate) of 148 lots and 6 piers were forwarded to the Land Officer in connection with the issue of leases. Notable among these were the plans of practically the whole of the T_aikoo property at Quarry Bay, in which extensivereadjustments were made in connection with the large works carried out during recent years. 14. Boiincla:1y Stones. 13oundary Stones were fixed for U lots in Hongkong, 16 in Kowloon ancl 2 in the New Territories.

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--06 15. Swteys.-Many surveys of considerable exteut were undertaken for the purpose of defining the boundaries of lots or preparing Sale or Lease Plans. The most extensirn works of this nature were surveys of the whole of the Green Island Cement Oo.'s property at Deep Water Bay inchiding an area of about 5~ acres applied for for obtaining a supply of clay in connection with their works: Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.'s property at East Point (Marine Lot 52): Farm Lots 70 and 71 at Pokfulam : a large area between the Albany .Filter Beds and May and Peak Huads for the issue of new leases: the proposed site for the Hongkong University: traverses of Conduit and Robinson Roads including the whole of Inland Lots 1,544, 1,712, 1,801, &c., for the issue of leases: and certain new lots for l\Iessrs. Butterfield & Swir0 at Quarry Bay. Extensive su1Teys have also been carried out in Kowloon, practically the whole of the W estem and Southern portions of the Peninsnla haYing been surveyed and partially plotted on the New Orduanee Sheets to the scale of 1/2,400 and 1/600. This work has been considerably delayed owing to sickness amongst the staff and the necessity of withdrawing surveyors for other urgently required surveys. Progress was made with the New Triangulation of the Colony which ,rns extended to Taipo, and, in connection with it, two bases were carefnll.v measured, one at Taipo having a length of 2,168 feet and the other at Ngau Shi Wan, New Kowloon, having a length of 2,270 feet, steel tapes being used for this purpose. As there was some douht as to the correctness of the existing Standards of length in the Colony, a certified 100-foot "Konstat" wire was requisitioned from England and on its arrival the two bases were re-checked and a considerable difference was found to exist between the two series of measurements, which, if the Konstat" meas1ll"ements are accepted as correct., will necessitate a re-solution of the whole triangulation. Nineteen main triangulation stations liave been fixed in Hongkong, Kowloon and the New Terri tories and 18 minor stations, mostly in Kowloon; 24 main triangles and 29 minor triangles have been observed and 2 Azimuths checked. One suneyor is partially engaged on this \York at present. 16. Sites fur booths nl the Race Cou1se.-A sum of $5,060 was realized by the letting of sites for the erection of booths and stands at Happy Valley during the Hace Meeting. 17. Squatters' Lieenee.~.-During the year the claims of all the outstanding squatters were heard and adjudicated upon by the Squatters' Board and, where the claims were good, recommendations for the issue of Crown Leases were forwarded to Government. The number of Yillages dealt with was 29. All Squatters' Licences were r~ancelled at the encl of the :,;ear and the work of the Squatters' Roard was completed. 18. Militcwy L,.1,11d6.-Surveys were made and Agreements prepared for the Sanitarium and Reserye at :i\fagazine Gap, Victoria Battery, Stonecutters' Island (for which the W.D. plan was accepted) and a Position Finding Cell aboYe the old Dock Battery. The fol lowing areas of War Department land were handed back to the Colonial Government, Agreements being prepared accordingly :Kowloon Dock Battery; 4 Kowloon Garden Lots; the old Time Ball

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07 -Station at Kmvloon Point; :'llt. Cochrane, Kowloon ; Gascoigne aud .Jordan !loads, Kowloon; and various areas on the gast, West and :-;orth sides of King's Park, Kowloon, classed as Building Land. As the 1;esult of quarrying operations, Mount, Cochrane is fast disappearing and the area occupied by the hill will become available for building purposes. A s:nall area containing about 360 square feet, being a portion of the lVIilitary Cantonment near Arsenal Street, was handed over to the Colonial Government for the purpose of constructing a Urinal, the value of the site at $1.00 per square foot being credited to the 'vVar Department in the Colonial Military Lands Account. Permission was granted for the following encroachments, viz. : ( l.) By Wa, Department on Coloniul Ooi:emment Lcind. (a.) 2 Datum Points on Lamm1. and Kau I Chau Islands. (b.) Rifle range (300 yards) situated South-east of Sanitarium Reserve. (c.) 'l'wo Jalousies to the Army Ordnance Store which project over the footpath in Queen's Road East near Arsenal Street. (2.) By Colonial 001:einm.ent on lVm Dep<11't1nenf; Lancl. Telephone Pole. on vYar Departmeut Land at Murray Battery. 19. Xtu:a/. Luncl8.-'l'he only item nuder thi:-i heading was an ('twroaehrnent b, tho Nnrnl Authorities at Lai Chi Kok. ~ew Kowloon, lJy the crectiu11 of a beacon, granted Oil payment of :::1.00 1wr annum. 20, l'ie1.~. --The right of erecti11g piers Llmler luug lcai:;es was granted in one case in Hongkong and in three in Kowloon. An extension of one permanent pier in the l\'ew Territories was granted. Licences for the following temporary piers for rnrious periods were issued :-10 in Hongkong, 8 in Kowloon and 12 in the New Territories. Licence:; were also issued or renewed for 9 slipways in Hongkong, 4 iu Kowloon and one iu the Xew Territories, the fees for whieli amounted to $2,040. The permia cleriYetl iu respect of pier rights mnountetl to $7,721.90 for permanent piers and $6,680 for temporary piers. 21. C!emele1ies.---Duri11g the .rear the Uornrnment Cemetery at Cheung Chau Island, New Territories, was surrnyed and stones fixed, the revised area being 5 acres. Work under the Buildings Ordinance. 22. 1lmending 01'Clnance, 1908.-'l'he two additional OYerseers mentioned in last year's report were appointed during the year. 23. ~11nendi11g01dhwnec, 1909.-A forthcr amending Ordinance which dealt principally with the transfer of certain duties from the Registrar General's Department to the Sanitary Department and the exhumation of bodies Lut which also
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--08 24. J->la,ni1.-The munber 0 plans dealt with shews an incraese as compared with 1908, the greatest difference being in the number deposited or alterations and additions to existing buildings. The following is a tabulated statement 0 those deposited during the year, the figures 0 1908 being given in a parallel column or pur poses of comparison:-----------11908. 1909. Inc,'"""I Decrease. i----1 European Houses, -i 18 221 4 Chinese Houses, 104 50 54 Buildings and Structures other i I than above, --88 146 58 Alterations and additions to I existing buildings, J,:305 1,395 !)() i \'eraudahs, I rio I 23 :{Ii -I Balconies, --I :m :{] ] I SunshadcR, 9-) d-2fi i Arem:1, l ., 1 Piers, u 8! I 3 I I --,I I Total, ....... .' .......... 1,6 l,i02: .157 !!7 25. Ce,tijiwles.-Thc following certificates for 11ew buildings were issued :ii9 for 154 domc::;tic building::; under Section 20-! of Ordinanco No. 1 of mm. 5-.1 for 78 non-domest ir building::; or worlrn. 'l'hci;e figures show an increase of 2G in the number of nondomestic buildings certified as compared with 1908, the domestic buildings being one less than in 1908, or a net increase of 25. 26. Notices aml Permits.-Notices relating to structures in a dangerous condition were served in 270 cases, whilst 876 permits, 269 notices of a miscellaneous nature, and 5,349 notices dealing with nuisances reported by the officers of the Sanitary Department were issued. These figures show increases of 127 in the dangerous structure notices ; of 134 in the number of permits issued ; and of 61 in the notices of a miscellaneous nature. The nuisance-notice work having on]>been trarniferred to the PuhliC' Worlrn Department

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--09-during the latter part. of 1908, no useful comparison can be made with the figures for that. year, but. it may be mentioned that the increase amounted to 4,607. The fees collected on account of the issue of permits to obtain sand and stone from Crown land amounted to $1,228.55. 27. Resmnptiuns /01 Sca-i;engi:ny Lanes, d:e.-.A statement of the work done will be :found under the heading Public Works Extra ordinary". 28. JJ.ri1Jcde .Slreel.s.-Resurfacing and other repairs under the provisions of Sections 186 and 187 of the Buildings Ordinance were carried out by this Department atthe cost of the :frontagers in the following streets :-Tsz Mi Alley. Li Yuen Street ~ast.. Li Yuen Street \,Vest. Yuk Sau Lane. 29. Impl'Ovemenls, &c., of P.ublie Stieets.-The new public street, referred to in last year's report, leading from Queen's Road East to Praya East about midway between Arsenal and Ship Streets has been resumed bv the Government and named Gresson Street. The buildings on the adjacent lots (Marine. Lots Nos. 295 and 296 and Inland Lots Nos. 1,797 to 1,800) were nearing completion at the dose of the year and the new street will he formed and opened tn public traffic in clue comse. Schemes for rairiing the leveb qf certain areas in Hongkong aw.l Kowloon have received careful attention, and a number of hom.;e,; ha,o been rebuilt at highe1 level,; in order that lhe ULljoining streets may be raiHed whenever practicable. 30, Pootways.-Attention has been given to the footways under balconies and ,erandahs. Numerous notices have been served calling upon owners to repair such footways and in Beveral cai;es the ne cessary work has been carried out by this Department and the cost thereof recovered from owners. ln most cases the areas dealt with were ;;mall and are not worthy of specific mention. 31. Typhoon and Rainslo1,n Damage8.-Cornparatively little damage was done to buildings in t1re Colony by typhoons and rain storms. In the typhoon of October 19th there were several small slips uf earth and roofs generally suffered to a slight extent. Nothing uf a very serious nature occurred but the following buihlings in Kowloon were rendered to some extent dangerous :-18 and 19 Fuk Sing Lane. Parts o:f the walls of these houses collapsed. The occupiers had previously been ordered to vacate the premises and no one was injured. 12 Main Street, Fuk Tsun Heung. These premises were considerably damaged but no collapse occurred. 129 Temple Street, Yaumati. The verandah was damagerl and parts were rendered dangerous. 32. Collop8P8.-No serions collapses orcnrred.

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-010a3. 'l'est.~ uj Mort11,1.--.Attention was girnn to the testing of mortar, 169 sample8 being taken from works in progress. Though still not up to the standard desirable, in no case was the quality found to be so inferior as to warrant a prosecution. 34. P1osewtions /01 Dcf eetive Building l\lodi:.-'l'hern were nu cases of a serious nature in which it was found necessary tu take legal proceedings for defective work. 35. Prosecut:io11.~ fm othe1 Nuisauee8.--Legal pro<:eedings were taken in 161 caRes for non-complianee with not.ices issued in connec tion with nuisances reported by oflieers of the Sanitary Department. In the case of 118 of these fines were inflictPd. 36. Oemclerics.-Surveys for the 1.rnrpo;;e of defining the n1rious sections in which each Cemetery has to be Rub-divided were put in hand, but owing to vacancies on the staff the progress made was not satisfactory. The large new Cemetery at Kai Lung wan was completely smTeyed and a detailed plan prepared. Some sections of the Colonial Cemetery were also mapped and a start was made with the smTey of l\fount Caroline Cemetery. "\Vork in connection with forming new terrace:,:, &c., to afford additional grave Hpaces was carried out at Mount: Caroline, Kai Lung Wan, Aberdeen, Kowloon Tong and Ma Tau Wai CemeterieH. I:xhumation was carried ont in accordanee with the usual practice at Ma Tau Wai, Sham Shui Po and Aberdeen Cemeterie8. Questions having arisen a;; to the procedure adoJJted in l'arrying out exhumations, provision was made in the IJnblic Health and Buildings Amendmrnt Ordinallle ol' 1909, specifying the action to ho taken. :Six mont.lrn' notite of i11tontion to carrv ont exhumation has 110w to be gfren and such notiee iu respel't of a large area in 1Iuuut Caroline Cemetery was 1mblii;hed in the Uurcrnmeu/, Gazelle of Septembei 10th, 1909. When cleared, this area will ho laid out in terrace8 for fotnre h1.uials aud it is intendecl to carry out a regular Rystf'm of burial and exhumation in proper rotation at stated in term ls. 37. F1incipul lVu1k.~ !Jy 'l'riwlc Fi1i;.---Messrs. Butterfield & 8wire continued work ou the sea-wall oJ their Shipyard at (~uarr~ Bay and the e1ection of Quarters for their employees at Shanki,rnn \Vest. The latter were approaehing completion. The Standard Oil Company's works at Lai Uhi Kok were completed during the year. Some extensionH hmrnver are still being made. :Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.'s new premises in Pedder Street w,ere completed in September. Work is still in progress on the reconstrnctiou of the southern portion of the Hongkong Hotel. Work on the extension of the Hongkung & Whampoa Dock Co. 'H ):o, 1 Dock at Hunghom was carried on dnring tlw ycm but is llot yet completed.

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---011-Sernral extem;ions of the Green fsland Cement ( '.o.\; workP. .-at Hok Un wp1e made during the year. Among oLhcr 11ork:-; which ha,e been ronune11eed or ,r111;pleted during ilie ~-0nr the following may he mentioned:-----1l'ur7,:.~ i:011rnrn11ced. H Chiue8e houses on I.L. 796, Third Street. ~eamen's Institute on :?ILL. 295, Praya East. -! Semi-Enropean houseH on l\LL. 296, Praya East-. :{ homes and godowns on J.L. 1,588, Whitficld. Ii European houses on K.I.L. 522 R.P. and K.l.L. fi48 8el'. A., :i\athan Hoad, Kowloon. Hospital near Q.B.I.L. 7, Quarry Bay. 4 Chinese houses on K.I.L. 1,211, Shek Shan. Swimming Bath at JHurray Pier for Victoria Recreation Club. Hopo Faetory extension on J.L. 906, Smithfiel
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38. F'irci,.----A serious fire occurred at Shmrn,huipo on the 5th .July when 3(j houses were burnt dowi1 and many more were damaged. A considerable number of houses were shored up by this Department,"and some were pulled down ns they were in a dangerous condition. The cost of these operations was subsec1uently recovered from the owners. There were no casualties in connection with this fire. SeYeral othPr fires oC'curred in the Colony but none "ere of large dimensions. 39, Recl.11111ntiu11.,.--The following is a statemcut of the priva1.<' reC'lamat.ion works in progreRs during the year: ---C!om.zJl.etl'd, );-.K.:M.L. 2. Lai Chi Kok, Dn. iL do., ~.K.LL. 20, Bhamshuipo, Do. 41, do., J 1ea. Sy. ft. 345,028 140,2!50 J 1et1, 811. ft. 22,500 20,2JO The areai-; r:;tated arc those of the lots ,Yhich in semi-al ca:ses extend for some distance forthrr inland than old high water mark, and, though largely so, are not therefore exclusively reclaimed from the sea. [n some mses ad
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-01:-1---'.l\,im 1-lha 'l'fmi Police 8tation-Ueneral repairs aml painting throughout, -$2,505 Government BuildingR Generally-Cleansing drains and repairing and hanging punkahs, 1,898 Victoria Gaol-Supply of materials and repairs, 1,817 Government O~ces-Reconstructing ceilings and repairs, Govemment House--General repairs and external p1inting, Central Market--General repair:.; and limewhiting in-1,779 1,760 ternalh, -1,499 P11blic La11mlrie:.; -(!oluunvaRhing and painting throughout, -1,448 W ancha i 11farket--Reconstrnetiug a portion of the roof. general repair:.; and limewhiting anrl painting throughout, 1,445 Aberdeen Police Station --General repairs and painting throughout, -1,270 Kennedy Town Sheep and Swine JJeput-Limewhiting and tarring t.Iuoughout, -1,248 );n. 8 Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout, -1,230 \'ictoria Hospital-Repairing roof, etc., -1,068 Gough Hill Police Station-General repairs and paint-ing throughout, -1,021 WanC'hai ~tores and <}narten;--General repairs and limewhiting and painting throughout, Shaukiwan Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout, llagistracy--General repairs and painting throughout, ~aiyingpnn Market--General repairs and limewhiting and tarring throughout, (iueen's College-General repairs to woodwork, Mountain Lodge-General repairs and painting throughout, Kowloon Disinfecting Rtatiou-General repairs and painting throughout Kowloon British Rchool-General repairs and painting throughout. Kenned~ Town Hospital-Concreting to Compound and small repairs, Kem1edy Town Cattle Dep
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--01--Branch Prison (Uelilios Reformutory)--Ueneml re1mir;;, limewhiting and painting throughout, -$475 Public l\fortuary-Colomwashing and painting throughout, ~o. 5 Police ~tution--Reconstru<:tioug floon; and small repairt:>, General Post Office and Treasury-General l'epairs, 448 lime'.vhiting and painting throughout, 427 New Wet:>tern l\farket-Limewhiting and tarring internally, Nai,\ingpnm Nchoo~-Corn-reting Compound and small repairs, -Nook11npoo :.\larket-General repair:-; and limewhiting and taning throughout, Hnughom :.\larket.--Small repairi=. and limewhit.ing and painting intemally, Chatham Road, Kos. Hi, 18, 22, 28 and ::\2----General repair:,;, limewhiting and taniug, Yirtoria ~chool-Repairs, }lo11gkoktsui :.\Iarket-General 1epairs aml lirnewhit.ing 427 :180 37!) 360 and tarring throughout, 314. The use of the Branch PriRon, formerly known as the Belilios Reformatory, having been discontinued, the buildings were, with the sanction of the Secretary of State, granted to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge for charitable purposes on certain conditions after being put int-0 a reasonable state of repair. 42. Maintenance o.f Buildings, Sew Te1"1it01"ies.-In the case of the New Territories Buildings, the following are those which entailed considerable expenditure:-Tai Po Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout and alteration to Cells, -$1,766 Sha Tin Police Station-General repairs and painting throughout, 857 Ping Shan Police Station-Repairs, 699 Sheung Shui Police Station--General repairs, painting and colouring &c. throughout, 56:j Tai Po Island (Juartert,;--H,epairs to floors and general repai1R and painting, 542 An Tau Police t-,tation-Repairing; painting and colour-ing throughout, 400. The work on soHH' of these bnildiugt:> was Rtill in progress at the dose of the year. 43. l\Jaint,mrince of l~iuhlho1i8C8.--The following sums were expended upon the various lighthouses :-Gap Rock, $3,246 W aglan, 602 Green Island, 393 Capsuimun, 121 Cape Collinson, 102. The expenditure on Gap Rock Lighthouse included providing and fixing 13 pairs of Muntz Metal Shutters which completed the replacing of the decayed iron ones.

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015 44. Mainlenance o.f Roads and B1idge8 in Gity.---'L'he road surfaces were maintained in a satisfactory condition. That portion of Kennedy Road between the Peak Tramwav bridge anrl the nnllah Em~t of the German Club, 657' 0" long, and that portion of Robinson Road between the Peak Road and Gleneah, 610' 0" long, were laid with tar macadam. Part of Robinson Road at its junction with Cast.le Road was concreted with 4" lime aml cement concrete. The granite paving in Shelley Street bet\veen Staunton Street and Caine Road, and in Pottinger and Peel Streets between Queen's !load and Hollywood Road was taken up and relaid. Queen's Road East between Arsenal Street and Wanchai Market was improved b~, reducing the cross fall. The footway in Leighton Hill l{oad opposite J nland Lot 488 was 1oncrete
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--016--'fhe Morse telegraph instruments at Green Island and Uape Collinson Lighthouses were removed an
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017 the year. The new terrace which is situated at the south side of the Cemetery will provide for about 120 interments. 40 tombstones were renovated at a cost of $421.00. The duty of issuing permits for the erection and repair of monuments in the Cemetery was transferred to the Sanitary Depart-ment on the 1st ,July. 57. lllainlennnce uj Public Hecrealiun C:1owul.s.-s\.11 improvement was effected at the V\7 ongneichong Recreation Ground h., altering the positions of plots D, Dl and E which enabled the Royal Hongkong Golf Club to Jay out their links in a more satisfoetory manner.' A considerable portion 0 the turf on plot E was taken up, the ground levelled and the turf relaid at a cost of $427.07 of wl1ieh $244.04 was paid by the ::\Elitary Recreation Club. A sum of $265.82 was spent on the lJ,ucen's Recreation Ground turfing hare patches. 'I'he extension of this ground referred to in last year's report was completed at a total cost of $2,730.13, of which $630.13 was expenderl during 1909. To permit of further extension, an area of cultivated lan
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-018 Telegraphs and Telephon(H, Public Lamps, $1,000 700 100 Cemeteries, Su:ndries, Matsheds, &<'., and various small items,1,060 Waterworks, Hongkong, :1,500 ,, Kowloon, l,500 Drainage, 1,000. :MoHt of the damage had been re1Jaired by the close of the year. Hepairs to the Breakwater at Oaus0"ay Bay damaged in preYious years were completed at a total cost of $5,838.7J\ of whir.h :rl,371.35 was expended cluring the year. 60. Maintenance of City and Hi/.l ])i8Uiel lYllt111mJ1l.-11.Constant supply was in force until the end of January, when the rider mains were brought, into operation. Owing to the comparatively small amount of rainfall during the Summer, constant supply could not. be resumed again until the 25th of October, after which it remained in force to the end of the year. 'fhe quantity of water stored in the Impounding ReHen-oirs on the 1st of January amounted to 549,968,000 gallons and it reached a minimum on the 17th May when it amounted to 131,335,000 gallons. The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow-lcrnlfi for the following periods :-Reservoir. Total Capacity. Period. --------:--Gallons. Tytam, -Tytam Eyewash, Tytam Intermediate, W ongneichong, Pokfulam, 384,800,000 Oct. 20th 1o Dee. 8th (50 days). 22,369,000 to Nov. 8th (20 ,, ). 195,914,000 30,,000 nn,000.000 i August 7th to Dec. 31st (190 ,, ). ; Various periods, amounting to 45 days, between August 14th i and December 1st. '. Various periods, amounti1~g to 8G days, between July 18th and November 18th. The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 597,720,000 gallons. Pumping was begun at Tytam Tuk on the 1st of February and continued until 28th May. It was also found necessary, owing to the deficiency in rainfall, to resort to pumping between the following dates : -21st to 28th June, 30th August to 13th September, 4th to 20th October. The total quantity pumped from the 'fytam Intermediate Reservoir was 199,764,000 gallons or an amount equal to the total contents of this Reservoir. Both sets of pumping engineR were in operation fo1 21 days and one set for 132 dayR.

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o rn A comparative statement of the total rainfall recorded at various !Joints during the year is given in the following Table :----------------------------------------\lonth. s f 11 s -~ .l~ o i i rS ce ,..o roe .S C r: I t.t; ~;..i :== ,.. I a> -,-, d ,::__. ,... -,d al I I O Q,) i--t U-~ .., C:: ,.....0 00 t--f :::: ~---i:l-.i:c:; I t-' Cl;) ,_,,, ------l __ o __ :--------1--E--i_---+---------January, ...... J 1.46 1.891 February, ....... i 1.66 1. 70 }[arch, ........... -! 2.34 2.66 \.pril, ............ 2.45 2.3G )fay, ............... 1 6.70 8.11 ,Tune, . 7.38 7.33 ,July,.. . 12.82 12. 71 August, . 8.34 8.24 September, 8.50 10.40 October . 2:rn8 23.80 ~ovember, ...... -! 0.06 0.14 December, ...... ; 0.00 0.00 Total, HJ09, .. 1908. 75.m> 91.84 i!J.31 102.00 1.41 I 0.98 I 1.98 2.33 7.94 8.79 13.73 6.29 9.55 19.51 o.rn 0.00 1.80 1.22 1.89 ::!.62 9.51 8.67 13.46 5.56 9.09 21.96 0.181 0.00 1.52 1.0,1 1.89 2.06 6.37 1 5.82 10.13 9.90 8.51 19.76 0.09 0.00 i l i 1.21 2.08 2.87 2.30 8.15 10.45 19.42 9.28 7.07 25.58 0.07 0.00 ,----------------72.lH !12.:?2 7fi.tHi !)2.87 I (j7.0!J 88.-l.S 8(i,4(j i 119.(jfj The total nantit._\. of water :,mpplied during the year wa,; l,512,54li,OOO gallons filtered and 24,255,000 gallons unfiltered, rnak ihg a grand total of l,53G,801,000 gallons, 01" .14fi,594,000 gallons less than in 1908. ThiR decrease is due to the long period of restricted snpply by ride1 maim,. The ave.rage consumption of filtered water per head per clay for all purposes amounted to 19!.) ~gallons, taking an estimated popula tion of 208,560. Full details of the consumption, contents of reserrnirs, &c., will be found in Annexes C and D. The analyse~;-made b_v the Gornrnment ~\.nalyst show the water to have been of excellent quality throughout the year. Bacterio logical examinations also garn satisfactory results. The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District during the year amounted to 65,651,000 gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of 180,000 gallons, whilst 30,074,000 gallons were pumped to the Hill District gfring an average daily consumption of 82,000 gallons. As compared with 1908 there was an increase of 1,644,000 gallons in the quantity pumped to the High Level District and of 2,5Hi,OOO gallons in that pumped to the Hill District. The grand total pumped during the year amounted to fl,j, 7iG.OOO gallons as rnmparnrl with 91,(1'10,000 gallnrn; in lfl08.

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-OiOTabulated statements containing particulars of the quantitie:-; pumped to the High LeYels and the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E. All motors and station buildings were kept in a good state of repair during the year. The number of meters in use at the end of the year was l,13!J in the City and 1G9 in the Hill District, or a total of 1,308 as com pared with 1,070 and 165 in 1908, or n total of 1,235. The quantity of water snppliml hy meter was as follows : --Filtered :-Trade, .................. 194,272,000 gallons. Domestic (City), ...... lOG,643,000 Do. (Hill District), 30,074,000 Unfiltered, . . . 24,294,000 Total, ..................... 355,283,000 This shows an increase of 30,453,000 gallons in the quantity oJ water supplied by meter over 1908. :New senices were constructed or old ones repaired, altered, improved or connected to the mains to the number of 593 and 42 supplies were laid on for building purposes. The number of inspections of prinite services was 2,89i5; all defects were made goocl aHer the mnrnl notices (195 in all) had been served. 61. :llainl.enanc.e u/ Ku11:/.ao11 J,\iuta11:01h.s.----The total quantity of water supplied amounted to 293,171,000 gallons which gives a ,.Iaily consumption of about 803,000 gallons, or, taking an estimated population 0 87,700, !) gallons per head per
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---Oil--The supply to Sai Wan Battery, which it:1 included in the Shau kiwan returns, amounted to 3,464,000 gallons for the year. There were 6 meters in use at Aberdeen and 9 at Shaukiwan. 63. ,lfoi:nle1urncc of La,i, Chi Kok Wate1wo1'ks: Wate1-Boal Supply.-The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 61,414,000 gallons, or about 168,000 gallons per day. Details are given in Annexe K. There were U1 meters in use at the end of the year as compared. with 16 in 1908. 64. Wate1 ilccuunt.~'l'he fixing of meters to properties not supplied by the rider mains was continued and at the end of the year there were still some left to fix. The number of meters examined and repaired
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.... 0 2i -The concrete flooring oI the first floor colonnade ancl the concrete 1oof of same were completed. A considerable proportion of the stone for the pinnacles, cir cular wall of dome, &c., was prepared ready for setting. Towards the close of the year a start was made with the tlres8-ing down and pointing of the granite face work. The average number of Masons employed daily on the site was 84. 66. Laiv Coul'li;-Cunt1ael fo1 .Jo1:11e1y, Fitt:i:11y.s, d:c.-Thr teak panelling for walls of Courts, the floor and ceiling boards and a number of doors, &c., were prepared ready for fixing. The ceiling joists of the Second and Third Courts and of the offices and stores on the second floor were fixed and a start was made with the plastering of the walls on this floor. 1909. Estimates, ... $130,000.00 I Total Estimates, $ 79G,200.00 1909. Expenditure, 81,150.21 I Expenditure to \ :31;12/09, u44,473.::io. 67. Pust 0.//ice.-The whole of the walls of the building, with the exception of those of the Clock 'L'ower, were practicall~bnilt to the required height. The main cornice extending round the l"l)randahs was fixed .For the balustrade of the verandahs, a large proport,iou of the plinth was set and man~ of the granolithic haluster:,; and much of the. coping were fixed. Tlw llat-l'oncrete roof of the Ycrandahs wa::. ah,o constructed. The central gables 011 the three principal fronts were built to about half the required height ; the small gablcR on these fronts and those on the West front being nearly completed. 'l'he main granite aornice round the towers at the South-east and North-east angles of the building was partly fixed. The steel framing for the flat roof covering that. portion of the main building adjoining the central yard was fixed and the cornier round walls of same was set. The steel trusses and a number of the steel joist:;; used a~ principals in the construction of the roof of the main building were fixed and also the steel girder carrying part of the tower at t.he ~orth-east angle .Most of the timber framing for the roof of the Chinese l--luarters on the West front ,vas fixed. A large proportion of the special cement tiles for the gable roofs was made. The plastering 0 the internal surfaces of walls and pointing of external surfaces were both well adv~nced at the close of the year. Doors, casements, floor and ceiling lJoards and otl1er portions of the joinery work "ere prepared ready for fixing.

PAGE 376

--0 23 'l'he average Hurn.her of Mai,;on.K emplorecl daily on the site was 81. 1909. Estimat_es, ... :li18U,000.00 I Total Estimates, $930,000.00 1909. ExpenditUl'e, J 5:3,4:j4-_fj?, / Expe~di,ture to ,,-; ,-,-3112_.0D,...... 1>1.\101.04. 68. Publ{e Lal.rine.~ aw.l f 1inak--The following latrines were comple.t.od durmg the year:--(i.) One containing 20 seals antl 2 urinal stalls at Taikok tsui Village. (ii.) One containing Hl seats and i minal stalls in Chuk Hing Lane. (iii.) One containing 24 seats and 2 minal stalls at Wongnei chong Village. (iv.) One containing :-: seats in J.;:ennedy Hoad, Vfost of the Peak Tramway. The following structures were begnn :---(v.) One latrine eontaining 30 seati:; for men and 10 or women, in additiou to 2 urinal st-alls, in Nelson Street, Mongkoktsui. (vi.) One urinal containing 8 >itallR adjui11i11g )::o. ], (~ueen's Road East. All the above were cmu,truC'tetl of bril'kwork poiute
PAGE 377

--024 with, both struetures being pulled down. They also admitted of the conversion of a portion of the main block hitherto occupied aF< a stme and cement-testing room into an additional office. 1909. Estimates, ...... $7,450.00 I Total Estimates, ... $12,000.00 HlO!l Expenditure,... G,871.30 I Expenditure. tn I 3ljl2/09, .. .. 13. 723.07. A supplementary vote for the excess was obtained. 70. Madwl at Kowloon .Point.-The walls of the market, with the exception of the Western temporary wall, were built to 15' 4f' above first floor level, 'i.e., to the underside of the concrete lintels. The Eastern portion of the building, which contains the neces sary offices in connection with the market., was built to its :full height, ready for the concrete roof. The concrete floors in it were laid and the tiling of the walls was commenced. The work had to he stopped at the end of October owing to the non-arrival of the columns and girders ordered from England and it. was still suspended at the close of the year. 1909. Estimates, $50,000.00 I Total Estimates, ........... $66,000.UO 1909. Expenditure, 17,662.32 Expenditure to 31/12109. 18,554.90. 71. Staff Quaitei-s, Tai .Po.-The contract for this work, which eomprised the erection of a bungalow, servants' quarters ann. stable, wa,; completed in June. The bungalow contains a hall or sitting room, lW 0" >< 17' O''; a dining room, 22' 0" x 16' O"; an office, 16' 0" x 8' 6"; 3 bed-rooms, 16' 0" x 15' 0"-each with a separate bath-room-and a drying room, pantry and stores. An open verandah runs practically round the building, the greater portion being 10 feet in width. A semi hasement under the bungalow contains the European kitchen and l;ome additional store accommodation. The walls are built of Canton red bricks, generally in lime> mortar, pointed externally and plastered internally. The floors of the rooms are of l" hardwood on China fir poles, and those of the ~ 9' O", :i Chinese kitchen 6' 0" x 9' 0", a small tool-house and a latrine. A <:oYered way is provided where necessary round the building. The walls are of Canton brick in lime mortar pointed externally and finished fair and whitewashed internally. The floors are of cement concrete finished with l" granolit.hic. The roof is of double pan and roll tiling on China fir poles. The stable is a two-storied building containing a loose-box. 10' >< 10'; stall 6' x 9'; coach-house, 10' 0" x 12' 6"; harness-room, W x 10'; 2 servants' rooms, eaeh 10' x 10'; a mafoo'Fi room, fi' ~< 8'; and a kitchen, 6' x 10'.

PAGE 378

0 25 The huildiug ii:; of a :;;imilar description to the servants' quarters already described .In <'.Onnection with the aliove buildings, a considerable amount of work wa:;; ne<'.essary i11 forming the sites and an approach road to the stable. The total coi:;1: of: the bungalow, i:;ervants' quarters and stable was $2G,574-Al. there being a balance of tGOl.05 to be paid in 1910. The cost of the four native houses for the clerical staff, described in last year's report, was t2,G22.10. Partitions in the living rooms and rails to the coek-lofts were afterwards added at a cost of $28ti.93 but this part nf the work was defrayed out of "Miscellaneous Works" Vote. 1909. Estimates, ... $lti,880.00 I Total Estimates, ........... $30,000.00 Hl09. Expenditure. 16,599.27 I Expenditure to 31/12/09, 28,595.46. Furniture for the bnngalow was supplied at a cost of$1,142.50 but this was charged tn a Yote pro1idcd under the Police Depart ment Esti rnatPs. 72. Qwurrntine Station ut Lcii Chi Kok.-The ten corrugated iron sheds and the various kitchens, latrines and outhouses, &c., in connection with them, which were acq nirecl in 1908, were repaired at a cost of' ~,l,157.41, oF 1dtich $2,157.41 was expended during the year \ stone boundary wall, U feet high, coped with cement and lirokeu glass. was lrnilt ronnd the site at a cost 0 $G,87 4.5G. The old Custou1s building at the pier was put in good repair for 11se as a guard-house at a cost of i:' 1,709.39. 'l'hc tonstrnction oI a hospital was not undertaken. 1909. Estimates, ... ,HU, 777.0U i Total Estimatei:;, ........... $16,000.00 Hl09. Expenditnn~, l0.77fi.48 i Expenditure to 31/12/09, 12,782.48. 73 ldditious to So. :! 1-'ulice .Slal"ion.-A contract for this work 1rni:; let and a start "ith it was made but no expenditure was incurred up to the end of the year. The demolition of the old huilrlings ,Yith small exteptions was necessary before any new work eould be hegnn. 1900. Estimates, ;;:12,UOO.OO I Total l<;stimates, ........... $14,000.00 HlOD. Expenditun\ i Expell(lit.ure t.o ~Hi12/09, 74. Nl"leu.~ion of '/'11i l'o l,r1,ncl O,tlice lo zi}'()i;ide a.econunodation /u1 1Ji.st1ict 0-Mire,.--A contraet for this work was let to Mr. Luen On in April 'and at .the close of the year the brickwork was practi eally completed and the roof trusses were in position. 1909. Estimates, ... $10,000.00 I Total Estimates, ........... $11,700.00 1909. Expenditure, 2,212.44 I Expenditure to 31/12/09, 2,212.44. 'i 5. Permanrmt 8tafriwy to Bcillroo111, Ooi:ermnent House.-A eontra'ct for the erection of: this stairway was entered into with Mr. Cha11 A Tong on the ~lst l\farch and the work was completed

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0 il.i at the enJ of Oetober. It consi::;ts of a stainrny fru111 the ballroom Yerandah affording dire('t ac<"ess to the ground:,;. A wide stairway from the Yeranclah descends tu a landing and roof ganlen, below which it brmwhes into t,rn fligfits of steps leading to ground level. s\ smmnrr house is provided underneath the roof garden and store8 underneath the flights of steps. The work ge1wrally wai:, cu11Htrueted of brickwork in cement mortar, linislwd with plaster: 1 he' s1p::; and lm1di11gs heing of granite. The summer house and roof garden were paved with J" >-: 4" titles, laid -on cement concrete, a la_,er of asphalte being provided underneath the tiling of the roof garden. It was found necessary to pile the fonndatiom:. 1909. Estimates, ... ~:4,500,00 i Total l~stimatei;, ............ $5,800.00 1909. Expenditure, -!,486A5 I Expenditure to :n 12/09, 4,486.45. 76. ildditionnl Hoo111 11/; (,_)11een'8 (.'ullege f,n-JJupil 1'eae.he1's.-This work was completed with the exception of some minor details and some extra work that wai-l ordered towards the close of the year. It consisted of the ereetion of a detached building at the South west angle of the main building, with which it is connected by a covered way. It contains one room, 30' 611 square, provided with verandahs, 7' 6" wide, 011 two opposite sides, the whole being constructed on pillars and arches so as to provide a space under neath, 11 feet in height, which is open all round and forms a small covered pla,yground. A portion of one of the Yeranclahs is enclosed to form an ante-room for the use of the master. The room is fitted up with desks, black-board, electric-light fittings, &!'., ancl a small raised gallery is constructed along oue side. 1909. ~s_timat~s, ... -~~.ooo.~o. I 'J~otal ~~tin_iat eb, __ ; ..... : ... i .. :::~,~~o-~o 1909. Expend1tme, 3,275.08. Expem,1tme to c1L 12 0.J, u,2, 5.68. 77. Mnrket at Abe1(/e1m.--ln co11sequei1ee uf a proposal to lease an area of foreshore, ,d1ich induded the i;ite proposed for the market and unrler which a considerable improvement in the localit.v wonld have bee11 effected, this ,rnrk was allmrnd to stand over. 1909. Estimate;;, ...... ::ii::!,:WU.00 j Total Estimates, ......... ~2,200.00. 1909. Expenditure, Expenditure to :H/1210\J, 78. Sew Roculs iu Kow/1Ju11.---'I'he following were the worh executed under this vote:(i.) E.rtmrnion o.f Al'gy/,e St1eel, Jlo11ykoklsui.--This work was m1clertaken for the purpose of affording communication with Yanmati Railwav Station. It neeessitatecl the resumption of an m;a of 73,177 square feet from Kowloon Farm Lot 4, which was effected at the same rate as that paid for the area acquired by arbitration in 1907 for the railway, namely 16c. per square foot. The cost of the resumption was $13,690.20, which included $1,516 for buildings and $100 for trees.

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-027 -The work consisted of the formation of a considerable embankment and the construction of one of the side walls of a nullah which had to be provided for the drainage of the locality. As communication with the Rtation was also required from waterloo Road and as this involved a considerable amount of cutting, provi sion was made in the contract for obtaining the necessary material for Argyle Street embankment from this source. The work was begun towards the close of the year, the expenditure on it, exclusive of thr resumption already mentioned, amounting to $1,000. (ii.) Conthiuation of Nathan Rocid f'l'Om Waterloo Road tu K.l?.L. 2.-This work was completed at a total cost of $8,961.09 of which $44u.73 was expended during the year. (iii.) Road from Mn 'l'ati Kok tu Tai f:Jhek Kii.-'l'his work was completed, the expenditure on-it amounting to $627.79, making the total cost :j;l:3,723.94. Tlw length of the road is 0 mile and itR width 8 feet. 1909. Estimates, ...... $30,000.00. 1909. Expenditure, l5,778.fi2. 79. Seu; Ro(/.d8 in New 'l'eritu1i.e.,.---'l'he works execut-ed under this heading were the following :--(i.) Hoa.d f1'U'l1t l{ou;/uon Uity /.u 8Ju1ti11 L'a.,.,. ---By arrange ment wit;h the :Militarv Authorities, a new road was constrw~ted from neai:Kowloon City to Shatin Pass by way of Chuk Fn Village. The road is 2l miles long and H feet in width. It. was urigiually desi,gned to be 7 fee1 in width but was subsequently widened to 1:.1 feet. From near Kowloon City to beyond Chuk Un Village, it is practically level, hut. beyond this point it. ascends the Kowloon range of hills with gradients varying from 1 in 43 to l in 5 until it reaches Shatin Pass at an elevation of about H60 feet above Ordnance Dalwu. The surfacing is of decomposerl granite except where the road passes through rock,v ground where it has been surfaced with concrete. '.!'here are 20 culverts, some of which are of consider able size. A side channel of lime and cement concrete has been constructed throughout that portion of the road ascending the hill and numerous cross drains have been provided for the escape of storm water. The work was nearing completion at the close of the year. The arrangement made with the Military Authorities was that they should contribute one-third of the cost of the section extending from near Kowloon City to Clrnk Un and defray the entire cost. of the remainder of the road, the Colonial Government undertaking to maintain the whole road in future. The estimated amounts of the Military contrib11t.ions ,vere $2,000 and $5,700 or a

PAGE 381

0 28 -total of $7,700. In view of the widening of the road 1o meet their requirements, their total contribution was subsequently increased to $10,332, of which only $2,000 had been paid up to the close of the year. 'l'he t;otal cost of the road has been:-Resumption of land, ......... $1,605.94 Construction of road, ........ 17,309.14 $18,915.08 Deduct contribution bv Military Authorities,...... 10,332.00 Net expenditure by Government, ..................... $8,583.08. A balance of $4,492.68 remained to be paid in 1910. The expenditure during the year amounted to $11,221.78, of which $Il.2fiwas for resumption of land. (ii.) Road f1vm Ca8tle l1cah Bay to P-ing S7um.-This road is 4 miles long and 6 Jeet in width, except in some of the cuttings, where its width is increased to 8 feet. It runs through a flat valley and is generally on embankment, but, to afford a good alignment and obtain material for the embankment, it was found advantageous to carry it in cutting through some of the spurs of the adjoining range of hills. Tn setting out the road, the possibility of laying a light railway along it at some future period has been provided for and both gradients and curves have been determined with this in view. The maximum gradient is I in 100 and the road is surfaced throughout with decomposed granite. There are five bridges, four of one span (varying from 10 to 15 feet) and one of two spans (each 25 feet). The bridges me 14 feet in width, being constructed for the full width to which it is ultimately proposed to widen the road. The abutments are of lime concrete faced with rubble masonry in lime mortar and the decking is of reinforced concrete. Some stream diversions ~ere made in carrying out the work. The road commences at a rocky promontory on the East side of Castle Peak Bay where it is proposed to construct a pier to enable launches to come alongside at all states of the tide. The work was practically completed with the exception of a causeway and some minor works within the first mile where the road sl~irts the bay. The expenditure during the year amounted to $14,485.15, which included $4.83 for land resumptions and $393.U6 for surveying and certain expenses of supervision. (iii.) Ex.ten8ion of Ping Shan Road to Un Long.-A survey was made with the object of extending the road above described to the important; village of Un Long. The only expenditure that had been incurred up t,o the dose

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0 i9 of the year 1rns $550.35 for land resmnptiou and 8180 for surveying expenseR. The length of the extension is 1 miles. (iv.) Road jl'om San Tin to 11-u /fo G,1/J.---.\ snrvey was also in hand for the construction ol" a roall between the places mentioned. It is intended eventually to link np this road with the one to Un Long and to extend it to Sha Tau Kok, thus providing ai good road from Castle Peak Day to the place last-mentioned. Crossing the railway near Fan Ling Station, it will opeu up communication with it from the extensive districls which it traverses. The only expenditure during 1he year was l]i81 in connectioJJ ,Yith the survey. 1909. Estimates, ............ !$25,000.00. 1909. Expenditure,......... 24,518.08. 80. li'o1tinr1 and Kerbing St:reet8.---The foUowing is a state ment of the works executed under this heading, except those of a trifling nature. The sum stated is in some ca8es only a part of the cost m1i11g to lhc "ork extending inlo more than one >'ear: (i.) (ii.) (iii.) (iv.) (v.) (vi.) (vii.) (viii.) (ix.) (x.) HONGKONG. lmpruving Shaukiwan Road from S.lll.L. l tu a point midway betweenS.L.'s 395 and 397: Diverting Tramway, ................................. $5,31W Kerbing and channelling road,.................. 1,320 .. -----$1i,722 Imprming Shaukiwan Road below lJuan-y Bay Dam No. 4, .................................... $1,lOK Forming and kerbing streets intersecting S.M.L.'s 2-10, ................................. 1,961 Raising foo.tpath in front of Inland Lots Nos. 1,575 and 1;576, Causeway Day, ........ Forming Forbes and Cadogan Streets, Kennedy Town, and constructing retaining :inn wall to prevent further slips, . 5,21.:-1 Forming path from Dowen Road to :May Road, East of Peak Tramway, .................... 25:J Widening Belchers Street opposite Marine Lot 26f-i, ...................................... Straightening line of kerb on West side of Pedder Street and making good footpath, roadway, &c., ................................ 4153 -$Hi,J.i\l KowLOox. Reclaiming North ends of Reclamation l::,tre('l and Macdonnell Road adjoining Kowloon Inland Lot 1,077 and constructing side wall of nullah, ................................. $5,!/:1!J Raising level of Reclamation Street, including kerbing and channelling, opposite K. M. L.'R 29, 30 and 31, Yaumati, .............. 4,71:!

PAGE 383

0 ,'.\() -(xi.) Forming, kerhing and channelling Hi Lnug Lane, .......................................... $1,511 (xii.) Partly forming Salisbury Road between Nathan and Chatham Roach; for access to ICM.L. 88, .................................. 1,050 (xiii.) Filling in Dundas Street from sea ,Yall to Heclamatiou Street, . . . 450 ------$1;',,fl()2' X EW_.'l'ERHlTURIES. (xi L) Laying 011t new streets at Tai \Vo Shi, 'l'ai l'o. (xY.) Repairs t.o the 10-Rpan Bricl_ge, Tai Wo Rhi, ... $fi00 25'1 190!:l. Estimates, ................................. $35,000.00. 1909. Expenditure, .............................. $.:-\1,821.54. Items (i) & (ii). These arc a continnation of the wm-ks referred to iu last year's reporl. Item (iii). This calls for no (ummenl. Item (iv). ConReqnent on the raising u[ the level of the old Shaukiwan Road on the East side of Causeway Hay, it was found advisable to raise the footpaths opposite the lots mentioned. 'J'he locality has been much improved by the work carried out. It.em (v). This is a continuation of the work referred to in last year's report, which has now been completed, no fnrther slips having OC'l'\Ured. Item (vi). Advantage was taken oI the opportunity afforded by the deposit of material from the Albany Filter Deds to form a small pathway and skps from May Road to Bowen Road. Item (vii). This work consisted of cutting away a portion of the hill opposite the lot mentioned to form Belchers Street to its full width. As the work involved blasting, it was considered advisable to carry it out before the lot was built upon. Item (viii). The line of kerb on the West side of Pedder Street ,ms formerly very irregular, partly owing to a large portico which projected from Messrs. ,Jardine, :Matlwson & Co.'s old offices, causing the footpath to be of exceptional width where it was situated, and partly to the obstruction of the roadway by the Clock Tower which caused the footpath to be greatly narrowed opposite it. The portico having disappeared, the opportunity was taken to make the footpath of uniform width as far as possible though it is still narrowed at tht> 8nuth end on account of the presence of the Clock Tower. Item (ix). This is a continuation of the work mentioned in last ?ear's report, which has now been completed. Item (x). A considerable area 0 the older part of Yaumati is too low to admit 0 proper drainage and, wherever rebuilding is taking place, the floors 0 the new buildings are arranged at a suit ahle height to admit 0 raiRing the R1TectR to the requir0d leYelR.

PAGE 384

--0 ;Jl 'l'.lie houses un the lot:,; mention.ed having been mostly rebuilt, the raising of Reclamation Street in front of them was undertaken. It is only the beginning of a work which will probably extend. over many years. Item (xi). This calls for no comment. Item (xii). Consequent upon the completion of their new godowns and offices, Messrs. Butterfield & Sw:ire requested that reasonable access should be afforded to their property. A_strip of Salisbury Road was accordingly put in order. Item (xiii). This work consisted merely of filling in Dundas Street to the required levels. Item (xiv). As it is believed that considerable developments will occur in the Tai Po district as the result of constructing the railway and providing a station there, provision has been made for them by laying out some new streets. Item (xv). The work consisted of surfacing with cement concrete, :3" thick, the old granite slabs which form the platform of the bridge and erecting a railing along one side of it. 81. Raising lerel of Des V wux Rvacl (1e-11a111ed Chatham Road), Kowloon, conseqnent on 1eclamalion :fo1 Railicay Te1in1u.-The work executed under this Yote consisted of two parts :(i.) The raising of the old roadway, 50 feet in width, whieh has been carried out by the Public Works Department. (ii.) The widening of the roadway from 50 to 100 feet, in width, which has been carried out bv the Kowloon-C'antou Railway Department. That portion of the work coming under (i) was completed at a eost of $12,605.76, of which $6,500 was paid in 1908. The raising extended from Kowloon Inland Lot 882 to Austin Road and included kerbing, channelling and surfacing. A sum of $9,935.69 was paid to Railway Funds on account of the work executed under (ii). 1909. Estimates, ... $17,000.00 I 'l'otalEstimates, ......... $20,000.00. 1909. Expenditure, $16,041.45 Expenditure to 31/ 12/09, $22,541.45. The estimate of $20,000 was for item (i) only but it was subsequently decided to charge the work executed by the Railway Department to the same vote. The amount has accordingly been increased to $51,000 in the Estimates for 1910, there being considerable liabilities still outstanding. 82. Road along Northern slopes of Victoria Peak.-This work was not proceeded with and no expenditure under t.he vote was incurred. 83. Gullies Reconstruction.-This work was practically com pleted. Du:ri:p.g the year 20 gullies "ith single gratings and 11 gulJics with double gratings wprc const.rnctcct, or n total of '1~

PAGE 385

-03:! gratings, bringing the total number dealt with up to the close of the year to 696 gullies with single gratings and 721 gullies with double gratings. 1909. Estimates, ... $2,000.00 I Total Estimates, ............. $98,000.00 190!). Expenditure,$1,252.75 I Expenditure to 31/12/09, $92,936.13. 84. 7'mining NuUah.~.-The following is a statement of the works carried out under this heading:Length Tminecl. E.-czienditwe. (i.) Nullah in Waterloo Road, Kowloon, from Railway Bridge No. 4 to: wards Disinfecting Station (not Lin. F'I. $ completed),........................... 340 1,698 (ii.) Channel for stream near W anchai Gap and below Coombe Road (completed), .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 390 91)9 (iii.) Nullah between Inland Lots 1,617 and 1,618, Shaukiwan Road (completed), . . . . 18::! ;j8i, (iv.) Nullah between Inland Lots 1,523 & 1,570, Bowen Road (completed),.. 70 262 1909. Estimates, ..................... $ 20,000.00. 1909. Expenditure, .................. $ 3,993.07. 85. Large Plitshing.Ta:nks :fo1 Main Sewe1s and Substitution of Iron f01 Earthenware Pipes.~No new flushing tank was under taken but iron pipes were substituted for earthenware pipes in the case of a portion of the Bonham Road sewer, East of Eastern Street. The portion dealt with comprised 440 yards 0 10" diameter pipes. Cast Iron pipes, 10" diameter, to be laid in substitution for earthenware ones in Garden Road were deposited on the site, but the work was not commenced. The length to be undertaken was about 140 yards. 1909. Estimates, ... $5,000;00 I Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 4,770.25 I Expenditureto31/12/0D, $19,252.58. 86. Miseellaneous Dminage TVmks.-Extensive works were carried out under this heading. The following is a statement of the principal items, the amounts stated representing in some cases only a portion of the cost owing to the work extending into more than one year :-I-lo~ GKUNG. (i.) Raising sunken sewer, Connaught Road West, and works in connection therewith (not completed), . . . . $10,416 (ii.) Training nullah South of No. 8 Bridge, Shaukiwan (264 lineal feet), .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3,74G

PAGE 386

-033 -(iii.) Completion of nullah near Paper Mills at A.herd ( 1 t d) )i:;3,11:;;J-een comp e e . . .. .. .. .. ., (iv.) Extension of stormwater outfall, Stone Nullah Lane (completed), .. .. .. .. .. .. 2,841 (v.) Construction of stormwater drain, Shaukiwan Road, from nullah at Bay View Police Station to Inland Lot 1,462 (practically completed), .............. . . . 2,084 (vi.) May Road Sewer:(vii.) (viii.) (ix.) (x.) Sewer from Peak Road to Inland Lot 1,772 (work completed in 1908), ... $55(.i Extension from Inland Lot 1,772 to near Tramway Bridge (completed), ...... 794 Extension of sewer for :Marine Lot 29, Praya East (completed), ................................ Extension of sewer to new lat1ine, W ongneichong Village (completed), .......................... Extension of stormwater outfall opposite Tai Vv o Street on account of reclamation (completed), ............................................ Drain Connections (completed), .................... KowLoo:s. (xi.) Construction of stormwater drain, Shangtung Street, from sea-front, to Portland Street (practically completed), ...................... .. (xii.) Redrainage of portion of Yaumati in consequence of reclamation in front of Police Station (completed), ...................................... (xiii.) Construction of sewer for Kowloon Mortuary (not completed), ............................... .. (xiv.) Construct.ion of sewers between Dundas Street and Nelson Street, Mongkoktsui (work completed in 1908), ............................. (}..-v.) Redrainage of portion of Yaumati in consequence of reclamation of Kowloon Marine Lot 89 (extension of K.M.L. 49), (work completed in 1908), ......................................... (xvi.) Extension of sewer, Argyle Street, for K.I.L.'s 951 and 952, 1800-$300 contributed by lessee of lots (practically completed), ..... (xvii.) Extension of sewer, Salisbury Road, to K.M.L. 88 (completed), ................................. .. (xviii.) Extension of sewer outfall at. Boundary Street, Fuk Tsun Heung (completed), ............. .. (xix.) Drain Connections (completed), .................... NEW TERRITORIES. 1,350 '111 310 150 787 3,115 3,115 2,000 1,450 l,ll!i 500 168 80 (xx.) Drainage works at Tai Wo Shi, Tai Po (completed),....................................... 752 1909. Estimates, ..................... $45,000.00. Hl09. Expenditure, .................. 38,773.51.

PAGE 387

-0 34 Item (i). The necessity for this work ar0se ram the settlement of the Praya Reclamation which caused the sewers in the locality of the Wing Lok Street outfall to get out of their proper levels. 'rhe maximum settlement found amounted to 2' 9". The work comprised the reconstruction of pipe sewers varying in diameter from 9" to 24", principally on piled and concrete foundations, in Connaught Road West, Des Vceux Road Central and West, MorriEJon Street, Queen Street, Wing Lok Street and Bonham Strand West. Item (ii). This work was partially described in last year's report. The work done this year consisted of an extension of the nullah to the South of No. 8 Bridge. Item (iii). Under an arrangement made with the owners of the paper mills at Aberdeen with regard to certain reclamation work, the Government undertook to complete the nullah adjacent to their property before the end of June, 1909. The work, which comprised the construction of the North-east wall of the nullah and a portion of the invert, was carried out accordingly. The wall is of rubble masonry and the invert of cement concrete with rubble pitching. The work previously carried out was described in the report for 1907. Item (iv). This work was rendered necessary by t.he gradual extension of the reclamation on which the Public Works Department Stores at W anchai are situated. It comprised the construction of a short length of open uullah, the walls being built partly of cement concrete and partly of lime concrete, faced with rubble masonr~ and supported on piles, and the invert of cement concrete. Item (v). This work was rendered necessary by the reclamation carried out in conjunction with the deepening of Causeway Bay. It consisted of the construction of a concrete culvert 2' 0" to 2' G" in diameter, extending from the nullah near Bay View Police Station to Inland Lot 1,462. Item (vi). This \\:ark was described iu lai;L year's report. lt was considered advisable to extend the sewer with a view to providing for future building operations in the locality mentioned. The extension consisted of the laying of a 6" sewer between Inland Lot 1,772 and the line of the Peak Tramway. Items (vii), (viii), (ix), (xvi), (xvii) and (xviii). These items refer to extensions of sewers or stormwater drains necessitated by the erection of new buildings or by the silting up of the outfalls. Items (x) and (xix). These items need no comment. Item (xi). Owing to developments in Mongkoktsui district and alterations in the drainage of the lociility caused by the construction of the Kowloon-Canton Railway, the large open nullah in Shangtung Street became obsolete and was superseded by a pipe drain, varying in diameter from 15" to 25", which was laid generally in the bed of the old nullah. Items (xii) and (xiv). 'rhese items were rlesiribed in fost year'~ report.

PAGE 388

--0 35 Item (xiii). It was considered advisable to provide a special sewer, altogether se~arate from the Yaumati sewerage system, for carrying off the dramage from the Kowloon Mortuary. The work comprised the laying of a 6" sewer, on a concrete foundation (partly piled) in Waterloo Road, from the sea wall to the Mortuary. Item (xv). This work was described in thQ Ueports for 1907 and 1908. In last year's report, the expenditure from Gmernment funds was erroneously stated as $15,187. This was the total expenditure for the year and the contribution 0 $4,000 by the Land Reclamation Co. should have been deducted from it, making the net expenditure from Government funds $11,187. Item (xx). This work was rendered necessary by the filling in of the fish pond into which the sewerage from the Yillage of Tai W o Shi formerly found its way. It comprised the construction of an intercepting channel to convey the sullage water to the sea. 87. Extensions of Lighting.-The following lamps were erected or fitted with lanterns and burners:CITY AND HILL DISTRICT. Blake Pier-4 lamps were removed in 1908 in connection with the erection of the roof over the pier, . . . .. i* Wah Lane (taken over from owner),............ I A Chung Lane ( do. ),. .. .. .. ... I May Road (lanterns and burners), . 11 i\fonnt Kellett. Road, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2 22 No new lamps were erected in Kowloon. 1909. Estimates, ........................... $2,500.00. 1909. Expenditure, $505.00. 88. Permcinent Marks fo1 'l'rare1se 8u.1rey Points in New 'l'e1ito1ies.-Owing to the lack of a proper survey of the Colony and the absence 0 uniformitv in the scales of such piecemeal plans as had been produced in p~st years, it was decided that ai1 Ordnance Rurvey should be undertaken. Bases were measured at Ngan Shi \Van and Tai Po with a _100-foot steel tape and the Tai Po base was remeasured with a certified standard "Konstat" wire, but as the wire was not received until December, it was not possible to C'heck the Ngau Shi Wan base before the end of the year. From the Ngan Shi Wan base, the triangulation miscarried through to Tai Po, 24 stations in the main triangulation being observed to and from and the positions of 18 determined. Similar ly, in the minor triangulation, 14 stations were obser,cd to and from and the positions of 8 were determined. Paid out of the' vote "Blake Pier Shelter ".

PAGE 389

-036 More detailed information has been given in a special report on surYey work for the 12 months ending 31st March, 1910, prepared at t,he inst,ance of the Secretar;v of State and appended to this report (Annexe L); The period dealt with differs howeYer from that rornred by this report. 1909. Estimates, ...... $4,000.00 I Total Estimates, ... $11,000.00 1909. Expenditure, ... $ 785.13 Expenditure to 31/12,IO!J, il,099.78. 89. Rein.fo1ced Co11Cl'ete Yie1.-All the piles for Kowloon City pier extension were driven, the old timber extension being diverted where necessary to admit of this being done. Some dredging "as also done in the vicinity 0 the pier to improve the depth of water. The amount expended during the year was $15,282.94 but this included a sum 0 $12,306.18 for plant, which will be in great measure recovered "hen the "ork is completed and the plant retmn ed into StorP. 1909. Estimates, ... $20,000.00 I Total Estimates, ... $5,J,300.UO 1909. Expenditure, $15,282.941 Expenditure 1o 31/12/00,...... 2(i,8fii .ii4. 90. Blahe Pier Shelta.-The fixing of the lamps was corn J1leted in January and the painting of the ironwork of the shelte1 was finished during the month of March, thus completing the "ork. The total cost was $28,545.70. 1909. Estimates, ...... $3,555.00 I Total Estimates, ... $:28,lUO.OO 1909. Expenditure, ... 3,554.80 I Expenditure to I 31/12/o!J,...... is,Mii.70. A supplementary vote for the excess was obtained. 91. Miscellancon.~ -Worhs.-The following are the principal items 0 expenditure under this heading, representing in some cases only a part of the cost 0 the works in consequence 0 their execution extending oYer more than one year :-Queen's College:-Additional store-room for Technical lm;titute, ......................................... Enclosing verandah for clerk's room, ..... Fitting up clerk's room and providing desks for class rooms, .................... Furniture and desks for class rooms, ..... Telephone from clerk's room to Head-master's room, ............................. Overhead ans in class rooms, .............. Installatio_n 0 electric light in rooms 7, 1:3 and 24, ...................................... Lavatory fittings, ................................ Sundry small items, $ 290 494 8(.il 8{if> 112 404 275 211 50 ----,l,Gfi::!

PAGE 390

( 'entral Police Station:-Building in compound to afford additional n fiice accommodation (2 rooms, lavatory and verandah), ............................. Improvement of Fire Service, .............. Converting large room into :Mess Rooms (completed), ................................ lnstallation of electric lights and desk fans, $ 2,8G7 357 129 &c., in Asst. Superintendent's quarters, 136 $ ---3,489 Uoverumcut Offiees-Extension of Uorre Rpnndem:e and Accounts Offices, P.w.n., (completed):-Structurnl work, .............. ~as ~ttings, &c., .............. lurmture, ....................... $1,064 fi49 695 Extension of Buildings Ordinance Office (completed), ................................ Trough closet in Annexe for messengers 2,408 458 (cnmpleted), . . . . 476 ---3,342 1,ighthouse Pier---Green Island-Extension (completed), ...................................... Xo. !i Police Station-Laying wood-paving in (),ueen's Road to obviate damag() to roa
PAGE 391

0 ;:)8 Tai Wo Shi, Tai Po-Filliug in part of fish pond to a higher level (cumpl0ted), .............. Yaumati Polire StationExtension for Indiau Constables by adding a store~' over 1lw Interpreter's rco:n, ............................. Xew Chinese Cemetery, Kcndoo11 'J'ong,--Forming approach path .............................. Yic1oria British School-Filling iu and fencing area for playgrnnncl (rompletccl in 1908), ... Government House:-Arrangements in connection with the cele bration of His Majesty's birthday $ (completed),................................. 7fi7 Miscellaneous small works (completed), 212 Kowloon Waterworks-Telephone line to bungalow at Storage Reservoir (completed), Signal Hill, Kowloon,-Tower on signalling station for light to mark Kmdoon Point (completed), ............................................ Government Civil Hospital :-" B" Block-Sliding collapsible shutters to confine delirious patients (completed), l\fedical Staff Quarters-Fixing 2 water closets and tiling pantries (completed), Green Island Gunpowder Depot-Store for detonators (completed 'in 1908), .................... Botanical and Forestry Department-Enclosing verandah of Herbarium and Superintend-ent's Office, ...................................... Arrangements for unveiling Statues of H.:M. (~ueen Alexandra and H.RH. the Princess of Wales (completed), ........................... .. Tai Po--Bungalow for Assistant District Officer -Furniture, ...................................... W aglan Lighthouse and Quartern--'--U eneral repai t'R (completed), ...................................... Harbour Oflice-Enclosing Yerandah of Boarding Officer's Quarters and alterations to provide for Imports and Exports Office, ........... Land Office-Enclosing passage at :~forth end of Building for extension of office (completed), Tai Po-Native houses for clerks-Partitions, &c., Victoria Gaol-Enlarging windows (completed), Valves, &c., (watP-r supply), 317 45:-\ 179 83 $ 1,050 1,052 1.,0.Jl J,02ii 969 770 (i45 ;"j00 J98 :38H ;JG!) 340 .'ll2 287 t62

PAGE 392

-039-$ Liu .Ma Hang-Contribution towards construction of bridge, . . . . . 250 Sheung Shui Police Station-Sinking well (com-pleted),............................................. 234 Douglas Rock-Beacon to mark position (completed in 1908), . . . . 218 King's Park-Matshed shelter for children (com-pleted),............................................. 216 1909. Estimates, ....................... $35,000.00. 1909. Expenditure, .................. 35,ll7.07. 92. Mongkokt.sui Breakwate'I' Typhoon Refuge fm Small Cntft. -Dredging for the foundation trench of the breakwater was continued and was nearly completed. The quantity dredged during the year was 256,000 cubic yards, of which 207,000 had been done by the end of .July when the dredger was placed in the hands of the Government Marine Surveyor with a view to the execution of any necessary repairs. The vessel was docked at 'l'aikoo Shipyard 011 the 9th of September for a complete overhaul to her hull and, after coming out of dock but whilst still in the ha11L18 of the ~hipyard Co., was driven ashore during the typhoon of the l!)th October close to the Taikoo Sugar Refinery. Rhe waR refloated on the 30th October aml was found to be but little damaged, the extent, of her injuries being a few bent plates which were taken off, straightened and replaced. She resumed mll'k on the 19th November, after an interval of fully :-\} months. An Ordinance authorizing the construction of the breakwater and other works was passed by the Legislative Council in ~ovcmber under the title of "The Harbour of Refuge Ordinance 1909 ". :Negotiations were in progress with the lessees of Kowloon .Marine Lot 32 with regard to the arrangement of a reclamation adjoining their lot, which it was considered advisable to make on account of a dangerous rocky shoal near the Northern entrance to the refuge, but these had not reached a conclusion by the close of the year .. 1909. Estimates, ... $200,000.00 I Total Estimates, 1909. Expenditure, 69,529.21 Expenditureto31/12/09,$2i8,222.53 93. Causeu;ay Bay '.l'yplwon Refuge-Deepening shallow a/'ea to t1/ll' foot below 01dn11,nce Datwn.-Reference was made in last year':,; report to the commencement of this work, which was undertaken in accordance with the recommendation of the Public Works Committee ('t'ide minutes of meeting held on 4th January, Hl08). The work was nearly completed, 00,000 cubic yards of material being removed during the year. A portion of this material, amounting to 34,000 cubic yards, was utilized in reclaiming an area of foreshore between Marine Lots 285 and Inland Lot 1,588, extending to 99,570 square feet in area. The reclamation is protected by a rubble mound faced with a pitched slope. 1909. Estimates, ... $63,000.00 / Total Estimates, ........... $74,000.00 1909. Expenditure, 63,000.00 Expenditure to 31/12,109, (3:1,000.00.

PAGE 393

-04094. Compcn1mtion unde1' the Buildinys Unli111111ee of 1903.This vote provides for the resumption of areas to form scavena-ino lanes and for the paymc11t of compensation in connection with th~ removal of houses over the ends of private lanes or streets. In some cases, instead of the area devoted to scavenging lanes being resumed an agreement has been entered into with the owner to the effect that the lane will be preserved so long as the buildings abutting on it; exist and in a few cases the owners have surrendered the areas required, in whole or in part, in consideration of being permitted to count them as part of their open 8pace. 1909 .1stimates, ...................... $20,000.00. 1909. Expenditure,.............. 9,829.75. The following i8 a statement of the resmnption8 effect.eel cluring the year_:--Sca1:enginu Lane:; 1csumed on payment of compensat.io11. slna in Compen8U-8q. Pt. lion pwid. In rear ol 2 huuses uu lnlaud LoL .l ,U09, Xo8. 5 & 7, Bridges Street, ........ Jn rear of 2 hom;es 011 M.L. 77, No:,. 270, Dm; V(PUX Road Central, and G2, Wing Lok StreAt, ................. In rear of t\ houses on Kl.L. 609, Nos. 18-28, Nathan Road, ............... 1,170 In rear of 4 houses on I.L.'s 341 and 342, Shelley Street, . . 5791 In rear of 2 houses on I.L. 9,1 Sec. U-., Nos. ;39 & 41, Aberdeen Street,... t.'~41 In rear of 21 houses on K.I.L.'s 550,551, 1,204, 1,205 and 1,208. These lanes were referred to in the report for 1906 as in rear of houses on K.I.L. 412, the amount of com pensation being stated as !:3,465. Compensation was not paid u}J.til l 909 and, as the result of a re adjustment of the area, the amount paid was reduced to $3,196. The lot (K.I.L. 412) and adjoining lots (KI.L.'s 550 and 551) have been re-arranged and re-numbered, $ :rnn.oo 2,1-!7.00 2,39~.50 1,159.oo 4fil.25 3,196.00. A sum of $100 was paid from this vote for valuation fees in connection with lanes in the rear of houses on K.I.L.'s 522 and 548.

PAGE 394

--0 41 -The following lanes ,rnre also formed but delay in the eomplet.ion of the necessary legal formalities prevented payment of the snms due as compensation being made before the end of the year :.A1'ea in Sq. F't. ln rear of 2 houses on :i\I. L. 76, Nos. 208, Des V ceux Road Central, and fiO, Wing Lok Street, .................. 8+} Jn rear of lfihousesonP.R.:M.L. 57, Nos. 78-92, Des V ceux Road West, and Nos. 27-41, Ko Shing Street, ...... 1,055 Co111p,m.salion paid. $ ~, l Ofi.2 8,,14:Ulu. ~cavenging lanes were also arranged for in the rear of 33 ho'uses on Inland Lots 1,797-1,800 and Marine Lot 295 (formerly Marine Lot 29), situated bet,Yeen Praya East and Queen's Road East, but the amount due by way of compensation was in this case paid out of a Rpecial vote provided for the resumption of the areas required for a public road and the lanes referred to. The amount paid in respect of t]rn lanes was $-J-,(i30, the total area being 2,319 square fept. 8c11renging L1rne::; 1,ii1encle1ecl lo the G01:.e1n11w11t witlio11l p((ym!'11t n.f r.nmpmuution. In rear of 5 houses at Tai Hang Village on I.L.'s 1,735-1,737 and 1,537-1,541, ... In rear of one house on I.L. 568, No. 263, Hollywood Road, ..................... _. .... 400 8fi.2T ,V.ca-renging La11l'8 lil'Orided by ow1w1s but not .sweudc1ed l:o the Oovenzment. Jn rear of 4 houses on I.L. 1,628, Kennedy ,, Road, ...................................... of 4 houses on Q.RI.L. 4, Quarry Bay, .......................................... of 15 houses on A.I.L. 76, Main Street, Aberdeen, ....................... of 2 houses on I.L. 1,743 (old M.L. 184), 397 A & B, Queen's Road West, .. of 6 houses on I.L. 1,780, Shauki,van Road, ................................ of 3 houses on P.R.1\LL. 14, Connaught Road Central, ................. of 4 houses on Q.B.I.L. 7, Quarry Bay, ......................................... of 3houses on:M.L.'s 222 & 223, Nos. 310, 312, and 314, Des Vreux Road Central, ................................... of 1 house on K.I.L. I, 122, No. 289, Canton Road, l\fongkok, .............. 111-ea. in 8g_. Ft. 7l'i2 630 1,112 1,648 544 24G l,728 405 100}.

PAGE 395

-042 -95. Resumption fo1 Public Road tlmmgl1 i)fo1ine Lot 29 f/'l>11r Quec.n',q Road East: to Prnya EaM-.-This matter was referred 'to in para. 28 of last year's report. The compensation agreed upon was paid during the year and the road was formed with the exception of a short length adjoining Praya East. It was named Gresson Street. In addition to compensation for the area required for the road, the amount due in reHpect of scaYenging lanes ,ms defrayed from thiR Yote. The respectiYc amonn1R ,rnre as follom::; :8 this vote and, as the Treasury Books for 1900 had been closed heforr it was discoYerecl, 1he error could not be rectified. 1909. Estimates, $21,400.00 I Total Estimates, ......... $21,400.00 I 909. Expenditure, 20,840.24 Expenditure to 31/12/09, 20,840.24. 96. Allurny Pille./ Bed1:1, Re.con8lnwt io11 and l~xten.si011.-'l'he contract for the reconstruction and extension of the Albany Filter Beds was complrterl hy MesRrn. Sang Ler & Co., the Contractors, in Angust. The ,rnrk comprised thr demolition of the old watchman's quarters and the erection of new and enlarged quarters in a different position to accommodate the watchman and coolies employed in sand-washing, &c.; the construction of one entirely new bed next the Peak Tramway and the deepening and enlarging of the old beds, six in number, but 110\r co1werted into seven, making a total of eight beds and increasing the filtering area from 3,246 to 4,945 superficial yards m by fully 52o/o. During constant supply, the quantity of water passing through these filter beds amounts to about 2,950,000 gallons per day or at the rate of about 700 gallons per square yard, assuming one bed to be always out of operation for cleaning purposes. The new filter beds and gauge basin were constructed at a lower le,el than the old and the 6' 0" rectangular gauge was fixed 1 feet below the level of the old gauge. In addition to enabling an accurate measurement of the water passing it to be obtained, which was generally impossible hitherto on account of the flooding of the gauge, this arrangement admits of the necessary quantity of water for the supply of the City being passed through the C'onduit without a certain proportion of it overflowing and running to waste as has frequently occurred during recent years. Eight 10'' Venturi meters were fixed, one to each bed, for re cording the quantity of water passing from the filter beds to the Service Reservoir. The records obtained shmv at a glance whether the rate of filtration is being properly regulated. 1909. Estimates, ... $31,000.00 I Total Estimates, ......... $150,000.00 rno9. Expenditure, 44-,987.(ifl Expenditme to 31112/09, Hifl,004.32.

PAGE 396

-0-!3 _\ ,mpplementary vote was obtained for the exeesi; expenditure. The total eost of the work, which involved the excavation of a large mass of -earth and rock in order to level the area for the construction of the new and the extension of the old filter beds, has been $181,792.41, of which $15,788.09 remained to be paid in 1910. 97. Kowluon lYaleru:ork8, Gmritation Scheme.-With the exception of a few trifling matters connected with the meters and meter-hpuses, the ouly work in hand during the year was the Main Dam of the Storage Reservoir. Owing to his becoming involved in financial difliculties, the Contractor for this portion of the works suspended operations until March, when work was resumed and continued until the lfit.h September. Operations once more came to a standstill at that date and formal notice was served on the Contractor t.aking the contract out of his hands. After some delay caused by the preparation of the nece!:jsary documents, fresh tenders were invited in December for the completion of the work. The tender of Mr. Kang On was accepted, but the new (ontract was not signed until after the closr of the year. \fork done during the year was, as already stated,
PAGE 397

----0 44 -Item (ii). As there ii.; a good deal o[ nwk in ::\lay l{uad, it wai-; considered advisable to extend tlw (i" main before s11rfaci11g and lighting the road. Item (iii). AK stated in l.u;t year\; report, 1111cltr '' Maintenaucp of City and Hill District Watl'nvorki-; ", difficulty hai:; been experienced in supplying the Western District of 11w City when the contents of' Pokfulam ReserYoir ham hnd to he eonsened f'or the supply of the High Level and Hill l>ii.;trictR. To
PAGE 398

-O-:l:5101. Re.nimptions o.f Land at Kowloon Point.-Kowloon Inland Lots N os. 443, 1, I 40 and I, 141 were resumed with a view to the construction of the Passenger Terminus for the Kowloon-Canton Railway. Their total area was 159,527 square feet, the amount paid for them being $438,699.25. ~egotiations were in progress for the resumption 01 Kowloon luland Lots 4-12 anrl 618 but had not reached a conclusion at the close 01 the year. 1909.Estimates, --j Total Estimatei;, Hl09. E:xpenditure,:1,J:J8,f\99.25 Expenditure to 31 '12/09,$438,699.25. Staff, &c. 102. The following Officers left the Service of the Department.:Mr. A. C. Lit.tle, Assistant Engineer. Mr. A. R. A. Bone, Overseer. Mr. W. G. Jury, do. Mr. James Kirby,
PAGE 399

0 46 104. The following Officers returned from leave and resumed duty on the dates mentioned:-Mr. H. T. Jackman, Executive Engineer, ... 5th August. ,, I. l\L Xavier, _\ssistant Engineer, ...... 7th October. ,, H. E. Goldsmith, do., ...... 8th August. ,, J. J. Bryan, Drainage Surveyor, ...... 8th July. ,, H. C. Sayer, Surveyor, ..................... 9th September. ,, W. Dobbs, Overseer, . . I st April. ,, H. W. \Yolfe, do., ..................... 8th .July. ,, A. :M. Souza, Clerk, ........................ 17th November. 105. No change of any moment occurred in the Staff during the year. Punuc Worurn OrnuE, lfoNGKOXG, 17th ,Jmw, 19W. \\T. CHATHAM, U.s\l.li.1 ~J.J.U.E., J)i1'f'clor of Pnbi-i'.c T,Vmlrn.

PAGE 400

-047 Annexe A. ANNUALLY RECURRENT EXPENDITURE, 1909. H:u.ns AND S1:n-HEAns. ESTA BLlSI-DIE'.IIT. Personal Emoluments including Exchange Compensat10n, ....................... Other Charges, ................................ Bu.ildiugs. l. ~faiutenance of Building~, .............. 2. ,, ,, in New Territories, ............................ .. H. ~Iaintenanco of Lighthouse~, ........... Commuuicatious. 4. Ma_inte~ance of RoaJs and Bridges 111 City, ................................. 5. :Maintenance of Roads a111l Bridges outside City, ......................... .. (j. Maintenance of Roacls and Bridges in l{owloon, ............................. Maintenance of Roads nnd Briilges in New Territories, .................... 8. Maintenance of Telegraphs, .......... .. 9. ,, ,, in New Territoriee, ............................. /Jrr,inar,c. 10. Maintenance of Sewer,, :'-;ullah~, &c., ... T,ighti11_q. l l. Ga,; Lighting, City of Victoria aml the Peak, ................................. 12. Elect.de Lighting, City of Victoria, ... 13. Gas_ Lighting, Kowloon, .................. 14. Elect-ric Jliscellaneous. EsTnrAu:o. AcTu.u .. 291,492 22,418 $313,910 c. 267,441.26 24,577.10 292,018.36 lNt'ItEASI,. $ (' 2,159.10 2,159.10 I j PROVISlON-J)E,rnAsE, I ALLY VOTED. $ c. 24,050.74 24,050.74 $ 10,558 10,558 I==== ----;;;====1-------1~===.;;,. 57,000 8,000 4,.500 .'i5,000 26,000 22,000 10,000 8,500 4,000 21,0CO 45,000 22,,100 10,000 1,000 ;'56,9i I. 71 .'i,523.04 4,466.93 54,983.22 25,941.98 21,545.16 9,94i.24 7,747.31 3,439.18 Hl,216.56 44,4i5.83 22,297.15 9,389.36 883.20 I ...... 28.2,, 2,476.9G aa.01 16.i8 58.02 454.84 52.iG i 52.69 5G0.82 1,783.44 .524.17 202.85 610.64 116.80 = ,~#{j. 'i:Vllliufeunnce of Pra.ya Wall a[)d Piers,. 7;000 G,l i0.97 H2~l.03 ,, Pnblic Cemetery, ..... 1 2,885.2.'{ 16. 4,000 1,114.72 17. ,, Public Recreation Ground~, ................................. 3,500 2,732.96 767.04 18. DrOllging Foreshores, ..................... 10,000 5,744.65 4,255.35 l9;, Miscellaneous Services, .................. I 1,000 7,721.76 3,278.24 20, Typhoon aud Rainstorm Damages, ...... 12,500 34,200.25 21,700.25 ...... 37,210 '."' Traterwor/1s. --21. i\Iuinteuance of City and Hi II District,. 60,000 46,024.66 13,975.34 22. Kowloon, ................ i,000 8,585.34 1,585.34 .. ..... 1,600 23. Shau-KiWan, .......... 1,000 864.60 135.40 :24. Aberdeen, ................ 500 213.!Ji 286.03 I 25. Lai-Chi-Kok, ............ 2,000 1,033.02 966.98 26. Water Acconnt'., (Meters, &c.), ......... 20,000 8,668.08 11,331.92 _________ ------_______ _____ Total, ..................... $ 433,000 409,90:?.85 23,285.59 46,382.74 38,810 -.. --------------_________ !_ _________ -'------'----------

PAGE 401

0 48 Annexe B. EXTRAORDINARY EXPE~DITURE, 19ml. HEADS AND Scrn-l-IEADS. Punuc WonKS ExTRAORl>INARY. Buildings. 1. Law Courts, ........... .............. ..... 2. Post Office, .......................... ..... 3. Pnblic Latrines an,l Urinals, ........... 4. Exte11,ion of Old Stables to provide Additional Office Accommodation required for Public Works De-partment, ............................. ;'5, Market at Kowloon Point, First Portion, 6. Staff Quarters, Tai Po, ................. 7. Qunr:wtine Station at Lai Chi KokHospital, Approach Paths, &c., 8. Additions to No. 2 Police Station, .... 9. Extension of Tai Po Land Office to provide accommodation for Dis-trict Officer, ........................ 10. Permanent St.nirwny to Ballroom, Government Hou$e, .............. 11. Additional Room at Queen's College for Pupil Teachers, ............... 12. Market at Aberdeen, .................... Communications. 13. New Roads in Kowloon, ................. 14, New Roads in New Territorfos, ....... .. 15. Forming and Kerbing Streets, ........ 16. Raising level of Des Vmux Road (re nr..med Chatham Road) Kowloon, consequent on reclamation for Railway Terminus, ................. 17, Road along northern slopes of Victoria Peak, ................................ .. Di-ainage. 18. Gullies Reconstruction, ................. 19. Training Nullahs, ........................ 20. Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers and substitution of Iron for Earthenware Pipes, ........... 21. Miscellaneom, Drainage Works, ........ Liglitiug. 22, Extensions of Lighting-, ....... _._._._. ... .._._.:_ 1'lisccllaneou11. 23. Permanent Marks for Traverse Survey Points in New Territories, ...... 24. Reinforced Concrete Piers at Green Island Gunpowder Depot, New Harbour Office&, Kowloon City, 2,'i. Blake l'ier Shelter, ....................... 26. Miscellaneous Works, .................... 27. Mong-kok-tsui Breakwater-Typhoon Refnge for Small Craft, .......... .. 28. Causeway Bay Typhoon RefugeDeepening shallow area to one foot below Ordnance Datum, ... 29. Store Account, ............................. I Pnovrsros-EsTrnATE1>. ACTUAL. i INCREASE, DECREASE. ALLY I VOTED. ---------------------------$ 130,000 180,000 12,000 2,000 50,000 16,700 7,500 12,000 10,000 4,500 8,000 2,200 30,000 25,000 3.3,000 17,000 4,300 2,000 20,000 5,000 45,000 _?,50() 4,000 20,000 1,400 35,000 200,000 20,000 100 $ (), 81,150.21 l.5::l,454.63 9,09/l.OO 6,871.:30 17,662.32 16,599.27 10,776.48 2,21:!.44 4,486.45 3,275.68 15,778.52 24,518.08 31,821.54 16,041.45 1,252.75 3,993.07 4,770.25 38,778.51 50,5.00 78,5.13 15,282.94. 3,554.80 35,117.07 69,529.21 63,000.00 e, 4,871.30 3,2i6.48 2,154.80 117.07 43,000.00 $ ,:. ,18.849.79 26,545.:31 2,907.00 32,387.GS 100.73 I 2,000.00 7,787 .5(i 13.55 4,724.32 2,200.00 14,221.48 481.92 3,178.46 958 .55 4,300.00 717.25 16,006.93 229.75 6,226.49 3,214.87 4,717.06 130,470.79 ...... / c. ,5,450.00 180.00 3,277.00 ... ___.._ .. / 2,155~ ... 43,000;00 --------Carried forward, .......... $ 901,200 630,305.10 / 53,419.65 v,214.55 54,062.00

PAGE 402

0 40 ANNEXE B,-Continued. HEADS AXD Sun-H1uus. ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DEcRE..1:-E. I [PROVISION! ALLY i VOTED. ---1----1-----$ Brouplit forward,............ ~)01,200 Public llealtlt and Buildings 01dinance, 1 .903. 30. Compensation, ............................. 31. Resumption for Public Road through Marine Lot 29 from Queen's Road East to Pray a East, ........ Waterworks. 32. Albany Filter Beds, Reconstruction and Extension, .................... 33. Kowloon water Works, Gravitation Scheme, ............................. 34. Miscellaneous "r atcr Works, .......... .. fVorks not appearing in Estimates. 35. Resumit!~ .ancl Filling in Fish Pond at la1po, ............................. 36. Compensation for Resumption of Lot ~o. 3,21,2, in_Su:vey District IV rn New lerntories, .............. :J7. Resumptions of Laml at Kowloon Poi11t, ................................ 20,000 21,400 31,000 44,000 25,000 $ c. 630,:l05J0 ~),829.75 20,840.2,!" 44,987.l:i6 42,106.34 24,984.39 1,4-13.60 301.95 438,699.25 $ c. 5:3,419.G.'i 13,987.66 1,443.60 301.95 438,699.25 I ('. I s ,:. s24,:21 c1.5.3 I .'i4,062.oo 10, 170.2.'i ;;59.76 1,893.66 15.61 19,917.00 1,548.40 302.00 -----------1-----1----Total, ........................ $ 1,042,600 Plus Store Account Debi~, ...... Plus Honorarium to the Crown ) Solicitor in respect of action ( re K.M.L. 30, ................ ) 1,213,49~.28 39,958.65 1,000.00 507,852.ll 1336,853.83 39,8-58.65 1,000.00 I ----~--------------~(~5~,456.~3 __ 1_ 548,710.76-~--75,829.40 Includes a sum of $388.74 for land resumed in the New Territories ,Yhich was enoneously charged to this Vote.

PAGE 403

Annexe C. CITY AND HILL DJRTHIC'l' WATERWORKS, 1900. Mo11t.hly. C011smnption and Oontcnis of Rcscri:oirs (gaU011s). .. l'OK1"ULA~I. I w O1rn-NE1-cnoNG. -----~-+-----c-----T.UT} )!. TOTAL CoN-CoLLECTRD ToTAJ, CoNIn Reservoir 1st of mouth. MAIN. Delivered over ]fr-WASH. INT ,RMEDIAT!l. Delivered over In Reservoir In Reservoir In Reservoir gauge. gauge. ~ofm~~-=-~of u:_o_n_th_._1 _____ I In Beser I Delivered Yoir l st ;f over month. ,I __ g_a_n_g_e. TENTS OF btPOUN'DING RESERVOIRS. Jan., 51,550,000 21,286,000 287,550,000 1,235,000 20~,633,000 I 107,890,000 nil. 20,000 549,968,000 Feb., 42,680,000 14,607,000 March, 33,840,000 16,26.7 ,ooo April,. 25,700,000 18,082,000 May,. 11,620,000 15,048,000 ,Tune, 21,375,000 18,134,000 July, 28,200,000 25,587,000 Ang.,. 65,-!60,000 27,605,000 200,420,000 149,640,000 102,620,000 55,718,000 73,920,000 87,080,000 221,640,000 1,841,000 20 ,651,000 266,000 18~,021,000 644,ooo 141,soo,ooo i81,000 11:/,499,000 966,000 2,346,000 gio21,ooo uJ,153,000 83,443,000 2,034,0 00 90,561,000 2,620,0( )0 93,789,000 3,290,0 00 92,061,000 2,704,0 00 81,794,000 6,979,0 00 73,220,000 7,953,000 I 898,000 18$,456,000 79,599,000l 24,8i3,000 0~' Gil,950,000 30,080,000 287,255,000 2,564,000 20 ,406,000 65,643,0001 1 7,3ii4,000 nil. 455,626,000 366,387,000 1,164,000 280,75.l,OOO 3,121,000 183,322,000 8,614,000 202,2G7,000 5,941,000 244,742,000 1,524,000 .301,327,000 32,359,000 542,291,000 16,75G,OOO 575,529,000 ~ept.,. 63,160,000 31,327,000252,740,000 18,000 19l',768,000 52,639,000 27,605,000 N ov., ~,040,000 31,029,000 407,000,000 :26,301,000 20 ,732,000 88,969,000 33,138,000 497,000 742,211,000 FROM STI:EUJS. 7,092,000 4,095,000 4,030,000. I 2,605,000 8,640,000 9,iii,000 18,950,000 18,965,000 15,266,000 28,344,000 25,019,000 18,448,000 Dec., 61.~ooo 20,485,000 398,970,000 9,000 20/ ,732,000 77,432,000130, 702,000 2 i,7 42,000 696,473,000 ---'..::.. .. i-----1----i-----:---1,------______ l_---1--------------SUMPTION ( Filtered). 136,288,000 102,145,000 I I 0,858,000 115,640,000 118,870,000 118,319,000 123,698,000 127,693,000 131,591,000 140,823,000 145,514,000 141,107,000 MINT DAM, BLUE PooL AND SuPPLrns, PoKFULAM Co:<:DUIT, ( Unfiltered). 606,000 400,000 2,343,000 2,593,000 2,465,000 l,508,000 1,315,000 2,529,000 2,716,000 1,845,000 2,988,000 GRAND TOT AT,. ------l 36,S94,000 102,545,000 113,201,000 118,233,000 121,335,000 119,827 ,ooo 125,013,000 130,222,000 13 ,j ,307 ,000 142,668,000 148,502,000 2,947,0001 144,054,000 I RAIN FALL AT OBHER1 \'ATOR\. I RE~!ARKS. ( Inclu,s ). i __ I __ 1 I 1 l 2 2 45 6 7 t 12 8 j 8 23 Constant snpply J ammry 1 st to 3 st. Intermittent supply iu Rider Main Districts from February 1st to October 2~th. Tait.am Tuk Pumping Engines running from 1st Febrna.ry to 28th Ma.y, 21st to 28th June, 30th August to 13th September, 4th to 21st October, number of davs running : 158. ) I Constallt supply [ from October 25th OO _1 to Der,ember 31st. Total,. 1909. 26~/i3i,000 I 987,040,000 94,738,000 161,231,000; 1,512,646,000 24,255,000 I,536,801,000 75 Total,. 1908. ----I----'--,-..-------------;---+------1-----1---272,016,0ci(} ------1 '"" 49,262,000 ... 1,146,300,00(JI. -----1-------'"-----:---------1------1--------2,479,000 ~. ... 1----_ ,.~':ooL Increase or Decrease. + 45,4i6,000 198,065,000 1,665,643,000 17,752,000 1,683,395,000 91 -36,834,000 -153:09i,000 + 6,503,000 -146,594,000 -16 0 c;, 0

PAGE 404

Annexe D. CITY AND HILL DISTRICT "\VATERWORKS, 1909. Particular.~ of Jlfeterul and Unmrtrrrd Supplies ( gallons). ---------------------------------------------------------------------. MONTH. ,January, February, :March, .. April, .. Nfoy, .... June, ... .. ,Tnly, .... .................... I' Augnst, Septemhe October,. Novembe December r, .................. .................. Total, 1909, ... Total, 1908, ... Im:rease or Decrease, ... _FILTERED HL;PPLY. GNMETEltED. / ___ METERED. I CITY. 1--------Trade. Domestic. 113,003,000 13,066,000 7,847,00J 77,163,000 16,121,000 6,962,000 84,360,000 15,878,000 8,232,000 90,196,000 14,937,000 8,409,000 92,290,000 15,028,fJOO 9,126 000 92,344,000 14,626,000 8,939,000 93,305,000 17,903,000 9,680,000 96,111,000 19,3!7,000 9,548,000 97,8:12,000 20,673,000 10,299,000 112.930,000 15,ii64,000 9,605,000 117,873,000 l.'5,675,000 9,298,000 114,150,000 1,'i,454,000 8,698,000 1,181,5.57,000 194,272,000 106,643,000 ------1,362,667,000 172,787,000 102,556,000 -H!l,110,000 +21,485,000 +4,087,000 ; HILL DISTRICT. 2,372, 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 1,899, 2,388, 2,09H, 2.426, 2.410. 2,810, 2,687, 2,787, 2,724, 2,66'!, 2,805, 30,074, 000 27,633, 000 +2,441, 000 lJXFILTERED SUPPLY GR.urn TOTAL TOTAL. (Netered). i 136.288,000 i--610,000 I 136,898,000 102 145,000 405,000 102,,i.50,COO 110,858,000 : 2,346,000 118,204,000 1 Hi.640,000 2,597,000 118,237,000 118,870,000 2,46i,OOO 121,337,000 118,319,000 1,511,000 119,830,000 123,698,000 1,319,000 125,01 i,000 127,693,000 2,533,000 130,226,000 131,5?1,000 2,il~,000 I 134,310,000 140,823,000 l 1,841,000 i 142,670,000 145,514000 ; 2,991,000 I 148,505,000 u1,101,ooo 1 2,949,000 I t44,o5o,ooo ------------i---------1,512,546,000 24,294,000 I 1,536,840,000 1,665,643,000 21,85-1,000 1,687,497,000 _____ 1 -= 15;:-097,0001 + 2,440,000 I -150,657,000 0

PAGE 405

Annexe E. CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORK8, I!:lml fV,,tcr Pumz1ed to Hill Dishict and lliglt l,e't'els of the City (gal/ems). (Theoretical Displacement of Pumps.) -------------------------------------------------,----~ HILL DISTRICT. MONTH, ---------HIGH LEVELS OF CITY. -------------------------1 700' and 750' TANKS. 600' and 650' TANKS, (nmduit <5 Pettit Rond.~ .Di.~fr-irt.) (Rubin.wm Road IJ-ist1ict.) COMBINED TOTALS, GRANll TOTAL Pm.iPED. Motors. l___!_1ginn. Total. Motors. Engine. j Total. Motors. __ 1_1 __ Engine. Total. ----------1----1 1----1----' I I ----1-----2,372,000 2,372,000 1,663,000 I 1 663 000 4,202,000 4 202 000 5,865,000 8 237 000 January, February, March, April, May, -,June, -July, August, September, October, November, -December, 'l'otal, 1909, 1,899,000 1,899,000 1,201,000 1 1;291:000 3,334,ooo a:aa4:ooo 4,625,ooo 0;524:000 2,388,000 2,388,000 1,603,000 I 1,603,000 3,487.000 3,487,000 5,090,000 7,478,000 2,098,000 2,098,000 2,065,000 2,065,000 3,305,000 3,305,000 5,370,000 7,468,000 2,426,000 2,426,000 2,358,000 :l,358,000 3,551,000 3,551,000 5,909,000 8,335,000 2,410,000 2,410,000 .. 2,882,000 2,882,000 3,287,000 3,287,000 6,169,000 8,579,000 2,810,000 2,810,000 53,000 2 185,000 2,238,000 3,485,000 3,485,000 5,723,000 8,533,000 2,687,000 2,687,000 19,000 2,20/i,000 2,224,000 3,781,000. 3,781,000 6,005,000 8,692,000 2,787,000 2,787,000 2,200,000 2,200,000 3,621,000 3,621,000 5,821,000 8,608,000 2,724,000 2,724,000 1,386,000 1,386,000 3,617,000 3,617,000 5,003,000 7,727,000 1 2,668,000 2,6681000 l,4lfi,0OO 1,415,000 3,431,000 3,431,000 4,846,000 7,514,000 : ... 2,805,000 2,805,000 _._ .. 1,425,000 1,425,000 3,800,000 _.,, 3,800,000 5,225,000 8,030,000 _____ ._ .. 30,~74,000 30,074,000 _22,000 22,678,00~ i_~,750,000 [42,901,000 ~2,901,000 65,651,000 95,725,~ ____ 1!_,000_ 27,558,000 27,633,000 _2~872,000 5,928,000: 13,800,00~ 35,422,000 14,785,00~150,207,000 64,007,000 91,640,0~ lncrease or Decrease, -75,000 i+2,516,00 +2,441,000--7,800,000I+ !f;,7:,0,000 ,+s,950,00oi+7,479,0001-l4,,~5,000 r--7,306,000,+l,644,000 +4,085,000 'l'ota.l, 1908, 0

PAGE 406

Annexes F & G. KOWLoo;-.; \VATERWORK~, 1909. ro11te11ts u( R<.~en,.j,. anti 0f'taih r!( Jf uthl.11 Consumpti-,u (w1flon.~). --------------------------------. ------------Mont.Ji. lsH F.SEHYOI Jl IRT oF Mmnn. Tr"de. 1-IETEREfl Sl'l'PL Y. Do111e~f ic. lJ:-ornTElrnl St:PPJ.Y. To1al. (, !{ASI> TOTAL. ------------1-------------------January, ........................ 1 February, ......................... ; March, ........................... 1 April, ............................. May, ............................ .. June, ............................. July, ............................. August, .......................... September, ................... .. October, .......................... November, ...................... .. December, ....................... Total 1909, ..... Total 1908, ..... Increase or Decrease, .. 162,311,0JO 156,200.000 14.i ,43:1,000 129,:Jfi7,000 99,225,000 f/5.100,000 26,825,000 15,5,100.000 194,GG7,000 240,417,0UO 237 ,6 l 7 ,L:00 246,792,000 1,778,000 1,575,000 1,795,000 2,0IH.000 l ,7~6,000 2,262,0UO 2,642,000 2,725,000 2,813,000 2,4i8,000 2,421,000 2,237,000 (i,177,000 5,aa:1,000 1 .'i.fH:l,000 5.882,000 6,490,00() fi,5.'i!l,000 7,568,000 7,692,000; 7,581,000, G,90J,000 7,381,000 I ti,560,000 i 4,:l!:m,ooo ; :i,758,000. 3,84.~,ooo i 3,863,000' 4,74,00D 4,:!97,000: 4,926,000 l 4,967,000, 4,768.000 I 4,422,000 i 4,960,000 i 4,323,ooo I --.------1------i 53,275,000 26,491,000 79, 766,ooo I ----1----------,_ _____ i 58,862,000 25,028,000 sa,s9o,ooo I -5,587,000 I + 1,463,000_l -4,124,000 I i 21,R(i I ,000 i 2~.0:l8.00J 15,.56,5,0()0 i i0.898,0JO IH,25~,000 23,1101,000 1 7 ,SO(i,000 1 2ll.iH8,000 li,:1:l6,000 I 23,8:26,0 JO li,961,000, 2 l,520.000 Ii ,3G2,000 24,930,000 I 7 ,Gas,ooo 2.5,330,000 17,l:!09 000 2,1,890,000 I 7,940,000 24,840,000 16,789,000 24,170,000 l 7,480,000 24,040,000 213,405,000 293,171,000 ------212,907,000 296,797,000 --+498,000 -3,626,000 Rn1,utKS. 'l I '-' ....., $ 0 2 ~; :i. !3 -::;, "' .:...:. ....... """':;;. "' e,-!3 lcn:S CD :; '~ 0 CD Q.. c-:::.. I i;,, = a 2 '!' ~Jg I ~, C: ; I ~-t s ro I ~ :a J

PAGE 407

?.foNTH. January, ........................ .. Jt'ebruary, ............... ....... March, ........................... April, .............................. May, .............................. .. June, ............................... July, ............................. .. August, ....................... September, ....................... October, .-........................ November, ....................... .. December, ....................... Total, 190!!, Annexes H, J & K. VILLAGE AND WATER BOAT SUPPLIES, l!:.109. Details of Co11sumption ( gal Ions). H. J. ABERDl>EN w ATimWoRKS. SHAUKIWAN WATEHWOllK!-'. iJe:ere,l :-uppl_r. {Tnm<.tcrecl ~upply. Tut-al. Meterrd Supply. Unmctcrc,l ~upply. 'l'olal. ~,ii \\"au i :-1q,ply. ------------,---1----38,000 3fi.Ollil noou 4!l.O O ;14 0110 :l7,0tHl 4H,Ct00 46.00 27,000 25.000 2:-<,llllO 32,000 I 228.011(1 ll02.0ll(t :-W7.000 I 38!),fl(IIJ I 4.0~,f. ()ft 46:1,11011 ~H7,11l!O 5~!1.0l!O I 4r,r;,oon I 420:0110 I i-HiiU)OII i ;!;;3,U(H) 1 ______ ______ ;. %1.000 H:'18,000 :J!J2,000 '138.000 442,0ll(l ii00. 540,000 575,00fJ 492.0 0 H,1,001) 3!14,000 1185.0110 !l6,0t10 110,noo 7!!,000 IRH. 00 12fl.000 106,000 rn-.ooo %.000 102,000 1!17. no ]'.!fi.000 148,U0ll R21i.0(10 ).(1;!8.000 1 l.OH!l.ll(l:1 I ,;l:li\,000 1,-173.00!l l.:i 7 ii.l" ,u us-:ooo 1.4!1.(0GO 1,ll8 .' (l() 1,71HJOO 1,~fitl.ll()l) l,~8-LOOO 41 r.,ooo 4, 7f;G,ooo .,,202,000 1,312,000 16, 1 o 1,0110 9~2.1 00 J ,i+'.ll)II 1.11~,ooo UiB.(1110 I ,:,!l!-1,(lllll l,f~ 1.000 1.(L3.0!) 1 1.5!10:000 l .41tliHllJ 1,821.1100 1.~86.t'CO 1 1;1rn:!,OilO 2/iJ.000 n1., no !lf,_(!110 12:1.000 Ii~ ,(1(1(1 (i,(1110 ;;:12.00 Ji-8 000 i\(i 1.000 l.2KK.000 282.00ll 3,00 I I ;.4 ;,;_ooo ll,41i.J..OOU l,Oi!J.000 I !J.!!19.000 1------. ---! ____________ _.__ ____ -------,, 1 !)Of;, H3o,ouo 3,950.000 I -!,nE0,000 20,1l78.(;()() l,(l!l!),(I(!() +293,0110 -3,Hlo,I 00 2,90:UHHJ + 1,11;,,,uuo K. LAI-CH l __________ KOK \VAT r; It (j. 1aJHl Tot .. !. I. ll-\:l.llllO I .20!1.11110 1.21 H.l O I 1 /)~)f) (1()1 I 1.6fi;l,0011 I.Ii 7 0 (I ~.l:i:>.' 00 l,i7:'.0iQ 2.0-l~.1,011 :1: ]{)!1:01111 1:rw8. on l ./i:1,;,000 ------:!ll.9rn,ono ---~ 22,0ii.0011 ---l,13i.U00 BOA'!' :-uPPl,Y ( Ml:TEltfD). ii.!l(j!)_(;{)II Fi.ft; 1.000 ri.!llH.000 7.1172.0 (I 7,0!12,' oo :i,70/i,I OO :-1.8.J.8.000 :-1.11J:-1:o-o ,, : 0()!). 0( I( J H.,ii\2.1100 ~.lill:1,000 4.u:rn,ono ----(j 1,414,000 -------r;,; (i!lll,000 -----5.2711,00(1 Increase or Decrea&c, ... 1 -214-,00o +S36,0110 i +f,~:!.1100 ______ ...:... ______________________ ,:.. ______________ 0 :::.::1 4'-

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--0 55 Annexe L. REPORT ON LAND SURVEY WORK FOR THE YEAR ENDING 3lsT MARCH, 1910. J. Organ,i,zation.-The Land Survey Office, which includes a HtaI 0 surveyors under the direction of an officer designated the Principal Land Surveryor, forms a branch of the Public Works Department. Its principal function in the past has been the survey of leased areas, which were generally of small extent, but the acquisition of some 350 square miles of new territory in 1898 and extensive developments in the Colony generally have necessitated an extension of its operations. The Principal Land Surveyor, m addition to supervising the usual survey work necessary in a rapidly developing Colony, is the executive officer for dealing with all matters relating to Crown Lands, the whole of which are under the charge of the Director of Public Works. He submits reports on all applications for land, conducts all sales of areas to be let on long leases, prepares permits for temporary occupation of land and licences 101: temporary piers, and attendR to the preparation of lease plans for lots of land, quarries, permanent piers, &c., and to the keeping of the numerous records. The work performed by the surve.vors is of Yery varied eharacter as will be gathered from the particulars given later in this report. Each surveyor is responsible for co-ordinating his own tra,erses and plotting them. Two Land Bailiffs, whose time is wholly occupied in preventing illegal squatting and encroachments upon Crown Land, which are very common offences among the Chinese population, are attached to the office. Two Chinese clerks and 4 tracers are employed m carrymg on the purely clerical wlirk.

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0 fifi -:/-List of O:tficerl!. i D I es1gnat.10n. Nnme. Date. of I Present Scale of AppomtSala y Salary. 6~~::L l~II ,l-,54~> Priucipnl Land Surveyor,' L. C. l{ees. Land Sur1480 p.a. by ;;0 tn1 I enuially. veyor, B. vV. 1 .5.99. 420 ., i ,l-:4:W I 1 1iy .no tri-Grcr. f'Jrnially. Do. i A. ,f. Dar-, 22.5.03. I 890 ,, Do_-hy. Do. E. 8. Recd.i28.10.0,5. I :3(i() ,. L~ntl llail-! 1ff, ......... 1'. I I. Dil-I 6.6.04. 2:;o .. lou. r Land ~ur-: I ,eyo,, .. .: F. s .. um,. j ,o.6.08. ;;30 ,. l Do., ... G. C. Mc-1 24.5.07. 30(1 ,. Intosh. ; I (I) i Do., ... 1 ,J. Grall t.. 126.10.08. 330 ,, Do., Do., i (2) : I ;, i A.B. West. 14.1.10.13,;0 ., C. F. For-) 7.3.10. i 300 ,, bes. Land Bail-1 iff, ......... ,T.lfackay. 1.10.07.,210 ,, 5th Grade Clerk, Do., 5th Grade Tracer, ... I Do., Tracer, Do., I $ E. A.Chiu. 23.1.03. 660 p.a. i Ko Siu Fall. 3.6.08. 540 ,. TangNgok 28.10.05. 660 Wan. Lo Ka 1.11.06. 600 ,, Tsok. Wong Sun 24.9.08. 360 Kuen. Wong 10.10.08. 420 Wing Ju. I (3) Do. I I by tri cunially. ;;30-.-120 by t, ieunially. 1 -v by tnellllially. No progres ;;ive scale. Do. Do. by tri en11ially. $480-$66() by $60 annuallY. Do. Do. Do. No progres-sive scale. Do. Convey ance Allowance. $ 360 p.a. Do. Do. llo. fltJ. Do. Du. Do. Do. Do. Do. (1.) As this officer was not so fully qualified as t.he others, he was noi allowed to participate in the general advance of salaries granted in October, 1908. (2.) Dismissed on 29th March, 1910. (3,) Services dispensed with on 31st December, 19 09.

PAGE 410

--0 57 --. There were also 29 smTey coolies receiving wages at rates var~mg from $8 to $11 per month according to seITice. Total wages for year $2,928. ~Cost of DezJattment.-As_ the survey office forms part of the Public Works Department and 1s accommodated in the same building, which is known as the Government Offices, there are numerous charges, such as those for lighting, heating, electric fans, &c., which cannot he stated. Omitting charges of such a nature, the following iR a statement of the cost:Ralaries, .......................................... S 3(i,Ci51.50 Conyeyance Allowances,............ . .. j,578. 79 Wages o:f Coolies, .. . .. .. .. 2,928.00 Drawing :Materials and mounting plans, 660.2fi tSurveying Instruments, . . . 489.82 Land Survey Contingencies (largely l:ost of advertising land sales, &c.), ........ )fiscellaneous Expenses, ....................... Trian,gn latirm of Colour, 1,265.70 429.43 1,095.97 Total, .................. $ 46,099.47 -1. 1'1iyonumet1ical 11101-k.-As no survey 0 the Uolony hacl been made since that carried out by Lieut. Collinson in 1845 (his plan contains many inaccuracies), it was decided in HJ08 that a proper Ordnance :Map should be built up on correct triangulation and thiR work was commenced early in 1909. The staff then con8isted of six surveyors, exclusive of the Principal Land Surveyor, three of whom had been appointed during the t,vo previous yearR. The necessity for this considerable increase and further additions i:mbsequently made was partly due to difficulties and delays which had occurred in procuring qualified men anll to sickness among the staff which caused the survey work to fall so seriously into arrear that it has not yet been found possible to ovntake it. In addition to Collinson's map, which was on a scale of 4 inches to the mile, there were in existence plans of various portions of the Colony, such as the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Kowloon, the principal villages, &c., but in most cases these had been produced in a piecemeal fashion and were far from accurate. As will be seen from the following statement no uniformity of scale had been obserYerl in the preparation of these pla.ns :-City of Victoria, -1=160 feet. Hill District, 1"=250 feet. Kowloon, 1/2,500 or 1"=208:33 feet. Aberdeen Village, -1"=40 feet. Shaukiwan Village, -1"=50 feet. The above remarks refer to the Colony proper. In the case of the New Territories, ceded in 1898, a map had been prepared by a Survey Party from India during the years 1898-1904, but so man~, of the traverse points have since been destroyed by the natiYe population, who were nnfriendly at first to British rule, that it was

PAGE 411

--0 ;j8 -found impracticable to utilize it in the preparation of the new maps and as all filling in had been done by plane table it was not possible tn replot the survey. Here again the mistake of variety of scales was repeated, those employed being different from any of the plans preYiously produced. A considerable area was plotted on a scale of 16"=--"'l mile (l"-,c:..c330 feet), but, as this was found to be too small to he applicable to many parts, a scale of 32"0---~l mile (l"--165 feet) was adopted or the remainder. After full consideration of the matter, it was decided that the new Ordnance lVIaps should be plotted on scales of 200 feet and 50 feet -,1 inch, the latter being only used fo